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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: TNReady Blinks Again, Gov. Debate Thoughts and Mud Island's Museum -

There was a point Thursday morning during the troubled TNReady testing at some Tennessee school districts when there was a “brief” slow down in the online testing, according to the Tennessee Education commissioner’s office. By noon that had been resolved and more than 250,000 completed tests had been submitted since testing began Monday. One can only imagine what some of the thoughts were in the office during the slow down and the gap between how long the slow down seemed and how long it actually was.

2. Minnesota Prosecutor Won't File Charges in Prince's Death -

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Prince thought he was taking a common painkiller and probably did not know a counterfeit pill he ingested contained fentanyl, a Minnesota prosecutor said Thursday as he announced that no charges would be filed in the musician's death.

3. Mississippi University Tuition to Rise 4 Percent, on Average -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Mississippi's eight public universities plan to raise tuition by an average of 4 percent next fall, saying lingering effects from state budget cuts two years ago require them to get more revenue from students.

4. Richards Focused on Customers and Employees -

Chris Richards knows the value of a chance encounter.

As a 20-year-old sophomore at the University of Iowa, Richards traveled with her college roommate to Memphis, intending to stay for the summer and explore a new city.

5. Last Word: 'Poking The Bear,' National Walk Out Day and McQueen on Capitol Hill -

The state House’s Tuesday action cutting $250k in funding for Memphis from Gov. Bill Haslam’s budget proposal is turning into a cause back here, starting with a GoFundMe page. Elsewhere on social media, you can see the unmistakable outline of a party or parties for the cause beginning to form. This is near the end of session for the Legislature when the budget is the last action before going back to the district to run for re-election. Different timing over here, with multiple crawfish outings leading into Memphis in May.

6. GM Replaces Cadillac President After US Sales Decline -

DETROIT (AP) — General Motors has replaced the head of its Cadillac luxury brand, which has struggled for years to compete against German and Japanese luxury automakers in the U.S.

The company says Steve Carlisle will replace Johan de Nysschen, who is leaving to pursue other opportunities.

7. The Latest: Judge Defends Right to Oppose Death Penalty -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — The Latest on an Arkansas judge participating in an anti-death penalty demonstration outside the governor's mansion (all times local):

12:35 p.m.

An Arkansas judge prohibited from hearing execution cases said he remains as committed to the law and his First Amendment right to express his "moral and religious" opposition to the death penalty as he was a year ago when he was disqualified for participating in an anti-capital punishment demonstration.

8. MIFA Founders Day Celebration May 22 -

As the first of a several events to commemorate MIFA’s 50th anniversary, the nonprofit will hold its annual Founders Day celebration May 22 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Church of the Holy Communion’s Cheney Hall, 4645 Walnut Grove Road.

9. Civil Rights Cold Case Bill Nears Passage -

Years of work behind her, state Rep. Johnnie Turner is making the final push for creation of a state body designed to initiate investigations into civil rights cold cases, potentially solving decades-old murders or giving people the opportunity to put a heinous act behind them.

10. GoFundMe Page Seeks to Reimburse Memphis for State Money Withdrawal -

NASHVILLE – A GoFundMe page has been started on Facebook to raise funds to make up a $250,000 budget cut the Tennessee Legislature levied against the city of Memphis for removing Confederate monuments from two city parks late last year.

11. Here Comes the Hot Chicken -

Hattie B’s Hot Chicken is finally opening the doors of its first Memphis location to the public Wednesday April 18 and bringing its signature Nashville hot chicken with it.

Co-owner Nick Bishop Jr., who started the business with his father, said this popular Nashville dish is similar to traditional southern fried chicken, but with an extra kick.

12. Last Word: Failed Test, Trolley Back Story and Violent Crime Down City and County -

The state’s third problem with online student achievement testing in three years is gathering political force in Nashville. And that force is aimed for the most part at testing in general and the role it plays in evaluating teachers and students.

13. One Dead After Jetliner Apparently Blows an Engine in Flight -

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A Southwest Airlines jet apparently blew an engine at 30,000 feet and got hit by shrapnel that smashed a window and damaged the fuselage Tuesday, killing a passenger and injuring seven others, authorities said.

14. Judge Rules Law Allowing Dogs in Court is Unconstitutional -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — An Arkansas judge has ruled that a law allowing child victims of sexual assault to testify while accompanied by a comfort dog is unconstitutional.

The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reports that Pulaski County Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen determined Monday that state lawmakers exceeded authority by passing the Courthouse Dogs Child Witness Support Act.

15. WFGM Grant Makes Memphis An Evidence2Success City -

The Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis has been awarded a $150,000 grant from the Annie E. Casey Foundation to lead Memphis as one of six cities implementing the Evidence2Success program.

16. Hacker Blamed for Third TNReady Computer Snafu -

Frustrated by a third year of TNReady foul-ups, this time with testing statewide disrupted by a suspected hacker, state lawmakers are set to step in and put an end to what they feel is a fiasco.

Two measures were to be considered by the House Tuesday afternoon, April 17, to put an end to mistakes in the administration of tests used to evaluate student progress and teacher effectiveness. School districts statewide were affected by the disruption this week after an outside source hit the state’s testing vendor, Questar.

17. Dogs + Vodka = Winning Marketing Strategy -

New York Times best-selling author, Robert Cialdini, is known for his expertise on the subject of persuasion – specifically the role it plays in driving consumers to purchase.

In his book “Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion,” Cialdini cites six key principles of influence – one being the concept of “liking.” In its simplest form, this principle states that consumers are more easily persuaded to make a purchase by people they like. “Liking,” in this sense, doesn’t mean there is necessarily friendship. It is about discovering common attributes. Sales reps who draw attention to commonalities with prospects have a greater chance of closing the sale. The same holds true for your marketing effort.

18. Running Away Money -

I recently had the privilege of interviewing Margaret Heffernan. Margaret is incredibly impressive, with a career that includes running five companies in the United States and the United Kingdom, being a college professor, authoring five books, and giving multiple TED Talks. Originally from Texas, Margaret has lived all over, including in the U.K.

19. Last Word: The Wheels on the Bus, HelloHome and Cooper-Young's Debate -

It’s been so long that when someone talks about trolleys in this town of ours, you might think of the ones with rubber tires that have been running for the last four years. You might be part of the discussion about larger changes to the city public transportation system and some wondering about where trolleys should be in the way of priorities. Or you may have been someone caught by surprise during the recent trolley tests by how quiet the new ones are.

20. Idaho Counties Suing Drug Makers for Enabling Opioid Abuse -

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Several Idaho counties are taking their fight against opioid overdoses to the courtroom.

The counties are suing the makers of OxyContin, Lortab and other opioids, accusing them of offenses such as fraud, false advertising and racketeering, the Idaho Statesman reported .

21. Arkansas, Oklahoma Divided on Opioid Withdrawal Alternative -

FORT SMITH, Ark. (AP) — Legislation on an alternative substance that some say could help mitigate the effects of opioid withdrawals is divided along state lines.

Kratom, a tropical tree from Southeast Asia with leaves that produce stimulant and sedative effects, has been used in the Fort Smith region to both treat chronic pain and mitigate the effects of opioid painkiller withdrawals. Though it is sold legally through alternative medicine stores throughout Oklahoma, it is listed as a banned substance in Arkansas.

22. Chemical Weapons Team in Syria Kept From Alleged Attack Site -

DOUMA, Syria (AP) — Syrian and Russian authorities prevented independent investigators from going to the scene of a suspected chemical attack, the head of the chemical watchdog group said Monday, blocking international efforts to establish what happened and who was to blame.

23. Sheriff: 80 Rescued From Flood at Mississippi Campground -

PERKINSTON, Miss. (AP) — Authorities say heavy rainfall unleashed flooding in Mississippi that required emergency workers to rescue 80 festivalgoers by boat and air.

WLOX-TV cites the George County Sheriff's Office as saying that most of the campers who were evacuated from the Red Creek Off-Road park Sunday morning were attending the annual Mud Bug Bash, which featured a duck hunt, free crawfish and a concert.

24. Mississippi Judge Cuts Troubled Hospital Pensions 25 Percent -

PASCAGOULA, Miss. (AP) — A judge is ordering an immediate 25 percent cut to pensions paid to retirees of a Mississippi Gulf Coast hospital system.

WLOX-TV reports the Friday ruling by special Jackson County Circuit Court Judge James Bell came at the recommendation of a financial expert.

25. Two Memphis Cooks Compete for WFC Title -

Two Memphis cooks will go head-to-head with eight other food category champs in Bentonville, Arkansas, this weekend to see whose dish is worthy of the event’s ultimate title and grand prize.

26. Hiring Your New Leader -

It happens all the time. “I quit!” or “You’re fired!” are the extremes that can mark the beginning of a crucial organizational change process.

When you find yourself in the midst of a leadership transition it will be critical that your search team pays attention to each candidate’s experience with and knowledge of fundraising.

27. New Plans Would Change Memphis Medical District -

With 27,000 people who either work or attend classes in the Memphis Medical District, and about 375 acres of parking space, something has to give.

Following last week’s release of a reconfigured city bus system plan and a new shuttle system that the Memphis Medical District Collaborative is working on, officials hope to convince 2,500 people to leave their cars at home.

28. Last Word: Parking Distrust, Early Voting Numbers and Missile Strike Reaction -

There is probably no better symbol of the distrust that has been a factor in reaching a compromise in Overton Park to end greensward parking by the Memphis Zoo. It is what happened to the idea of a walkway from the zoo plaza to the greensward with the critical juncture being where the gravel driveway is now that is used by cars to park on the greensward. We examine that and other larger points from last week’s decision by City Hall to change the design and make the amended plan the final plan.

29. Order Exempting Farmers From Dicamba Ban Challenged -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – Efforts to exempt some farmers from Arkansas' ban of an herbicide blamed for widespread damage were challenged in state court Friday, days before the prohibition was set to take effect.

30. Immigration Raid at Tennessee Plant Inspires March -

MORRISTOWN, Tenn. (AP) – Tennesseans took to the streets a week after 97 people were detained in an immigration raid at a meat packing plant.

WBIR-TV reports more than 100 people marched Thursday in Morristown, holding pictures of those detained in the raid at the Southeastern Provision plant in Grainger County.

31. USL Memphis to Operate Memphis City FC in 2018 -

USL Memphis has acquired Memphis City FC and will operate it as a Premier Development League (PDL) franchise starting with the 2018 PDL season, with the first match set for Saturday, May 12.

Tryouts will be held on Saturday, April 21 at Memphis University School. The fee to register for tryouts is $35 and can be done at www.usl2memphis.com/pdl.

32. Cordova’s Tyler Harris Chooses Tigers; Hardaway’s Staff in Flux -

Cordova guard Tyler Harris on Friday signed a national letter of intent to play at the University of Memphis. Harris led the city in scoring this past season with a 30.3 average.

Harris joins East High’s Alex Lomax in new coach Penny Hardaway’s first wave of recruits. They’re the first local players to sign with Memphis in three years.

33. The Week Ahead: April 16-20 -

Good morning, Memphis! It’s time for Africa in April, which in the minds of many Memphians, is the seasonal kick-off for festivals. The annual Southern Hot Wing Festival comes this weekend on Tiger Lane, so get ready for good times to replace that winter weather. Check out what else you need to know about in The Week Ahead...

34. UTHSC Addiction Center To Host Opioid Forums -

The Center for Addiction Science at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and the Memphis Area Prevention Coalition will present forums April 18 and 19 to educate health care providers, first responders and the public on recognizing and treating opioid use disorder.

35. Events -

The Mississippi River Commission will host a public meeting aboard the Motor Vessel Mississippi as part of its annual high-water inspection trip Tuesday, April 17, at 9 a.m. at Beale Street Landing, 251 Riverside Drive. Interested parties are invited to present views on matters affecting the water resources infrastructure needs in the region, including flood control, environmental issues, recreation and more.

36. Around Memphis: April 16, 2018 -

The Daily News offers a weekly roundup of Memphis-related headlines from around the web, adding context and new perspectives to the original content we produce on a daily basis. Here are some recent stories worth checking out…

37. Last Word: Mud Island Changes, Zoo Parking and Capitol Hill Revolt On UT Board -

This could be your last chance to see the Mississippi River Museum at Mud Island River Park as it has been for about the last 30 years. The park on the southern half of Mud Island opens for the season Saturday. The museum will be open only through July 4 is what is billed as a “limited run” followed by a public engagement process for “reimagining how we tell the story of the Mississippi River in a 21st century way,” according to park general manager Trey Giuntini in a Thursday press release.

38. Doubleheader -

These days, Craig Unger calls himself the “corporate guy.” After all, he is now president of both the Memphis Redbirds and the United Soccer League (USL) team that will share AutoZone Park with the St. Louis Cardinals’ Triple-A club beginning in 2019.

39. UT Board of Trustees Appointees Go Awry -

NASHVILLE – One of Gov. Bill Haslam’s main legislative pushes ran afoul of a Legislature angry about everything from Sex Week at the University of Tennessee to the handling of the football coach hiring at the Knoxville campus.

40. UT Board of Trustees Appointees Go Awry -

NASHVILLE – One of Gov. Bill Haslam’s main legislative pushes ran afoul of a Legislature angry about everything from Sex Week at the University of Tennessee to the handling of the football coach hiring at the Knoxville campus.

41. US Publishers Worry About Pricier Newsprint With New Tariffs -

MILWAUKEE (AP) – Newspaper publishers across the U.S. already strapped by years of declining revenue say they're dealing with an existential threat: Recently imposed tariffs on Canadian newsprint driving up their business costs.

42. Volunteers Sought For Comcast Cares Day in April -

This month, more than 500 local Comcast NBCUniversal employees and their families, friends and community partners will volunteer at seven different projects in Memphis as part of the 17th annual Comcast Cares Day.

43. Past Tigers Will Coach At Friday Night Stripes -

Former Tiger football greats DeAngelo Williams and Jake Elliott will serve as coaches at the annual Friday Night Stripes on April 13 at the Liberty Bowl.

Elliott won this year’s Super Bowl with the Philadelphia Eagles, perhaps clinching the game with a 46-yard field goal with 1:10 left that put his team ahead of the New England Patriots 41-33.

44. Events -

Memphis Botanic Garden will hold its Spring Plant Sale Friday, April 13, from from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday, April 14, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 750 Cherry Road. The sale features a wide assortment of plants, herbs, bushes, flowers and more. MBG’s horticulture staff and experienced volunteers will be on hand to answer questions. Admission is free. Visit memphisbotanicgarden.com.

45. How Much Are You Worth? -

Ray’s Take: What do Mike Tyson, Curt Schilling, Marvin Gaye, Francis Ford Coppola and Meat Loaf all have in common?

46. A Memphis Parable -

HOWARD AND BILL. One of my first columns was this very Memphis story. It’s time to tell it again. 

In the ’60s, Howard Robertson was a black postal carrier moonlighting as a waiter at the capital of white money dining in Memphis, Justine’s, housed in an antebellum mansion. Bill Loeb was a successful white businessman, owner of ubiquitous laundry branches about town, and the brother of Henry Loeb, mayor during the 1968 sanitation strike. Loeb lived in a home literally bordering the Memphis Country Club. Robertson lived in the other Memphis those of us who grew up white then never really acknowledged.

47. Kunal Shalia connecting young professionals at FedEx -

Kunal Shalia, newly armed with a graduate degree in industrial engineering from the University of California at Berkeley, had a choice to make. He could stay within the sphere of the Bay Area and his native home of San Jose, where he had friends, family and the community that only your original stomping grounds can provide – or he could completely remove himself from everything familiar and start anew.

48. Last Word: Bakery Rising, Legislative Notes From Nashville and Jazz Messiah -

Some call it the Bakery Project – others Wonder Bread. Whatever you call it the redevelopment project that is centered on the old Wonder Bread bakery on Monroe between Downtown and the Medical District is moving with a building permit this week for what developer Gary Prosterman and his team call the Cadillac Building … because it was once a Cadillac dealership. That’s part of the code being used for places that have been out of action or barely functioning for decades and are now under development.... very post-apocalyptic. 

49. Fed in March Discussed 'Slightly Steeper' Future Rate Hikes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve officials signaled rising confidence last month that a strong economy will lift inflation closer to its 2 percent target and that they may accelerate the Fed's pace of interest rate hikes as a result.

50. Events -

The 2018 Bartlett Business Expo is Thursday, April 12, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Bartlett Recreation Center, 7700 Flaherty Place. A variety of local businesses will showcase their goods and services. Admission is free. Visit bartlettchamber.org.

51. Own Your Next Interview -

“Your work is going to fill a large part of your life,” Steve Jobs once said, “and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do.”

52. Lots of Noise, But Few Results in Legislature -

Just when you think the Tennessee Legislature is going off the deep end, someone will throw them a bungee cord. Maybe a rope made out of hemp would work better because a bungee cord leaves people bouncing, never quite reeling them in.

53. Kroger Spends Millions to Permanently Cut Prices in Memphis and Beyond -

Kroger has made a “multimillion-dollar investment” to permanently cut prices on more than 3,000 products in its grocery stores across Memphis and its multistate Delta Division.

Shoppers will be met with oversized signage announcing the price cuts almost anywhere they turn inside Memphis-area Kroger stores. That includes messaging that completely covers the entrances that shoppers walk through at locations like the Kroger at 1675 N. Germantown Parkway, where a bright yellow image of a few grocery items and the announcement “Say Hello To Lower Prices” covers the doors.

54. Sunday Wine, Liquor Sales Passes in Tenn. Senate -

NASHVILLE – Buoyed by Bible verses and compromise giving liquor stores a head start on Sunday sales, legislation allowing grocery stores to sell wine on Sundays passed the Senate Wednesday on a 17-11 vote.

55. Last Word: Play Ball, Porch & Parlor and A New Bus System -

If you go to enough political gatherings you start to see parallels. Sometimes you see things that aren’t there but that’s another story. Many political gatherings begin with the pledge of allegiance and a prayer as well. Sometimes the pledge isn’t enough and there is someone there to sing the National Anthem.

56. Holy Rosary Program Urges Memphis to 'Go Blue for Autism' -

Holy Rosary School’s ANGEL Program (Autism iNtervention and Guidance for Early Learners) is recognizing Autism Awareness Month in April through its “Go Blue for Autism” light bulb sale, a fundraising effort that is part of a national campaign for greater awareness and understanding of autism.

57. Frontier Adds Nonstop Memphis-Philadelphia Route -

Frontier Airlines has launched its new nonstop service between Memphis International Airport and Philadelphia International Airport (PHL).

The service, which is scheduled to be seasonal, initially runs four times weekly on Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, then transitions to twice weekly beginning in June.

58. Drug Distributor to Donate 80,000 Doses of Overdose Antidote -

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) – An Ohio-based drug distributor facing lawsuits linked to the opioid crisis is donating more than 80,000 doses of an overdose antidote for use by emergency responders in several states, including Tennessee.

59. Kroger's Hiring Spree Goes On, Another 11K Jobs This Year -

CINCINNATI (AP) – Kroger is hiring 11,000 workers, up about 1,000 from last year.

The nation's largest grocery chain by revenue is locked in a fierce completion with Amazon.com, which acquired Whole Foods last year, as well as Walmart and Target.

60. Events -

The 2018 Bartlett Business Expo is Thursday, April 12, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Bartlett Recreation Center, 7700 Flaherty Place. A variety of local businesses will showcase their goods and services. Admission is free. Visit bartlettchamber.org.

61. Overtime Exemption Rules Not So Simple -

In today’s world, the 40-hour workweek may seem old-fashioned. Employees work remotely, answer emails on mobile devices anytime, and fewer workers clock in at nine and clock out at five. While the business climate evolves, the overtime requirement set forth in the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) remains consistent: non-exempt employees must receive overtime pay – “time-and-a-half” – for any time worked beyond 40 hours in a workweek. This raises the important and complicated question, “Which employees are exempt?”

62. A/B Test Your Way to Email Success -

In years past, plenty of brands adopted a “set it and forget it” email-automation mentality. Once a marketing email was released, it became a distant memory.

There’s a much better way, though, to leverage the still-popular email marketing technique and more closely connect to reader preferences as a way to obtain an end goal.

63. SXSW 2018: My First-Year Experience -

I recently had the opportunity to attend South by Southwest (sxsw.com) in Austin, Texas, for the first time. If you’ve never been, SXSW is a giant festival in downtown Austin that draws in thousands of people. Founded in 1987, SXSW has boasted an economic impact to Austin of over $300 million in past years.

64. Early Voting Opens for May County Primaries -

Early voting in the first of three 2018 elections in Shelby County opens Wednesday at 21 sites across the county and runs through April 26.

The primaries are led by contests for county mayor, all 13 seats on the county commission and most of the county’s elected offices. The remainder are in the other even-year election cycle or have an eight-year term of office that comes around next in 2022.

65. Mortgage Market Up 2 Percent in March -

When Financial Federal executive vice president John Loebel looks at the local mortgage market, he has a straightforward assessment: If you want to buy a home, buy it now.

“The mortgage rate trend is up, period,” he said. “With the Federal Reserve’s consistent raising of rates to control inflation, we foresee this will only continue. We wouldn’t be surprised if rates hit 5 percent next quarter. Due to these variables, we’re experiencing such a seller’s market. Countless buyers are bidding on every single home, decreasing the timeframe for negotiations and even appraisals.”

66. Seller’s Market -

With one quarter in the books, the Memphis-area housing market appears to be on pace for yet another record-breaking year. The average home sales price for the first three months of 2018 rose to $159,274, which is the highest first-quarter amount on record, according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, chandlerreports.com.

67. Bus System Overhaul Would Shift Balance of Service to More Frequency -

Consultants mapping a reconstruction of the city’s bus system are suggesting $30 million more a year in annual city funding for the system and a shift of bus service so that 70 percent of the routes have a higher frequency, reducing wait times during peak hours on major north-south and east-west corridors.

68. Last Word: Pera's Move, The Catechism of 1968 and Whitehaven's ER -

A day ahead of the last game of the season for the Grizz on the road, the team’s majority owner, Robert Pera, acted Monday to clear up questions about the ownership of the team going forward. Pera emailed season ticket holders Monday evening that he will not be exercising a buy-sell agreement with his partners who have minority shares of the franchise.

69. UTHSC Addiction Center To Host Opioid Forums -

The Center for Addiction Science at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and the Memphis Area Prevention Coalition will present forums April 18 and 19 to educate health care providers, first responders and the public on recognizing and treating opioid use disorder.

70. Child Advocates Ask FTC to Investigate YouTube -

The fine print of YouTube's terms of service has a warning that goes unheeded by millions of children who visit YouTube to watch cartoons, nursery rhymes, science experiments or videos of toys being unboxed.

71. Events -

The Orpheum Theatre presents “Something Rotten!” Tuesday through Sunday, April 10-15, at the theater, 203 S. Main St. This Broadway musical tells the story of two brothers who are desperate to write their own hit play while the “rock star” Shakespeare keeps getting all the hits. Buy tickets at orpheum-memphis.com.

72. Poo as Good Business -

Talk about nothing wasted. Behold the founding story, which reads more like a creation myth, of Poo-Pourri.

Suzy Batiz, a 40-year-old woman from Jonesboro, Arkansas, declares her second bankruptcy conventional “rules” of success did not work for her life. To heal, she renounces the world of commerce and takes a two-year spiritual quest, experimenting with alternative healing methods that included the lost art of tapping and shamanic training in Peru.

73. 10 Ways to Energize Volunteer Leaders -

A special column for executive directors and college presidents. “I guess I’ll have to do it myself. I can’t depend on anyone. People say they want to help, but...”

74. Grizzlies Set to Pick in Top Five; Bickerstaff’s Future Cloudy -

On Wednesday, the Memphis Grizzlies will play their last game of this difficult season at Oklahoma City. They are on track to finish with the second-worst record in the NBA and to have just under a 20 percent chance in the NBA Lottery to wind up with the overall No. 1 pick.

75. Council Gets First Look At MATA Route Changes -

A task force looking to overhaul the city’s bus system presents a draft report Tuesday, April 10, to Memphis City Council members.

The Memphis 3.0 transit plan goes to the council at a 1 p.m. committee session for discussion.

76. Last Word: MLK50s Surprise Ending, Senate Race Shake Up and EDGE Insights -

Does the NBA need a version of the mercy rule for this meaningless part of the season for teams that have already made the second season – I mean, the playoffs – and those who are looking to lose their way to the top draft pick? The Grizz played their last home game of the season Sunday at the Forum. Grizz over the Pistons 130 – 117.

77. Week Ahead: April 9-15 -

Good morning, Memphis! We’ve seen in recent national elections how important every vote can be, much less on the local level where far fewer votes are cast than in a national presidential election, for example. It’s one of your basic rights and a great opportunity for you to be an influence in the local community.

78. Around Memphis: April 9, 2018 -

The Daily News offers a weekly roundup of Memphis-related headlines from around the web, adding context and new perspectives to the original content we produce on a daily basis. Here are some recent stories worth checking out…

79. Events -

Opera Memphis’ sixth annual Midtown Opera Festival takes place Friday, April 6, through April 14 at Playhouse on the Square, 66 S. Cooper St. The festival is anchored by two operas, “The Triumph of Honor” and “The Opera 901 Showcase,” plus other musical performances, family events, panel discussions and more. Visit operamemphis.org/mof18 for a schedule.

80. State of Flux -

Anyone paying attention to recent news headlines alone should have a pretty good indication that health care in the U.S. – really anywhere you look, on local, state or national levels – remains a byzantine, expensive proposition. Health care keeps getting more expensive. It involves navigating a lot of paperwork with bureaucratic legalese that bears the fingerprints of a tangle of stakeholders, including insurers, doctors and lawmakers.

81. Last Word: I Am A Man Plaza, Graceland Clears EDGE and Filing Deadline Action -

Sometimes the simplest concepts say more than an elaborate explanation can – even when the history it depicts is complex. A plaza dedicated to the 1,300 city sanitation workers who went on strike in 1968 formally opened Thursday on what had been a vacant lot just across Pontotoc from the south side of Clayborn Temple. And the occasion included more of the small moments that have made this week so compelling. Watching civil rights icon Rev. James Lawson walk around the plaza and discover it includes one of his quotes from the 1968 strike.

82. Dot to Open West Memphis Terminal, Raise Driver Pay -

Dot Transportation, an affiliate of Dot Foods, announced it is opening a new terminal location in the Memphis-area market and will raise wages for its drivers fleetwide.

Dot Transportation employs more than 1,500 drivers at 11 Dot Foods distribution centers and 16 terminals across the country, including 87 drivers at its Dyersburg, Tennessee, distribution center. Dot Foods Tennessee plans to hire 40 more drivers this year and is opening a new terminal in the Memphis area this month.

83. Resolution Denouncing Neo-Nazis Dies Again in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A resolution denouncing neo-Nazis and white nationalists has died in the Tennessee legislature for the second time in recent weeks.

The Tennessean reports House Republican Caucus Chair Rep. Ryan Williams, R-Cookeville, requested Monday that the resolution be withdrawn from consideration by the Delayed Bills Committee.

84. A Dream Remembered -

With the world honoring the memory of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. this week, Memphis artist Martha Kelly depicts the National Civil Rights Museum at the Lorraine Motel, where King was assassinated 50 years ago. Kelly, who illustrates local life and culture each month for The Daily News, can be reached at marthakellyart.com. (Martha Kelly)

...

85. To Refinance or Not to Refinance? -

Ray’s Take: According to The American Mortgage in Historical Context, 30-year mortgages are a relatively new thing. In the time before the Great Depression, mortgages had short maturity times and usually required a very high down payment. Pre-Depression mortgages featured variable interest rates and were usually renegotiated on a yearly basis. Boy, have times changed!

86. Bouki Fait Gombo -

THE OWNED PERSPECTIVE. From 1936 to 1938, as part of the WPA and the Federal Writers’ Project, more than 2,000 interviews were conducted with former slaves resulting in “Slave Narratives: A Folk History in the United States.” Those former slaves were very old by then, but their memories of dark childhoods were clear.

87. Events -

Art by Design, a designer showcase benefiting ArtsMemphis, is underway through Sunday, April 8, in the Pipkin Building at the Mid-South Fairgrounds. More than a dozen interior design team have created custom “vignettes” within a chic gallery showroom, with special presentations each day. Single-day tickets are $20. Visit artsmemphis.org for details and hours.

88. Last Word: MLK50s Big Day, Hotel Changes and Murica on Capitol Hill -

The peak of the MLK50 events came Wednesday with a chill but some sunshine and lots to consider. Understand -- this isn’t over. There are still a few more events to go through the weekend and even into next week. If nothing else, a lot more Memphians and visitors got a good look at most of South Main in the best way possible – on foot. And if the Beale Street District ever expands east to Danny Thomas, the intersection there makes a really good place for a party.

89. Arkansas State University Gets $10 Million From Alumnus -

JONESBORO, Ark. (AP) – Arkansas State University is renaming its business college to honor an alumnus who donated $10 million to his alma mater.

The university announced the gift Tuesday from Neil Griffin, who lives in Kerrville, Texas. The 91-year-old World War II veteran graduated from Arkansas State in 1948 with a degree in business administration.

90. AP Was There: The Assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – In the spring of 1968, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. had won victories on desegregation and voting rights and had been planning his Poor People's Campaign when he turned his attention to Memphis, the gritty city by the Mississippi River. In his support for striking sanitation workers, King wanted to lead marches and show that nonviolent protest still worked.

91. AP Journalists Recall Covering MLK Assassination -

Nancy Shipley was working in a news office in Nashville, Tennessee, when the call came 50 years ago. Gene Herrick was in Chicago routing photos to newspapers when his phone rang. Jack Thornell got the call in New Orleans; Kathryn Johnson heard the news in Atlanta.

92. Fake Hotel Booking Websites a Growing Problem -

NBC ran a story about a family who booked a room on the ocean but found they had no view of the water at all when they got to the hotel. A family of five arrived at the hotel and found that the room reserved for them only had one king bed. It was summer in Florida, the hotel was full, and there was nothing the manager could do to accommodate the families.

93. Tracing Civil Rights Struggle Through Travel -

Attention is on Memphis this year with the MLK50 commemoration to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on the 50th anniversary of his assassination on April 4, 1968. Keeping this focused on travel, I believe it’s a good time to point out some of the newer civil rights sites across the U.S., along with a few that have been around for a while – all opportunities to honor King’s legacy while trying to better understand the struggle.

94. Events -

The city of Memphis dedicates I Am A Man Plaza with a ceremony and open house Thursday, April 5, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the plaza, which is adjacent to Clayborn Temple at Hernando Street and Pontotoc Avenue. The city plaza is dedicated to the 1,300 city sanitation workers that went on strike in 1968 and includes a wall with the names of the strikers. Thursday’s event will also feature food trucks and live performances. Cost is free. Visit iammemphis.org.

95. Lawmakers See Conspiracy In UT Board Alterations -

It’s not that hard to light a fire under some state lawmakers, but the University of Tennessee FOCUS Act raised blood pressure considerably in the House of Representatives before barely passing with 51 votes.

96. Lomax Commits to Memphis Tigers, Hardaway Staff Hire May be Near -

Penny Hardaway’s first commitments as head coach at the University of Memphis are his son, Jayden, and East High point guard Alex Lomax. Jayden announced his commitment Tuesday, April 3, and Lomax made his official through social media early Wednesday morning.

97. Last Word: Mason Temple 50 Years Later, Medical Pot Dies in Nashville and Fire -

Mason Temple still looks pretty much the same as it did in 1968 when Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. came there to give what would be his last speech – the Mountaintop speech – the night before his assassination. Tuesday evening, 50 years to the day that King gave that speech, the Church of God In Christ sanctuary was awash and aglow in multi-colored lights as a capacity invitation-only crowd gathered to mark the occasion.

98. Transplant Foundation Marks Blue and Green Day April 13 -

The Mid-South Transplant Foundation is calling on businesses, households, churches and other supporters to light up the city in blue and green Friday, April 13, for National Donate Life Blue and Green Day, a day set aside to support organ and tissue donation.

99. Data Back Up AP Poll: Little Progress on Civil Rights Issues -

Fifty years after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., American perceptions of progress toward racial equality remain largely divided along racial lines, a recent AP-NORC poll shows.

The majority of African-Americans surveyed saw little to no progress toward equal treatment in key areas that the civil rights movement sought to address. White respondents frequently portrayed a rosier picture. A review by the Associated Press shows that the available data more often align with African-Americans' less optimistic reflection of their reality.

100. Events -

The Withers Collection Museum and Gallery will stage an “I Am A Man” Reenactment Photo Shoot Wednesday, April 4, with the lineup starting at 8 a.m. at Fourth and Beale streets. The picture will re-create photojournalist Ernest C. Withers’ iconic “I Am A Man” photo from the 1968 sanitation workers’ strike. Register in advance at the Withers Collection, 333 Beale St., or online at 2018mlk50.com.