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Editorial Results (free)

1. Lendermon Retires As Riverfront Plans Evolve -

Benny Lendermon was familiar with the controversy that comes with plans for the city’s riverfront before the Riverfront Development Corp. started in 2000 and he became its founding president.

2. Lendermon To Retire From Riverfront Development Corp. -

Benny Lendermon is retiring as the founding president of the Riverfront Development Corp. effective in April.

3. Memphis Leaders Await Final Reports for Possible Coliseum Renovation -

As Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration considers final details for a Fairgrounds redevelopment plan, he and his staff are waiting on a complete analysis of the condition of the Mid-South Coliseum.

4. Brooks Pursues Riverfront Site for New Museum -

The board of the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art announced Tuesday, Oct. 17, it is working with city government to relocate the museum from its Overton Park home to a Downtown site on Front Street between Union and Monroe avenues.

5. Brooks Museum Eyes Downtown Fire Station Site -

Brooks Museum officials are considering relocating to a Downtown site at Front Street and Union Avenue that is currently occupied by the Memphis Fire Department headquarters.

While officials with the city and the museum would not comment, the idea of putting a “cultural amenity” on the river side of Front Street between Union and Monroe avenues first surfaced about two months ago.

6. Brooks Museum Eyes Downtown Fire Station Site -

The city fire station at Union Avenue and Front Street and the adjacent parking garage appears to be under consideration as the new site for the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, according to a source close to the situation who did not want to be identified by The Daily News.

7. Sept 29-Oct 5, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

1991: Willie Herenton is elected mayor – the first African-American elected mayor in Memphis history. Herenton upsets incumbent Dick Hackett by 142 votes, the closest margin in a mayor’s race under the mayor-council form of government, but not the closest in the much-longer history of Memphis mayoral elections under various forms of municipal government.
The election also sees the election of an African-American majority to the 13-member Memphis City Council. It is a tumultuous election night in which the vote count goes past midnight. The Shelby County Election Commission before and after this election had always released absentee votes first. In this case, the absentee vote totals are not added until the election day totals had been tabulated. The delay prompts several hundred Herenton supporters gathered at The Peabody to come to the Downtown offices of the election commission. They follow U.S. Rep. Harold Ford Sr., with a Hackett team of advisers arriving as well to oversee the absentee vote count. Herenton went on to become the longest-serving Memphis mayor, resigning July 30, 2009.

8. Editorial: Beale Street and The Line for City Leaders -

When he was mayor, Willie Herenton had a saying that was his answer to speculation about whether he had crossed a legal line. Like the time when he bought an option on land fronting Union Avenue near AutoZone Park that was being considered as a possible site for a new convention center or hotel.

9. Interest High in Fairgrounds Fast Track -

The shorter, more compressed drive to a Fairgrounds redevelopment plan feels, at the outset, more certain and much less tentative than versions that surfaced during the administrations of previous mayors Willie Herenton and A C Wharton.

10. Collins Exiting MLGW After 10 Years -

One of the most scrutinized, criticized and well paid jobs in local government is going to be open at the end of 2017.

Jerry Collins announced Friday, Aug. 4, that he will retire as president and CEO of Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division effective Dec. 19 at the end of a five-year appointed term of office.

11. Collins To Retire as Head of MLGW -

Memphis Light Gas and Water Division president Jerry Collins will retire as president and CEO of the utility company effective Dec. 19, Collins announced Friday, Aug. 4.

12. Last Word: More Intermodals, 20 Years After the Oilers In Memphis and New Path -

The "skinny" repeal of Obamacare comes up short in the U.S. Senate in an after midnight Friday vote in D.C. And it appears U.S. Senators Bob Corker and Lamar Alexander of Tennessee voted for the repeal measure that came up short. Here are the basics early Friday morning from The New York Times.

13. Herenton's New Path -

Dan Michael is not the first Juvenile Court judge former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton has talked to about educating juvenile offenders in custody.

14. Resolution, Dollar-Figure Miscues Raise Sanitation Workers’ Grants by $20,000 -

After all of these years, maybe what happened Tuesday, July 25, to the city’s plan to pay the 14 surviving sanitation workers from 1968 a grant of $50,000 each was part of the larger narrative of the enduring turmoil of that historic time.

15. Last Word: Alexander and Corker Differ, Instant Runoff React and Kroger On Hold -

Tennessee’s two U.S. Senators split their votes Tuesday in Washington on the vote that followed the vote to open debate on a repeal and replacement of Obamacare. Lamar Alexander and Bob Corker both voted yes on the debate motion. But then Corker was one of the nine Republican Senate votes that killed the Obamacare replacement plan known as BCRA, while Alexander voted for it.

16. Overton Gateway Compromise Approved By Council -

Memphis City Council members approved the Overton Gateway mixed residential development Tuesday, July 25 in a pair of unanimous votes – one for the plans on the north side of Sam Cooper Boulevard at East Parkway and the other for the plans on the south side of Sam Cooper at East Parkway.

17. Overton Gateway Compromise Approved By Council -

Memphis City Council members approved the Overton Gateway mixed residential development Tuesday, July 25 in a pair of unanimous votes – one for the plans on the north side of Sam Cooper Boulevard at East Parkway and the other for the plans on the south side of Sam Cooper at East Parkway.

18. Juvenile Court Oversight Issue Spills Into Larger Criminal Justice Reform Debate -

Talking Monday, July 24, about criminal justice reform, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael mentioned the formal written request he, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and Sheriff Bill Oldham made to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions in June to end Justice Department oversight of the court.

19. Juxtaposing Views Greet Voting Change -

Memphis City Council members Edmund Ford Jr. and Patrice Robinson have each been on the winning side of a council runoff election and share a district border along Elvis Presley Boulevard in Whitehaven.

20. Last Word: The Old Auto Inspection Station, Beale Field Trip and Re-Democrating -

Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton has a different version of his 2016 plan to build two youth development centers for juvenile offenders to go to instead of detention at the Wilder Youth Development Center in Somerville. About a year ago, Herenton had tentative plans for two of the New Path centers in Shelby County that would be centers where the offenders could live.

21. Michael Calls Out Juvenile Court Critics -

Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael acknowledged Monday, July 24, that the court still has a problem with disproportionate minority contact. That is African-American youth who not only show up in the court more often than white youth, but get disproportionately harsher punishments and are more likely to be transferred for trial as adults than white children charged with the same offenses.

22. Michael Talks About Move to End Federal Oversight of Juvenile Court -

Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael acknowledged Monday, July 24, that the court still has a problem with disproportionate minority contact. That is African-American youth who not only show up in the court more often than white youth, but get disproportionately harsher punishments and are more likely to be transferred for trial as adults than white children charged with the same offenses.

23. Additional Sanitation Workers May Get Benefits -

The city of Memphis had 1,100 sanitation workers when the historic strike began in February 1968, with close to 1,000 of them walking off the job following the grisly deaths of two of their own trapped in the grinder of a garbage truck in East Memphis.

24. Council Approves Sanitation Workers Benefits -

There may be more than 14 city sanitation workers from 1968 who are still alive. And the city is double-checking its list as the Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, July 11, the payment of $50,000 grants to 14 of the workers it has already identified including four still working for the city.

25. Foote Homes Last Vestige Of Public Housing -

As the last of the city’s large public housing developments is demolished, the oldest of the mixed-income communities that replaced them is about to turn 20.

College Park opened in 1998 on the site of what had been Lemoyne Gardens in the area of South Memphis now known as Soulsville.

26. Long-Awaited Demolition at Foote Homes Begins -

Foote Homes, the last large public housing project in Memphis, began coming down Tuesday, May 30, with a formal ceremony marking the start of demolition toward the broader South City redevelopment.

27. Dunavant Winners Have Passion for Public Service -

As he presented the Bobby Dunavant Public Servant Award Tuesday, April 18, to Collierville Mayor Stan Joyner, U.S. Sen. Bob Corker recalled fondly his time as the mayor of Chattanooga.

“The best job in America as a public official is being a mayor,” Corker said after giving the keynote address at the awards luncheon at the Hilton Memphis that drew more than 500 people.

28. McCloy and Joyner Accept Dunavant Honors -

Collierville Mayor Stan Joyner agreed Tuesday, April 18, that Memphis Libraries director Keenon McCloy deserved an award just for working for four consecutive mayors.

He and McCloy were the recipients Tuesday of the 14th annual Bobby Dunavant Public Servant Awards given by the Rotary Club of Memphis East and the family of the late Shelby County Probate Court Clerk.

29. Memphis’ Political History Reflects Changes With New Entries -

There was a moment during the March unveiling of former Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s portrait in the Hall of Mayors when the task of framing history gave way to the present.

It came when attorney Ricky E. Wilkins talked about the importance of Wharton and his predecessor, Willie Herenton – the only two black mayors in Memphis history – to the city’s political present. Wharton attended the event; Herenton was noticeably absent.

30. Last Word: Lawsons Exit, LaRose Lessons and No Medicaid Expansion This Year -

The Lawson Brothers exit Tigers basketball seeking a release from the University of Memphis. The statement from Dedric and K.J. Lawson was all sweetness and light and apparently about as sincere as one of those interviews where players and coaches declare that if they will just play hard and put more points on the board than the other team then they should win.

31. Award-Winner McCloy Brings Modern Applications to Library System -

Keenon McCloy got around to doing the math on her time at City Hall. “I just crossed over 25 years,” said McCloy, director of the Memphis Public Libraries system, a position she has held for 10 years. Before that she was director of the city’s Division of Public Service, head of the Memphis Sexual Assault Resource Center and started as director of the transition office for Memphis Mayor-elect Willie Herenton in 1991, one of four mayors whose administrations she has worked in.

32. Joyner, McCloy to Receive Dunavant Awards -

Collierville Mayor Stan Joyner and Memphis Public Libraries director Keenon McCloy are the 2017 winners of the Bobby Dunavant Public Servant Awards.

A committee of members of the family of late Probate Court clerk Bobby Dunavant and the Rotary Club of Memphis East announced the award winners Wednesday, March 28, in advance of the April 18 awards luncheon.

33. Joyner and McCloy To Receive Dunavant Awards -

Collierville Mayor Stan Joyner and Memphis Public Libraries director Keenon McCloy are the 2017 winners of the Bobby Dunavant Public Servant Awards.

A committee of members of the family of the late Probate Court Clerk and the Rotary Club of Memphis East announced the award winners Wednesday, March 28, in advance of the April 18 awards luncheon.

34. Political Past, Present Meet as Wharton’s Portrait Joins Hall of Mayors -

When A C Wharton Jr. was Memphis mayor, his relationship with the Memphis City Council wasn’t always good. And it would usually get worse whenever he’d call a press conference in the Hall of Mayors on a Tuesday the council was meeting. Some council members thought it was to draw attention from them.

35. Muslims in Memphis Series Draws Increased Attendance -

It’s been 15 years since former Mayor Willie Herenton declared March the month to acknowledge Muslims in Memphis, and that celebration has grown substantially since then, especially in recent years.

36. Evans Brings Precision, Experience To Chairmanship of TVA Board -

Lynn Evans is precise, a trait that comes with being a certified public accountant and the owner of her own accounting and consulting firm. It also works well with her path to becoming the new chairwoman of the Tennessee Valley Authority board.

37. New Tri-State Defender Has Credibility, Influence in the Community -

When president and publisher Bernal E. Smith II speaks about his newspaper, The New Tri-State Defender, and how business is conducted today and what’s necessary for success going forward, he sounds like just about any other newspaper executive trying to navigate today’s quick-change media world.

38. Last Word: De-Annexation Theories, Clash on School Vouchers and Garth & Trisha -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and his administration come up with some surprises in de-annexation recommendations to the city task force on the issue. The three most recently annexed areas of Memphis were considered likely to be in the recommendations. Although the indication last year was that this would take a lot of discussion before someone actually wrote that on a Power Point presentation at City Hall. Not only did Strickland do that – he also included four other areas.

39. Body Count -

A day at a time, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland has been writing the names of those who have been murdered in a notebook he keeps with him since he became mayor in January 2016.

When five people, two of them 15 years old, died violently the weekend that much of the world’s attention was on protest marches and the new administration in Washington, Strickland was getting updates on the latest surge in violence.

40. RDC’s Role Changes With New Riverfront Task Force -

The role of the Riverfront Development Corp., a nonprofit group raising private money and receiving a static amount of city funding that was a precursor to the county park conservancies of the last decade, changed this week.

41. Strickland To Announce Riverfront Task Force -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland will announce a mayoral task force Wednesday, Jan. 24, to “examine and develop a vision for the future of the Memphis riverfront,” according to Tuesday City Hall media advisory.

42. Last Word: Convention Center Hotel, The Crime Discussion and A Gas Tax Hike Plan -

Grizzlies fall to the Clippers 115-106 in Los Angeles. They play Golden State Friday in another West Coast road game.

During the California sojourn, Chandler Parsons turned up on the tabloid TV show TMZ clubbing in the general vicinity of Kendall Jenner after New Year’s Eve with Kate Beckinsale.

43. Crime Issue Shows Complexity After Record Homicide Tally -

When the subject is crime in Memphis, it never stays in one place for very long. Former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton’s conclusion that the city’s problem with violent crime is a black problem drew criticism Tuesday, Jan. 3, from Memphis City Council member Janis Fullilove.

44. Last Word: Laurelwood Lament, Fairgrounds Redux and Deeper on Crime -

Booksellers at Laurelwood made it through the Christmas shopping season but will close its doors in Laurelwood probably in February with the liquidation sale beginning Friday – as in this Friday.

45. Herenton's First New Year's Remarks In A Decade Stir Pot -

It’s been 10 years since Willie Herenton delivered his last New Year’s Prayer Breakfast message – a political homily Herenton made an institution while serving as mayor of Memphis.

46. Last Word: 2016's Toll, Strickland & Herenton and Downtown Hotel Changes Hands -

The city’s homicide count was at 228 as 2016 came to an end, breaking the old 1993 record.

In a few years maybe there will be a better idea of the larger trend that made 2016 a more violent year. Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings has said gangs were a factor in more homicides but not necessarily most of them – or if they did, it still remained an act between two people who knew each other and being in a gang wasn’t necessarily what set off the violent reaction.

47. Strickland, Herenton Seek Larger, More Focused Volunteerism Efforts -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton pointed to a better coordinated form of volunteerism in 2017 at Strickland’s first annual New Year’s Prayer Breakfast.

48. Herenton, Cohen Keynote Dec. 31 Prayer Breakfasts -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen and former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton will be the keynote speakers at two New Year’s Eve Prayer Breakfasts on Saturday, Dec. 31.

49. Herenton, Cohen Keynote Dec. 31 Prayer Breakfasts -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen and former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton will be the keynote speakers at two New Year’s Eve Prayer Breakfasts on Saturday, Dec. 31.

50. Last Word: Liberty Bowl Memories, Talk About Violence and The Year In Ed & Med -

Grizz fall to the Celtics in Boston Tuesday 113-103. With Mike Conley and five other starters out. Away from triple digits, it is SMU over the Tigers at the Forum Tuesday 58-54.

51. November 11-17, 2016: This week in Memphis history -

2005: Premiere of the movie “Walk the Line” – the film bio of Johnny Cash that was made in Memphis.

52. Clayborn Reborn Effort Charts Different Pre-vitalization Path -

The hope has been that the redevelopment of Central Station in the South Main area would cause a ripple in development to the east and link up with the sprawling South City development that encompasses the Foote Homes public housing development, the area south of FedExForum, and go south of Crump Boulevard.

53. October 21-27, 2016: This week in Memphis history -

2010: On the front page of The Daily News, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton marks one year in office with the city filing more than 130 lawsuits in Shelby County Environmental Court against owners of blighted properties. “I’m a lawyer and I’ve gotten to the point where I’m just saying, ‘Hey, I gotta sue somebody,” he says. Wharton says he feels “right at home” in the mayor’s office. “You never see me arguing with council members,” he adds. “Wonder why that is?” The remark is the closest Wharton comes to comparing his governing style to former Mayor Willie Herenton, whose July 2009 resignation set the stage for the October 2009 special election that Wharton won while serving as Shelby County mayor. The contrast in governing styles is one factor in Wharton’s move to City Hall. But Wharton’s relationship with the council is already becoming more complex as he marks one year as mayor.

54. SCS May Still Pursue East High T-STEM After Missing Out on Grant -

Although Shelby County Schools didn’t get a federal grant for a new optional school program at East High, the school system is still likely to continue with the ambitious plan.

The SCS grant application to the U.S Department of Education for the Magnet Schools Assistant Program calls for a T-STEM – transportation, science, technology, engineering and math – optional or magnet school at East to replace the engineering optional program that has been in place since 1984.

55. Target Zero Outlines Shelter Philosophy -

A leader of a national nonprofit group working with the city of Memphis to reform the Memphis Animal Shelter said animal welfare organizations often get in their own way in pursuing a common goal of reducing deaths by euthanasia.

56. Indie Memphis Festival Promises To Be ‘Eclectic and Uncompromising’ -

Brandon Harris, a New York City-based writer and editor, loves the “eclectic and uncompromising nature” of the annual Indie Memphis Film Festival, which he’s attended three times now.

57. Last Word: The Grizz Are Back, Bass Pro Shops Buys Cabela's and Stein at Amurica -

Some of you will remember the late George Lapides, whom I worked with for a time at WREC, had a policy about pre-season baseball games or what he called the “Grapefruit League.” It was that they didn’t exist. He wouldn’t acknowledge the games much less the scores.

58. Study Leads to Broader Call for Business Ties -

Rodney Strong, CEO of the Atlanta law and public policy firm Griffin and Strong that authored city government’s latest disparity study on minority contracting, didn’t come to talk about the study last week when he spoke to a room of 40 African-American civic and business leaders.

59. City, Wiseacre Set to Discuss Brewery’s Proposal for Coliseum -

The first order of business is to figure out what the city and the owners of Wiseacre Brewing Co. are negotiating about when it comes to Wiseacre’s proposal to convert the Mid-South Coliseum into a brewery.

60. Animal Shelter Moves Toward Three-Year Action Plan -

The Memphis Animal Shelter should have a three-year action plan by the end of October to end the killing of pets at the shelter for time and space considerations.

“We’re a public safety agency so euthanizing animals that pose a danger to our community is something that is part of our core mission and humanely euthanizing animals that are sick, that are suffering,” said Alexis Pugh, director of Memphis Animal Services on the WKNO/Channel 10 program Behind The Headlines. “What we want to avoid is having to euthanize an animal that is adoptable, that is healthy, that is able to be placed, simply because we don’t have the space in our facility and this animal has been there too long.”

61. August 12-18, 2016: This week in Memphis history -

2011: On the front page of The Daily News, city leaders vow that construction work is about to begin on The Pyramid’s long-delayed conversion from an arena to a Bass Pro Shops store with added attractions. The first stirrings of action on the dormant project include a $75 million city buyout of county government’s interest in the Memphis Cook Convention Center as part of the deal for the city to get exclusive ownership of The Pyramid.

62. Last Word: The Evolution of Michael Rallings, Mediation Confidential and Council Day -

The appointment of Michael Rallings as the permanent Memphis Police Director goes to the Memphis City Council Tuesday for what is expected to be a unanimous vote.

Rallings and Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland talked about the appointment – the only major appointment in Strickland’s inner circle left seven months into his term as mayor – during a press conference Monday morning in the Hall of Mayors.

63. Chism Readying 2018 Bid for County Mayor -

Former Shelby County Commissioner Sidney Chism wants to be the Democratic nominee for Shelby County mayor in 2018, and he plans to begin his campaign after the November presidential election.

64. Council Faces Yet Another Residency Requirement -

Memphis voters could take up the question of where city government employees should live for the fourth time in 12 years.

With no debate, Memphis City Council members approved on the first of three readings Tuesday, June 21, a referendum ordinance to go on the November ballot that would require city employees to “live and maintain a residence” within the boundaries of the city of Memphis.

65. Corrections Officers Want Commission to Increase Pay -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a stable county property tax rate of $4.37 Monday, June 6, on the first of three readings and set the stage for final budget deliberations in committee sessions next week.

66. Last Word: A Different Aftermath and Trolleys Aren't Just for Tourists -

A week that will likely end with the funeral of a Memphis Police officer began with a discussion about violent crime that is even at this early point proving to be different from the past discussions we’ve had at times like these.

67. Commission Adds To Budget Decisions, Backs Herenton Juvenile Offender Schools -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a stable county property tax rate of $4.37 Monday, June 6, on the first of three readings and set the stage for final budget deliberations in committee sessions next week.

68. Commission Adds To Budget Decisions, Backs Herenton Juvenile Offender Schools -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a stable county property tax rate of $4.37 Monday, June 6, on the first of three readings and set the stage for final budget deliberations in committee sessions next week.

69. City Opens Up Mid-South Coliseum to Reviews -

For a week in June, the city will allow citizen groups with qualified experts including architects and engineers to have access to the Mid-South Coliseum for four hours at a time twice a day.

The “Mid-South Coliseum Review Period” has a May 27 deadline for groups to request access under the city’s terms.

70. City Opens Coliseum To Experts In June -

For a week in June, the city will allow citizen groups with qualified experts including architects and engineers to have access to the Mid-South Coliseum for four hours at a time twice a day.

The “Mid-South Coliseum Review Period” was announced by the city Friday, May 20, with a May 27 deadline for groups to request access under the city’s terms.

71. City Opens Coliseum To Experts In June -

For a week in June, the city will allow citizen groups with qualified experts including architects and engineers to have access to the Mid-South Coliseum for four hours at a time twice a day.

The “Mid-South Coliseum Review Period” was announced by the city Friday, May 20, with a May 27 deadline for groups to request access under the city’s terms.

72. Raleigh Mall Demolition Signals Change After Delays -

The crowd of several hundred people on the south end of the Raleigh Springs Mall Saturday, May 7, was larger than the crowd inside the mall to shop.

They came to watch the beginning of the end.

73. Last Word: Mall Demo, Defining 'Fringe Element' and Herenton's New Path -

Once upon a time there were three “town centers” planned by the city of Memphis.

City facilities like libraries and police precincts would be the anchors and encourage private retail development in them.

74. Herenton Pitches Two New Schools For Juvenile Offenders -

Former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton began Wednesday, May 4, with an appeal that got the attention of Shelby County Commissioners. “We don’t want your money,” he told 11 of the 13 commissioners in committee sessions as he pitched two new residential campuses for children in juvenile detention.

75. Kyles Played Big Role in Civil Rights Movement -

The world knows him through his story of standing near Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in 1968 just seconds before King was assassinated.

76. Civil Rights Veteran Rev. Samuel Billy Kyles Dies At Age 81 -

Civil rights movement icon Rev. Samuel Billy Kyles died Tuesday, April 26, after a long illness at the age of 81.

77. Hagler Launches Solo Practice as Real Estate Sector Picks Up -

Monice Moore Hagler grew up in a real estate family. Her father owned a real estate company and her brothers studied finance and real estate before going on to become brokers.

So of course it only made sense that she pursued a career in social work, where she worked with children on welfare and children who were placed for adoption. She worked closely with special needs adoptions, including older children who were more difficult to adopt.

78. Three Decades In, Africa in April Maintains Cultural Focus -

It was 30 years ago that David and Yvonne Acey answered a dilemma from an educators’ conference about levels of learning among African-American students compared to white students.

79. Former City Attorney Founds Hagler Law Group -

Monice Hagler, a longtime Memphis lawyer who served as city attorney during the administrations of Mayors Dick Hackett and Willie Herenton, has founded a new law practice.

The Hagler Law Group PLLC is focused on real estate-related economic development as well as small- and minority-business development.

80. Former City Attorney Founds Hagler Law Group -

Monice Hagler, a longtime Memphis lawyer who served as city attorney during the administrations of Mayors Dick Hackett and Willie Herenton, has founded a new law practice.

The Hagler Law Group PLLC is focused on real estate-related economic development as well as small- and minority-business development.

81. City Has Offer On Adams Police Station -

The realty group that proposed a short-lived Hotel Overton for Overton Square in 2015 has offered the city of Memphis $1.1 million for the old Central Police Station building at 128 Adams Ave.

82. City Has Offer On Adams Police Headquarters -

The realty group that proposed a short-lived Hotel Overton for Overton Square in 2015 has offered the city of Memphis $1.1 million for the old Central Police Station building at 128 Adams Avenue.

83. Luttrell Could Impact 2 Races -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell made a few stops between his first thought this month that he might want to run for Congress and going public with those thoughts Tuesday, Feb. 23.

84. Last Word: Leaving Warren and Tulane, New Police Brass and Losing Housing -

Post Super Bowl edition of Last Word: Broncos 24 – Panthers 10 – Lady Gaga’s National Anthem kudos – Coldplay/Bruno Mars/Beyonce ambitious halftime extravaganza got lost in spots by bad sound.

85. New Brass -

Just days before Toney Armstrong was off the city payroll, his successor as interim director of the Memphis Police Department, Michael Rallings, was getting used to the attention and ring kissing that comes with being the city’s top cop.

86. Strickland Names Interim Memphis Police Director -

Mayor Jim Strickland has chosen an interim Memphis Police director from inside the ranks, naming his pick two weeks to the day after current director Toney Armstrong announced he’s retiring from the role.

87. Last Word: Secrets In A Small Town, Bullard Bounce and Beale & Mud Island -

Munford! A winning Powerball ticket for the largest jackpot ever was sold in Munford and that warrants a rare exclamation mark.
Possibly two when you consider that small towns are supposed to be places where it is nearly impossible to keep a secret – at least from the other folks in the town.
The fact that it was sold at Naifeh’s, a long-standing Tipton County business institution adds to the story.
The person who bought the ticket in Munford holds one of three winning tickets which comes out to about $582 million for that ticket.
That is roughly the size of the city of Memphis operating budget.
There was a similar mystery underway Thursday in Dyersburg where someone bought a Powerball ticket worth a paltry $2 million. Probably worth an exclamation mark if I wasn’t over the limit and already feeling the unspoken disdain of my reporting brethren who are judging me harshly as you read this.

88. Lowery’s Prayer Breakfast Marks 22nd Year -

Myron Lowery is leaving the Memphis City Council as of New Year’s Day.

But the outgoing council chairman will still be hosting a New Year’s Day Prayer Breakfast Friday, Jan. 1, at 9 a.m. on his first day out of office in 24 years.

89. Lowery’s Prayer Breakfast Marks 25th Year -

Though Myron Lowery’s 24-year tenure on the Memphis City Council ended Dec. 31, he planned to start 2016 with a familiar tradition: his New Year’s Day Prayer Breakfast.

90. This week in Memphis history: January 1-7 -

1993: Production of the motion picture "The Firm" is underway in Memphis with Tom Cruise, Gene Hackman and Jeanne Tripplehorn in the city to film the adaptation of the John Grisham novel. Producers of the movie decide to shoot exterior scenes in the city as well and use the old International Harvester plant in Frayser, which includes a law library for the fictional law firm.

91. City Hall Shuffle Moves Into Christmas Eve With 8 Positions Cut -

Memphis-Mayor elect Jim Strickland announced on Christmas Eve that he will eliminate eight positions in the current administration, one of them vacant. And a ninth positon will become a part-time position. Strickland will also follow through on his long-held desire to end the city’s involvement in and funding of the Memphis-Shelby County Music Commission.

92. A List of Mayor-Elect Jim Strickland’s Appointments So Far -

Memphis Mayor elect Jim Strickland still has some appointments to make, but he is methodically filling key positions in his administration ahead of taking office Jan. 1.

93. Editorial: Election Night Marred By Recurring Incompetence -

The next 10 weeks will go by quickly for Jim Strickland.

The mayor-elect has decisions to make about who to trust and how far to trust them with his still-forming plan to govern for the next four years.

94. Memphis Mayoral Transition Begins -

The transition at City Hall begins this week from Mayor A C Wharton to Mayor-elect Jim Strickland.

Strickland won’t take office until January.

95. Strickland Upsets Wharton In Memphis Mayor's Race -

Not even close. Mayoral challenger Jim Strickland rolled up a wide margin over incumbent Mayor A C Wharton in the early-vote totals in advance of the Oct. 8 election day count.

And based on that and other election indicators, Wharton conceded the election shortly after 10 p.m. to Strickland after the vote count was long delayed by computer glitches.

96. Election Day Beckons In Hard-Fought Memphis Mayor’s Race -

The most competitive Memphis mayor’s race in 24 years goes to the city’s 403,227 voters Thursday, Oct. 8, along with races for all 13 seats on the Memphis City Council and the race for City Court clerk.

97. Fair Trade: The Mid-South Fair’s transition to Southaven -

A FedEx jet turned for Memphis International Airport just north of Landers Center in Southaven, Miss., on Saturday, Sept. 26, the opening weekend of the Mid-South Fair.

Below it, a ride on the parking lot of the arena made a perpetual turn in the other direction under the same overcast skies.

98. Early Voting Turnout Up 76 Percent So Far -

Early voting in the 2015 Memphis elections is running ahead of the pace from four years ago but behind the pace from 2007 and the special mayoral election of 2009.

The early voting period in advance of the Oct. 8 election day runs through Saturday, Oct. 3, at 16 locations across the city.

99. Memphis Early Voting Turnout Up 76 Percent So Far -

Early voting in the 2015 Memphis elections is running ahead of the pace from four years ago but behind the pace from 2007 and the special mayoral election of 2009.

The early voting period in advance of the Oct. 8 election day runs through Saturday, Oct. 3, at 16 locations across the city.

100. Memphis Mayor's Race Poised For Close Finish -

A political summer dominated by the campaign for Memphis mayor begins turning toward fall Friday, Sept. 18, with the opening of the early voting period in advance of the Oct. 8 election day.

All 16 early voting sites are open weekdays from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Oct. 3.