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Editorial Results (free)

1. Local, State and Federal Election Cycles Blend On Last Weekend of Early Voting -

Candidates in the August and November elections were out on the last weekend of early voting in Shelby County in advance of the May 1 election day for county primaries.

The events were a mix of candidates from all three elections on the calendar in 2018.

2. Opioid Litigation, FedExForum NonCompete Top Local Law Developments -

Here are some of the legal issues making news in recent months.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery says lawsuits by local prosecutors over the opioid epidemic are complicating his efforts to reach a multistate settlement with drug companies. In response, the prosecutors, who represent about half of Tennessee's counties, say local communities lose out when lawsuits like theirs are rolled into one settlement.

3. Last Word: Parking Distrust, Early Voting Numbers and Missile Strike Reaction -

There is probably no better symbol of the distrust that has been a factor in reaching a compromise in Overton Park to end greensward parking by the Memphis Zoo. It is what happened to the idea of a walkway from the zoo plaza to the greensward with the critical juncture being where the gravel driveway is now that is used by cars to park on the greensward. We examine that and other larger points from last week’s decision by City Hall to change the design and make the amended plan the final plan.

4. Events -

The 2018 Bartlett Business Expo is Thursday, April 12, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Bartlett Recreation Center, 7700 Flaherty Place. A variety of local businesses will showcase their goods and services. Admission is free. Visit bartlettchamber.org.

5. Jones Named Managing Partner of Fisher Phillips’ Memphis Office -

Fisher Phillips has appointed David S. Jones regional managing partner of its Memphis office. Jones, who has 18 years’ law experience, represents clients exclusively in immigration-related employment and compliance matters, and that will continue to be his primary focus as regional managing partner. In addition, he will oversee development of the office, attorneys and staff, and will play a greater role in the management of Fisher Phillips as a whole as a member of the operations group. Jones takes the reins from Jeff Weintraub, who served in the role for six years, as part of a routine leadership rotation.

6. UTHSC Addiction Center To Host Opioid Forums -

The Center for Addiction Science at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and the Memphis Area Prevention Coalition will present forums April 18 and 19 to educate health care providers, first responders and the public on recognizing and treating opioid use disorder.

7. Events -

Art by Design, a designer showcase benefiting ArtsMemphis, is underway through Sunday, April 8, in the Pipkin Building at the Mid-South Fairgrounds. More than a dozen interior design team have created custom “vignettes” within a chic gallery showroom, with special presentations each day. Single-day tickets are $20.  Visit artsmemphis.org for details and hours.

8. Memphis Lawmakers Helped Advance Medical Marijuana Bill in House -

NASHVILLE – Three Shelby County lawmakers played key roles in helping a medical marijuana bill move through the Legislature, supporting its passage in the House Criminal Justice Committee before the bill was pulled Tuesday, April 3, by its Senate sponsor, Democratic state Sen. Steve Dickerson of Nashville.

9. Last Word: I Am A Man Plaza, Graceland Clears EDGE and Filing Deadline Action -

Sometimes the simplest concepts say more than an elaborate explanation can – even when the history it depicts is complex. A plaza dedicated to the 1,300 city sanitation workers who went on strike in 1968 formally opened Thursday on what had been a vacant lot just across Pontotoc from the south side of Clayborn Temple. And the occasion included more of the small moments that have made this week so compelling. Watching civil rights icon Rev. James Lawson walk around the plaza and discover it includes one of his quotes from the 1968 strike.

10. MLK50 Observances Come With Appeals, Memories -

The way National Civil Rights Museum president Terri Lee Freeman described it as the MLK50 commemorations began this week, the church bells would cascade when they rang Wednesday, April 4, starting at 6:01 p.m. – the moment Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was shot 50 years ago.

11. Events -

Art by Design, a designer showcase benefiting ArtsMemphis, is underway through Sunday, April 8, in the Pipkin Building at the Mid-South Fairgrounds. More than a dozen interior design team have created custom “vignettes” within a chic gallery showroom, with special presentations each day. Single-day tickets are $20. Visit artsmemphis.org for details and hours.

12. Anniversary of King's Assassination Marked With Marches, Rallies -

Several thousand people marching under the banners of unions and civil rights organizations marched peacefully Wednesday, April 4, from the headquarters of the American Federal of State County and Municipal Employees at Beale Street and Danny Thomas Boulevard to Mason Temple Church of God in Christ.

13. MLK 50 Years Later -

Bernard Lafayette remembers being in Memphis April 3, 1968, and a dejected Martin Luther King Jr. being roused from his room at the Lorraine Motel to speak at Mason Temple on a rainy night.

14. Prescription for Tragedy -

He has his own GPS, an internal shield that keeps him from driving anywhere near 637 Poplar Ave. Home to the Memphis morgue. That’s where they showed Jerry Davidson his 22-year-old son, Oliver, his eyes closed and his lips purple.

15. Health Department Isolates Local Measles Case -

An international traveler who arrived in Memphis on Monday, March 12, has been identified by the Shelby County Health Department as having the measles.

The unidentified traveler was immediately placed in isolation after immediately seeking medical care upon arrival in Memphis.

16. Health Department Isolates Local Measles Case -

An international traveler who arrived in Memphis on Monday, March 12, has been identified by the Shelby County Health Department as having the measles.

The unidentified traveler was immediately placed in isolation after immediately seeking medical care upon arrival in Memphis.

17. Civil War Re-Enactor Outflanked On Statues, Medicaid Expansion -

When state Rep. Steve McDaniel was a youngster he often read the historical marker at the intersection of Highway 22 and Wildersville Road detailing Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s first West Tennessee raid in the Battle of Parker’s Crossroads.

18. St. Jude Welcomes Future Scientists for Annual Event -

Students and teachers from various Shelby County high schools got to see the inner workings of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital last week when the hospital hosted its third annual Science Scholars of Tomorrow event.

19. May Primaries Feature More Candidates, Women -

The May 1 Shelby County primary ballot is set, with 33 Republicans and 50 Democrats seeking 23 county offices – specifically the right to advance as the nominees of their respective parties to the August county general election.

20. Last Word: Rising River, Driving The Dream and Harwell Advances Medical Pot -

The Mississippi River at Memphis should reach flood stage at any moment. As Last Word was going up online Wednesday evening the National Weather Service at Memphis put the river level here at 33.52 feet. Flood stage at Memphis is 34 feet. The river is forecast to crest some time next week at 38 feet, four feet over flood stage. Keep in mind that in April 2011, the river at Memphis crested 10 feet higher, at 48 feet on the Memphis river gauge – which turned to be the one on the support beams of the bridge over Beale Street at Riverside Drive. That was the second highest river level at Memphis ever recorded.

21. College Awarded Training Grant for Nurses for Crisis Situations -

The College of Nursing at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, in collaboration with Regional One Health, has been awarded a $16,000 grant to train area nurses to handle and diffuse crisis situations in hospitals and other health care settings.

22. Last Word: Corker & Blackburn, More Frost and Dale Watson's Move to The Haven -

It's possible around City Hall these days to get your RFQs mixed up with your RFPs. And there is a difference in requests for qualifications and requests for proposals. Usually RFQs come before RFPs – but there are exceptions – loopholes. The latest RFQ out of City Hall – album title or t-shirt slogan? – is for the adaptive reuse of the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art.

23. Events -

Hattiloo Theatre will perform “Selma: A Musical Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.” Friday, Feb. 23, through March 18 at Hattiloo, 37 S. Cooper St. The dramatic musical captures prominent moments such as the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the crossing of the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. Visit hattiloo.org for showtimes and tickets.

24. CRE Owners Look To Reap Rewards Of New Tax Cuts -

The start of the year enjoyed a flurry of commercial real estate sales and building permits, on the heels of federal tax cuts passed late last year that are expected to benefit CRE owners and possibly impact the number of new projects and sales announced this year.

25. Memphis a Hot Bed for High-Demand Jobs -

Each year the Center for Economic Research in Tennessee puts together its Labor and Education Alignment Program report detailing which jobs are most in demand statewide and for each of the state’s nine economic and community development regions.

26. Memphis Health Care Facility Under Investigation -

The Tennessee Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services department is investigating the care home were a woman who died outside City Hall earlier this month lived.

Shelley Thompson was reported missing the day before her body was found on a park bench outside City Hall. She lived at Taylor Brown Garden Healthcare facility, 111 Lucy Ave., which has been licensed by the state since October 2008.

27. Digest -

Memphis Toys R Us

To Remain Open

A representative with Toys R Us has confirmed to The Daily News that the retailer’s Memphis location, at 7676 Polo Ground Blvd., won’t close after all.

28. Fairgrounds Project May Get More Acreage -

More than 12 acres of land next to the Mid-South Fairgrounds could open up with the move of the Shelby County Schools central office as the city embarks on a redevelopment of the Fairgrounds and surrounding area.

29. Luttrell Slower to Move on Opioid Lawsuit -

An opioid epidemic lawsuit the county will bring against defendants still needs questions answered and a better focus, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell said on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

30. Last Word: End of the Camp Out, Megasite Views and The Glory Years -

No camp out this year for the opening of applications for optional schools because it is online at Shelby County Schools this year. Also the applications are available at the same time – Monday morning at 10 a.m. – for the open enrollment at any other SCS school that has available space. Those were some hardcore campers that in some cases had been at this for a couple of generations. Persisting through barcodes and a 99.9 percent probability that their first choice of school would happen without the tent, generator and heaters.

31. Memphis Health Care Facility Under Investigation by State -

The Tennessee Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services department is investigating the care home were a woman who died outside City Hall earlier this month lived.

Shelley Thompson was reported missing the day before her body was found on a park bench outside City Hall. She lived at Taylor Brown Garden Healthcare facility, 111 Lucy Ave., which has been licensed by the state since October 2008.

32. Last Word: Eureka Education, Confederate Monuments in Court and Dillon Brooks -

Supermarkets are hard. That is the tag line in every discussion about getting a supermarket or grocery store for a given part of town that doesn’t have one. And once a new supermarket goes up somewhere else, there is inevitably word that a competitor or two is going to build nearby. The discussion always includes the mandatory recitation of the 3 to 4 percent profit margin stores operate on, which even knowledgeable critics of the decisions about where to locate and not to locate stores acknowledge is accurate.

33. Pushing The Plan -

Before she signed on as Church Health’s medical director in 2015, Dr. Susan Nelson was a volunteer provider for the organization, helping bring health care to uninsured workers and businesses from musicians and landscapers to child care workers.

34. Last Word: Snow Week, Liberal Arts and Their Critics and Tunica Casinos -

Snow Day 3 as this becomes a snow week for many of us. Granted one of those days was a federal holiday in which the temperature was above freezing and the sun was out. During the second consecutive snow day Wednesday for Shelby County Schools students, Candous Brown, a teacher at Raleigh Egypt High School held class anyway via Facebook.

35. Last Word: Mural Madness, Madison Plans and New Judges -

Maybe this discussion was bound to happen in a city where murals have been going up at a pretty good clip for several years now. At first, it was a rather startling form of civic witness in a new kind of Memphis boosterism that was a reaction to years of downing Memphis as the dominant civic monologue. And it rapidly became about how much the murals could speak to the real Memphis – in other words pro-Memphis but with an edge and more than a nod to the city’s reality. That’s a lot for a mural to pull off.

36. Week Ahead: January 8-14 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! This week brings the first meetings of 2018 for the Memphis City Council and the Shelby County Commission, events celebrating Elvis’ birthday, a luncheon honoring the local PRSA chapter's Communicator of the Year, the Sozo Children’s Choir, business owner seminars, a full slate of sporting events to attend and more.

37. Weekend Monuments Protests, Response Suggest Shift -

Memphis Branch NAACP president Deidre Malone may have had the most concise description of what has changed since the city’s two most visible Confederate monuments came down Dec. 20.

“What we want happened. The monuments are down,” Malone said Friday, Jan. 5, as the NAACP and other groups called on Memphians to ignore plans for protests in the city the next day by groups opposed to the removal of the monuments.

38. Memphis Experts See Economic Growth Building Off 2017 Into 2018 -

With resolutions made and the new year now, another annual exercise rises to the forefront – predictions on what Memphis and its economy can expect in 2018.

If 2017 taught us anything, it’s that there’s so much we won’t be able to even remotely see coming, from Memphis bidding to become the potential home for Amazon’s second headquarters to action finally being taken on the Confederate monuments in city parks and so much more.

39. AWA to Honor Haltom at Annual Event -

After 30 years working with Shelby County government as a practicing attorney and a Juvenile Court judge, the Honorable Claudia Haltom retired and turned her focus to creating something that would make a difference.

40. UTHSC's Stern Proposes Substance Addiction Network -

For Dr. David Stern of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, his interest in proposing a new pilot program to benefit those with mental health and substance use problems comes from a deeply personal as well as professional place.

41. Last Word: Grizz Troubles Deepen, Germantown Kroger Enigma and The Strikers -

Tigers over Great Danes Tuesday at the Forum 67 – 58. The Grizz are in Washington Wednesday to play the Wizards and some of the attention around the Grizz is shifting away from what happens on the court. What would you call the place that the Grizz are at this mile marker past Grit & Grind? It is more than a losing streak, says Don Wade in his Press Box column.

42. May Primary Ballot Continues to Fill Up -

Floyd Bonner, chief sheriff’s deputy for Shelby County, is among the latest candidates to file for a place on the May 2018 primary elections ballot. Bonner filed Friday, Dec. 8, in the Democratic primary for sheriff. He is expected to run against sheriff’s office supervisor and 2014 Democratic nominee for sheriff Bennie Cobb in the primary.

43. Last Word: Awaiting A Sell-Out, Public Art and Controversy and Southaven's Triangle -

The Grizz fall to 8-19 with a loss Monday to the Miami Heat 107-82 at the Forum. It is Tigers basketball Tuesday at the Forum with the Albany Great Danes. Meanwhile the Tigers football appearance in the Dec. 30 AutoZone Liberty Bowl is moving toward a sellout. The Tigers have sold 15,000 tickets to the bowl game including an initial allotment of 8,300. And offensive coordinator Darrell Dickey announced Monday he is leaving to take the same post at Texas A&M after nine seasons in Memphis.

44. Last Word: Bredesen's Return, Ford's Exit and Otis Redding 50 Years On -

Former Tennessee Gov. and Nashville mayor Phil Bredesen formally entered the 2018 race for the U.S. Senate Thursday via a YouTube video. AP on Bredesen’s entry and his background. Republican partisans are already assuming Bredesen is the Democratic nominee and Democratic partisans are already assuming U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn is the Republican nominee. And the expectation of such a match up automatically went on the list of midterm races that those on both sides and pundits inbetween will be watching to get a read on national trends.

45. Battle Over Arlington ER Facility to Resume in 2018 -

A pitched battle in the town of Arlington between major Memphis health care institutions and state officials is set to pick back up in 2018.

State officials in late summer will hear an appeal filed by Baptist Memorial Health Care Corp. over a denial in August of its application to build an emergency room facility in the Memphis suburb. That denial followed an earlier rejection by the Tennessee Health Services and Development Agency of a slightly different version of the same request in April.

46. The Week Ahead: Dec. 4-10 -

Good morning, Memphis! The holidays are in full swing, and several events this week aim to help you make a dent in your shopping list while also supporting local artisans and small businesses. Check out the details on those, plus our entertainment picks and more you need to know about in The Week Ahead...

47. Holder, Branch to Keynote April Observances of King Anniversary -

Former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder and author and historian Taylor Branch will be the featured speakers at two days of panel discussions and keynote speeches in April as the National Civil Rights Museum marks the 50th anniversary of the 1968 sanitation workers strike and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

48. Palazola Produce Making Fresh Deliveries for Decades -

The Palazola name has been associated with produce in the Bluff City for more than a century.

In 1974, Mike Palazola founded M. Palazola Produce Co., a wholesaler and distributor of fresh fruits and vegetables to restaurants and institutional food service establishments in the Greater Memphis area, but his grandfather before him had delivered produce around the city out of his truck.

49. Expanding Its Reach -

His was a story as tragic as it is familiar. E. Young had immediate family members in a gang. More than one gang tried to recruit him. His parents were in no way equipped to raise him.

When he moved in with an aunt, Phyllis Brown, he was by his own words “angry, depressed.”

50. Folk’s Folly’s Kauker Named Tenn. Restaurant Manager of Year -

Folk’s Folly Prime Steak House general manager Diane Kauker has won the Tennessee Hospitality & Tourism Association’s 2017 Restaurant Manager of the Year Award, which honors a manager who has demonstrated exceptional leadership, service, and community and civic involvement. The judges noted Kauker’s outstanding performance beyond her normal job duties, including providing excellent service to Folk’s Folly guests and the greater community.

51. Last Word: Changes Behind Highland Row, Lee Harris Opens and Ron Olson Moves -

Shelby County Commission chairwoman Heidi Shafer says the commission, through its attorneys, is in ‘the final stages of launching litigation” against big pharma over the opioid problem locally. And in a written statement Thursday she said she believes the litigation “will result in significant recovery for hundreds of millions of dollars that Shelby County has spent trying to heal, save, nurse and otherwise deal with the opioid crisis.” Shafer specifically announced the hiring on a contingency basis of a national law firm.

52. Harris Cites Effects of ‘Trump Approach’ on County Races -

Three weeks into his run for Shelby County mayor on the 2018 ballot, state Sen. Lee Harris told a group of 30 supporters in Victorian Village Wednesday, Nov. 1, that he is running as a response to the “Trump approach.”

53. Campbell Clinic Invests $30M In Germantown -

Campbell Clinic is in the throes of $30 million expansion of its Germantown campus, comprised today of a 60,000-square-foot clinic and 12,000-square-foot ambulatory surgery center on 15 acres near Wolf River Boulevard and Germantown Road.

54. Run Women Run -

In 2018, Shelby County voters will be presented with a long ballot as candidates compete for most county offices, many school board and suburban government positions and congressional and legislative seats.

55. Goodin Joins Hagwood Adelman As Memphis Managing Attorney -

Michael T. Goodin has joined Hagwood Adelman Tipton PC as managing attorney of the Memphis office. In that role, he provides legal services to HAT’s clients in matters such as medical malpractice and senior housing litigation for health care providers along the continuum of care, including skilled nursing, assisted living, behavioral health, home health and hospice litigation. In addition, he assists in supervising the attorney and paraprofessional teams.

56. Health: Our Local - and Global - Concern -

The United Nations Foundation’s theme this year is “Global Goals, Local Leaders” as it aims to engage our local elected officials in global health issues, especially health care.

Should Memphians be concerned about local health care? And, is there a way to create a conversation regarding health care that is non-partisan and, rather, more compassionate and humane? Now is the time our community must come together and respect each other regardless of race, gender, religion or political affiliation to make discussions about health care run smoothly.

57. Last Word: T.A. Talks Memphis, EDGE Debate and Politics, Lots of Politics -

Grizz season opener at the Forum Wednesday is a win over NOLA 103 – 91. And Tony Allen’s Grizz jersey is retired. The day before, Allen wrote a piece for The Players’ Tribune on the Memphis experience and it is just about the best thing that will happen to you all day. He just walks right off the court and into the soul of this place.

58. Fincher ‘Very Close’ to Entering Race for Corker’s Senate Seat -

Former Tennessee Congressman Stephen Fincher said Tuesday, Oct. 17, he is probably going to run for the U.S. Senate seat Bob Corker is giving up.

“We’re very close to getting in. We’re not 100 percent. But we’re very close,” Fincher said after the last stop of a week-long statewide listening tour in East Memphis.

59. Fincher Says 'Very Close' To Senate Run -

Former Tennessee Congressman Stephen Fincher said Tuesday, Oct. 17, he is probably going to run for the U.S. Senate seat Bob Corker is giving up starting with the 2018 Republican primary.

“We’re very close to getting in. We’re not 100 percent. But we’re very close,” Fincher said after the last stop of a week-long statewide listening tour in East Memphis.

60. County Commission Advances Pay Raises -

Shelby County Commissioners advanced pay raises Monday, Oct. 16, for 19 elected offices including their own, but vote totals on the three separate pay ordinances varied.

Ranging from 32.4 percent for sheriff to a 10.3 percent hike for county commissioners, the pay raises would take effect with the winners of the August 2018 county general elections. That’s if each of the ordinances gets the required nine-vote, two-thirds majority on third and final reading.

61. Last Word: Athens Bound, The Amazon Campaign and All Things Grizz -

This may be the most covered meeting of the Tennessee Historical Commission ever – the meeting Friday in Athens, Tennessee where Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland will attempt to make the case for the commission granting him permission to remove the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest in Health Sciences Park. The chairman of the commission has already told Strickland in writing that the commission will not take up the matter – not even discuss it. Strickland hopes he will at least be heard. And he says the city should have a decision by mid-November and is adamant that this cannot be put off into the new year.

62. Financial Exploitation of Elderly a Crime of Increasing Opportunity -

America’s oldest citizens always have been at risk for financial exploitation and abuse. But as people live longer, the window of opportunity for such crimes widens.

From July 1, 2016, until June 30, 2017, the Tennessee Department of Health Services’ Adult Protective Services division hotline fielded about 20,000 calls from people reporting the abuse, neglect or financial exploitation of an older person. The number to report suspected abuse or exploitation is 1-APS-TENN (1-888-277-8366).

63. Last Word: A Centennial, Corker Controversy Goes Wider and Ranked Choice Votes -

One of the most influential political figures in the city and state in the last half of the 20th century turned 100 years old MondayLewis Donelson, cofounder and senior counsel at Baker Donelson. A direct descendant of Andrew Jackson, the president from Tennessee who made the mold of the modern Democratic Party, Donelson started out, of course, as a Democrat. But by the 1950s was shaping the modern local and state Republican parties.

64. ACA Sales Tax to Impact Businesses, Employees Starting In January 2018 -

With ongoing premium increases small and large businesses and their employees normally experience each year, the added cost of a new sales tax on health insurance premiums that goes into effect on Jan. 1 is expected to hit particularly hard.

65. Monica Wharton Starts New Role As Methodist’s Chief Legal Officer -

When Monica Wharton came to the Glankler Brown law firm, she specialized in employment law. She was good at it.

66. Moral Mondays Organized by Religious Leaders Who Talk of ‘Fragmentation’ -

A group of 25 local religious leaders plan three “Moral Mondays” gatherings over the next six months to discuss social justice issues before the April observances of the 50th anniversary of the sanitation workers strike and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

67. Events -

PizzaRev Taproom will host a “pay-what-you-want” fundraiser benefiting Humane Society of Memphis & Shelby County Wednesday, Sept. 27, from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. at PizzaRev’s new Wolfchase-area location, 2825 N. Germantown Parkway. Guests are invited to pay what they want for their first custom-built, personal-sized pizza, with all proceeds going to the humane society.

68. Graham-Cassidy Bill Withdrawn Amidst Local Protest -

Ahead of an increasingly tentative vote on the latest Republican health care proposal in the U.S. Senate, about 100 critics of the Graham-Cassidy bill rallied Downtown Monday, Sept. 25, to call for U.S. Sens. Bob Corker and Lamar Alexander of Tennessee to vote against the proposal.

69. County Delays Convention Center Funds -

Shelby County commissioners again delayed passage Monday, Sept. 25, of a resolution that would allow the city of Memphis to use surplus hotel-motel tax revenue for Memphis Cook Convention Center renovations.

70. Last Word: Grit & Grind As A Mindset, Sewer Retaliation and MUS & Hutchison -

More than a few bread crumbs on the direction the Fairgrounds redevelopment proposal is … well, developing after the second of three very important public forums last week by City Hall. The signs indicate a water park or surf park is highly unlikely, the gym at Maxine Smith STEAM Academy would go to open up Central Avenue frontage and a new gym built behind Kroc Center, a hotel by the Children’s Museum and the high school football field and track oval move from Central to where Libertyland used to be. And the city says none of this is set in stone even if it does show up on a tentative site plan among the exhibits last week.

71. Commission Again Delays Convention Center Hotel-Motel Tax Flow To City -

Shelby County Commissioners again delayed passage Monday, Sept. 25, of a resolution that allows the city of Memphis to use surplus hotel-motel tax revenue to go toward Memphis Cook Convention Center renovations.

72. Events -

The Greater Memphis Chamber will hold the 2017 Move It Memphis 4-Mile Race Thursday, Sept. 28, at 6:30 p.m. starting and ending at Loflin Yard, 7 W. Carolina Ave. New this year is a Memphis Spirit Contest, a costume contest where runners can show their Memphis spirit and be judged for their creativity. Cost is $30 in advance or $35 on race day. Visit memphischamber.com.

73. Dean: Economic Development More Difficult in Memphis -

It’s a story that former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean tells just about every place in the state he goes in his campaign to be the state’s next governor.

74. Volunteers Needed For Project Homeless Connect -

Community Alliance for the Homeless Inc. is seeking volunteers across Memphis and Shelby County to help during Project Homeless Connect – Memphis, taking place Thursday, Sept. 21, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Memphis Cook Convention Center, 255 N. Main St.

75. Volunteers Needed For Project Homeless Connect -

Community Alliance for the Homeless Inc. is seeking volunteers across Memphis and Shelby County to help during Project Homeless Connect – Memphis, taking place Thursday, Sept. 21, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Memphis Cook Convention Center, 255 N. Main St.

76. Commission Votes Down Health Coverage Change -

Shelby County Commissioners voted down a switch Monday, Aug, 28, of the county’s health insurance administration contract from Cigna to an $11 million, two-year contract with two one-year renewal options with Aetna.

77. County Commission Votes Down Health Coverage Change -

Shelby County Commissioners voted down a switch Monday, Aug, 28, of the county’s health insurance administration contract from Cigna to Aetna in an $11 million two-year contract with two renewals of one year each.

78. A Different Body of Work Emerges For The Hereafter -

With the cost of traditional casket funerals rising to an average of $9,000 or more, many people are choosing less expensive options like cremation and donating their bodies to science. Numerous “green” options for cremated remains such as biodegradable urns or even using ashes for tree planting, use in rebuilding coral reefs, for stones for jewelry or for tattoos and portraits are gaining popularity.

79. Editorial: Memphis Still on Road To Becoming ‘Bike Community’ -

The Shelby County Board of Adjustment this week approved a proposed multifamily development in the Cooper-Young Historic District, a small project by many standards on a 0.4-acre tract near the neighborhood’s namesake, the intersection of Cooper Street and Young Avenue.

80. State Rejects 2nd Request from Baptist Memorial Health Care for Arlington ER -

A state agency has again turned down Baptist Memorial Health Care Corp.’s application to build a free-standing emergency room in Arlington.

81. City Council To Take Up Monument Removal Resolution -

Memphis City Council members will discuss and possibly vote Tuesday, Aug. 22, on a resolution that directs the city to act on the “immediate removal and/or sale of Nathan Bedford Forrest statue from Health Sciences Park and statue of Jefferson Davis and related artifacts from Memphis Park.”

82. Last Word: Night in the Park, Hattiloo Goes Bigger & Cohen on the Republican Soul -

A gathering in Health Science Park a little before 11:30 Monday evening by a group of protesters who Facebooked that their intent was to take down the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest. Memphis Police showed up quickly and the police supervisor told those around the statue that the park is a private park and that no one can be in the park after 8 p.m. No arrests but the police did ask for identification from those in the park.

83. Events -

The annual Elvis Presley candlelight vigil starts Tuesday, Aug. 15, at 8:30 p.m. at the gates of Graceland. After an opening ceremony, fans may walk up the driveway to Elvis’ gravesite and back down, carrying a candle in quiet remembrance. Gates remain open until all who wish to participate in the procession have done so, which usually stretches into the early hours of the next morning. Cost is free. Visit graceland.com/elvisweek/schedule for details and other Elvis Week events.

84. Events -

Talk Shoppe will meet Wednesday, Aug. 16, from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. in NovaCopy’s conference room, 7251 Appling Farms Parkway. Representatives from the University of Tennessee Extension’s Shelby County office will present “Shelby County Extension – Focusing on Families, Fitness, Food & Finances.” Cost is free. Visit talkshoppe.com.

85. Vandiver Growing Customer Relationships at Agritech Firm The Seam -

The Seam, a technology firm founded by agribusiness companies that specializes in commodity trading and management systems, has added Rex Vandiver in a customer development role. Vandiver helps with customer support and project management, and he’s also taking a greater role in involvement with the peanut industry to help The Seam better serve its customers’ needs.

86. Last Word: Primary Care, Weirich On Twitter and Tigers Offense -

Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich has been responding by Twitter for the last two days to the New York Times Magazine article about the Noura Jackson case that went up online earlier this week. Using the hashtag “ProCrimeNYTimes,” Weirich @ShelbyCountyDA -- tweeted Wednesday that the long read is “a blatant effort to create sympathy for the defendant while demonizing prosecutors.”

87. UTHSC’s Dr. David Stern Focusing on a Healthier Tennessee in New Role -

Getting invited to make a presentation at the White House last fall as part of a meeting on drug addiction turned into an epiphany of sorts for Dr. David Stern.

The discussion about substance use disorders and addictions – and how multidisciplinary clinical care can go a long way in addressing those challenges – touched a nerve with Stern. He’s spent the last six years as the Robert J. Kaplan executive dean and vice chancellor for clinical affairs at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, where his work has included recruiting more than 30 nationally recognized chairs and directors.

88. Last Word: Kustoff at Rotary, Royal's Vibe and The Terms of MEMPOWER -

The investment group that renovated the Chisca resurfaced Tuesday evening with a plan for the Wonder Bread factory, vacant for the last four years. But don’t look for a return of the bread smell to the Edge area. And if you look at what has started to happen in that particular corridor since Wonder Bread shut down, the mixed-use plan has some precedent. Throw in the move to sell The Commercial Appeal property just a few blocks away and if the economy remains this good, the transformation in this area could be radical in another four years.

89. HealthChoice Promotes Henning To Director of Population Health -

Sarah Henning has been promoted to director of population health programs at HealthChoice. Henning previously served as manager of the department. In her new role, Henning is responsible for designing, implementing and managing population health and wellness initiatives and programs for the HealthChoice network.
She also collaborates with stakeholders to promote and support these programs and to ensure they meet the needs of the affected populations and adapt with the changing health care environment.

90. Last Word: More Intermodals, 20 Years After the Oilers In Memphis and New Path -

The "skinny" repeal of Obamacare comes up short in the U.S. Senate in an after midnight Friday vote in D.C. And it appears U.S. Senators Bob Corker and Lamar Alexander of Tennessee voted for the repeal measure that came up short. Here are the basics early Friday morning from The New York Times.

91. Boyd Says Luttrell Endorsement is ‘Partnership’ -

Republican contender for Tennessee governor Randy Boyd says his endorsement this week by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell is more like a partnership.

92. Last Word: No Assumptions, Riverfront Concepts and A Tale of Two Teams -

The “Midtown is Memphis” arch in Overton Square is no more. Vanished this week as the former Chiwawa is being converted to Indian Pass Raw Bar – for those of you new to Memphis, these are both restaurants – one former and the other future.

93. Dean Touts ‘Middle Of the Road’ Focus For Democrats -

Former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean is making exactly the same observation in his bid for the Democratic nomination for Tennessee governor that Republicans are making on their side of the 2018 race.

94. Events -

A NASA Contracting Outreach Forum will be held Tuesday, July 18, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. in Southwest Tennessee Community College’s Nursing, Natural Sciences and Biotechnology Building, 675 Union Ave. Representatives from NASA’s Johnson Space Center, Marshall Space Flight Center and Shared Service Center will share how local and regional business owners can become NASA suppliers, subcontractors or service providers. Cost is free; registration required. Register at tsbdc.org/swtcc or call 901-333-5085 for details.

95. Legislature Losing Some Powerful, Familiar Members -

A shakeup in leadership is looming for the state Legislature, though it may portend more of a change in personalities than party strength.

In the House, longtime Rep. Craig Fitzhugh, the affable Democrat from Ripley in West Tennessee, is preparing for a 2018 gubernatorial run, a move that would knock him out of his House seat, at least temporarily, and the position as Democratic Caucus leader.

96. County Commission Leans Back to $4.13 Tax Rate -

Shelby County Commissioners took a step Wednesday, July 12, toward taking back a 3-cent cut in the county property tax rate.

And in the budget committee session, commissioners favoring the tax cut to a $4.10 tax rate said they would reopen this week’s contentious budget debate if the $4.13 tax rate appears to have traction when the full commission meets Monday, July 17.

97. Commission Goes Back to $4.13 County Property Tax Rate -

Shelby County Commissioners took a step Wednesday, July 12, toward taking back a three-cent cut in the county property tax rate.

And in the budget committee session, commissioners favoring the tax cut to a $4.10 tax rate said they would reopen this week’s contentious budget debate if the $4.13 tax rate appears to have traction when the full commission meets Monday, July 17.

98. Stern Working to Expand UTHSC’s Community Reach -

When the University of Tennessee Health Science Center launched its Center for Addiction Science in the College of Medicine last year, it represented an ambitious bid by the school to help people beat a variety of addictions and to research the causes of substance abuse.

99. Last Word: Corporate Musical Chairs, Another Dollar General and Ronnie Grisanti -

The three-way deal by which Memphis-based Fred’s was to buy hundreds of Rite-Aid stores from Walgreens just keeps getting worse for Fred’s even though the deal happened last week without Fred’s. An analyst says Fred’s got cut out because of questions about the corporation’s viability to enter into what is an ambitious change of course for the company on a large scale.

100. Last Word: Harold Ford Jr. on Change, Tourism Turns a Corner and Sim at UTHSC -

Very different outlooks along party lines still in our delegation to Washington over the Senate’s version of Trumpcare.

On the day the Congressional Budget Office estimated the proposal would end health insurance coverage for 22 million Americans, Republican U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander’s reaction: