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Editorial Results (free)

1. Workforce Effort Leaders Talk About Skills Gap -

Before Olympus Corp. announced last month its plan to locate a service and distribution center in Bartlett, a bigger medical device manufacturing company was on the hook for the town.

2. Artspace Pushes Back Groundbreaking -

The South Main Artspace Lofts are in the final stretch of fundraising with $80,000 left to close the gap on the $12.9 million project.

At a town hall meeting held earlier this month, the Artspace developers presented adjusted timelines for the affordable housing development. If Artspace meets its goal, construction could start in early May with move-in by May 2017. Previous timelines put groundbreaking at early February.

3. Editorial | Help Wanted: Top Cop With View Beyond the Ranks -

Finding the city’s next top cop is the most important police director selection in a generation.

And we believe the next Memphis Police Department director must be more than a leader of the ranks.

4. New Brass -

Just days before Toney Armstrong was off the city payroll, his successor as interim director of the Memphis Police Department, Michael Rallings, was getting used to the attention and ring kissing that comes with being the city’s top cop.

5. Mike Norvell Era Starts with Optimism And a Raise-the-Bar Recruiting Class -

In a few minutes, first-year coach Mike Norvell would be standing behind a lectern providing assembled media a summary of his first recruiting class at the University of Memphis.

“Not a good class,” he would say, “a great class, a home-run-hitting class.”

6. Midtown Memphis Ready for Apartment Building Boom -

It’s been more than a decade since new apartments were built in Midtown, and that’s poised to change in a big way with a wave of new multifamily construction stretching from Binghampton to Crosstown.

7. New Mental Health Court Aims for Intervention -

At any given time, around 525 of the people jailed at 201 Poplar have a persistent mental illness. That’s means 25 percent of the jail’s capacity, and exponential care and liability, are directed to people who commit crimes as a byproduct of illness.

8. The Week Ahead: Feb. 1, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? The good news is you officially made it through January. Here’s a look at what’s happening this week, from a frigid swim to a FedExForum double-header…

9. The Death of ‘Digital’ Marketing -

Editor’s Note: This column is the final in an 11-part series on the Top Ten 2016 Marketing Trends. Search memphisdailynews.com for the remainder of the series.

10. RDC Leader: Pyramid Isn’t Translating to Tourism Elsewhere -

Toward the back of its proposal for Mud Island River Park, executives with The Mansion Entertainment and Media LLC included a few caveats for those judging the five redevelopment applications.

11. Last Word: The Big Fizzle, John Jay Hooker's Exit And "A Great Sports Town" -

Everybody talks about the weather but nobody does anything about it – isn’t that how the saying goes?
In our case, it might be better to say everybody talks about the television weather coverage but nobody does anything about it.
As we all know now, Memphis dodged the “blizzard” warning artfully and passive-aggressively teased by several television stations who shall go un-named here because they know who they are and you do too.
That’s because they spent much of the day of "the blizzard that wasn’t" whining about the reaction from viewers who complained about the hype and then the promos the stations ran the day of the big fizzle.
We didn’t get much in the way of snow in Memphis, but we got a couple of feet of hype.

12. Impatient Clemmons Anxious for Minority Voice to Be Heard -

Democratic state Rep. John Ray Clemmons is only halfway through his first two-year term representing District 55 in Nashville. But he’s not willing to wait years to speak out or push for change.

13. Tennessee Startups Chasing Greater Opportunities -

When it comes to launching startup companies, Tennessee is best described as “early stage.”

The less than $200 million in venture capital invested in Tennessee businesses in 2014 is a rounding error compared to the $30 billion invested in California. And when the final tally for 2015 comes out later this month, the disparity won’t be much smaller.

14. Stubby and Bo Know First Big-League Hit Is Forever -

They will always remember the first one because in baseball, there is no charity.

June 22, 2001, the St. Louis Cardinals are losing 10-5 to the San Francisco Giants when Stubby Clapp, back-flipping hero to Memphis Redbirds fans, leads off the bottom of the ninth inning as a pinch-hitter.

15. Memphis Council Approves Recycling Cart Loan Effort -

The city of Memphis could close the gap in outfitting its households with new and larger recycling carts if a no-interest loan comes through.

The Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, Jan. 5, the plan by the Public Works division to pursue the $5.2 million loan that would allow the city to buy 105,000 recycling carts.

16. SEC Still Overrated? Wrap Your Head Around SEC West, Says Bielema -

That an Arkansas team played its best football at season’s end, coming into Memphis and defeating Kansas State 45-23 in the AutoZone Liberty Bowl, hardly qualifies as a surprise.

But the Southeastern Conference’s eight bowl wins – the most by a conference in a season – did seem to shake up some folks.

17. The Latest in Gadgets: Even Footballs Are Getting Smarter -

LAS VEGAS (AP) — The latest developments surrounding the consumer-electronics show in Las Vegas known as CES (all times PST):

12:15 p.m.

Kids tossing around a football probably hope to throw a perfect spiral in a big game one day. Technology is about to help them out.

18. Memphis Council Approves Recycling Cart Loan Effort -

The city of Memphis could close the gap in outfitting its households with new and larger recycling carts if a no-interest loan comes through.

The Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, Jan. 5, the plan by the Public Works division to pursue the $5.2 million loan that would allow the city to buy 105,000 recycling carts.

19. Strickland Pushes Change Theme Beyond Campaign Borders -

Change as a political force is usually defined by the length of a campaign season.

Once the votes are counted, it’s taken as a verdict on how much or how little voters wanted change in a short span of time.

20. Refugees, Regents, Privatization On Tap for New Session -

State Sen. Ken Yager isn’t quite ready for the state of Tennessee to reclaim the Refugee Resettlement Program from Catholic Charities.

21. Last Word: Watching The River, The Clerk's Inner Circle and Universal Bankers -

The Mississippi River is on the rise here and elsewhere which means for many of us the New Year will include a look at the river and memories of 2011 when the river at Memphis was the highest it had been since the record 1937 flooding.

22. Kiddie Tablets 'Grow Up' As Competition Grows -

NEW YORK (AP) – Kiddie tablets have grown up. Tablets designed just for kids are getting more sophisticated as they face increased competition from regular tablets. The new products also have better screens, speedier chips and fashionably slim bodies. They let older children do more, yet hold their hands until they're ready for unsupervised access.

23. Opera Memphis General Director Reflects on Challenges, Storytelling -

Even though he’ll have reached the five-year mark as general director at Opera Memphis in January, Ned Canty says there are some days when it feels like he’s still just getting started.

In a recent conversation with The Daily News, he was by turns philosophical and as optimistic as ever about the nature of his work and about the task of making one of the oldest musical forms relevant in the city where rock ’n’ roll was born.

24. Legislature Not Playing Santa With Insure Tennessee -

It’s going to take a Christmas miracle for Insure Tennessee to make it into anyone’s stocking this year.

As the 2016 session of the General Assembly approaches in early January, Republicans are showing no support for the plan Gov. Bill Haslam offered for a special session in early 2015.

25. From Beginning to End, Tigers Not Good Enough to Handle Ole Miss -

Even John Calipari lost to Ole Miss at FedExForum. It was Dec. 11, 2004, and the Tigers were on the short end of a 65-53 score.

That season ended with the Tigers in the Final Four – of the NIT.

26. University of Memphis Promotes Health Through Architecture -

Five departments of the University of Memphis are now members of the American Institute of Architects’ Design & Health Research Consortium.

The partnership works to improve public health by drawing out its connections to lived environment and architecture.

27. Sister Pact Aims to Raise Breast Cancer Awareness for Black Women -

Debra Melton did just about the best thing a young African-American woman in Memphis – or anywhere – can do in the fight against breast cancer.

28. University of Memphis Promotes Health Through Architecture -

Five departments of the University of Memphis are now members of the American Institute of Architects’ Design & Health Research Consortium.

The partnership works to improve public health by drawing out its connections to lived environment and architecture.

29. So Far, Grizzlies Fail the Eye Test -

In this day and time we hear a lot about statistics and analytics vs. the eye test.

It’s a discussion we have throughout the season when debating the College Football Playoff rankings, and when arguing about the seeding that sets our brackets for March Madness.

30. Home Values Point to a Sharp Wealth Divide Within US Cities -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's still possible in Boston for a mail carrier, an accountant and a Harvard-trained psychiatrist — basically, the crowd from "Cheers" — to live as neighbors.

That finding by the real estate brokerage Redfin makes the capital of Massachusetts a rarity at a time when neighborhoods in most U.S. cities are increasingly isolated from each other by income and home values.

31. Agape Child & Family Services Receives $25,000 Grant -

Memphis-based Agape Child & Family Services has been given $25,000 to assist with its Families in Transition (FIT) program.

The grant, which was given to the nonprofit through the Walmart Foundation’s State Giving Program, will help Agape serve homeless women and their children by providing housing, food and other support services.

32. Ready for Launch -

Five hundred new companies in 10 years. That’s the idea that founded EPIcenter, short for Entrepreneurship-Powered Innovation Center, an organization looking to catalyze the entrepreneurial movement in Memphis.

33. Agape Child & Family Services Receives $25,000 Grant -

Memphis-based Agape Child & Family Services has been given $25,000 to assist with its Families in Transition (FIT) program.

The grant, which was given to the nonprofit through the Walmart Foundation’s State Giving Program, will help Agape serve homeless women and their children by providing housing, food and other support services.

34. Shelby County Schools Eyes Crosstown -

Shelby County Schools wants to open a high school at Crosstown Concourse. SCS superintendent Dorsey Hopson confirmed the school district’s interest Wednesday, Nov. 18.

“We’ve spoken with some of the local funders about putting together some plan to ensure that there are some high-quality options there,” Hopson said. “There are a number of different ways that we’re thinking about it. But absolutely we would love to be a part of it.”

35. Report Shows Impact of Tennessee's Health Care 'Gap' -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A new report reveals the negative impact that the state's health care "gap" is having on local communities.

The report was released this week by the Tennessee Justice Center in Nashville.

36. Tennessee Says Prison Officer Assaults Down Year Over Year -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The number of recorded assaults on prison officers is down compared with a year ago, but critics say it's hard for them to accept any statistics from the Tennessee Department of Correction as fact.

37. Greenprint Summit Shows Region’s Possibilities -

Trails and bike lanes aren’t the only path to regional success, but they’re playing a growing role in partnerships among communities that sometimes find themselves competing for jobs.

To date, 19 of those communities have adopted a 25-year, green-centric plan that was introduced earlier this year and has been endorsed by more than 50 organizations.

38. No. 25 Memphis Stunned in Closing Minutes by No. 16 Houston -

HOUSTON (AP) — After scoring to start the fourth quarter, No. 25 Memphis was up by 20 and looked well on its way to a big win over undefeated Houston.

The Tigers were left stunned less than 15 minutes later.

39. Time for Tuition Equality in Tennessee -

Tennessee has a unique opportunity to help the state economy and support education. Passage of the “Tuition Equality” bill in the upcoming state legislative session will provide a critical chance to educate thousands of Tennessee youth and narrow the skills gap that exists for Tennessee employers.

40. Others might join Whisenhunt before it’s over -

The clock is ticking for Mike Mularkey, just as it is for most of the organization’s management team.

As the Tennessee Titans new interim coach, Mularkey has nine games now to prove himself worthy of being the team’s head coach beyond just the remainder of the team’s wrecked 2015 season.

41. US Housing Recovery Divided on Age, Race and Place -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's the most profitable time to sell a house since the Great Recession started in late 2007. But first-time buyers are increasingly scarce.

More Americans are qualifying for mortgages, yet minorities still get disproportionately rejected.

42. Conference Aims to Spark Positive Change, One ZIP Code at a Time -

The world can be a big place, even within one city or a single ZIP code. But the world also can be made smaller when the right kinds of lines are crossed.

Steve Nash founded nonprofit Advance Memphis in 1999, beginning an ambitious project without end. His goal: bring economic sustainability to the people living in and around the Cleaborn/Foote Homes public housing developments in South Memphis’ 38126 ZIP code, the poorest urban ZIP in Tennessee.

43. Pass vs. Run, Disciplined vs. Undisciplined; That’s Memphis Vs. Navy -

Navy and the University of Memphis share the lead (along with Houston) atop the American Athletic Conference’s West Division at 4-0.

But Navy and the No. 15 Tigers are otherwise a study in contrasting styles. From the way they like to get it done on offense to the discipline – and lack of discipline – captured in where they rank nationally in penalties.

44. Artspace Lands Grant, Seeks Design Approval -

Developers of the South Main Artspace Lofts are clearing major hurdles this week with final approval for the building design, a crucial tax incentive decision and a grant from a new-to-Memphis donor.

45. LendMed Wants to Track Health Care Sharing -

Through conversations with health care industry professionals, Ryan Freiden saw a need he thought he could fill.

46. Students Find Options via Tennessee Promise -

Siegel High School graduate Davione Williamson wasn’t quite sure he was college material when he entered Motlow State Community College in Smyrna this August on a Tennessee Promise scholarship.

47. US Budget Gap for 2015 at $439B, Lowest in 8 Years -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. budget deficit for 2015 has fallen to its lowest level in eight years, spurred by gains in tax revenue that outpaced greater government spending.

The Treasury Department says the deficit in the just-completed 2015 budget year fell to $439 billion from $483 billion in 2014. It is equal to 2.5 percent of the economy, the smallest proportion since 2007, and below the average of the past 40 years.

48. Posturing Against Supreme Court Is a Waste of Money -

Legislation rejecting the U.S. Supreme Court’s same-sex marriage ruling faces major constitutional questions and, if passed, could put a financial burden on Tennessee taxpayers.

When the high court declared gay and lesbian couples have the right to be married across the United States, overturning state laws to the contrary, Tennessee’s Republican legislators started brainstorming for methods to work around the decision or to defy it. The Republican Caucus still hasn’t announced the outcome.

49. Hattiloo Forum Explores Black Generation Gap -

Always looking for a good topic of conversation, Hattiloo Theatre founder Ekundayo Bandele decided to put a group of millennials and active senior citizens together.

The Tuesday, Oct. 13, event was prompted by a dinner conversation Bandele had with his 21-year-old daughter.

50. Downtown Memphis Artspace Project Wins $200K Grant -

The South Main Artspace Lofts got a big boost from the Downtown Memphis Commission in an “extraordinary” grant that went beyond the parameters of its established financial incentive programs.

51. US Cold Storage Latest Growth For Tipton County -

Phil Coles remembers one job interview in particular as he was hiring for the new United States Cold Storage plant in Covington, Tenn.

The job applicant, who was from Covington, had questions for Coles, the plant’s general manager. Was the plant paid for? Or was U.S. Cold renting? The bottom line was job stability in a town and county that has had a rough recession.

52. Metro Nashville’s Local-Hire Rule Gets Battered On Many Fronts -

The ink wasn’t dry on standards for Metro Nashville’s local-hire charter amendment when new Mayor Megan Barry put the measure on hold – despite sizable support in the August election.

53. Redshirting: Waiting an Extra Year to Start Kindergarten Has Its Risks -

Mary-Michael and Joe Horowitz know their son Armour, 5, can handle the academics of kindergarten. But instead of pushing him through to meet state age cutoff standards, they decided to delay his start until next year when he is older and emotionally ready.

54. Candidates Play Out Early Voting-Election Day Gap -

The early vote is in but still to be counted. There is still some television time booked for last-minute appeals to election day voters.

The debates and questionnaires speak for themselves, and no longer have a place on schedules that in the run-up to Thursday’s Memphis election day have become about opportunities to meet and be seen by the most people possible.

55. Memphis School Wins National Honor for Student Performance -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Six Tennessee schools, including one in Memphis, have been recognized nationally for exceptional student performance.

The state Education Department said the schools were recognized this week as 2015 National Blue Ribbon Schools based on their overall academic excellence or progress in closing achievement gaps among students.

56. Earlier Conversions Leave Lessons for Foote Homes Project -

The coming redevelopment of Foote Homes will be different from previous public housing conversions, incorporating lessons learned from relocating residents.

The last phase of neighboring Cleaborn Homes’ conversion to a mixed-use, mixed-income development is under construction on the other side of Lauderdale Street. It will create 67 multifamily units and should be completed by the end of the year.

57. Workforce Alliance CEO Hosts Teacher Tour -

Dr. Glen Fenter made a presentation to 51 Shelby County technical career teachers who toured Arkansas State University Mid-South in West Memphis, Ark., on Friday, Sept. 18.

The instructors were there for a district learning day to see the college’s nationally recognized dual enrollment programs. Among the points Fenter, the Greater Memphis Alliance for a Competitive Workforce’s CEO, made is that only 11 percent of employers believe college graduates have skills that employers need.

58. Leadership Memphis, WGU Launch Scholarship Fund -

Leadership Memphis and nonprofit online university WGU Tennessee have partnered to launch the Graduate Memphis Scholarship, the two organizations announced Wednesday, Sept. 16.

Through the program, WGU will award up to $300,000 in funds to 100 new students who live in Shelby County and submit an application through Dec. 31.

59. Chamber Launches Workforce Partnership -

A few local civic organizations have teamed up to form a public-private workforce partnership to address the gap between available jobs, available training programs and the unemployed and underemployed in Memphis.

60. Leadership Memphis, WGU Launch Scholarship Fund -

Leadership Memphis and nonprofit online university WGU Tennessee have partnered to launch the Graduate Memphis Scholarship, the two organizations announced Wednesday, Sept. 16.

Through the program, WGU will award up to $300,000 in funds to 100 new students who live in Shelby County and submit an application through Dec. 31.

61. Pastner, Always True to Self, Is Still Doing Things His Way -

Expectations. That’s the word that drives all sports narratives. Remember the record of Josh Pastner’s first University of Memphis team, the ragtag bunch that was left over after John Calipari exited for Kentucky?

62. Planning for Lifestyle Creep -

Ray’s take: Investopia defines lifestyle creep as a situation where people's lifestyle or standard of living improves as their discretionary income rises either through an increase in income or decrease in costs.

63. Ole Miss, Alabama Face Rematch -

A year ago, Ole Miss put up 13 fourth-quarter points to rally and defeat Alabama 23-17 at Vaught-Hemingway Stadium in Oxford. The victory wasn’t secure until 37 seconds were left in the game and Senquez Golson intercepted a Blake Sims pass in the end zone with an acrobatic catch that required an official’s review to be ruled valid.

64. New Tax Incentive Aims to Boost Declining Memphis Neighborhoods -

Just north of Interstate 40, the commercially empty gateways to the Frayser neighborhood between North Hollywood Street and North Watkins Street are hardly fit to accommodate the thousands of vehicles that pass by every day.

65. Memphis Chamber Launches Workforce Partnership -

A few local civic organizations have teamed up to form a public-private workforce partnership to address the gap between available jobs, available training programs and the unemployed and underemployed in Memphis.

66. Roundhouse Revival 2 Takes Shape Outside Coliseum -

Four months after they drew thousands of people outside the Mid-South Coliseum, the group that organized the Roundhouse Revival, as it was called, is prepping for an even more ambitious show.

For the Oct. 4 event, the Coliseum Coalition has a six-hour lineup for two wrestling rings on the building’s west side. Posters for “round two” of the revival promise “roundball, rock and roll, rods, rhythm and blues, rasslin’, roller derby, rap and rally.”

67. Kosten Foundation Lifts Pancreatic Cancer Awareness -

When the Herb Kosten Foundation began in 2003, it was out of a desire to honor the man’s legacy.

Kosten passed away in June 2003, about a year after his diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. A gifted athlete in his youth – the University of Alabama named him to its All-Century Team for his play on the baseball diamond – Kosten would be 79 today.

68. US Job Openings Soar to Record High of 5.8 Million in July -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of available jobs jumped sharply in July to the highest level in 15 years, evidence that confident employers sought to step up hiring to meet greater demand for their goods and services.

69. Health Care Suffers As Rural Hospitals Continue Slow Fade -

Fayette County is the latest victim of hospital closings in Tennessee as many rural health care facilities continue to struggle financially.

Methodist Healthcare-Fayette Hospital closed in late March, bringing to four the number of shuttered hospitals in West Tennessee after Gibson General, Humboldt General and Haywood Park Community called it quits in 2014.

70. Budget Report Sees Shrinking Deficits, But Only For Now -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An unforeseen flood of revenue is shrinking federal deficits to the lowest level of President Barack Obama's tenure, Congress' nonpartisan budget adviser said Tuesday. But in a report that will fuel both parties in their autumn clash over spending, the analysts also warned that perilously high shortfalls will roar back unless lawmakers act.

71. Tardy Tax Filers Risk Loss of Health Care Subsidies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sign-up season for President Barack Obama's health care law doesn't start for another couple of months, but the next few days are crucial for hundreds of thousands of customers at risk of losing financial aid when they renew coverage for 2016.

72. Fairgrounds’ Future -

It’s hard to imagine that a 65,000-seat stadium could be overlooked. Perhaps it’s because the Liberty Bowl wasn’t in the center of the Mid-South Fairgrounds when the stadium was built in 1965; it was on the eastern side of 155 acres of city-owned land, with a rail spur running along its eastern boundary.

73. Tennessee Officials: New Test Will Better Measure Progress -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — State education officials said Thursday that new assessments in math and English for students in grades three through 11 will provide a better measurement of their progress and make sure they're on track to succeed after graduation.

74. More Millennials Stuck Renting for Years Before Buying Home -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Home ownership, that celebrated hallmark of the American dream, is increasingly on hold for younger Americans.

Short of cash, burdened by student debt and unsettled in their careers, young adults are biding time in apartments for longer periods and buying their first homes later in life.

75. Problem Properties -

Memphis has a crippling issue with blight, and one nonprofit is front and center with changing the culture that led to the city’s inundation of abandoned properties and lots.

Neighborhood Preservation Inc. was founded in 2012 as a court-appointed receiver of properties taken away from neglectful owners. Over the years, it has evolved to become a robust advocate for stronger legislation and development tools to deal with problem properties.

76. Real Deal -

They were tossing around numbers, trying to guess the win total for the 2015 University of Memphis football season.

In the not-too-distant past, the two Highland Hundred members and longtime season-ticket holders might have been able to add their guesses together and still come up short of the six victories needed for their favorite team to be bowl-eligible.

77. US Trade Gap Widens 7 Percent in June as Imports Jump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit increased in June as solid consumer spending pulled in more imports, while the strong dollar restrained exports.

The Commerce Department said Wednesday the trade gap jumped 7 percent to $43.8 billion in June, up from $40.9 billion in May. Imports increased 1.2 percent to $232.4 billion, while exports edged lower to $188.6 billion from $188.7 billion.

78. Wolf River Greenway Targets Raleigh Riverbend -

At the northernmost bend of the Wolf River in Shelby County, the Wolf River Conservancy has plans for a boat ramp onto the Wolf and a nature center that together promise to change the surrounding area of Raleigh where the river turns.

79. Short History of the Nation's Most-Visited National Park -

In 1899, the Appalachian National Park Association began discussing the concept for a 12,000-square-mile park in parts of North and South Carolina, Georgia, Virginia and Tennessee.

During the next century, many individuals, organizations, politicians and nature advocates worked to establish what is now the country’s most visited national park – the Great Smoky Mountains.

80. Unlikely Path -

It all started on whim. Cassius Cash was on his way to band practice at the University of Arkansas when he decided to practice his interview skills instead.

“Someone informed me the (U.S.) Forest Service was doing recruitment, but I had no intention of going in there and landing the internship,” says Cash of that interview for a wildlife biologist internship. “I thought the interview was about as far as I was going to go to chase my dreams.”

81. Congress Passes 3-Month Highway, Transit Aid Patch -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress sent President Barack Obama a three-month bill to keep highway and transit money flowing to states on Thursday, one day before the deadline for a cutoff of funds.

82. Study Says West Tennessee Economy Has Lagged -

West Tennessee’s economy has been lagging behind other regions in the state but is starting to make inroads in employment growth and technology-related hirings, a new report says.

The region’s mayors and economic development officials met Thursday at Jackson State Community College to review the report, The Jackson Sun reported. The study was financed by a $50,000 grant given by the Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development.

83. With No Real Rival, Tennessee Republicans Attack Their Own -

Republicans are sitting in Tennessee’s political catbird seat, but that doesn’t keep them from flying off in different directions.

Elected political leaders of the same stripe found themselves at odds this year over the Bible as a state book, Common Core education standards and Insure Tennessee, Republican Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to catch 280,000 people in a medical coverage gap.

84. Families Face Tough Decisions as Elder-Care Cost Soars -

NEW YORK (AP) — Doris Ranzman had followed the expert advice, planning ahead in case she wound up unable to care for herself one day. But when a nursing-home bill tops $14,000 a month, the best-laid plans get tossed aside.

85. Digital Diaspora -

The ubiquitous connectivity that permeates today's workplace is having a profound effect on company cultures, most notably in the digitally-fueled diaspora unfolding in which employees can work from just about anywhere.

86. Editorial: Creatives Prove Memphis’ Cool Factor is Heating Up -

“If you have the vision, and the gumption, you can create something original in Memphis.”

The Memphis News cover story this week features four distinct entrepreneurs who are living, working and creating in Memphis. The aforementioned quote comes from Ben Fant, principal at local marketing firm Farmhouse. He is just one member of the city’s creative class, one guy trying to make something lasting for himself, his employees and his city.

87. Disruptive Innovation Helps Fill in the Gaps -

Being out of work in today’s economy can be daunting. Even as things continue to improve, finding a job can be tough. In addition to the small number of new positions created each day, the entire hiring process takes longer – despite when you find the perfect job.

88. Tennessee’s ‘Fighting 26’ Democrats Work to Stay Relevant -

Sometimes Tennessee Democrats must feel like a tree that falls in the forest: Does anyone hear them?

When Democratic legislative leaders called for a special session this summer on Insure Tennessee, Gov. Bill Haslam’s market-based plan to use federal dollars to catch 280,000 working people in a health care coverage gap, they found themselves alone.

89. Durham, Agape Hosting Hickory Hill Job Fair -

Agape Child & Family Services, New Hickory Hill Missionary Baptist Church and Durham School Services will host a community job fair Monday, July 20.

The free event will take place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at New Hickory Hill Church, 6580 East Raines Road.

90. Donate a Backpack for Boys & Girls Clubs -

Parents looking to get a head start on back-to-school shopping can this week get a discount and support the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Memphis at the same time.

Gap stores at Carriage Crossing and Wolfchase Galleria will accept new or gently used backpacks that the Boys & Girls Clubs will give to its members.

91. Tracking Second-Quarter Market Trends -

With the second quarter basically in the rear-view mirror, have the trends that began in the first quarter of the year continued during the second quarter? Or, has there been a reversal? Let’s take a look, starting with the broad global stock markets. All returns are thru Wednesday, June 24:

92. Senate, House Look to Update Bush-Era Education Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's something most Democrats and Republicans in Congress can agree on — an update to the Bush-era No Child Left Behind education law is much needed and long overdue.

93. Projects, Issues Spill into Memphis' New Fiscal Year -

On Monday, June 29, two days before the new fiscal year, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. was in the back of a house on Ridgewood Drive in Whitehaven.

Wharton was marking the start of a 90-day public works project spanning both fiscal years to build a retention pond for the Days Creek area. The $450,000 project includes removing trees and brush from the drainage area, in an effort to prevent flooding. In September 2014, some homes in the area were heavily damaged in a sudden and prolonged downpour.

94. Haslam Needs to Back Up Call for More Local Control -

If Gov. Bill Haslam is trying to build political capital, he’s making the right move by trying to light a fire under local officials.

He might also want to turn up the flame on his own game.

95. US Economy Not As Bad in First Quarter, Paving Way for Rebound -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy contracted in the first three months of the year, just not as much as previously estimated. More recent data show that the weakness was largely temporary, with a rebound in the works for the April-June quarter.

96. HopeWorks Workshop Aims to Help Memphis Employers Reduce Entry-Level Job Turnover -

Different experiences, different vocabularies, and a different perspective on what it means to go to work each day. The difference, really, between a “job” and a “career.”

Making sense of these differences for the benefit of entry-level employees and their employers is the mission of the free workshop “Finding Talent. Growing Profits.”

97. American Bar Association President Pushes Online Models for Civil Disputes -

The president of the American Bar Association says the traditional method of providing pro bono legal services in civil matters to those who can’t afford to pay for an attorney isn’t working despite best efforts.

98. The Invisible Safety Net -

This week, the Internet is buzzing about the struggles of Gap Inc. and Lucky Magazine. Gap announced it will lay off 250 workers and close 175 stores. From the outside, Lucky appears to be going out of business or reducing operations considerably. At Lucky, there are rumors claiming many people were laid off without any severance. I received an email from a reader about just this issue, and what workers can do to prepare.

99. Memphis City Council’s Distrust of Wharton Boils to Surface -

If it wasn’t obvious in five previous budget seasons, Memphis City Council members made the point clearer Tuesday, June 16, just before they delayed final city budget votes for another week.

They don’t trust the numbers and explanations they are getting from Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. as they try to rearrange his $656.5 million budget that was proposed in April.

100. Overbey Has No Regrets for Sponsoring Insure Tennessee -

Republican Sen. Doug Overbey took the road less traveled this year when he sponsored Insure Tennessee at the request of Gov. Bill Haslam.

Despite the legislation’s failure in special and regular sessions, he has no regrets and looks forward to continuing the fight in 2016 for a market-based plan to obtain roughly $1 billion annually through the Affordable Care Act to provide coverage to some 280,000 Tennesseans who are caught in a gap between TennCare and the federal plan.