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Editorial Results (free)

1. New Type of Subdivision to Replace Foote Homes -

Memphis’ last traditional public housing complex is coming down and a new kind of subdivision will rise in its place.

The Land Use Control Board formally accepted the site plan for the South City development at its Thursday, Sept. 8, meeting. With the help of a $30 million federal Choice Neighborhoods grant, the Memphis Housing Authority plans to raze the 420 units of Foote Homes that date back to the 1940s to make way for Memphis’ first sustainable subdivision.

2. Enoble Business Capital Offices Sell in Foreclosure -

813 Ridge Lake Blvd.

Memphis, TN 38120

Sale Amount: $9.6 million

Sale Date: Aug. 31, 2016

Buyer: Merchants Capital Real Estate LLC

3. Bike Share Attractive for Developers, Tenants -

On both sides of the spectrum, real estate developers and tenants are attracted to bike share because proximity to the rental bikes makes areas attractive.

Developer Billy Orgel said he’s interested in securing a bike station to serve the four residential buildings, office users and 358-space parking garage at his planned Brewery District Downtown.

4. Last Word: $60 Million, Frozen Graceland and Wreck It Ralph's Return -

The federal government’s problem with a law the Tennessee Legislature passed earlier this year is serious -- $60-million serious.

And Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam, in Hickory Hill Thursday, said he’s working on a compromise that would have the Legislature undo what it did this year when the new legislative session begins in January.

5. Yellen, in Speech Friday, Could Send Signal About Next Hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The job market is humming, and so are the U.S. financial markets, with major stock indexes near record highs.

All that would normally trigger a green light for the Federal Reserve to raise interest rates – especially when they're barely above all-time lows. Yet the Fed, still casting a wary eye on the economy, has yet to signal that it will resume raising rates soon.

6. US Homebuilder Sentiment Rises in August as Sales Improve -

U.S. homebuilders are feeling more optimistic about the housing market this month, reflecting strong growth in new-home sales and prices.

The National Association of Home Builders/Wells Fargo builder sentiment index released Monday rose two points to 60 following a downwardly revised reading of 58 in July.

7. Collaboration Among Accelerators Hailed as Ultimate Startup Move -

Last year’s Demo Day marked the first time that the city’s primary entrepreneurship partners, Start Co. and Memphis Bioworks, combined their separate efforts into one event. This year soared past previous collaborative efforts, with seven different accelerators and three partners participating in Demo Day, the culminating pitch event for Memphis-based companies seeking the next stage of investment.

8. 5 Tips to Bounce Back After a Foreclosure or Short Sale -

Philip and Denise Powell lost their home in 2011 after Philip's hours as a pastor were cut in half and Denise was sidelined by a surgery. But they were determined to become homeowners again, so they rolled up their sleeves and got to work.

9. Crosstown Concourse Spawns New Memphis Brewery -

Crosstown Concourse’s latest tenant is a brewery. Crosstown Brewing Co., a newcomer to Memphis’ craft brew scene, will move into a newly constructed building on the west side of Crosstown Concourse.

10. First Tennessee Consolidating Real Estate -

First Tennessee Bank is renovating and restructuring three of its Memphis properties in a project totaling upwards of $62 million.

11. Red State, Blue Mayors -

Nashville Mayor Megan Barry, a Democrat in Tennessee’s sea of red, finds herself adapting to the control Republicans hold over the state Legislature.

12. Pinnacle Financial to Anchor Boyle’s Building -

Pinnacle Financial Partners will be an anchor tenant in Boyle Investment Co.’s long-awaited office building in Ridgeway Center.

13. Pinnacle Financial Anchor Tenant in Boyle's New Office Building -

Pinnacle Financial Partners will be an anchor tenant in Boyle Investment Co.’s long-awaited office building in Ridgeway Center.

14. Business Formed to Finish Germantown’s Enclave -

Builder-developers John Duke, Mike Murphy, Chip Tayloe and Frank Uhlhorn, along with developer Dan Turley, formed a joint venture business to finish out The Enclave, a luxury estate home infill project they saved in Germantown after it had stalled during the Great Recession.

15. Land Bridge Project Could Transform Entire University of Memphis Area -

The official planning phase has begun for the much anticipated $33 million University of Memphis land bridge, which will safely connect two sides of the university that are currently split by the Norfolk Southern railroad tracks and Southern Avenue.

16. Boyle Completing Key Quadrant At Schilling Farms, Eyeing More Retail -

Boyle Investment Co. is wrapping up construction on a critical corner of Schilling Farms that will bring more retail and encourage more office users to consider the development. The three adjacent projects fill in the southern quadrant of Schilling Boulevard and Winchester Road, a small part of the sprawling 443-acre, city-within-a-city in Collierville.

17. Last Word: Regrouping, Freedom Awards and The View From Another Bridge -

It will be a year come Sunday – a year since Darrius Stewart, a passenger in a car pulled over by Memphis Police in Hickory Hill was shot and killed by Officer Conner Schilling.

18. Loeb Looking to Build Homes Near University of Memphis -

Loeb Properties has a piece of University of Memphis-area land under contract for purchase and the eventual construction of single-family homes.

The vacant land faces Ellsworth Street between Midland and Central avenues and was intended for townhomes as part of the Highland Row project.

19. Symbols of War Keep Dragging Us Down -

More than 150 years ago, we fought our nation’s most bloody war, a conflagration that claimed 620,000 lives, almost as many as were killed in all other American war efforts combined.

Despite the horror of it all, we just can’t seem to learn a lesson, possibly because of Southern hardheadedness, and a century and a half later, we seem doomed to an eternal task: pushing Sisyphus’ rock to the top of a hill only to have it chase us back to the bottom.

20. South End Gets a $15 Million Apartment Complex -

250 E. G.E. Patterson Ave.
Memphis, TN 38126

Permit Amount: $14.6 million

Owner: Elmington Capital Group

21. Pinch District to Move in a New Direction: Up -

The Pinch District is getting a sky-high development treatment. For decades, the north Downtown neighborhood has been known as a sea of parking lots punctuated by a handful of small businesses.

With St. Jude Children's Research Hospital announcing $1 billion in new construction, the Pinch's largest tenant is opening up its campus with new buildings, some as tall as 12 stories, in the greater Pinch neighborhood. A neighborhood-level presence is a sea change for the institution, which has grown to 2.5 million square feet behind a gated campus.

22. Last Word: Budget No Go, Largest Home Sale of 2016 and Crosstown Moves -

The Shelby County Commission probably has enough votes to approve the funding in the county budget the Shelby County Schools system wants, which includes $24.7 million on new funding.

Yet after about four hours of discussion, the commission didn’t take votes on any budget resolutions or the county property tax rate resolution Monday.

23. Believe It or Not -

Long before Jim Strickland was mayor of Memphis, he was a thirtysomething lawyer and sports fan. Not always in that order. He loved the University of Memphis – his alma mater – and rooted like crazy for the basketball team. And on those less frequent occasions when there was a reason to believe, for the football team, too.

24. Last Word: Back On, EDGE and Diversity and Jungle Room Sessions -

Are your lights on yet? How is your air conditioning? First came the rain Wednesday night and then came the power outages that stretched into Thursday.

So the last Twitter update from Memphis Light Gas and Water at 8 p.m. Thursday shows 248 outages in the MLGW service area with 2,746 customers still in the dark and the worst heat of the year so far. Those numbers translate to 95 percent of the customers impacted having their power restored Thursday evening.

25. Young Brings Data Focus to City Planning -

Want to gaze into the future? Hop into Paul Young’s Infiniti and ride around Downtown for an hour. “These three blocks will be something of a spine for the neighborhood,” he says, as a light rain falls on the windshield. “We envision five- or six-story buildings with restaurants and retail at street level, commercial and residential up top.”

26. Last Word: Verdell Smith and Lifeline, Strickland's First 5 Months and Tennessine -

Lots of blue lights in Cordova Thursday evening as the Memphis Police Department remembers Officer Verdell Smith, who died in Saturday’s Downtown rampage in the line of duty. His funeral is Friday.

27. Haves, Have-Nots Get Varied Tax Relief -

Amid the rancor of bathroom and counseling bills, two major pieces of legislation slipped through the General Assembly this session with hardly a peep – elimination of the Hall tax and a partial revitalization of property tax relief for seniors and disabled veterans.

28. More Student Housing For University District -

3557 Mynders Ave. 
Memphis, TN 38111
Permit Amount: $15.5 million

Completion: Fall 2017
Owner: 908 Group
Tenant: The Nine
Architect: BDG Architects
Details: A student housing tower near the University of Memphis has taken a step forward nearly two years after a development on that site was first announced.

29. Impact of Low Housing Inventory Spreads to Home-Staging Business -

The low inventory of single-family homes means prices are higher and homes are selling quicker, but also that fewer people are dressing up their homes to make them more attractive to potential buyers in the market.

30. Lakeland to Build $13.7M Middle School -

The city of Lakeland is moving forward with a new middle school. The Lakeland School System recently applied for a $13.7 million building permit for a new 111,172-square-foot building at 5020 Lions Crest Drive.

31. Retail, Amenities Embellish Highland Row Development -

Highland Row, a mixed-use development sprawling across an entire block in the University of Memphis area, will see its first residents this summer.

Construction began in February on the three-building project located along Highland Street between Midland and Eastland avenues.

32. Collierville Breaks Ground On $93.5M High School -

11605 E. Shelby Drive
Collierville, TN 38017

Project Cost: $93.5 million

Completion: August 2018

33. Collierville to Break Ground For New High School -

Collierville leaders will break ground May 13 for the new Collierville High School.

The $93.5 million project is being built on 150 acres of land at 11605 E. Shelby Drive, near the street’s intersection with Sycamore Road, and it’s scheduled to open in August 2018.

34. Re-Evaluate Your Cash Strategy -

Ray’s take: When it comes to a cash reserve, the standard advice is three to six months of expenses. Do you think that’s enough? It might not be.

Emergency funds are no longer one-size-fits-all.

35. Ikea: 'Everything's on Track' for New Memphis Store -

A construction crew of nearly 500 is at work turning what is now a steel frame into Tennessee’s first Ikea store. This week, the crew began installing Ikea’s trademark cobalt-blue walls on the western edge of what will be a self-serve warehouse.

36. Finding a Compromise on the Greensward Issue -

The current debate over the Memphis Zoo’s use of the Greensward for overflow parking is more complex than most realize. Opponents of this usage try to paint a very compelling picture of the Zoo as a massive, profit-driven enterprise which came into Overton Park like an invasive species and has recklessly expanded, gobbling up park land and taking it away from the citizens.

37. Mid-South Mayors Don’t See Barriers In Regionalism -

It took the Mississippi River’s devastating flood in 2011 for Mid-South leaders to consider greater collaboration among the area’s 10 counties and three states.

Mid-South mayors came together to plot their way out of disaster, and that convening set the stage for a formal alliance, the Mid-South Mayors’ Council.

38. Middle Tennessee construction can’t meet demand -

When it comes to residential real estate around Middle Tennessee, there are plenty of buyers but not nearly enough sellers, says Heather Benjamin with Reliant Realty’s Benjamin McConnell Group. And new construction just can’t keep up with the demand.

39. Lot Availability, Prices Putting Home Construction Behind Demand -

The recent uptick in the residential real estate market is devouring what’s left of lot development that lagged during the recession, and tight supply is raising home prices in the Memphis area.

40. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

41. Moving Dirt -

The Memphis development community is looking inward and upward to increase density in the urban core. New construction is happening across all four commercial real estate sectors, with long-anticipated projects like Trader Joe’s and the redevelopment of Central Station finally coming to fruition. Construction and operating costs continue to be a challenge as new projects hit the top of their class to command higher rents.

42. Lake District Would Put Lakeland on the Map -

Before Lakeland became a city, it was the Lakeland Amusement Park. A California-based developer is bringing back that original flair with his proposal for The Lake District, a 165-acre mixed-use development.

43. Cleaning House -

Every neighborhood in Memphis and Shelby County has the right to be free from the negative effects of vacant, abandoned and blighted properties. That’s the battle cry of the Memphis Blight Elimination Charter, a 23-page pledge that will steer policy and programs dedicated to blight eradication.

44. Last Word: D-Day, Opera Festival Returns and Buying GMF After the Bond Default -

This is what you might call D-Day in Nashville. The “D’ in this case stands for deannexation.
The bill to permit deannexation by referendum has in the course of two weeks become the city’s dominant political issue.

45. Careful What You’re Being Sold -

ZOO DOO IS BACK. In the early ’90s, an enterprise started in Memphis to market recycled zoo dung – talk about organic – called the Zoo Doo Compost Co. A pungent and powerful fertilizer, raw product supplied seven days a week, a clever name, a great promotional headline, “Gardeners Love This Crap.”

46. Dyer Farmer John Butler to Lead Agricenter -

John R. Butler has been selected as the new president of Agricenter International, officially beginning his position on July 1 of this year. Butler, a fifth-generation farmer who also held various management roles at Cargill, Inc., will succeed retiring president John Charles Wilson.

47. Allen & Hoshall’s Legacy Spans Memphis -

To an outside observer, the building process might seem segmented with planning, architecture, engineering and consulting firms all providing necessary aspects to the finished project.

Allen & Hoshall tries to simplify the process with its comprehensive offering of all those services and more. Whether it’s mechanical or plumbing engineering for a building project or wastewater system engineering for a utility project, land surveying or construction management, Allen & Hoshall covers the gamut.

48. Death of The Cover Letter -

Have you heard the rumor? Everything important about your career is listed within the pages of your resume. Why would you possibly want to waste your time putting together a cover letter these days?
Applying online is easy. All you need to do is upload your resume and click submit. If you’re qualified, the company will call you. Right?

49. Poplar Opens Up -

The prized retail stretch of Poplar Avenue between Perkins Road and Interstate 240 is shaking up in a way the area hasn’t seen in several decades. Within the next two years, more than 230,000 square feet will be made available in what has historically been a tight trade area.

50. Last Word: Presidential Distractions, Dude Perfect and The Kirby Farm House -

When it comes to political surprises, the presidential contenders may be the next group on the ballot locally. But they need to up their game if they are going to hold the attention of Memphis voters.
With three of the Republican contenders on their way to Shelby County this weekend and probably more making plans, the attention Tuesday shifted dramatically to the open 8th District Congressional seat that isn’t on the ballot until the August primaries.

51. Downtown Hotel Pipeline May Deter Larger Developer -

The proliferation of limited-size Downtown hotels could make the area less attractive for the 500-room, full-service hotel Downtown desperately needs.

That was board member Rob Norcross’ warning at the Feb. 11 meeting of the Land Use Control Board. And the Memphis Convention & Visitors Bureau agrees that small hotels pose a risk.

52. Last Word: Love and Glory and Guitars, New Frost and Scalia's Passing -

To each his or her own on Valentine’s Day observances Sunday that become Valentine’s Day memories with the arrival of Monday.

The Majestic Grille, for instance, had the movies Roman Holiday and Casablanca back to back on the screen of the movie theater turned restaurant.
No sound, but you really don’t need sound for the scene where Audrey Hepburn takes the throne with Gregory Peck and a beatnik Eddie Albert among the press corps at the rope line.
And The Majestic saved The Second Line in Overton Square with a loaner of some champagne after Second Line ran a bit short.
Chef Kelly English thanked the Majestic via Twitter for “saving our sweet Valentine’s Day asses.”

53. Last Word: The First Surrogate, Parkside at Shelby Farms and Manilow Memories -

Here they come, fresh from Iowa and New Hampshire – first the surrogates and in the next two weeks the Presidential contenders themselves.

The nation’s “first surrogate” – former President Bill Clinton is at Whitehaven High School Thursday evening to rally early voters in the heart of a large reliably Democratic middle class community.
And it is that voter base that was integral to Barack Obama carrying Shelby County in the 2008 Democratic Presidential primary even as Hillary Clinton carried the state that year.
As mentioned here Tuesday, the local Bernie Sanders campaign opens its Memphis HQ over the weekend.
Hillary Clinton headquarters in Memphis and Nashville are on the way soon with the Nashville HQ opening Thursday as the former President is in Whitehaven and the candidate is preparing for another television debate Thursday in Milwaukee with Sanders.
And early voting opened Downtown Wednesday.
The first day's turnout Wednesday was 177 early and absentee voters. Combined with another 645 absentee votes cast before the early voting period, that makes 822 early or absentee votes.
Another Republican contender on the ballot in Tennessee is out of the race. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie dropped out the day after his dismal finish in New Hampshire. He did not have a slate of delegates on the ballot here.

54. Shelby County Home Sales Slow in January -

After closing out 2015 on a high note, Shelby County home sales are off to a slow start this year.

The 971 home sales recorded in January marked a 28.9 percent drop from the 1,366 sales in December, according to real estate information company Chandler Reports.

55. U of M Notebook: Wins, Attendance Not Created Equally -

Despite all the hue and cry about lousy attendance at FedExForum – and the concerns are justified because both announced attendance and actual people in the seats are on the decline – the Tigers still lead the American Athletic Conference with an average (announced) attendance of 11,534.

56. Four Beale Street Proposals Feature Different Backgrounds -

Jeff Sanford fielded inquiries from 17 or 18 companies, local and out of town, expressing some level of interest in the contract to manage the Beale Street entertainment district.

57. Homewood Suites Proposed For Vance Area of South Main -

A six-story Homewood Suites hotel is the latest new development proposed in the South Main Historic District.

The application to the Land Use Control Board for the hotel at 139 Vance Ave., between Mulberry and Second streets, is from NPH Investments on a lot owned by Henry and Cheri Rudner. The proposed site sits two blocks north of the National Civil Rights Museum and three blocks south of FedExForum.

58. Council OKs Strickland's Directors, He Defends Pay Raises -

Memphis City Council members approved Mayor Jim Strickland’s slate of 12 division chiefs and directors Tuesday, Jan. 5, at the first council meeting of 2016. And Strickland defended the pay raises for some of those positions compared to the salaries those appointed positions paid in the Wharton administration.

59. Midway Point -

A quality, affordable neighborhood for low- to moderate-income Memphians. That’s developer Henry Turley’s ongoing vision for Uptown, a North Memphis neighborhood benefiting from $150 million in redevelopment efforts.

60. To Combat Lot Shortage, Developers Take on Small Subdivisions -

With landlocked urban areas and a dwindling supply of vacant lots, developers are looking to increase Memphis’ density one house at a time with single-family residential infill projects.

“The problem in Memphis is that the cost of lots with a house on it, in the most desirable areas of Memphis are extremely high,” said Keith Allen, principal of Keith Allen Homes and president of the West Tennessee Home Builders Association.

61. Downtown Agency Looks to Tighten Up Hotel Tax Breaks -

To keep tourists flowing to Downtown, the Center City Revenue Finance Corp. grants tax breaks, or payment-in-lieu-of-tax incentives, for hotel developers. Such readily available incentives have helped create a market with 15 hotels and 3,000 rooms in Downtown Memphis.

62. US Homebuilder Sentiment Slips in December -

U.S. homebuilders are feeling slightly less confident about their sales prospects in coming months, though they remain positive overall that the housing market will continue to improve next year.

The National Association of Home Builders/Wells Fargo builder sentiment index released Tuesday slipped to 61 this month, down one point from a reading of 62 in November.

63. Forest Hill Heights Plan Seeks Community Follow-Up -

Development and government leaders are in the process of crafting a broad development plan for Forest Hill Heights, an area located at the southwest corner of Forest Hill-Irene and Winchester roads.

64. Interstate Numbers Fuel Mississippi Economic Development -

Highway, routes and interstates can be a numbers game when they show up on maps.

And it is common for the same stretch of road to have several numbers and designations.

But in October, the part of U.S. 78 between New Albany, Miss., and the Alabama state line became Interstate 22.

65. Forest Hill Heights Plan Seeks Community Follow-Up -

Development and government leaders are in the process of crafting a broad development plan for Forest Hill Heights, an area located at the southwest corner of Forest Hill-Irene and Winchester roads.

66. Memphis, North Mississippi Competition Raises Questions -

When leaders of the city-county Economic Development Growth Engine didn’t grant developers a $24 million tax abatement to build an industrial park on the site of the former Mall of Memphis, some saw it as more kindling for competition between the industrial markets of North Mississippi and Southeast Shelby County.

67. Editorial: Neighborhoods are the Battleground in Grocery Wars -

The development of grocery clusters in Germantown and Midtown raises some important questions about supermarkets in other parts of the city.

If these clusters of retailers, each aimed at different segments of a larger, overlapping market, are the reality of a supermarket business that was dominated by one chain not too long ago, how will Memphis’ food deserts be affected?

68. Belz Finds Compromise on Deal-Breaking Midtown Gate -

Memphis City Council members worked out a compromise Tuesday, Dec. 1, over a controversial plan by Belz Investco to close Idlewild Street south of Union and install a metal gate across the roadway.

69. Events -

Downtown Memphis Commission Design Review Board will meet Wednesday, Dec. 2, at 4 p.m. in the Downtown Memphis Commission conference room, 114 N. Main St. Visit downtownmemphiscommission.com.

70. Events -

Kiwanis Club of Memphis will meet Wednesday, Dec. 2, from noon to 1 p.m. at The University Club of Memphis, 1346 Central Ave. Chef Jennifer McCullough (Chef Jenn) will speak. Lunch fee is $20. RSVP to bethhaag@comcast.net.

71. City Council to Vote on Idlewild Gate, Water Rate Hike -

A gate across Idlewild Street between two competing supermarket projects in Midtown tops the Memphis City Council’s next-to-last meeting of the year.

The council is to vote Tuesday, Dec. 1, on a resolution that would close Idlewild south of Union Avenue to vehicular traffic and install a gate. The reason, according to the resolution, is to prevent motorists coming from Union Avenue and the two developments from cutting through the residential area.

72. Events -

Lifeblood will host its third annual “Bears for Le Bonheur” holiday donation program Tuesday, Dec. 1, through Dec. 15 at any donor center or mobile blood drive. For each donor that gives blood or platelets, Lifeblood will donate a stuffed bear to a Le Bonheur patient. Visit lifeblood.org or call 800-LIFEBLOOD for details and to schedule an appointment.

73. Events -

Holiday Fun in Cooper Young, hosted by the Cooper Young Business Association, will be held Thursday, Dec. 3, from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Businesses will light up their windows and outdoor displays for the annual “Unwrapped” contest; the Peabody School Choir (5:30 to 6) and Memphis Men of Harmony (6 to 6:30) will perform in the gazebo. Call 901-276-7222.

74. Branching Out -

The building going up at 2504 Poplar Ave., where a construction crew has been making steady progress since Iberiabank filed a $750,000 building permit for it back in April, represents something a bit unusual.

75. Business-Nonprofit Partnerships Crucial to Transforming Communities -

Whether in Memphis, Nashville or metro Denver, there are success stories. Businesses and nonprofits coming together not just to create jobs, but to forge life-changing opportunities that turn out to be positive for everyone involved.

76. The Week Ahead: Nov. 9, 2015 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from revenge on the Warriors to crime reduction through urban planning…

It’s still election season in 70 percent of the city, which sounds like a weather forecast – part warning and part advisory.
But the seven-day outlook calls for an increased chance of political engagement this week. Early voting in the set of five Memphis City Council runoff races continues this week at eight satellite locations as well as the Downtown site, 157 Poplar Ave.
The runoff elections in council districts 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7 will determine the identity of a council that will have at least six, possibly seven new members. Super District council members Philip Spinosa and Martavius Jones, the two confirmed new faces on the council, were elected outright on Oct. 8.

77. Design Board Approves New Peabody Place Facade -

The Downtown Memphis Commission’s Design Review Board approved a multitude of Downtown projects Wednesday, Nov. 4, including new Peabody Place Tower signage and Central Station plans that include an outdoor Malco movie screen.

78. Summit Distribution Center Sells for $21.6 Million -

5155 U.S. 78
Memphis, TN 38118

Sale Amount: $21.6 million

Sale Date: Oct. 21, 2015

Buyer: Summit I Distribution Center LLC

79. Lakeland Buys 94 Acres For New Middle School -

The Lakeland School System paid $1 million to purchase 94 acres, where it will build a new middle school expected to open in August 2018.

The school system’s leaders purchased the land Friday, Oct. 23. The site is north of U.S. 70, east of Canada Road and south of Old Brownsville Road.

80. Central Station Design Plans Come Into Clearer Focus -

A six-screen movie theater and nine multistoried apartment buildings with a total of about 200 units are among the updates in the recently submitted plan for the redevelopment of Central Station.

In its application to the Design Review Board, an affiliate board of the Downtown Memphis Commission, developers submitted their $55 million proposal to turn the Downtown train station into a vibrant mixed-use campus.

81. State Systems Inc. Buys New HQ -

One of the Economic Development Growth Engine’s latest payment-in-lieu-of-taxes recipients is expanding its market footprint and real estate holdings with the recent purchase of seven Memphis properties.

82. Lakeland Buys 94 Acres For New Middle School -

The Lakeland School System paid $1 million to purchase 94 acres, where it will build a new middle school expected to open in August 2018.

The school system’s leaders purchased the land Friday, Oct. 23. The site is north of U.S. 70, east of Canada Road and south of Old Brownsville Road.

83. Binghampton, Uptown Grocery Projects Win Tax Breaks -

Two community development groups are the first recipients of Community Builder PILOTS, a payment-in-lieu-of-taxes incentive housed at the Memphis-Shelby County Economic Development Growth Engine.

Binghampton and Uptown are both USDA-Certified Food Deserts, and that could change with Community Builder PILOT incentives intended to attract grocery stores.

84. Developer Long on Downtown Memphis, Short on Specifics -

Three Downtown properties are now owned by an Atlanta-based affiliate of an Australian real estate investment and development company, which is giving little in the way of clues about its Memphis plans.

85. Delayed Midtown Kroger Details Unveiled -

With completion of the Union Avenue store now 18 months past initial projections, Kroger Delta Division officials say that the store is on track and “not anywhere near your standard Kroger.”

86. City Council Approves Hotel-Retail Development Near Shelby Show Place Arena -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, Oct. 20, plans to develop one of the few open parcels of land along Germantown Parkway as either a hotel with retail or two retail strips.

The Germantown Market planned development by the Debra Loskovitz Spousal Trust is on the east side of Germantown Parkway, south of Timber Creek Drive next to the Shelby Show Place Arena.

87. Dunavant Touts Direct Sales -

Woodson Dunavant and Don Lake are used to the question now that Dunavant Enterprises is through its non-compete with Dreyfus Commodities, the company that bought its global cotton operation in 2010.

88. Curb Market Set to Open In Midtown -

A new market for locally sourced meat and produce, which brings a sense of heritage to its name and operation, is set to arrive in Midtown before the end of the year.

The Midtown Easy-Way location at 596 S. Cooper St. will soon reopen as The Curb Market, part of Memphis businessman Peter Schutt’s plan to add to the area’s growing nexus of locally produced, healthy food businesses.

89. Long-Awaited Artesian Opens on Riverside -

Despite being unfinished and empty for six years, the 16-story building at the corner of Riverside and Channel 3 drives has remained a landmark in the Downtown skyline.

And finally, the lights are coming on.

90. Tennessee Creates $8M Fund to Promote Rural Development -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The state Economic and Community Development Department is creating an $8 million program aimed at promoting projects in rural Tennessee.

The initial $6 million is designated for "shovel-ready" economic development sites, and another $1 million in grants will be available to enhance tourism projects.

91. Collierville Sites Being Groomed to Attract Industrial Development -

Cartwright Farms in the Collierville Commerce Center is a 165-acre lot well positioned for new industrial activity.

It has the infrastructure and utilities capability. It is served by U.S. 72, which just underwent a $20 million five-lane expansion. It’s shovel-ready. It’s one of the largest pieces of Collierville’s 500 acres zoned industrial. All it needs is a little statewide attention.

92. Vet Clinic Proposed For Binghampton Corner -

A new veterinary clinic at the northwest corner of Sam Cooper Boulevard and Tillman Street will keep the lights on 24/7 and hopefully direct activity to Memphis’ less-trafficked Binghampton core.

93. Editorial: Connect Cooper-Young to Keep Midtown Momentum Going -

If you went to the Cooper-Young Festival a decade ago and compared it to what you saw this year, you would notice a difference.

And it would be more than just the size of the crowd.

You’d see different businesses, a different mix of restaurants and retail – and those would be just the immediately apparent changes.

94. Craving Cooper-Young -

If a neighborhood can be said to possess whatever the real estate equivalent is of that new car smell – a sense that there’s something new here to enjoy, of possibilities, of happy things to come – Cooper-Young would seem to have that, in spades.

95. Collierville Goes to Market on School Bonds -

Collierville went to market last week to sell the bonds that will finance construction of a new $90 million Collierville High School.

The town locked in a 3.3 percent interest rate on the $111.8 million in general obligation bonds.

96. First Tennessee Again Eyes Sale Of Downtown HQ Building -

One of Memphis’ tallest buildings could come under new ownership as First Tennessee Bank looks to sell its Downtown tower at 165 Madison Ave.

97. Mid-South Farm Tourism Harvests Big Autumn Business -

Deciding to start a business that is focused on carving paths through a field of corn might not seem like a sound post-college plan.

But Justin Taylor and friend Chris Taylor weren’t thinking long term when they started what is today known as the Mid-South Maze at Agricenter International. It was 2001, and the pair had a friend who owned land in Arkansas, a few miles outside of Downtown Memphis. That April, at the last moment possible to plant and be ready for a corn maze that fall, the two took the plunge just to see what would happen.

98. Highland Row Developer Seeks Permit for Parking Garage -

Highland Row
Parking Garage
Permit Amount: $5 million

Application Date: September 2015
Completion: Late summer 2016
Owner: Poag Shopping Centers LLC
Architect: Looney Ricks Kiss
Contractor: Milhaus Development LLC
Details: Indianapolis-based developer Milhaus Development LLC and Memphis-based Poag Shopping Centers LLC have pulled a $5 million building permit as they continue developing the new Highland Row urban infill development.

99. Memphis Multifamily Action Gets Second-Quarter Boost -

Multifamily fundamentals were strong for the second quarter of 2015 as Downtown and Collierville continued to perform well in their new-construction booms.

New construction is ahead compared to second quarter 2014, with 567 units coming online in the Memphis metro area compared to 466 units last year, according to CBRE Memphis’ Multifamily MarketView. By year-end, construction will total 1,280 units.

100. Karlen Evins Finds Her ‘Most Authentic Self’ in Farming -

A diminutive Karlen Evins walks from her vegetable garden to the reassembled church in which she lives, her arms full of just-picked corn, tomatoes, herbs and okra, and drops them on her kitchen counter.