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Editorial Results (free)

1. Houston Levee Center Sells for $2.3 Million -

A 16,320-square-foot retail center in northeast Shelby County has sold for $2.3 million.

Mahmoud Faedah Jaber of Eads bought the Class B power strip at 2821 Houston Levee Road from Houston Levee Investments LLC, according to a Dec. 1 warranty deed.

2. Last Word: Grizz Speculation, SCS Grade Floors and Cedar Heights -

Grizz lose to the Wizards 93-87 in Washington. And ESPN columnist Zach Lowe says the team has lost its identity as well as a lot of games. CBSSports reports Marc Gasol is open to a trade but will not request one. And if you are looking to go far afield with the theories, here’s one from a Dallas Mavericks fansight, mavsmoneyball, that includes a really good graphic on the salaries of Grizz players.

3. Houston Levee Retail Center Sells for $2.3 Million -

A 16,320-square-foot retail center in northeast Shelby County has sold for $2.3 million.

Mahmoud Faedah Jaber of Eads bought the Class B power strip at 2821 Houston Levee Road from Houston Levee Investments LLC, according to a Dec. 1 warranty deed.

4. Trump Signs Proclamation to Scale Back 2 National Monuments -

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) – President Donald Trump signed a proclamation Monday to scale back two sprawling national monuments in Utah, pledging to "reverse federal overreach and restore the rights of this land to your citizens."

5. Coalition Taps Green & Healthy Homes Initiative -

Leaders from Memphis and Shelby County and representatives from nearly 25 partner organizations signed an agreement Thursday morning, Nov. 30, at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library in East Memphis to work together on Tennessee’s first Green & Healthy Homes Initiative (GHHI) led by the Baltimore-based organization.

6. Coalition Signs on With Green & Healthy Homes Initiative -

Leaders from Memphis and Shelby County and representatives from nearly 25 partner organizations signed an agreement Thursday morning, Nov. 30, at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library in East Memphis to work together on Tennessee’s first Green & Healthy Homes Initiative (GHHI) led by the Baltimore-based organization.

7. Last Word: A Centennial, Corker Controversy Goes Wider and Ranked Choice Votes -

One of the most influential political figures in the city and state in the last half of the 20th century turned 100 years old MondayLewis Donelson, cofounder and senior counsel at Baker Donelson. A direct descendant of Andrew Jackson, the president from Tennessee who made the mold of the modern Democratic Party, Donelson started out, of course, as a Democrat. But by the 1950s was shaping the modern local and state Republican parties.

8. Vegas Shooting Renews Debate on High-Capacity Ammo Magazines -

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) – The rapid-fire shooting that killed or injured hundreds of concertgoers in Las Vegas has highlighted the easy availability of ammunition magazines that allow shooters to fire dozens of shots without having to reload.

9. For Memphis Libraries, ‘Start Here’ Message is Reality -

At a time when it might seem that the usefulness of public libraries is waning, they are reemerging as 21st century community hubs — democratic spaces where people from every walk of life can encounter humanity, the elusive element technology cannot conquer.

10. Lawsuit Targets Searches of Electronic Devices at US Border -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A federal lawsuit filed Wednesday claims the U.S. government's growing practice of searching laptops and cellphones at the border is unconstitutional because electronic devices now carry troves of private personal and business information. The government has vociferously defended its searches as critical to protecting the homeland.

11. Right Response -

For many people in the Mid-South with barriers to getting to the appropriate health care professionals, sometimes a 911 call has seemed like their only option. That’s all changing now thanks to a new collaborative effort between the Memphis Fire Department’s Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and local health care organizations, area hospitals, nonprofits and philanthropists.

12. House Passes Bill to Speed Deployment of Self-Driving Cars -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The House voted Wednesday to speed the introduction of self-driving cars by giving the federal government authority to exempt automakers from safety standards not applicable to the technology, and to permit deployment of up to 100,000 of the vehicles annually over the next several years.

13. Officials Say Trump's Afghan Plan Involves 3,900 More Troops -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's plan to end America's longest war and eliminate Afghanistan's rising extremist threat involves sending up to 3,900 additional U.S. troops, senior officials said Tuesday. The first deployments could take place within days.

14. Last Word: The Orange Mound Way, Midtown Apartments and 'I Am A Man' Plaza -

First day of school redux on Tuesday for students in Memphis Catholic Schools and it is a half-day. The first day of classes in most of the county’s other schools Monday went smoothly. Shelby County Schools reports more than 6,000 students registered on the first day of school despite another concerted effort at numerous events to register students in advance. That’s in a school system of approximately 96,000 students.

15. Legislature’s End Game on Guns: No Rules at All? -

If you think the state Legislature is full of gun nuts, Rep. Micah Van Huss begs to differ.

“No, not at all,” Van Huss says when asked if the General Assembly is too pro-gun. “I don’t think they’re pro-gun enough. In fact, … I think our laws in Tennessee infringe on our constitutional rights. There are now 16 states – we’ve added two or three this year – that allow constitutional carry. So, we’re falling behind.”

16. Bridge Protest Anniversary Draws More Action, Reflection -

A year after the spontaneous protest march that ended with more than 1,000 people shutting down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge for several hours, the leader of that effort was again moving north along B.B. King Boulevard on Sunday, July 9.

17. Tourism Leaders Focus on City’s Complexity, Struggle -

Stax Records turns 60 years old this year, going back to its origins as a country music label called Satellite at a tiny studio in Brunswick. Next year marks 50 years since the sanitation workers strike and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. In August, it will be 40 years since the death of Elvis Presley. And in 2019, the city of Memphis will mark 200 years since its founding.

18. Century Mark -

During a visit to Memphis in April, Andrew Young was talking with reporters about his lengthy public history – being part of Dr. Martin Luther King’s inner circle, a congressman, mayor of Atlanta, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. It was as he talked about King’s death in Memphis that Young, without any prompting, talked about a trio of Memphis attorneys – Benjamin Hooks, Russell Sugarmon and A. W. Willis – that were the key to his and King’s efforts to get things done in Memphis and the surrounding region.

19. After the ‘Tom Lee Storm’: A Look At Recovery Efforts, What's Next -

Eleven days after the May 27 storm that knocked out power to 188,000 homes and businesses, Memphis Light, Gas and Water officials declared victory in the recovery with a Wednesday, June 8, late afternoon Tweet: “Update: Restored.”

20. Hanover Students Follow King’s Pilgrimage -

Even before it was the National Civil Rights Museum, the Lorraine Motel had pilgrims – visitors coming to the place where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated to stand where he fell, even stay a night on the same floor of his room when the Lorraine was still a working hotel.

21. Last Word: Sessions Notes, Lakeland Elects and Golf Classic Turns 60 -

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions doesn’t stick with the script he has when he makes a speech, like the one he gave Thursday at the federal building to a room full of federal prosecutors and local and state law enforcement. Some of that comes from his background as a former U.S. Attorney and Alabama’s Attorney General, not to mention his tenure as a U.S. senator.

22. Last Word: Sessions Visit, Election Day and Beale Street's Journey -

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions in Memphis Thursday to talk about crime in a city whose record homicide count in 2016 Sessions has recently mentioned. Sessions is in town to talk with local, state and federal prosecutors and law enforcement. When the Attorney General comes to town, he or she is usually coming with policy talking points from the White House.

23. Past, Present Converge at Lynching Centennial -

The only thing that runs through the area where the Macon Road bridge stood 100 years ago are power lines on wooden poles that take them over the oxbow lake, thick kudzu and two bridge supports almost overtaken by undergrowth on the edge of a thickly-wooded area.

24. Last Word: Centennial, Hackett Retires -- Sort Of and Baseball Dreams -

Monday marks 100 years since a mob took Ell Persons off a train and to the Macon Road Bridge across the Wolf River and burned him alive. It was the lynching that gave birth to the Memphis Branch NAACP one month later. The national NAACP field office investigator who came to Memphis at great personal peril to investigate Person’s death was none other than James Weldon Johnson, the man who also composed “Lift Every Voice and Sing.”

25. Hackett Retires From CMOM to Devote Effort to Grand Carousel Fundraising -

Former Memphis Mayor Richard C. Hackett is retiring as CEO of the Children’s Museum of Memphis in June to devote his attention to fundraising for the institution he helped create 30 years ago. Hackett became leader of the museum in 2006.

26. Former Banker Pleads Guilty to Felony Theft -

A former lead bank teller pleaded guilty Thursday, May 4, to systematically walking out of the bank with concealed cash that eventually totaled some $266,000 over a three-month period in 2009, according to Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich.

27. Bates Gold-and-Silver Fraud Case Includes Big Numbers -

At the end of a five-week trial in Memphis federal court this month, a jury convicted a former Tennessee state representative turned religious prophet and gold-and-silver broker on 46 counts of fraud.

28. Former Banker Pleads Guilty to Felony Theft -

A former lead bank teller pleaded guilty Thursday, May 4, to systematically walking out of the bank with concealed cash that eventually totaled some $266,000 over a three-month period in 2009, according to Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich.

29. Memphis May Day March Points To Deeper, Sustained Involvement -

Three months after a Downtown march protesting the first of President Donald Trump’s two immigration travel ban orders, the turnout was smaller Monday, May 1, along the same route between Clayborn Temple and the National Civil Rights Museum.

30. Groups Prepare for Persons’ Lynching Centennial -

When a pair of new historical markers on Summer Avenue are unveiled later this month, it will be the latest milestone in current discussions about what happened long ago in Memphis.

The markers will be unveiled at and near the site where Ell Persons was burned by a lynch mob 100 years ago this month.

31. Last Word: Two Science Marches, Bill Lee Kicks Off and Andrew Young on Ben Hooks -

Rainy Sunday in the city with ponchoed partisans of the Porter-Leath Ragin' Cajun gathering and Africa in April overlapping from the riverfront to Danny Thomas Boulevard. In Germantown, it was a soggy but colorful 5k for the Germantown Municipal School District with shades of blue, orange and of course pink, or was it red?, at different parts of the run.

32. Defining the Basics: Bike Lane Expansion -

Our current administration’s platform desires to be brilliant at the basics, but what is the definition of basic?

“Basic” is not merely the ability to reduce crime, provide sanitation services or put out fires; in today’s world, it means more than that. The basics are the acceptable standard of living in a large metropolitan city.

33. Guest Column: Defining the Basics – Bike Lane Expansion -

Editor’s note: Voice your opinion on Memphis’ proposed repaving and bike lane by taking the city’s online survey by 11:59 p.m. Monday, April 17.

34. Initiatives Geared at Boosting Owner-Occupied Housing -

Nearly a third of all homes in Shelby County are owned by investors, a fact which has state and city leaders looking for ways to stem the tide and encourage locals to buy into their communities through owner-occupied homeownership.

35. Last Word: Police Presence on MLK Day, 'R on R Crime' and Fashion on Flicker -

I’m going to err on the side of caution and say that the helicopter constantly circling over the National Civil Rights Museum Tuesday during the otherwise solemn observance of the anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination could have been one used by one of the television stations. It also could have been a police helicopter and that would fit with the highly visible presence Memphis Police have chosen to take in the last year or so of protest in the city.

36. Immigrant Tuition Break Gaining Support in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A push to offer in-state college tuition rates to students whose parents brought them into the country illegally is picking up unlikely momentum from some Republicans in Tennessee, a deeply conservative state that voted overwhelmingly for President Donald Trump and his tough stance on immigration.

37. Last Word: Mike Rose, Bartlett High Options and Memphis-Nashville Talk -

Mike Rose transformed Memphis-made Holiday Inn from a single brand to multiple brands and a corporation that transformed the hospitality industry as casino gaming spread beyond Las Vegas and Atlantic City in the 1990s. During his time at the helm of Holiday Inns and Promus Companies, Rose was also one of the city's most influential corporate leaders with the money and ability to raise money and set terms that made possible the transformation of St. Jude into a research institution and pointed the University of Memphis in that direction as well. Rose died Sunday in Nashville of cancer.

38. The Week Ahead: March 27-April 1 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! The Bluff City plays host to several big names this week, from acclaimed country musician Margo Price and influential feminist Dolores Huerta to the always-popular St. Louis Cardinals. Plus, Midtown celebrates its mojo and Germantown goes to the dogs, all in The Week Ahead… 

39. Last Word: 'Ono Poke and the Ghost of The Luau, Council Day and $3 Concerts -

The ghost of the Luau lives on. Loeb has a new tenant for the Shops of Chickasaw Gardens called ‘Ono Poke that features Hawaiian cuisine. And the restaurant will be just about on the other side of Poplar Avenue from where the Luau used to stand with its large concrete Easter Island head, Polynesian dishes and Hawaii Five-O era architecture – not the remake, the real Five-O and the real McGarrett.

40. New Police Recruiting Class Gets Started -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland touted a class of 151 Memphis police and police service technician recruits Monday, March 20, as the beginning of rebuilding a depleted police department that is below 2,000 officers.

41. Memphis Museums and Attractions Broaden Reach With Host of Upgrades -

Elvis Presley Enterprises made a splash in recent weeks with the grand opening of the 200,000-square-foot museum, restaurant and retail complex known as Elvis Presley’s Memphis. But the Graceland operator isn’t the only local institution upgrading what it offers visitors.

42. Obama's Final Year: US Spent $36 Million in Records Lawsuits -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration in its final year in office spent a record $36.2 million on legal costs defending its refusal to turn over federal records under the Freedom of Information Act, according to an Associated Press analysis of new U.S. data that also showed poor performance in other categories measuring transparency in government.

43. Tennessee Fusion Center Monitored July Protests In Memphis, Emails Reveal -

A state “fusion center” that coordinates information among local law enforcement has been keeping a detailed list of legal protests in Memphis and other Tennessee cities, according to emails from last July requested by a student researching “predictive policing” efforts in Memphis.

44. New Travel Ban Signed; Iraq Not Included This Time -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump on Monday signed a reworked version of his controversial travel ban Monday, aiming to withstand court challenges while still barring new visas for citizens from six Muslim-majority countries and temporarily shutting down America's refugee program.

45. The Week Ahead: March 7-13 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! Get your taste buds ready: Both Memphis Black Restaurant Week and the inaugural Vintage901 festival are taking place in the coming days. We’ve got details on those, plus plenty of other fun activities and entertainment to check out in The Week Ahead… 

46. Escort List Lawsuit Revives Old Court Order -

Nearly 40 years after U.S. District Judge Robert McRae signed a federal consent decree barring the Memphis Police Department from ever gathering and keeping information from “political intelligence” surveillance of Memphis citizens, the court order has come back to life.

47. City Hall List Controversy Deepens With Questions About Police Surveillance -

The controversy deepened Monday, Feb. 20, over a list of 81 people – many who participated in protests in the last year – who require a police escort while anywhere in City Hall.

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland took questions Monday from reporters for the first time since the list was made public Friday and followed up Saturday by announcing he had asked Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings to review names on the list.

48. City Hall List Controversy Deepens With Questions About Police Surveillance -

The controversy deepened Monday, Feb. 20, over a list of 81 people – many who have participated in recent protests for different causes in the last year – who require a police escort while anywhere in City Hall.

49. Strickland Calls For Review of City Hall Escort List -

Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings is reviewing a list of 81 citizens who cannot come to City Hall without a police escort to wherever they are going in the building after Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland requested the review Saturday, Feb. 18.

50. Strickland Calls For Review of City Hall Escort List -

Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings is reviewing a list of 81 citizens who cannot come to City Hall without a police escort to wherever they are going in the building after Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland requested the review Saturday, Feb. 18.

51. Strickland Calls For Review of City Hall Escort List -

Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings is reviewing a list of 81 citizens who cannot come to City Hall without a police escort to wherever they are going in the building after Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland requested the review Saturday, Feb. 18.

52. Body Count -

A day at a time, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland has been writing the names of those who have been murdered in a notebook he keeps with him since he became mayor in January 2016.

When five people, two of them 15 years old, died violently the weekend that much of the world’s attention was on protest marches and the new administration in Washington, Strickland was getting updates on the latest surge in violence.

53. Full Text of Gov. Bill Haslam's State of the State Address -

Here is the full text of Gov. Bill Haslam's annual State of the State address as prepared for delivery to a joint convention of the Tennessee General Assembly on Monday.

Speaker Harwell, Lieutenant Governor McNally, Speakers Pro Tem Tracy and Johnson, Members of the 110th General Assembly, Justices, Constitutional Officers, General Slatery, Commissioners, Friends, Guests, fellow Tennesseans, and for the seventh year in a row, the woman voted best first lady in the land, Crissy. My kids even made it this year.

54. Cohen Co-Sponsors Bill to Stop Trump Immigration Order -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen is among the House sponsors of a bill that would prohibit the use of federal funds to enforce President Donald Trump’s order barring refugees from seven majority-Muslim countries from entering the U.S. for 90 days.

55. Through Banking and More, Williams Invests in Memphis -

Duncan Williams runs his investment bank the way others might run a family. “We do things differently around here,” he concedes. “When I walk out on the floor, nobody calls me ‘Mr. Williams.’ Mostly it’s, ‘What’s up, D.?’”

56. Trump Moves to Pull US Out of Pacific-Rim Trade Deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump moved to pull the United States out of the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership trade pact Monday, dealing a quick blow to Barack Obama's legacy as the new chief executive began fulfilling campaign promises in his first full week in office.

57. Malone Takes Reins, Plans Changes At Memphis Branch NAACP -

The Memphis branch of the NAACP has one full-time employee and is looking for a new executive director in what amounts to a major overhaul of the chapter as it marks its centennial year.

The new president of the Memphis branch of the nation’s oldest civil rights organization told a group of 50 members Sunday, Jan. 22, that she is moving to rebuild and rebrand the chapter.

58. New Details of St. Jude Expansion Look to Medical Corridors To The East -

The city’s plans for the Pinch District between the Pyramid and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital are only half of the plan the city will seek expanded uses of the Tourism Development Zone and an expansion of a Tax Increment Financing district for.

59. New Details of St. Jude Expansion Look to Medical Corridors To The East -

The city’s plans for the Pinch District between the Pyramid and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital are only half of the plan the city will seek expanded uses of the Tourism Development Zone and an expansion of a Tax Increment Financing district for.

60. Pew Survey: Officers More Reluctant to Use Force, Make Stops -

ATLANTA (AP) – The so-called "Ferguson effect" – officers backing off of policing out of fear that their actions will be questioned after the fact – has been talked about but never really quantified. A new study suggests the effect is a reality, with three-quarters of officers surveyed saying they are hesitant to use force, even when appropriate, and are less willing to stop and question suspicious people.

61. Memphis Bridge Protest Underscores 2016 National Narrative on Race, Police -

It was a year to the month since Memphis Police officer Connor Schilling shot and fatally wounded Darrius Stewart during a traffic stop in Hickory Hill. Stewart’s death in July 2015 and a subsequent decision by a Shelby County grand jury that Schilling would face no state criminal charges was still an issue in Memphis. This past July, it became the local face of a resumed national narrative.

62. Memphis Democrat Karen Camper Learns To Work With Majority -

Editor’s note: This is part one of Nashville correspondent Sam Stockard’s feature on Memphis state Rep. Karen Camper. Read part two in the Friday, Dec. 23, edition of The Daily News or online at memphisdailynews.com.

63. Platform for Property -

Airbnb is revolutionizing the hospitality industry causing legislators worldwide to scramble to regulate it, but the Memphis City Council is gaining state and national attention for its hands-off attitude.

64. Justice Department Begins Yearlong Investigation of MPD -

In some ways, a year and a half of local protests, turbulence and questions about police conduct came full circle Wednesday, Nov. 30, in Hickory Hill.

A U.S. Justice Department panel investigating the Memphis Police Department heard from more than two dozen people among a room of 50 at Hickory Hill Community Center.

65. Saluting the Slitherer -

“Snakes, since the beginning of time, have accumulated a bad public image.” Thus begins Pete Ivey’s column, “Around the Old Well,” written in June 1975 for North Carolina newspapers. The title and subtitle go straight to the meat of the matter: “A Snake’s Not Evil – Snakes Need P/R Campaign to Improve Image.”

66. Why is It So Difficult for Tennessee To Oust Indicted Politicians? -

Tennessee is lagging much of the nation when it comes to the ability to remove scoundrels from public office.

And, make no mistake, the Volunteer State has had its fair share of ne’er-do-well politicians who would likely have been thrown out of office if the proper procedures had been in place. 

67. County Has Lowest Voter Turnout in 12 Years -

Voter turnout in Shelby County for the 2016 presidential general election was 59.7 percent, according to unofficial returns posted by the Shelby County Election Commission early Wednesday, Nov. 9. That marks the lowest showing since the 2004 presidential general election, when turnout was 57 percent.

68. Election Fallout: What a Trump Or Clinton Presidency Means for State -

Donald Trump is going to win easily in Tennessee.

Everyone, most of all the campaigns for both Trump and Hillary Clinton, accept this fact, as evidenced by the lack of campaign time spent in the state – and most of the South, for that matter – during this contentious campaign cycle.

69. Last Word: The Politics of Animal Welfare, SCS On Gestalt and Chandler Numbers -

It’s not that the Memphis Animal Shelter would change as much as services outside the shelter would change and their relationship to the shelter would change. That’s what two consultants from the national nonprofit Target Zero told about 80 Memphians at the Central Library this week.

70. Last Word: In Defense of The Cossitt, Joe Royer and 3 Months Since The Bridge -

Citizens of Memphis, I rise in defense of the city’s first public library. Not in its original much-loved state but in defense of its much-ridiculed modernization.

No, I will not follow that with a defense of John Calipari or the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s location in Cleveland instead of Memphis or the late Mo’ Money Taxes and the company’s commercials. But I reserve the right to, at some future date, defend the big silver sculpture thing on the northeast corner of Front and Poplar at the Cannon Center.

71. Meet Olli -

With deep and well-funded resources such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee, the Knoxville region is no stranger to innovation in science and technology.

But a new kid on the block, Local Motors, has the potential to spark a whole new era of manufacturing innovation and make Knoxville a hotbed for a technology sector widely considered to be truly revolutionary – self-driving cars.

72. Fourth Bluff Momentum Grows With $5 Million Grant -

They’ve been called the “things between things” in Downtown Memphis.

In the earliest plans for the city of Memphis, they were part of the Promenade – a section of public land that includes the city’s first public library, the river view behind what is now the University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law, and Memphis Park and Mississippi River Park below it on the other side of Riverside Drive.

73. Private Equity Firm Pays $13M for Retirement Community -

950 Cherry Road

Memphis, TN 38117

Sale Amount: $13 million

Sale Date: Sept. 7, 2016

74. Carter Says Disparities Keeping Underprivileged From Better Lives -

Last week, former President Jimmy Carter and nearly 1,500 volunteers flocked to Uptown to build 19 homes that will help improve the lives of underprivileged Memphians. In between swinging hammers, Carter and former First Lady Rosalynn Carter took time to visit the blues bars of Beale Street. Carter said Beale Street bears commonalities with the National Civil Rights Museum in that both cultural touchstones have reclaimed the city’s history and bring local heritage into a greater context.

75. Bursting the Bubble -

Graceland is in Memphis. But the two have tended to coexist, rather than being part of each other, since Elvis Presley’s home opened as a commercial enterprise in 1982.

That is starting to change as a $137 million expansion of Graceland – a $92 million hotel resort opening in October and a $45 million, 200,000-square-foot entertainment complex west of the mansion to open in the spring of 2017 – begins to overlap with a renewed emphasis on Whitehaven as the home of many of the city’s middle class.

76. Last Word: School Is In, It's Rallings and Looking At Our Reflection -

The school year begins Monday across Shelby County – for students.

Teachers have been back for the last two weeks in one way or another preparing for the year. School administrators longer than that including some new principals at several schools.

77. Outnumbered Democrats Hope To Ride Anti-Trumpmentum -

State Rep. Raumesh Akbari identified herself with the “Fighting 26,” also known as the Tennessee House Democratic Caucus, when she took the podium to support Hillary Clinton at Philadelphia’s Democratic National Convention.

78. Last Word: Early Vote Turnout Numbers, The Starbucks Factor and New Blue Collar -

Monday is the day. So is Thursday. Thursday is election day and Monday is the first day you can turn left on Union Avenue onto McLean Boulevard.

One comes with stickers. The other is simply an absence of tickets for making an illegal left turn.

79. Dark Money Ads Surface in 8th District Primary -

As Republicans were either at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland or watching it on TV last week, “dark money” entered the crowded Republican primary for Tennessee’s 8th Congressional district.

80. Last Word: Baton Rouge Again, Identifying The Memphis Movement & Early Voting -

It is becoming more and more difficult to keep the danger to police officers from extremists and the danger of police training and policies that are used to justify questionable police shootings in the same frame.

81. After The Bridge -

Four and a half hours after it began Sunday, July 10, the city's most significant and largest Black Lives Matter protest ended with police in riot gear slowly walking a group of around 100 protesters off the Hernando DeSoto Bridge and south on Front Street.

82. Protest at Memphis Bridge Ends Peacefully -

Four and a half hours after it began Sunday, July 10, the city’s most significant and largest Black Lives Matter protest ended with police in riot gear slowly walking a group of around 100 protesters off the Hernando DeSoto Bridge to Front Street.

83. Black Lives Matter Protest Draws Thousands In Memphis Protest Milestone -

Four and a half hours after it began Sunday, July 10, the city's most significant and largest Black Lives Matter protest ended with police in riot gear slowly walking a group of around 100 protesters off the Hernando DeSoto Bridge and south on Front Street.

84. US Gives Tentative OK to Flights to Cuba From 10 US Cities -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. government on Thursday tentatively approved scheduled commercial airline service to Havana from 10 American cities, further bridging the gulf between countries as close as 90 miles and an hour flight but long kept at a greater distance by the Cold War.

85. Last Word: Two Paths, Council Day, Conley Writes and WIGS Debut -

Two ways to look at the Fourth of July in Memphis. It was either soggy or the fireworks began early.

For probably less than a minute, the mother accused to killing four of her children last week in southeast Shelby County will make her first court appearance Tuesday morning either in person at 201 Poplar Ave. or by video link from Jail East.

86. Last Word: Brexit, Grizz Picks in the NBA Draft and the Race for the 8th -

Brexit – British Exit – it is. The end of the European Union in the United Kingdom in Thursday’s referendum there began to make its presence known in financial markets even before the very close vote count was well established.

87. Civil Rights Museum Highlights Lorraine Hotel’s Storied History -

The balcony is usually the part of the National Civil Rights Museum’s exterior that is the center of attention.

Visitors know the mid-20th century wrought iron railing and other features of the post-World War II Lorraine Motel’s motor court. It’s usually from pictures and videos of the April 4, 1968, assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on a second-story balcony outside room 306.

88. Massacre: 1866 and the Battles Over How Memphis History is Told -

At the end of March with much secrecy, Rev. Keith Norman took delivery and responsibility for a large, heavy crate that stayed in his office for the next month.

“Don’t tell anybody, don’t let anybody get it, if they come in and say they work for the park commission or anybody, tell them to show identification,” were the instructions said Norman, who is president of the Memphis Branch NAACP.

89. RegionSmart Details How to Prevent Erosion of Talent, Population -

During his three terms as mayor of Pittsburgh, Tom Murphy had to assume a great deal of risk in transforming the city’s economy from an industrial to an entrepreneurial base.

90. Regionalism Enhances Recruiting For Cities in Metros -

When Memphis hits a dirty dozen list – whether it’s for crime, or education attainment, or poverty – those ratings are based on Memphis Metropolitan Statistical Area data.

And while Memphis, as the largest city in the MSA, has the lion’s share of economic disparity, those problems don’t just effect the city’s 600,000 citizens.

91. Last Word: Prince, Violent Crime Numbers, and a Parkside Post Script -

Prince. It’s hard to think of a musician with a more complete knowledge of music as a social and cultural force and the ability to let that force inhabit his music and what he wanted to accomplish.
It is that knowledge and its use from obscurity to the pinnacle of fame and acclaim to his own journey for personal fulfillment that, to me, defines what has been lost.
Music mattered to Prince unlike it had ever mattered before. All of the influences analyzed and synthesized by someone born in rock and roll’s first wave pushed forward in a sound that combined rock and roll and rhythm and blues and funk with purpose and confidence.
It wasn’t a denial or downplaying of any of those music categories – all were present sonically and culturally. No juggling or quick changes.
That was his talent and it’s hard to think of anyone who has been as knowledgeable, intentional and successful -- commercially and artistically – in that combination.
Prince is remembered here for not only playing the city’s largest arenas but for his legendary after shows on Beale Street that brought an entertainment insider cachet the district has rarely seen since its early 1980s reopening.
His was an intensity and sense of purpose rarely seen and possessed in such a way in the 60 years since rock and roll started in this very city, kicked off by both Rocket 88 and That’s Alright Mama.
So why couldn’t the city’s rock radio stations do more than talk about Prince into commercial breaks after another Nickelback rock block and actually play some of his music to acknowledge such a huge genre crossing artist?
Not cool.

92. Bridging a Divide -

The Mid-South is united by more than the Mississippi River, but that’s what it took to get the region’s mayors in the same room.

In the aftermath of the 2011 Mississippi River flood, damage stretched from Millington’s naval base to Memphis’ Beale Street. Leaders of the affected municipalities had to come together to apply for FEMA grants and plot their way out of devastation.

93. Legislature Passes Online Voter Registration Bill -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The General Assembly passed legislation Tuesday that would allow Tennesseans to register to vote online.

The House unanimously passed a bill that the Senate had earlier approved. The measure allows Tennesseans to go online to register to vote or update their registration records. Applicants would be directed to apply on paper if their name, date of birth or other identifying information could not be confirmed with the Department of Safety.

94. Mid-South Mayors Don’t See Barriers In Regionalism -

It took the Mississippi River’s devastating flood in 2011 for Mid-South leaders to consider greater collaboration among the area’s 10 counties and three states.

Mid-South mayors came together to plot their way out of disaster, and that convening set the stage for a formal alliance, the Mid-South Mayors’ Council.

95. Last Word: Pastner's Georgia Tech Post-Season, Who Filed and Greensward Invitations -

Not so fast with the off-season. There is a Memphis post-season after all.

And the Grizz found it Thursday like a light at the end of a long-tunnel where a lot of people slipped and fell and can’t get up.
The light was Houston flaming out at home to Phoenix without the Grizzlies having to make a basket.
It’s all about the math. Stay in school, young people.

96. US Government Sets Record for Failures to Find Files When Asked -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration set a record for the number of times its federal employees told disappointed citizens, journalists and others that despite searching they couldn't find a single page requested under the Freedom of Information Act, according to a new Associated Press analysis of government data.

97. Last Word: Hedgepeth Speaks, Josh Pastner's Future and Big Box Liquor -

Where else is there to begin but the Greensward controversy.
And we start with an email from Memphis City Council member Reid Hedgepeth in what is rapidly becoming a Last Word tradition and institution – the email in full.

98. Big Tech Companies Join Apple in Its Encryption Fight -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – The tech industry is starting to line up with Apple in its fight against the federal government over the encryption it uses to keep iPhones secure.

Earlier this week, a U.S. magistrate ordered Apple to help investigators break into an iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino mass shooters. Apple was given until Tuesday to challenge that ruling, but a person familiar with the case says Apple has been granted an extension until next Friday.

99. The Week Ahead: Feb. 8, 2016 -

Guys, there’s an important holiday coming up that forgetting about would mean immense trouble for you. Luckily, City & State is coming to the rescue. Head over to the Broad Avenue retailer on Friday, two days before Valentine’s Day, for “BYOB” (Bring your own Bailey’s).
Bring something like Bailey’s, Irish cream, whisky, whatever, and City & State will add it to any item you order over on the coffee side of the shop. Meanwhile, the shop has also invited the makers behind Paper & Clay and Question the Answer to be on hand with their wares to take some of the pressure off trying to decide what to buy your significant other for Valentine’s Day.

100. Collaborative Aims to Enhance Memphis Medical District -

In 2016, the Memphis Medical Center will see $1.8 million in upgrades and enhancements aimed at creating a unified, livable district. That’s the annual budget for the newly established Medical District Collaborative, a nonprofit entity made up of the area’s stakeholders and executives.