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Editorial Results (free)

1. US Consumer Prices, Retail Sales Rose in June -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. consumer prices rose modestly in June as the costs of gasoline and rent kept climbing, while sales at American retailers registered a healthy gain.

The Labor Department said Friday that consumer prices increased 0.2 percent last month, matching the gain in May. Prices are up 1 percent from a year ago, well below the Federal Reserve's 2 percent inflation target.

2. White House: Budget Deficit to Rise to $600 Billion -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House on Friday predicted that the government's budget deficit for the soon-to-end fiscal year will hit $600 billion, an increase of $162 billion over last year's tally and a reversal of a steady trend of large but improving deficits on President Barack Obama's watch.

3. US Producer Prices Rose in June at Fastest Pace in 13 Months -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Prices charged by U.S. producers rose in June at the fastest pace in 13 months, reflecting a big jump in the price of gasoline and other energy products.

The Labor Department says that its producer price index, which measures cost pressures before they reach the consumer, increased 0.5 percent in June. That was the largest one-month jump since a similar rise in May 2015.

4. Fed Beige Book Finds Modest Growth in Most of the US -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve says the economy and hiring continued to expand modestly across most of the United States from mid-May through June, leaving some firms struggling to find skilled workers.

5. US Claims for Jobless Aid Fall, Sign of Employer Resilience -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Fewer Americans sought unemployment benefits last week, a sign that U.S. workers still have job security despite recent tremors in the global economy.

The Labor Department said Thursday that weekly applications fell 16,000 to a seasonally adjusted 254,000. The 4-week average, which is less volatile, dipped slightly to 264,750.

6. Survey: US Businesses Add Decent 172,000 Jobs in June -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. companies added 172,000 jobs last month, according to a private survey, a sign that hiring may have recovered after a slowdown in April and May.

Payroll processor ADP said Thursday that service firms, such as retailers and transportation companies, added jobs at a solid pace in June. Manufacturers shed 21,000 jobs, while construction companies cut 5,000.

7. Fed Minutes Show Worries About Job Slowdown, Brexit -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve policymakers last month were unsure about the outlook for the U.S economy because of a sharp slowdown in job growth and the potential threat posed by a vote in Britain over leaving the European Union.

8. Survey: US Manufacturing Accelerates In June -

WASHINGTON (AP) – American manufacturing expanded for the fourth straight month in June, hitting the strongest reading in 16 months as the outlook for new orders and production improved.

9. Pat Summitt Latest Exception to Tennessee Flag-Lowering Rule -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam's order for flags to be flown at half-staff following the death of former University of Tennessee coach Pat Summitt is the latest exception to state protocols that normally reserve the honor for members of the military.

10. Memphis Financial Pros Brace for More Brexit Fallout -

Markets are a little like patients going in for a medical checkup. Neither one likes big surprises.

Nevertheless, that’s what everyone got at week’s end after the United Kingdom voted to pull out of the European Union. And the first phone call that First Tennessee Bank chief investment officer Jerry Laurain got on the morning after the unexpected vote result was the kind investment professionals always brace for after market-moving shocks.

11. Yellen Says Uncertainties Justify Cautious Approach -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Tuesday that the U.S. economy faces a number of uncertainties that require the Fed to proceed cautiously in raising interest rates.

12. For Minorities, Pain is Severe Decade After Housing Peaked -

WASHINGTON (AP) – When the U.S. housing bubble peaked a decade ago, soon to burst with far-reaching consequences, the pain was particularly severe for black and Hispanic Americans.

A disproportionate number of minorities succumbed to subprime mortgages and foreclosures and lost their homes. Their collective loss of home equity and shift toward rental housing could widen America's racial and ethnic divides well into the future, according to researchers and housing advocates.

13. US Consumer Prices Climbed in May -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. consumer prices rose a moderate amount in May, driven up by rising energy costs and the biggest increase in shelter costs in more than nine years.

Consumer prices increased 0.2 percent last month following a 0.4 percent April increase, the Commerce Department reported Thursday. Energy prices rose for a third straight month, but food costs fell.

14. County Schools Funding Compromise to Be Tested -

Fragile is probably the best way to describe the compromise that emerged this week from county commissioners to fully fund the Shelby County Schools budget for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

The plan that closes a $27.4 million gap between what the school system wants and what Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell proposed in April had eight votes on the 13-member commission in Wednesday, June 15, committee sessions.

15. Fed Leaves Rates Unchanged; No Hint on Timing of Next Hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve is keeping interest rates unchanged in light of an uncertain job market and offering no hints of when its next rate hike might occur.

The Fed noted in a statement Wednesday after its latest policy meeting that the pace of hiring has slowed even as the overall economy has improved.

16. Banc3 Touts Niche, Inks Its First Acquisition -

The way longtime Memphis banking executive Frank Cianciola thinks a community bank ought to organize itself and how it should be run in today’s bank climate is right there in his new company’s name.

17. With Economic View Hazy, a Wait-and-See Fed Message Expected -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It's all about the data. For months, the Federal Reserve has said that once economic data showed a consistently healthy economy, it would be time to resume raising interest rates. And for almost as long, the data has shown improvement and suggested that a rate hike was likely this summer.

18. Memphis-Based Banc3 Makes First Acquisition -

Memphis-based community bank holding company Banc3 Holdings Inc. has completed its acquisition of The Farmers Bank of Woodland Mills, Tenn.

19. US Job Openings Rise, Yet Employers Cut Back on Filling Them -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. employers advertised the most open jobs in nine months in April but pulled back on filling them, a sign of caution that may reflect concerns about tepid economic growth.

20. Mortgage Market Up 26 Percent In May -

Shelby County’s mortgage market continued heating up in May, and when combined with April’s numbers makes it likely the second quarter will end up well above where things stood at this time last year.

21. Consumer Borrowing Slowed in April -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Consumers slowed their borrowing in April after pushing up their debt levels by a record amount in March.

The Federal Reserve said Tuesday that total borrowing increased by $13.4 billion in April. That's down from a revised March increase of $28.4 billion, which had been the largest monthly increase on record.

22. Memphis-Based Banc3 Makes First Acquisition -

Memphis-based community bank holding company Banc3 Holdings Inc. has completed its acquisition of The Farmers Bank of Woodland Mills, Tenn.

23. Yellen: Economy Improving but Timing of Rate Hike is Unclear -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen indicated Monday that the U.S. economy is improving but remains defined by so many uncertainties that it's unclear when the Fed should resume raising interest rates.

24. US Gains Just 38K Jobs, Fewest in 5 Years; Rate at 4.7 Pct. -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. employers drastically slowed their hiring in May, adding just 38,000 jobs, the fewest in more than five years and a sign of concern after the economy barely grew in the first three months of the year.

25. Fed Member Brainard Urges Caution on Raising Rates -

WASHINGTON (AP) – An ally of Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen who has been a longtime skeptic of raising interest rates signaled Friday that the Fed should be in no hurry to act, especially after a bleak U.S. jobs report was released earlier in the day.

26. Applications for US Unemployment Benefits Dipped Last Week -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Fewer Americans applied for jobless aid last week, the third straight drop in a sign that the job market remains healthy despite a recent slowdown in hiring.

Weekly applications for unemployment aid dipped 1,000 to a seasonally adjusted 267,000, the Labor Department said Thursday. The four-week average, a less volatile measure, fell to 276,750.

27. Fed Survey Finds Modest Growth in Many Regions -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve said Wednesday that the economy grew at a modest pace in much of the country from April to mid-May, despite headwinds ranging from slower consumer spending to ongoing weakness in the manufacturing and the energy sectors.

28. US Consumer Spending Scores Biggest Jump in 6 Years -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Consumer spending surged in April by the largest amount in more than six years, led by a big jump in purchases of autos and other durable goods.

Consumer spending rose 1 percent last month after a flat reading in March, the Commerce Department reported Tuesday. Incomes were up a solid 0.4 percent, matching the March gain. Wages and salaries, the most important component of incomes, gained 0.5 percent.

29. US Home Prices Rise in March as Spring Buying Season Begins -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. home prices kept climbing in March as the spring home buying season began, but so far the higher costs haven't thwarted sales.

The Standard & Poor's/Case-Shiller 20-city home price index increased 5.4 percent in March compared with a year earlier, according to a report released Tuesday. That is the same annual gain as in February.

30. US Economy Showing Signs of Life After Slow Start to Year -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy is showing signs of more life after a less-than-stellar start to the year.

The government said Friday that first-quarter growth, while disappointing, wasn't as bad as first thought. And a number of more recent indicators are showing decent gains in key areas like consumer spending and housing.

31. Janet Yellen Says Fed Could Raise Rates in Coming Months -

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Friday that an interest rate hike would be appropriate in the coming months if the economy keeps improving.

While economic growth was relatively weak at the end of last year and beginning of this year, it appears to be picking up now based on recent data, Yellen said during a discussion at Harvard University.

32. Last Word: Grizzdale?, Rio Bound and The Ways of the City Council -

The Grizzlies just about have their new coach. He is David Fizdale who comes to Memphis from being an associate coach for the Miami Heat.

33. Most American Households Doing Better Financially -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Most American households say their finances have strengthened slightly, but nearly half report that they would struggle to meet $400 in expenses from an unexpected emergency.

34. Big Memphis Banks Getting Bigger -

The biggest banks based in Memphis keep getting bigger. New figures from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis through the first quarter show broad-based improvement among banks in the Memphis-area market, from growth in net income to loans to total asset size.

35. US Industrial Production Highest Since November '14 -

U.S. industrial production in April posted the biggest increase since November 2014 as utility output surged, the Federal Reserve said Tuesday.

Industrial output – which includes factories, mines and utilities – rose 0.7 percent from March. It had dropped the previous two months.

36. Poll: Two-Thirds of US Would Struggle to Cover $1,000 Crisis -

NEW YORK (AP) – Two-thirds of Americans would have difficulty coming up with the money to cover a $1,000 emergency, according to an exclusive poll released Thursday, a signal that despite years of recovery from the Great Recession, Americans' financial conditions remain precarious as ever.

37. US Industrial Production Rises 0.7 Percent in April -

U.S. industrial production in April posted the biggest increase since November 2014 as utility output surged, the Federal Reserve said Tuesday.

Industrial output – which includes factories, mines and utilities – rose 0.7 percent from March. It had dropped the previous two months.

38. Mortgage Market Up 31 Percent in April -

Shelby County’s mortgage market kicked off the second quarter by posting strong numbers for April, a continuation of where the mortgage market has been heading so far this year.

Last month’s total purchase mortgage volume stood at a little more than $168 million, up from April 2015’s total of a little more than $128 million, for a gain of 31 percent. That’s according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, www.chandlerreports.com.

39. Hiring Slowdown in April May Signal Caution About US Economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – American employers signaled their caution about a sluggish economy by slowing their pace of hiring in April after months of robust job growth.

At the same time, companies raised pay, and their employees worked more hours – a combination that lifted income and, if sustained, could quicken the U.S. expansion.

40. Tennessee Leads the Nation in Bankruptcies -

Tennessee has a model program for financial literacy in its public schools. All high school students must pass a personal finance course to graduate, and even kindergartners are learning about money under a new initiative to extend the curriculum to primary school.

41. Federal Reserve Keeps Key Rate Unchanged -

The Federal Reserve kept a key interest rate unchanged Wednesday, April 27, against the backdrop of a slowdown in U.S. and global growth and provided no hint of when its next rate hike may occur.

In a statement after its latest policy meeting, the Fed noted that the U.S. is enjoying solid job gains but also that “economic activity appears to have slowed.”

42. Grinding Recovery -

Michael Drury is watching the current U.S. presidential season with a combination of professional detachment and an air of resignation.

Detachment, because part of his job as chief economist at Memphis-based McVean Trading & Investments is to keep abreast of what makes economies around the world tick. Part of that, of course, means at least some degree of focus on the man – or, possibly a few months from now, the woman – who sits astride the dominant global economy.

43. US Economy Struggles at Start of Election Year -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It was not a great start for the U.S. economy.

With consumers and businesses turning cautious, the U.S. struggled to grow in the first three months of a presidential election year that is shining the spotlight on the economy's fitful recovery.

44. Fed Keeps Key Rate Unchanged; No Hint on Timing of Next Hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve kept a key interest rate unchanged Wednesday against the backdrop of a slowdown in U.S. and global growth and provided no hint of when its next rate hike may occur.

45. First Horizon Reverses Loss in First Quarter -

With its first quarter results, First Tennessee Bank’s parent company is off to the kind of start to the year any large banking organization would love to report – a reversal of losses, abundant capital to deploy and metrics like loans and deposits trending in the right direction.

46. Fed Survey Finds US Economy Still Expanding -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve said Wednesday that the economy kept expanding in late February and March, despite weakness in the energy sector and a slowdown in exports of some factory and farm products because of global weakness and the strong dollar.

47. Mortgage Market Up 3 Percent In March -

Shelby County’s mortgage market closed out the first quarter by posting March numbers that headed in the direction bankers and real estate professionals like to see.

Last month’s total purchase mortgage volume was a little more than $131 million, up by $3.4 million over March 2015’s total of almost $128 million, for a gain of about 3 percent. That’s according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, www.chandlerreports.com.

48. Rapid Transit Option, Route Changes Designed To Make MATA More Relevant -

Budget season is looming, and the Memphis Area Transit Authority is angling for an additional $8 million in operating funds and $5 million in capital improvement dollars to prevent significant cuts to service.

49. The Week Ahead: April 11-17 -

Let’s get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from New Memphis Institute's popular “Memphis 101” crash course to the music- and culture-filled Africa in April festival.

50. 4 Fed Leaders Face Questions About Their Powerful Jobs -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Janet Yellen was put on the spot about whether she made a mistake in raising interest rates in December. Ben Bernanke was quizzed about what it felt like to be called a traitor by the governor of Texas.

51. US Consumer Borrowing Rises at Weak Pace Again -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. consumers borrowed at a modest pace in February for the second month in a row, evidence of ongoing caution that has kept a lid on spending this year.

Borrowing rose at a 5.8 percent annual rate, the Federal Reserve said Thursday, just above January's 5 percent pace. January's climb was the smallest in more than two years. The use of revolving credit – mostly credit cards – rose just 3.7 percent after slipping in January. Total outstanding credit increased $17.2 billion to $3.57 trillion.

52. Fed Minutes Show Officials Wary of April Rate Hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve policymakers were split at their last meeting over how to respond to a slowing global economy, with two officials supporting a rate hike in March even as an opposing group felt that even raising rates in April would be too soon.

53. US Hiring Reaches 9-Year High; Job Openings Slip -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. hiring jumped to a nine-year high in February, a sign of robust business demand for new workers, while the number of open positions slipped.

The Labor Department reported Tuesday that 5.4 million people found jobs, a 5.8 percent jump from January and the most since November 2006. More Americans also quit their jobs. Both figures point to a healthier, more dynamic labor market.

54. Job-Seekers Return at Fastest Pace Since Before Recession -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Americans are flooding back into the job market at the fastest pace since before the Great Recession, encouraged by steady hiring and some signs of higher pay.

The flow has halted, at least temporarily, one of the economy's more discouraging trends: the sharp decline in the percentage of people either working or looking for work. That figure fell last year to a four-decade low.

55. The Week Ahead: April 4-10 -

Let’s get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about in the coming days, from an observance of the anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination to your first chance to visit Mud Island River Park this season.

56. Yellen Stresses That Fed Foresees Gradual Pace of Rate Hikes -

NEW YORK (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Tuesday that the Fed still envisions only a gradual pace of interest rate increases in light of global pressures that could affect the U.S. economy.

57. Survey: Economists More Pessimistic On Growth This Year -

NEW YORK (AP) – Business economists are more pessimistic, predicting weaker growth in corporate profit and the economy than they were late last year, a survey found.

The median estimate from economists surveyed by the National Association for Business Economics said business profits would rise 2 percent in 2016, down from the 5 percent growth forecast in December.

58. US Consumer Spending Posts Scant February Increase -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. consumers barely increased their spending in February and spent less in January than the government had earlier estimated. The pullback led some analysts to downgrade their expectations for the economy's growth during the January-March quarter.

59. Household Spending, Home Building Fuel Modest US Growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Consumer spending and home construction are helping sustain modest U.S. economic growth despite problems caused by a strong dollar, low oil prices and an excess of business stockpiles.

60. US Job Market's January Stumble Likely to Prove Temporary -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. job market stumbled a bit in January, yet data released Thursday suggests the slowdown was likely temporary.

Total hiring fell sharply that month, the Labor Department said, and the number of people quitting their jobs also dropped.

61. Memphis Investment Firm Preserver Partners Launches Mutual Fund -

For the smaller investors that Memphis-based investment firm Preserver Partners LLC would like to attract to its newly launched mutual fund, one of the selling points is right there in the firm’s name.

62. Fed Keeps Key Rates Unchanged; Foresees Fewer Hikes In 2016 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve is keeping a key interest rate unchanged in light of global pressures that risk slowing the U.S. economy.

As a result, Fed officials are forecasting that they will raise rates more gradually this year than they had envisioned in December. The officials now foresee two, rather than four, modest increases in their benchmark short-term rate during 2016.

63. CDC Guidelines Aim to Curb Painkiller Prescribing -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Prescription painkillers should not be a first-choice for treating common ailments like back pain and arthritis, according to new federal guidelines designed to reshape how doctors prescribe drugs like OxyContin and Vicodin.

64. Grimes Joins Barge Waggoner As Transportation Project Manager -

Keafur Grimes has joined Barge, Waggoner, Sumner and Cannon Inc. as transportation project manager, bringing with him more than 35 years of experience. In his new role, Grimes manages transportation planning and construction projects to meet federal, state and local regulations; ensures that projects meet quality compliance and assurance standards as well as customer needs; and are delivered on time and within budget.

65. With No Rate Hike Seen, Fed's Outlook on Economy is Awaited -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The financial world is awaiting the Federal Reserve's response to a critical question: How stable are the world's economies and financial markets?

Whatever picture the Fed sketches will help shape expectations of when it will resume the interest rate increases it began in December. That's when the Fed raised its key rate from record lows to reflect an economy finally strong enough 6½ years after the Great Recession ended to withstand higher loan rates.

66. US Consumer Borrowing Growth Slows in January -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. consumers bumped up their borrowing in January at the slowest rate pace in nearly three years, as outstanding revolving debt – such as credit cards – slipped from December.

67. Fed Vice Chair Sees Hints of Too-Low Inflation Moving Up -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve Vice Chairman Stanley Fischer said Monday that inflation in the U.S. may be starting to tick up from too-low levels, a key condition for further interest rate hikes.

68. Survey: Economists Split on Fed's Policy Stance -

The bulk of business economists expect the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates this year but their views on the Fed's policy stance are divided.

The survey by the National Association of Business Economics found that 75 percent of respondents expect the Federal Open Market Committee will raise its target for the federal funds rate above the current level by year-end 2016. That view is roughly on par with when the last survey was conducted in August. Approximately 39 percent expect two rate increases in 2016 and 17 percent expect three or more.

69. Strong US Job Growth in February Helps Dispel Recession Fears -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A robust February jobs report showcased a resilient U.S. economy just as fears of a new recession had begun to surface.

Economic reports in recent weeks had fueled anxieties about a looming downturn: Manufacturers were slumping. Stocks had plummeted. China was slowing sharply along with other emerging markets. The rising dollar had crushed exports.

70. Fed Survey Finds Weaker Exports Hurting Manufacturers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The economy was expanding in most of the country in January and February, helped by gains in consumer spending and home sales. But there were also rising headwinds from falling oil prices and a strong dollar that held back some sectors, the Federal Reserve said Wednesday.

71. US Economy Ends 2015 on Better Note, Starts 2016 With a Bang -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy got a double dose of good news Friday. Economic growth in the final three months of 2015 didn't slow as much as previously estimated, and consumers roared back to life in January, spending at the fastest clip in eight months.

72. Last Word: Carson Cancels, Haslam Endorses, Bank Numbers and Kobe's Exit -

Presidential campaigns and the security concerns that come with them aren’t something that comes up a lot in terms of press coverage in this election cycle.
But it has come up leading into what will be a busy weekend locally and in the region among the presidential contenders.
Republican candidate Ben Carson was scheduled to attend both Sunday services at Highpoint Church in East Memphis.
Leaders of the church emphasized it was a non-political event in which Carson would talk about his personal story and his faith but would not make a political pitch.
This is not unprecedented.
In 2008, Republican contender Mike Huckabee attended an ordination ceremony for two ministers at Bellevue Baptist Church in Cordova – an event that was billed also as a nonpolitical event.
And so the reporters who came to cover the candidate who would win the Tennessee Republican primary days later watched not from the sanctuary but from the room where Bellevue’s video and audio feeds are coordinated. Huckabee talked politics with reporters after the service as he made a run for some barbecue to-go from Corky’s on his way to another city on the campaign trail.

73. Fed Numbers Show Improving Banking Market -

The five largest Memphis-based banks all got bigger over the past year. That’s according to new figures from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis covering the fourth quarter, which show continued improvement among local banks in a variety of key metrics like loans and loan-loss reserves.

74. New Year, New Financial You -

With the new year now well underway, you might have spent January tackling fitness or organizational goals, but many experts believe the most powerful resolution that you can adopt is to focus on your financial well-being.
With most of 2016 ahead of us, and tax season right around the corner, there’s no better time to take a look at your finances and make a plan to increase your financial stability for this year and beyond. 

75. Minutes Show Fed Worried By Global Turmoil -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve policymakers expressed growing concerns at their meeting last month about potential threats to the U.S. economy, including turbulence in financial markets, plunging oil prices and slowing growth in China and other emerging markets.

76. The Big Uh-Oh: Global Economy Shaky and Cavalry May Not Come -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Eight years after the financial crisis, the world is coming to grips with an unpleasant realization: serious weaknesses still plague the global economy, and emergency help may not be on the way.

77. Yellen: Too Early to Determine Impact of Global Developments -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen cautioned Thursday that global economic pressures pose risks to the U.S. economy but said it's too soon to know whether those risks are severe enough to alter the Fed's interest-rate policies.

78. Yellen: Persistent Economic Weakness Could Slow Rate Hikes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen cautioned Wednesday that global weakness and falling financial markets could depress the U.S. economy's growth and slow the pace of Fed interest rate hikes.

79. US Businesses Post More Open Jobs; Quits Rise to 9-Year High -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. companies advertised more available jobs in December and more Americans quit, trends that could lift wages in the coming months.

The number of job openings jumped 4.9 percent to 5.6 million, the most since July, the Labor Department said Tuesday. And quits increased 6.9 percent to nearly 3.1 million, the highest in more than nine years.

80. Stocks Lose More Ground as Jobs Report Disappoints -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks posted steep losses Friday, ending the week with broad declines, as investors fretted over a report showing that U.S. job creation slowed last month.

Technology stocks fell especially hard, and shares of LinkedIn had their worst day in history.

81. Many See Cause for Optimism Despite Slower US Job Growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Consider looking past January's so-so job growth.

At first glance, Friday's government report on U.S. hiring was a downer — 151,000 added jobs, well below the pace of the previous few months.

82. Haslam Outlines Conservative Approach to Surplus -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam told state legislators Monday, Feb. 1, that the state’s estimated $500 million surplus has to be balanced with a global economy that could change for the worse.

“Our approach is to realize that good times are not going to last forever,” Haslam said in his annual state of the state address on Capitol Hill in Nashville.

83. Haslam Touts New Spending On Teacher Raises, Urges Caution In Use of Reserve -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam told state legislators Monday, Feb. 1, that the state’s estimated $500 million surplus has to be balanced with a global economy that could change for the worse.

“Our approach is to realize that good times are not going to last forever,” Haslam said in his annual state of the state address on Capitol Hill in Nashville.

84. US Consumer Spending Flat, Savings Rate at 3-Year High -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. consumers kept their spending flat in December and instead boosted their savings rate to the highest level in three years.

Consumer spending was unchanged in December after rising 0.5 percent in November, the Commerce Department reported Monday. Incomes increased 0.3 percent, matching November's gain.

85. Fed Voices Concern About Global Economic Pressures -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve sounded a note of concern Wednesday about how global pressures could affect the U.S. economy, while keeping a key interest rate unchanged.

Six weeks after it raised rates from record lows, the Fed took stock of a more perilous international picture that could alter its plans for further raising rates. The statement it issued after its latest policy meeting signaled that the Fed could slow future rate hikes if financial market losses and global weakness don't abate.

86. American Consumers Showing More Confidence in Economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A strong job market and low gasoline prices helped boost U.S. consumer confidence again this month.

The Conference Board on Tuesday said that its consumer confidence index rose to 98.1 in January from 96.3 in December, the second straight monthly gain. The business research group said Americans were more confident about the future, though their assessment of current economic conditions was unchanged from December.

87. A Month After Raising Rates, Fed Faces Darker Global Economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Since the Federal Reserve raised interest rates from record lows last month, the global picture has darkened. Stock markets have plunged. Oil prices have skidded. China's leaders have struggled to steer the world's second-biggest economy.

88. Some Funds Offer to Tame Market's Chaos, But at a Price -

NEW YORK (AP) — Freaked out by the stock market's big swings?

Then the investment industry has something it built just for you: funds that hope to offer a steadier ride. That sounds especially comforting after this year's jarring start for markets, in which drops of more than 1 percent have become typical. But be careful, the funds carry their own risks.

89. NCRM Forum on Sports and Race Features Lively Dialogue -

Professional athletes pay a price when they speak out on issues outside of or larger than the games they play.

And ESPN commentator and retired NBA player Jalen Rose draws a distinction between the way players in Major League Baseball and players in “black sports” are treated by their teams.

90. First Horizon CEO: 2015 Was a ‘Very Good Year’ -

The top brass at First Tennessee Bank’s parent company kicked off their first quarterly earnings presentation to analysts in 2016 with frequent allusion to some favorite themes.

91. Insider Q&A: Allianz Strategist Hooper on Market Turmoil -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Last year was the stock market's first down year since 2008, and this year has opened with a thud. The market is down 8 percent in the first two weeks of trading, the worst start to a year ever.

92. Last Word: Secrets In A Small Town, Bullard Bounce and Beale & Mud Island -

Munford! A winning Powerball ticket for the largest jackpot ever was sold in Munford and that warrants a rare exclamation mark.
Possibly two when you consider that small towns are supposed to be places where it is nearly impossible to keep a secret – at least from the other folks in the town.
The fact that it was sold at Naifeh’s, a long-standing Tipton County business institution adds to the story.
The person who bought the ticket in Munford holds one of three winning tickets which comes out to about $582 million for that ticket.
That is roughly the size of the city of Memphis operating budget.
There was a similar mystery underway Thursday in Dyersburg where someone bought a Powerball ticket worth a paltry $2 million. Probably worth an exclamation mark if I wasn’t over the limit and already feeling the unspoken disdain of my reporting brethren who are judging me harshly as you read this.

93. Fed Official: Low Oil Prices Affecting Central Bank Action -

A key Fed official assured Memphis business leaders during a breakfast address Thursday, Jan. 14, that interest rates won’t climb dramatically this year.

Jim Bullard, the president and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, told the Economic Club of Memphis that rates today are “crazy low compared to the historical experience in the U.S.” and will “remain accommodative well into the future.”

94. No Great Places to Shelter From This Market Turmoil -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stock prices are crumbling around the world, but the usual place for investors to go for safety, bonds, can't provide as much cover as usual.

Bonds are still doing their job this year as investors' best friends during a downturn: They're holding up better than stocks, cushioning the blow for balanced investors. High-quality, investment-grade U.S. bonds have returned 0.9 percent through Wednesday, while the Standard & Poor's 500 index has lost 7.4 percent on worries about the strength of the global economy.

95. Shelby County Mortgage Activity Solid in 2015 -

The Shelby County mortgage market had a strong 2015, and lenders expect the momentum to continue for the foreseeable future.

Among loans made at the time of purchase, banks and mortgage lenders made 9,368 mortgages in Shelby County during 2015, up 11 percent from the 8,470 mortgages during 2014, according to the latest data from real estate information company Chandler Reports, chandlerreports.com.

96. Shelby County Housing Market 'Back to Normal' in 2015 -

The Memphis and Shelby County housing market moved closer to prerecession levels in 2015 as the year closed with the highest home sales revenue recorded since 2007.

There were 16,176 sales recorded last year, up 3 percent from 2014, according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, chandlerreports.com.

97. US Employers Hire at Robust Pace, Defying Global Trends -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy is motoring ahead despite slowing global growth that caused upheavals in financial markets around the world this week.

Employers added a robust 292,000 jobs last month, and the unemployment rate stayed low at 5 percent, the Labor Department said Friday. Job gains in the October-December quarter averaged 284,000, the best three-month increase since last January.

98. US Consumer Borrowing Rose $14 Billion in November -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. consumers boosted their borrowing in November, as higher credit card spending partially offset slower growth in auto and student loans.

Consumer borrowing rose $14 billion in November to a fresh record high of $3.53 trillion, the Federal Reserve said Friday. Economists believe that strong job gains in the labor market will boost consumer confidence and convince households to finance purchases by taking on more debt.

99. The Week Ahead: Jan. 11, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from drones and robot research to the Grizzlies’ annual MLK symposium at the National Civil Rights Museum...

100. Fed Minutes: Some Saw December Rate Hike as 'Close Call' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Despite the Federal Reserve's unanimous vote to raise a key interest rate last month, some policymakers viewed their decision as a "close call" because of stubbornly low inflation.