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Editorial Results (free)

1. Civil Rights Icon Smith Donates Papers to Library -

Maxine Smith pointed out that the wheelchair she used to enter the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library was borrowed – and she also made a point of walking from the doorway of the Memphis and Shelby County Room at the library to her seat in the room.

2. Telling the Story -

As Miriam DeCosta-Willis spoke in the Memphis Room of the Memphis Public Library and Information Center, a set of 19 gray file boxes was neatly lined up near the podium.

The files, containing manuscripts, notes, photographs and other items, are “parts of our history that never would be known” without DeCosta-Willis donating them to a growing archive in The Memphis Room, said library director Keenon McCloy.

3. City Budget an Issue in Mayor's Race -

More than half a century ago, the prominent civil rights leader A. Philip Randolph sent a letter challenging one of Memphis' most legendary political figures to a debate on race relations.

Randolph, founder of the country's first black labor union, had been sidelined in a previous attempt to speak at a gathering in Memphis by former mayor Edward Hull "E.H." Crump's political organization. So in an open letter to Crump, Randolph slammed him as "a symbol of Southern fascism" and a "menace and danger to American democracy."

4. Front Porches Are Making A Comeback in Local Building Circles -

From the grand verandas of southern mansions to the homes of Appalachia's bluegrass musicians, the porch has been a part of Southern history. And while newer construction in the South might have veered away from the porch, some statistics show it might be making a comeback.