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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: T.A. Talks Memphis, EDGE Debate and Politics, Lots of Politics -

Grizz season opener at the Forum Wednesday is a win over NOLA 103 – 91. And Tony Allen’s Grizz jersey is retired. The day before, Allen wrote a piece for The Players’ Tribune on the Memphis experience and it is just about the best thing that will happen to you all day. He just walks right off the court and into the soul of this place.

2. Corporations to Keep Tax Break Lost by Millions of Americans -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Millions of Americans would lose a prized tax break under President Donald Trump's sweeping revamp of the tax code, but corporations would get to keep it.

The Republican proposal would eliminate the federal deduction for state and local taxes, a widely popular break used by some 44 million Americans, especially in high-tax, Democratic-leaning states like New York, New Jersey, California and Illinois. But corporations, which pay billions in local property levies and state income taxes, wouldn't be affected.

3. How Should ‘Good People’ React to Racist Ideology? -

Southern nationalists planning to lead rallies in Murfreesboro and Shelbyville are banking on Republican ideas and protection to spread their views, a burr under the saddle for state lawmakers in the controlling party.

4. Relaxation Awaits in Puerto Vallarta -

I napped. I never nap. But off and on for a few hours a nap seemed like a perfectly reasonable activity as I laid in the shade of our poolside Bali bed cabana at Villa Premiere Boutique Hotel & Romantic Getaway in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico.

5. Last Word: Tigers Make Top 25, Pfizer's Next Tax Break and Shepherds Creek -

The Tigers make the top 25 ESPN Power Rankings for college football with the Liberty Bowl victory Saturday over Navy 30 – 27. And Tigers coach Mike Norvell responds to the pre-game arrest of a player on a rape charge.

6. The Week Ahead: Oct. 16-22 -

Hey, Memphis! Fall is definitely in the air now, as the slate of festivals and fun outdoor activities continue to roll on in the Bluff City. The Memphis Grizzlies open their 2017-2018 season at FedExForum against Tony Allen’s new team and don’t be surprised if you start seeing some ghosts and goblins by this weekend.

7. Last Word: Athens Bound, The Amazon Campaign and All Things Grizz -

This may be the most covered meeting of the Tennessee Historical Commission ever – the meeting Friday in Athens, Tennessee where Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland will attempt to make the case for the commission granting him permission to remove the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest in Health Sciences Park. The chairman of the commission has already told Strickland in writing that the commission will not take up the matter – not even discuss it. Strickland hopes he will at least be heard. And he says the city should have a decision by mid-November and is adamant that this cannot be put off into the new year.

8. What the NBA Needs is an Epic Upset -

One thing the NBA is not is international soccer. Which is to say, Trinidad and Tobago does not make magic here.

After T&T defeated the United States, 2-1, in a qualifier game for the World Cup, the Americans were eliminated. The Trinidad and Tobago team, not incidentally, already knew it was not advancing to the World Cup.

9. Designs for 3 Downtown Redevelopment Projects Approved -

Plans for three prominent Downtown redevelopment projects received the architectural green light Wednesday afternoon, Oct. 11, from the Downtown Memphis Commission’s Design Review Board.

Developer 495 TN Partners, which includes partners William Orgel, Jay Lindy and Adam Slovis, will be able to begin construction on Phase II of the Tennessee Brewery development at the southeast corner of Tennessee Street and Butler Avenue in the South Main Historic Arts District.

10. Steele Joins Southern Growth Studio’s Anthropology Team -

April Steele has joined Southern Growth Studio as a business anthropologist, responsible for collecting and analyzing data to evaluate existing and potential products and services. Steele’s hire comes as the Memphis-based innovation consulting firm grows its applied anthropology practice. Using qualitative social research methods like ethnography, the anthropology team steers the innovation process, conducting primary research to distill and communicate key insights to clients.

11. Last Word: A Centennial, Corker Controversy Goes Wider and Ranked Choice Votes -

One of the most influential political figures in the city and state in the last half of the 20th century turned 100 years old MondayLewis Donelson, cofounder and senior counsel at Baker Donelson. A direct descendant of Andrew Jackson, the president from Tennessee who made the mold of the modern Democratic Party, Donelson started out, of course, as a Democrat. But by the 1950s was shaping the modern local and state Republican parties.

12. Attorney Lewis Donelson Marks 100th Birthday -

Memphis attorney Lewis Donelson marked his 100th birthday Monday, Oct. 9.

The senior counsel and co-founder of Baker Donelson has had a 70-year career in the law and had been active in politics before he founded the law firm in 1954, including the founding of the modern Republican Party in Tennessee and Shelby County at a time when political boss E.H. Crump would not even allow the party to hold primaries in Shelby County.

13. Week Ahead: Oct. 9-15 -

Hey, Memphis! The real NBA and college basketball seasons creep closer with teasing events this week and the schedule of fun things to do is highlighted by the second annual Memphis Food & Wine Festival Saturday evening. Here’s toasting to a great week.

14. Outdoors Retailer REI Planning First Memphis Store -

5895 Poplar Ave.
Memphis, TN 38119

Permit Amount: $900,000

Owner: Weingarten Realty

Tenant: REI

Details: Seattle, Washington-based sporting and camping goods retailer REI has filed a $900,000 building permit application for tenant improvement in the former Sports Authority building at 5895 Poplar Ave. in the Ridgeway Trace shopping center.

15. October 6-12, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

2016: On the cover of The Memphis News, the opening of the $52 million “Heart of the Park” project at Shelby Farms Park turns a lot of heads and prompts a lot of new traffic on land that was once a prison farm and had been slated in the 1970s for residential construction. “I feel like it’s a city that’s reinvented itself,” Shelby Farms Park Conservancy director Jen Andrews says in the cover story. “It didn’t change who it was, but it reinvented itself – a sprawling city that chose to reconnect itself. … Memphis has become a city that believes in making things better for the public realm.”

16. Last Word: Bonus For the Head Tiger, Brooks Downtown? and Harris Runs -

A $100,000 bonus from the University of Memphis board of trustees for U of M president David Rudd at Wednesday’s trustees meeting. The bonus is from private funds raised by the university foundation. The board also approved a paid parental leave policy – specifically the funding for that policy. And it reviewed scaled-back plans for the $30 million new rec center for students that will incorporate some of the existing rec center.

17. Tigers QB Ferguson Named Campbell Trophy Semifinalist -

University of Memphis senior quarterback Riley Ferguson has been named as a semifinalist for the National Football Foundation’s William V. Campbell Trophy, presented annually to the nation’s top football scholar-athlete.

18. Vegas Shooting Renews Debate on High-Capacity Ammo Magazines -

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) – The rapid-fire shooting that killed or injured hundreds of concertgoers in Las Vegas has highlighted the easy availability of ammunition magazines that allow shooters to fire dozens of shots without having to reload.

19. Harris Talks ‘Radical’ Action on Confederate Monuments to Build Pressure -

City Council attorney Allan Wade says Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration and the council are not “in different places” when it comes to removing Confederate monuments from city parks.

20. Nashville Mayor Presents Stadium Financing Proposal for MLS Bid -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Mayor Megan Barry has proposed a $250 million stadium deal as the final piece in Nashville's bid for a Major League Soccer expansion team.

21. Moral Mondays Organized by Religious Leaders Who Talk of ‘Fragmentation’ -

A group of 25 local religious leaders plan three “Moral Mondays” gatherings over the next six months to discuss social justice issues before the April observances of the 50th anniversary of the sanitation workers strike and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

22. Week Ahead: Oct. 2-9 -

Hey, Memphis! Prepare to rock out this week as the Mempho Music Festival hits Shelby Farms Park and Wilco plays The Orpheum. Plus, Beale Street memorializes one of its own, Memphis legal pros discuss the Confederate monuments issue, and much more in The Week Ahead…

23. DHL Planning New Memphis Distribution Facility -

0 Tchulahoma Rd.
Memphis, TN 38118

Tenant: DHL Supply Chain

Landlord: Belz Enterprises

24. Lenoir Starts Bid for County Mayor with Mix of Optimism and Challenge -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir’s campaign for Shelby County mayor will talk about the economic resurgence in Memphis and Shelby County as a challenge to address longstanding problems.

And as Lenoir formally launched the long-anticipated bid Thursday, Sept. 28, in East Memphis, he touted his business experience and background as well as his two terms as county trustee.

25. Harding To Move Lower Schools To Cherry Road in Consolidation -

Harding Academy of Memphis is consolidating its senior-kindergarten through 12th grade students into one campus moving its lower school students from campuses in Cordova on Macon Road and East Memphis on Colonial Road to what is currently its upper school campus at 1100 Cherry Road.

26. For Fizdale, Conley, Speaking Out Is Part of The Job Now -

This conversation? No, they didn’t imagine it. Grizzlies coach David Fizdale and point guard Mike Conley did not enter the NBA thinking they would someday be talking about national protests, a president that shoots from the lip, or Confederate statues in Memphis.

27. Fourth Bluff Effort Moves Toward More Permanent Plans -

You can still see the words on the surface of Riverside Drive from the RiverPlay area that took over the street between the Mississippi River and Memphis Parks during the summer.

“In Memphis We Ball” reads the chipped white lettering on the asphalt, with the word “ball” almost unrecognizable.

28. Haslam Less Clear Than Usual On Run for US Senate -

Gov. Bill Haslam usually gives an answer to every question, even if his subjects and verbs don’t agree. But when it comes to a potential run for the U.S. Senate, he stumbles.

In fact, his response was almost inaudible just a week before his pal U.S. Sen. Bob Corker said he wouldn’t seek another term at the end of 2018.

29. Shafer: Graceland, FedExForum Should Compromise on Whitehaven Arena -

Shelby County Commission chairwoman Heidi Shafer says there may be some kind of compromise still to be made when it comes to a performance venue at Graceland in Whitehaven.

30. For Memphis Libraries, ‘Start Here’ Message is Reality -

At a time when it might seem that the usefulness of public libraries is waning, they are reemerging as 21st century community hubs — democratic spaces where people from every walk of life can encounter humanity, the elusive element technology cannot conquer.

31. Opera Memphis Kicks Off Effort to Diversify Audience -

The typical opera company busies itself with the normal things you might imagine – staging lavish productions, selling tickets and working to fill impressive venues with as many patrons as possible.

32. Graham-Cassidy Bill Withdrawn Amidst Local Protest -

Ahead of an increasingly tentative vote on the latest Republican health care proposal in the U.S. Senate, about 100 critics of the Graham-Cassidy bill rallied Downtown Monday, Sept. 25, to call for U.S. Sens. Bob Corker and Lamar Alexander of Tennessee to vote against the proposal.

33. Grizzlies Begin Life Without Z-Bo and TA, But Cling to Grit & Grind -

Another Memphis Grizzlies Media Day is done, the first one in this seven-year playoff run after the departure of Tony Allen and Zach Randolph.

34. Fairgrounds Proposal Coming Into Focus -

Aaron Shafer saw the writing on the wall, so to speak, at the second public gathering toward a redevelopment plan for the Fairgrounds last week.

35. The Week Ahead: Sept. 25-Oct. 1 -

Are you ready to ride into the coming week, Memphis? There are some big two-wheel events and races to take in along with performances, fine dining, even a vintage antique market at Agricenter International. Check out more you need to know about in The Week Ahead...

36. First Horizon CEO: Banking Industry Needs Consolidation -

The CEO of First Tennessee Bank’s parent company told attendees of a financial conference in New York City in recent days that the banking industry could benefit from more consolidation.

37. Grizz Broadcast Schedule Has 4 National TV Games -

The Memphis Grizzlies are scheduled to make four national television appearances during the upcoming season (one preseason and three regular season).

The 16th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day Game will be broadcast on TNT, and three contests will be on ESPN, including a preseason tilt on Wednesday, Oct. 11, against the Houston Rockets at 8:30 p.m. at FedExForum.

38. Last Word: GPAC's Grove, Fairgrounds Tea Leaves and Grizz Money Matters -

The Germantown Performing Arts Center has plans for an open-air performance center to be called “The Grove at GPAC” – the latest consideration in what is becoming a vibrant discussion about the capacity for concerts within Shelby County. And it is also a discussion about concert venues that can do other things like festival and movies.

39. September 22-28, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

1933: George Barnes, better known as “Machine Gun Kelly,” and three other people were arrested at a house on East Rayner Street for the kidnapping of oil millionaire Charles Urschel. Barnes was the first nationally known fugitive to be captured by the FBI. On the run from the FBI, Barnes returned to Memphis, the city where he had grown up and attended Central High School.
The house on Rayner Street belonged to his former brother-in-law. After a restless night that probably involved a lot of drinking, Barnes heard the next day’s newspaper hit the front porch and unlocked and opened the door to retrieve it. He didn’t lock the door.
Confronted by agents with their guns drawn, Barnes allegedly said, “Don’t shoot, G-men,” according to accounts of the capture over the decades. The FBI’s own website acknowledges that didn’t happen, attributing the “G-men” name for FBI agents to a comment Barnes made after he was in jail. Still other research shows it was Kelly’s wife and accomplice, Kathryn, who used the term.
Most Memphians didn’t know Barnes was Machine Gun Kelly until the national publicity about the arrest and Barnes, in the Shelby County jail, began recognizing and calling out the names of police officers he knew.

40. Widening The Path -

He asked to only be a small part of this story. But when you come up with an idea so good, so powerful, that it’s named as one of the top 20 ideas in the Forbes Change the World Competition, you are the story’s foundation.

41. Grizzlies Broadcast Schedule Includes 4 National TV Games -

The Memphis Grizzlies are scheduled to make four national television appearances during the upcoming season (one preseason and three regular season).

The 16th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day Game will be broadcast on TNT, and three contests will be on ESPN, including a preseason tilt on Wednesday, Oct. 11, against the Houston Rockets at 8:30 p.m. at FedExForum.

42. Bandele Crafts Cultural Hub for Black Artists -

Early one clear September morning, Overton Square is still half-asleep, the parking lot next to Hattiloo Theatre empty save a few cars. In 12 hours, Hattiloo’s lobby will pulse with a throng of guests at the opening night of “Fetch Clay, Make Man,” the theater’s current production. But for now, Ekundayo Bandele, Hattiloo’s founder and CEO, is leaning back in a desk chair, dreaming aloud about the year 2022.

43. Memphis Food & Wine Festival Returns to Celebrate Local Talent -

Back in 2014, when food blogger and Memphis public relations professional Cara Greenstein was attending the Austin Food & Wine Festival, she remembers thinking how great it would be if Memphis could host its own version of such an event.

44. 100-Year-Old Question -

The Memphis Brooks Museum of Art was already more than 10 years old when Sears, Roebuck & Co. opened its nearby Crosstown store in 1927 and the rest of the neighborhood began to fill in, so it was shock for many Memphians to hear about the possibility of the iconic institution leaving the only home it’s ever known.

45. Events -

Revolutions Bicycle Co-Op will hold a Fix a Flat Class Monday, Sept. 18, from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Revolutions, 1000 S. Cooper St. (at First Congregational Church). The class covers everything you need to know about tires and tubes. Learn why you get flats and the best ways to prevent them in the future. Cost is free for Revolutions members and $10 for nonmembers. Visit revolutionsmemphis.com for details and tickets.

46. Commission Delays Votes On Finance Ordinances -

Shelby County Commissioners delayed votes Monday, Sept. 11, on a set of three resolutions dealing with county finances, citing the need for further discussion and questions.

The first of the three is a supplement to the interlocal agreement on financing the Memphis and Shelby County Sports Authority to pay the debt on FedExForum. The agreement allows revenue from a 2015 increase in the hotel-motel tax to be used to finance renovations of the Memphis Cook Convention Center as well as the debt on the arena.

47. Editorial: Brooks’ Current Home As Important As Its Future -

It’s hard to imagine Overton Park without the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art. The park itself was just shy of 15 years old when the Brooks opened in a beaux-arts-style marble box in 1916, awaiting art objects to fill its space.

48. Last Word: Juvenile Court Return, Berlin Boyd's Week and Tony Allen Thoughts -

Two weeks ago Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael was on Behind The Headlines in a half-hour conversation about the court and federal oversight that drew quite a bit of reaction to Michael’s strong opinions about the need to end that oversight. Even before that reaction we had planned to do a second part of the conversation with those who favor continued federal oversight of the court.

49. All Eyes on Shoop’s Defense Against Gators -

Butch Jones will coach one of the biggest games of his Tennessee career against Florida on Saturday.

It’s an even bigger game for UT defensive coordinator Bob Shoop.

Shoop was hired Jan. 9, 2016, from Penn State to fortify Tennessee’s defense, arriving with much hoopla and great expectations. So far, he has not delivered like he did at Penn State (2014-15) and Vanderbilt (2011-13).

50. Josh Roberts Says Yes to Growth -

When Josh Roberts was growing up in the 1980s, Matchbox cars were still made of steel. One day, a young Roberts became curious about just how many of the toy cars he might be able to fit into the garbage disposal in his family’s Salt Lake City home. Roberts – now client engagement director at Southern Growth Studio – observes wryly, “It didn’t go well for the garbage disposal.”

51. Lawsuit Targets Searches of Electronic Devices at US Border -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A federal lawsuit filed Wednesday claims the U.S. government's growing practice of searching laptops and cellphones at the border is unconstitutional because electronic devices now carry troves of private personal and business information. The government has vociferously defended its searches as critical to protecting the homeland.

52. Commission Delays Votes On Finance Ordinances -

Shelby County Commissioners delayed votes Monday, Sept. 11, on a set of three resolutions dealing with county finances, citing the need for further discussion and questions.

The first of the three is a supplement to the interlocal agreement on financing the Memphis and Shelby County Sports Authority to pay the debt on FedExForum. The agreement allows revenue from a 2015 increase in the hotel-motel tax to be used to finance renovations of the Memphis Cook Convention Center as well as the debt on the arena.

53. Old-School Con -

After a disappointing turnout last year, the 2017 Memphis Comic Expo nearly didn’t happen. But last year, a little before Christmas, Donald Juengling’s father passed away. Richard Juengling had been a big fan of his son’s efforts to stage a creator-oriented comic convention in Memphis.

54. County Commission Joins City Call to Remove Confederate Monuments -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a resolution Monday, Sept. 11, backing the city’s efforts to remove Confederate monuments with a waiver from the Tennessee Historical Commission. The resolution by commissioner Walter Bailey also backs the Memphis City Council’s move to an ordinance that could take down the monuments after the Oct. 13 decision if the historical commission does not grant the waiver.

55. Does Memphis Have Right Mojo for Amazon HQ? -

Amazon.com’s announcement last week that it is actively searching for a second headquarters location caught the attention of governors, mayors and development officials from all over the country hoping to hit the jackpot.

56. Right Response -

For many people in the Mid-South with barriers to getting to the appropriate health care professionals, sometimes a 911 call has seemed like their only option. That’s all changing now thanks to a new collaborative effort between the Memphis Fire Department’s Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and local health care organizations, area hospitals, nonprofits and philanthropists.

57. Top US Fall Destinations -

Fall is my favorite time of year. The cooling temperatures, changing colors and football season all combine to make for a fun time of year.

It’s also a great time to travel. Fall means shoulder season in many top destinations, making travel a bit more affordable. But there also are some destinations that just seem to make more sense from Labor Day to the start of the holiday season at Thanksgiving. Here are my top U.S. fall destinations on my radar for travel this year.

58. Memphis Heritage Catalogs Historic Local Properties -

Memphis Heritage has announced the completion of a comprehensive catalog book, three years in the making, of all the historic properties in the city of Memphis and Shelby County that are listed in the National Park Service’s National Register of Historic Places.

59. Fewer Americans Buying Insurance in Coastal Areas -

PLANTATION, Fla. (AP) – Amanda Spartz nearly did not renew her home's flood insurance policy after her first year in Florida. Two hurricanes came close to the Fort Lauderdale suburbs last year, but they didn't hit and her home isn't in a high-risk flood zone. She figured she could put the $450 annual premium, due next week, to another use.

60. Review: Deadly Tennessee Fire Could Become 'New Normal' -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Drought-stricken Great Smoky Mountains National Park was not prepared for last year's catastrophic fire, and climate change is among the factors that will likely make conditions that led to the disaster the "new normal" for the park, according to a federal review released Thursday.

61. The Week Ahead: Sept. 4-10 -

Hello, Memphis – and Happy Labor Day! Hopefully the promise of an exciting football season and Memphis Redbirds playoff games will help ease you back into work mode after the three-day weekend. Both are in store – along with Goat Days and much more – in The Week Ahead...

62. ‘Light It Gold’ Plans in Place For Childhood Cancer -

The Chris Hope Foundation plans to flood the city of Memphis with a sea of gold in September in recognition of Childhood Cancer Awareness Month.

The foundation, along with families affected by childhood cancer, city of Memphis officials and the community will gather Saturday, Sept. 2, at Tiger Lane for the Light It Gold Memphis kickoff. The evening of awareness, games, entertainment, food and more takes place under the glow of the Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium, which will be lit up in gold for the occasion.

63. Big River Crossing Wins International Design Honor -

Big River Crossing has won the top honor among projects receiving 2017 Excellence in Design Awards from the Waterfront Center, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit that helps communities worldwide make wise long-term uses of waterfront resources.

64. Wizards Return -

The past couple of years has seen the return of pinball tables across the Mid-South, with groups like Memphis Pinball hosting weekly gatherings at places like Memphis Made Brewing and the new pinball arcade in Millington, The Retro.

65. Council to Weigh Statues, Funding Projects -

Memphis City Council members have a busy agenda Tuesday, Sept. 5: continued discussion regarding bypassing a Tennessee Historical Commission waiver process to remove Confederate monuments and a recently enacted ban on sewer connections to properties outside the city limits.

66. Vols, Jackets Each Eager to Make Statement -

Enough of the talk. Enough of the speculation. Let’s play some football.

Tennessee starts its fifth season of the Butch Jones coaching era on Monday night against Georgia Tech at the new Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta. Kickoff is 8 p.m. (TV: ESPN).

67. Tanney Hopes Nashville is Not His Last Stop -

By the time you read this, it is possible that Alex Tanney might have already thrown his last pass as a member of the Tennessee Titans.

But Tanney, even if he doesn’t make the 53-man roster in Tennessee, says he won’t stop pursuing his dream. As the Titans closed out the preseason in Kansas City on Thursday, the dread of impending roster cuts turned into reality this weekend around the NFL.

68. Memphis Receives First Check From Airbnb -

Nationally and in Memphis, the hotel room supply, room demand, occupancy rate and average daily room rate were all on the rise year-to-date through July, pointing to a healthy market overall.

That’s according to information compiled by STR presented at the Southern Lodging Summit Wednesday morning, Aug. 30, at the Cook Convention Center in Memphis. The Southern Lodging Summit is an annual event hosted by Pinkowski & Co. and the Metropolitan Memphis Hotel and Lodging Association.

69. Sharing Their Lessons As Business Owners -

One of the reasons that Deni and Patrick Reilly’s popular Downtown restaurant The Majestic Grille has endured for 11 years is because of the way they’ve learned to adapt to the limitations of the food business.

70. Latino & Local -

Mauricio Calvo has heard the saying “all politics is local” in the course of making and maintaining connections through the Latino Memphis organization he leads. But prior to this year, political connections for the organization were more about getting needed services and building long-term relationships over time.

71. Frayser Battle Renewed -

A plan to expand a construction landfill near Whitney Elementary School is drawing a lot of resistance from many Frayser stakeholders in advance of its Sept. 7 meeting with the Land Use Control Board.

72. ‘Light It Gold Memphis’ Raises Childhood Cancer Awareness -

The Chris Hope Foundation plans to flood the city of Memphis with a sea of gold in September in recognition of Childhood Cancer Awareness Month.

The foundation, along with families affected by childhood cancer, city of Memphis officials and the community will gather Saturday, Sept. 2, at Tiger Lane for the Light It Gold Memphis kickoff. The evening of awareness, games, entertainment, food and more takes place under the glow of the Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium, which will be lit up in gold for the occasion.

73. Regions, FedEx Backing Business Seminar -

Regions Bank is joining FedEx Corp. to provide financial backing for a seminar for business owners this week that will include 20 Regions bankers providing customized business coaching for entrepreneurs.

74. Boyle Insurance President Gresham A Trailblazer for Women in Industry -

In 1973, Cindi Gresham was a biology major at the University of Memphis – then called Memphis State University – when she was offered a part-time job, and later a full-time job, at a now-defunct Memphis insurance agency.

75. A Puzzle for Central Bankers: Solid Growth But Low Inflation -

JACKSON HOLE, Wyoming (AP) – Against a backdrop of strengthening growth but chronically low inflation, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen and other central bankers are taking their measure of the global economy at their annual conference in the shadow of Wyoming's Grand Teton Mountains.

76. A Matter Worth Raising -

SYMBOLS AND FLAGS MATTER. Nora approached the concierge desk at the General Walker Hotel in Obersalzberg, Germany, just below Hitler’s infamous retreat, the Eagle’s Nest, and just above the town of Berchtesgaden. We’d heard that there was a museum in the hotel’s basement. The man behind the desk was behind a newspaper when Nora asked, “Excuse me, could you tell me how we get to the Hitler museum?” He snapped the paper down and in a tone the Fuhrer himself would have been proud of and loud enough to turn heads in the lobby, he sneered:

77. Looks Like Another 8-4 Season for Tennessee -

Oops. I goofed last year. So did lots of other people who thought Tennessee’s football team would win the SEC East Division and go to the league championship game for the first time since 2007.

78. Elite Runners Expected At Ed Murphey Mile Event -

Christian Brothers High School is set to host elite runners from across the nation at its inaugural Ed Murphey Mile event Saturday, Aug. 26.

79. Providing Hope Through Service -

The French philosopher and Jesuit priest Teilhard de Chardin once said, “The future belongs to those who give the next generation reason for hope.” While I agree it’s a responsibility we all share to provide the inspiration and reasons to hope to those in succeeding generations, after decades educating generations of young people, I am ever mindful that often it is they who inspire and give us hope. My hope for the future comes from them. They are laying the foundation now.

80. State Panel Sheds New Light on Racial Atrocities -

State Rep. Johnnie Turner has seen what can happen when old wounds are never allowed to heal.

She’s seen it most recently in clashes between neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klansmen and white supremacists and those who resisted their hatred in Charlottesville, Virginia, where a counter-protester was killed and 19 were injured when a car was intentionally driven into a group of counter protesters. Two state troopers also died in a helicopter crash that weekend.

81. Pop-up Food and Drink Concept Activates Underused Spaces -

A few doors down from the main entrance to Cafe Society, a small chalkboard message announces in bright colors “Down the rabbit hole,” with an arrow pointing to the door that visitors are encouraged to walk through.

82. Artist Cat Peña Named Director Of CBU’s Ross Gallery -

Cat Peña, a Memphis-based artist, arts administrator and independent public art consultant, has been named director of the Beverly & Sam Ross Gallery at Christian Brothers University. As an artist, Peña’s work in recent years has centered on public art installations, including “There’s More To Be Proud Of,” a canopy of metallic streamers on display in the Edge District through next February. In addition, she is the founder of Collabortory, a creative platform that expands public art practices through collaborative and social practices.

83. Historic Eclipse Turns Day into Night Across the US -

Millions of Americans gazed in wonder through telescopes, cameras and disposable protective glasses Monday as the moon blotted out the sun in the first full-blown solar eclipse to sweep the U.S. from coast to coast in nearly a century.

84. Crosstown Concourse Opens With High Hopes -

With the First Baptist Church – Broad choir singing “Amazing Grace,” the $200 million mixed-use Crosstown Concourse development opened Saturday, Aug. 19, 90 years to the month that the building opened as a Sears, Roebuck & Co. store and distribution center.

85. Last Word: Crosstown & Forrest, Eclipse Day and The Problem With Day Care -

As an organizer of Saturday’s “Take Them Down” rally at Health Sciences Park walked toward Union Avenue where Memphis Police had taken one of the protesters arrested there, he looked at another organizer and said, “It’s time to make the call.” The call was bail money for the five, soon to be six people arrested. These were the first arrests of the last week of new momentum for an issue that has risen and subsided for decades now in our city.

86. August 18-24, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

1968: James Brown at the Mid-South Coliseum. Brown is touring the nation against a backdrop of two political assassinations – Martin Luther King Jr. in April and Robert Kennedy in June – racial and generational turmoil, and a heightened police response to gatherings like concerts where authorities believe the chance of violence is greater as a result.
By the time he arrives backstage in Memphis, Brown’s April 4 concert in Boston, televised live there the night of King’s assassination, has become a legendary chapter in the entertainer’s career. Brown isn’t resting on that, recording the breakthrough “Say It Loud, I’m Black and Proud” the same month the tour reached Memphis. By a year later, the anthem is gone from his set, with Brown later saying it had become obsolete in times that were changing fast.

87. Last Word: Ouster History, Lake District in Foreclosure and Crosstown -

Five of the seven flags that fly on the southern tip of Mud Island River Park are folded and stored as of Thursday. The Riverfront Development Corporation took down the five flags that have flown over the turf we now call Memphis – before and since it became a city – including a version of the Confederate flag – leaving only the U.S. flag and the Tennessee flag. This was a reaction to the week-long and counting aftermath from the violence in Charlottesville.

88. Tyson Foods to Expand Operations in Union City -

State officials say Tyson Foods Inc. plans to expand operations in northwest Tennessee, adding more than 300 jobs in the process.

89. Stronger Penalties Alone Won’t Solve State’s Opioid Crisis -

Rep. Bryan Terry deals with patients from every demographic caught up in the web of opiates.

Patients have an array of tolerance to opioids, as well, from those currently addicted to those who are recovering addicts. As a result, each patient requires an “individualized” anesthetic based on their background and the procedure or surgery they’re to have, says Terry, a Murfreesboro anesthesiologist.

90. Last Word: 3 Vigils, A Decade Since the Recession and Fairgrounds Fast Track -

There were several vigils going on around this old town Tuesday night – two Downtown and one in Whitehaven. All involving lots of police – two about Confederate icons and one the king of rock and roll.

91. Crosstown High School Gets $2.5 Million XQ Institute Grant -

A year from opening, organizers of Crosstown High School have secured a $2.5 million, five-year grant from a national education reform group focused specifically on high schools.

“It puts us in a much greater financial position,” said Chris Terrill, Crosstown High executive director. “But more important than the financial revenue is the connection we make to the XQ network of people.”

92. Last Word: Night in the Park, Hattiloo Goes Bigger & Cohen on the Republican Soul -

A gathering in Health Science Park a little before 11:30 Monday evening by a group of protesters who Facebooked that their intent was to take down the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest. Memphis Police showed up quickly and the police supervisor told those around the statue that the park is a private park and that no one can be in the park after 8 p.m. No arrests but the police did ask for identification from those in the park.

93. Charting a Course -

Daphne Large, founder, CEO and president of Data Facts Inc., didn’t have her company certified as a woman-owned business for 25 years. “I don’t want to be chosen because I’m a woman, but because I’m the best,” Large said, voicing a sentiment that many women business owners agree with.

94. Women-Owned Businesses Chart Progress of Diversity Contracting Efforts -

Daphne Large, founder, CEO and president of Data Facts Inc., didn’t get her company certified as a woman-owned business for 25 years.

95. Last Word: Bakery Questions, Komen Name Change and the Price of A Run For Gov. -

City Hall opens a set of four public meetings on the Fairgrounds Thursday evening at 5 p.m. at the Salvation Army Kroc Center to start the movement again toward another master plan for Fairgrounds redevelopment. And it’s hard to tell at the outset what this will look like because there are so many possibilities. There are also so many fault lines in these discussions.

96. Opera Memphis Hires New Music Director -

No one really needed to twist Michael Sakir’s arm to sell him on the Bluff City in advance of taking the job Aug. 1 as Opera Memphis’ new music director.

For one thing, he’d already worked a little in the city as a kind of itinerant musician, helping out as guest director for Opera Memphis programs like its 30 Days of Opera series. Those visits also introduced him to what life in Memphis might be like, should he choose to live here, with Sakir building relationships and getting introduced to civic, artistic and cultural landmarks and institutions that he found himself falling in love with.

97. Last Word: Megasite Prospect, Crosstown Opening Plans and New Chandler Numbers -

Tennessee is pursuing the new $1.6 billion assembly plant Toyota and Mazda announced just last week to turn out 300,000 vehicles a year and there is that regional megasite in nearby Haywood County that isn’t being used. Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says he wants to add the joint facility to the state’s auto industry.

98. Last Word: The Orange Mound Way, Midtown Apartments and 'I Am A Man' Plaza -

First day of school redux on Tuesday for students in Memphis Catholic Schools and it is a half-day. The first day of classes in most of the county’s other schools Monday went smoothly. Shelby County Schools reports more than 6,000 students registered on the first day of school despite another concerted effort at numerous events to register students in advance. That’s in a school system of approximately 96,000 students.

99. Tax Breaks Broaden For Residential, Retail Deals -

Some changes are coming in the rules surrounding incentives that the Economic Development Growth Engine for Memphis and Shelby County – or EDGE – can use for different kinds of development and for broader use of tax increment financing – or TIF – zones to sustain redevelopment.

100. Tensions of Density -

With hundreds of units already announced and all signs indicating there are more to come, the Midtown apartment market is primed to explode.

But when it comes to development, it’s no secret that Midtown residents can be fiercely protective.