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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: Budget-Mania, TNReady's Backstory and Slow Down Millenial Investors -

The Overton Park Greensward controversy moves back to City Hall Tuesday as the council talks over an ordinance that sets further in stone the council’s decision in March to give the Memphis Zoo control of two-thirds of the greensward.

2. Luttrell’s Budget Includes More Schools Funds -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell takes a $1.16 billion county government budget proposal with no property tax hike and a possible $8.7 million in new funding for schools to Shelby County commissioners Wednesday, May 4.

3. The Week Ahead: May 2-8 -

So, you think this is the “off-week” of the Memphis In May International Festival – the gap between the Beale Street Music Festival and the World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest. But, while Tom Lee Park gets a breather, there are plenty of cultural experiences to soak up across Memphis. Here's our weekly roundup of local happenings you need to know about...

4. Health Alliance Prepares for Annual Meeting May 12 -

The Common Table Health Alliance’s annual meeting will take place on Thursday, May 12, honoring three health impact leaders from the community and addressing the topic “Childhood Obesity: Have We Finally Turned the Corner?”

5. Commission Approves Houston High Project -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, April 25, the Germantown Municipal School Dis-trict’s use of $196,521 for a repaving project at Houston High School. The county capital funding is left from HVAC renovations at Dogwood Elementary School.

6. Reaction to the Death of Civil Rights Leader Rev. Samuel Billy Kyles -

Rev. Samuel Billy Kyles died Tuesday in Memphis after a long illness. Here's a roundup of reaction from local leaders, Kyles' associates and the National Civil Rights Museum...

7. Common Table Health Alliance Prepping for Annual Meeting -

The Common Table Health Alliance’s annual meeting will take place on Thursday, May 12, honoring three health impact leaders from the community and addressing the topic “Childhood Obesity: Have We Finally Turned the Corner?”

8. Commission Approves Houston High Project -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, April 25, the Germantown Municipal School District’s use of $196,521 for a repaving project at Houston High School. The county capital funding is left from HVAC renovations at Dogwood Elementary School.

9. Regionalism Enhances Recruiting For Cities in Metros -

When Memphis hits a dirty dozen list – whether it’s for crime, or education attainment, or poverty – those ratings are based on Memphis Metropolitan Statistical Area data.

And while Memphis, as the largest city in the MSA, has the lion’s share of economic disparity, those problems don’t just effect the city’s 600,000 citizens.

10. The Week Ahead -

It’s a new week that ends with Music Fest, Memphis! Here’s a roundup of other local happenings you need to know about, from some important government meetings, to corporate earnings reports and a new exhibit set to open at the Memphis Zoo.

11. Judicial Commissioners Grow in Number, Job Description -

Seventeen years ago, there were three newly minted judicial commissioners working at the Criminal Justice Center.

In makeshift quarters at first, they primarily worked night-time hours after the criminal courts, General Sessions and Shelby County Criminal, had closed for the day.

12. Bridging a Divide -

The Mid-South is united by more than the Mississippi River, but that’s what it took to get the region’s mayors in the same room.

In the aftermath of the 2011 Mississippi River flood, damage stretched from Millington’s naval base to Memphis’ Beale Street. Leaders of the affected municipalities had to come together to apply for FEMA grants and plot their way out of devastation.

13. Mid-South Mayors Don’t See Barriers In Regionalism -

It took the Mississippi River’s devastating flood in 2011 for Mid-South leaders to consider greater collaboration among the area’s 10 counties and three states.

Mid-South mayors came together to plot their way out of disaster, and that convening set the stage for a formal alliance, the Mid-South Mayors’ Council.

14. Last Word: Tubby Time, Haslam's Veto and Africa in April's 30th Year -

It was just four weeks ago that all of this talk about change at the top of the Tiger basketball chart was put to rest. Coach Josh Pastner’s performance was reviewed by the University of Memphis administration and he was staying at least for another season. Four weeks to the day of that announcement, Pastner is the new coach at Georgia Tech and we are in the first day of the Tubby Smith era at the U of M.

15. Lot Availability, Prices Putting Home Construction Behind Demand -

The recent uptick in the residential real estate market is devouring what’s left of lot development that lagged during the recession, and tight supply is raising home prices in the Memphis area.

16. Last Word: Tubby Fever, School Closings and March Real Estate Numbers -

The Tigers basketball grapevine is nothing but Tubby Smith as of Wednesday when the speculation was joined by torrent of rumors about contact between the Texas Tech coach and the University of Memphis.
Smith has now acknowledged he’s talking with the U of M.
More background on Smith from The Sporting News and Mike DeCourcy, a former sports reporter at The Commercial Appeal, that came out before everything went Tubby here.

17. Luttrell Wants to Bridge Urban-Rural Divide -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen knows the signs of someone making the transition to running for Congress.

So when he and Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell spoke at the March 31 opening of Moore Tech’s new welding school, Cohen watched closely as Luttrell began talking about the lack of workforce training and questioned the old Shelby County Schools slogan of “every child college bound.”

18. Kustoff Opens Congressional Bid With 15 Stops -

Former U.S. Attorney David Kustoff began his campaign for Congress Monday, April 11, with stops in Tipton County and Fayette County as well as East Memphis.

19. August Primaries Feature Intra-Party Challenges -

Two years after a disastrous slate of races for countywide offices, there is a move among younger Democratic partisans in Memphis to shake up the Democrats who represent the city in the Tennessee Legislature.

20. 8th Congressional District Primaries Draw 22 Contenders, 13 Republican -

The Republican primary race to fill the 8th District Congressional seat Republican incumbent Stephen Fincher is giving up drew a field of 13 contenders – seven from Shelby County and four from Jackson, Tennessee – at the Thursday, April 7, noon filing deadline for the Aug. 4 ballot.

21. Amended Senate De-annexation Bill Faces More Debate -

The de-annexation bill whose defeat became City Hall’s top priority in March is off the political frontburner.

But Memphis Democrats in the Tennessee Legislature who opposed the de-annexation by referendum measure expect that this isn’t the end of the concept or the move to make it law.

22. Last Word: The Curtain Falls in Nashville, Political Cuneiform and Ramsey Talks -

And in less than a half hour Wednesday, the de-annexation drama that should qualify as the political equivalent of a Netflix binge-watchable television series made just for Memphis was done.

23. Basar Out in 8th District Race, Luttrell Pulls Petition, Cohen Could Have Easy Ride -

Shelby County Commissioner Steve Basar has called off his plan to run in the crowded Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District, but Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has pulled his petition to join the same crowded field.

24. Amendments Cloud Issue of De-Annexation -

Tennessee state senators go back to work Tuesday, March 29, in Nashville on a modified de-annexation bill.

The Senate State and Local Government Committee will be reviewing a set of amendments to their version of the bill, which changed substantially from the House version in a committee session last week.

25. Cleaning House -

Every neighborhood in Memphis and Shelby County has the right to be free from the negative effects of vacant, abandoned and blighted properties. That’s the battle cry of the Memphis Blight Elimination Charter, a 23-page pledge that will steer policy and programs dedicated to blight eradication.

26. Memphis Fights Back: Senate Poised To Do Real Damage via De-Annexation -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland makes a persuasive argument against de-annexation legislation now being considered by the state Legislature, providing a long list of figures to show it would devastate the Bluff City.

27. Roadmap to Attacking Blight Awaits City and County Approval -

Blighted properties, overgrown lots and abandoned buildings are not unique to Memphis. But Memphis is the only city with a blight elimination charter that affirms cross-sector commitment to uproot the causes of blight and prevent further decline.

28. Last Word: Monday Vote, Beale's Search and Longview Heights -

Look for the state Senate to vote on the deannexation bill Monday in Nashville. At least that’s the date on the Senate calendar.

That could change as a member of the Shelby County legislative delegation has at last asked the Tennessee Attorney General for a legal opinion on the proposal. But it’s not a straight-up question about whether the proposal is constitutional. It’s a question about the specific characterization of past Memphis annexations as “egregious” – what has come to be the key legal term in this considerable political controversy.

29. County Commission Questions City Figures on Deannexation -

Some Shelby County Commissioners are skeptical about City Hall’s estimate of how much city government would lose in revenue if a deannexation bill in the Tennessee Legislature becomes law.

The commission’s discussion at Wednesday, March 16, committee sessions came as Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland was in Nashville to lobby against the bill in the state Senate.

30. Porter-Leath's Early Childhood Academy Highlights Collaboration -

The past six years have brought so many changes in kindergarten through 12th-grade education locally and statewide that it is easy to lose track of how different early childhood instruction is in its preparation of children for the next step in their journey.

31. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

32. Last Word: Cubits Anyone, The G-Word and The TV News Crime Block -

How long is a cubit? After a day in which many of you got about four to five inches of rain and more to come Thursday, it seems an appropriate and timely question.
And yes, there is a cubit conversion chart on line for converting that and other really old units of measurement no longer in use like the mina, drachma or the synodic month.
So the average cubit, which is supposed to be the length of a forearm, is 18 inches or a foot and a half. That’s 0.4572 of a meter, which might as well be an ancient unit of measurement.
Someone had to say it.
According to biblehub.com – I’m not making up websites – the book of Genesis sets God’s instructions to Noah as an arc with the dimensions of 300 cubits long, 50 cubits wide and 30 cubits tall. And it was to be made out of gopher wood and covered inside and out with pitch.
The New Living Translation and Holman Christian Standard Bibles convert that to an arc 450 feet long, 75 feet wide and 45 feet high.

33. Luttrell Exit for Congress Likely Would Not Lead to County Special Election -

There probably won’t be a special election for Shelby County mayor if current mayor Mark Luttrell gets elected to Congress later this year.

34. Last Word: Redbirds Sold, Memphis Burning and When Old Dominick Was Young -

Grizzlies over the Cavaliers 106-103 Monday evening in Cleveland despite the pre-game injury story dominating up to tip-off.

35. Commission Votes Down Term Limits Referendum On First Reading -

Shelby County Commissioners voted down a referendum ordinance Monday, March 7, to eliminate term limits in county government.

But the ordinance moves on to second and third readings despite the vote on first reading under the commission’s rules of procedure.

36. Last Word: Election Day, Luttrell Makes It Six, And About "Executive Sessions" -

Can You Feel It? Tuesday is election day in Memphis and across the state in this presidential election year. And all indications are the turnout locally should be above the 24 percent mark we’ve been at in the last two presidential election years.

37. Luttrell Declares for Congressional Bid -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell announced Monday, Feb. 29, that he will be a candidate in the August Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District.

38. Hopson: Help ASD Improve, At Least for Now -

The state-run Achievement School District has a problem in how it engages with the public, especially in areas where it is about to take over a school.

But Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson isn’t ready to say it is time for the state to pick a winner and a loser and fund either the ASD or Innovation Zone schools run by SCS.

39. Last Word: Timing and Numbers, Old Dominick Takes Shape and Zip Lines To Spring -

Political opportunity is defined by timing.
Witness a look at the early voting turnout numbers in advance of Tuesday’s election day.

More than half of the more than 43,000 Shelby County voters who cast early ballots voted Monday and Tuesday – the last two days of an early voting period that began Feb. 10 – way back there when Martin O’Malley was the third Democratic presidential contender and Jeb Bush was considered a force to be reckoned with in the Republican primaries.

40. Luttrell Could Impact 2 Races -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell made a few stops between his first thought this month that he might want to run for Congress and going public with those thoughts Tuesday, Feb. 23.

41. Last Word: Presidential Distractions, Dude Perfect and The Kirby Farm House -

When it comes to political surprises, the presidential contenders may be the next group on the ballot locally. But they need to up their game if they are going to hold the attention of Memphis voters.
With three of the Republican contenders on their way to Shelby County this weekend and probably more making plans, the attention Tuesday shifted dramatically to the open 8th District Congressional seat that isn’t on the ballot until the August primaries.

42. Luttrell Weighing Congressional Bid -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell is considering a run for Congress and he expects to make his decision in the next week.

43. Roland Passes on 8th District Congressional Bid -

Shelby County Commission chairman Terry Roland will not be running in the Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District in August.

44. Roland Passes on 8th Congressional District Run, Sticks With Mayor in 2018 -

Shelby County Commission chairman Terry Roland will not be running in the Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District in August.

45. Trust Fund Mentioned as Possible $1.1B Solution on School Benefits Liability -

A trust fund is one possibility that has surfaced early in the formal discussions of the Shelby County School system’s $1.1 billion benefits liability.

The first meeting of the ad hoc committee on the matter last week drew nine of the 13 Shelby County Commissioners, the administration of Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and two of nine Shelby County Schools board members.

46. Mid-South Mayors to Host RegionSmart Summit -

More than 200 local leaders from the government, economic development, planning, architecture and engineering sectors will come together this April to collaborate on the challenges and opportunities confronting the Mid-South right now.

47. Mid-South Mayors to Host RegionSmart Summit -

More than 200 local leaders from the government, economic development, planning, architecture and engineering sectors will come together this April to collaborate on the challenges and opportunities confronting the Mid-South right now.

48. County Commission Forms OPEB Committee -

Shelby County Commissioners have created an ad hoc committee to talk over the health insurance benefits liability of the former Memphis City Schools system and who is responsible for it.

Commission chairman Terry Roland announced Monday, Jan. 25, he had formed the committee, which includes leaders of the Shelby County Schools system and Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell’s administration.

49. HUD Funds Mid-South Greenprint With $60 Million Grant -

One of the largest federal grants ever awarded to Shelby County government will fund efforts to avoid some of the flooding the Memphis area saw in 2011.

The federal department of Housing and Urban Development and U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen of Memphis announced Thursday, Jan. 21, the $60 million grant to fund the Mid-South Regional Greenprint and Sustainability Plan.

50. Luttrell, Strickland Attend Obama’s State of the Union -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland both attended the Tuesday, Jan. 12, State of the Union address, the final State of the Union address by President Barack Obama

51. Reaves: Memphis Should Pay Share of Schools Liability -

The Shelby County commissioner who sought a legal opinion over who pays $1.1 billion of Shelby County Schools’ benefits liability says he has more questions.

Commissioner David Reaves requested the opinion from Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery in December through state Sen. Brian Kelsey.

52. Last Word: Legislature's Return, Uber Pilot, Minivan Comeback and Bowie's Exit -

The gavel falls in Nashville.
The Tennessee legislature is back in session Tuesday. This is an election year session for the legislature. So it will be short – likely an early April adjournment. But that doesn’t mean the session is without expectations from outside Nashville.

53. County Commission Approves Hacks Cross Contract, New Health Director -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, Jan. 11, a $223,600 contract for engineering and environmental work on the Hacks Cross Road widening.

The contract with Powers Hill Design LLC is to make Hacks Cross a seven-lane road from Shelby Drive south to Stateline Road, a span of 1.8 miles.

54. Luttrell, Strickland To Attend Obama’s State of the Union -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland will both be attending the Tuesday, Jan. 12, State of the Union address, the final State of the Union address by President Barack Obama

55. Tennessee Legislature Opens 2016 Session on Capitol Hill -

The Tennessee General Assembly's 2016 session will be a short one, likely done by early April. The gavels fall in the House and Senate chambers in Nashville at noon Tuesday, Jan. 12, opening the election year session.

56. Last Word: The Crest, OPEB Fever, Armstrong Leaves and An Elvis Warning -

The crest is here and it is not quite 40 feet on the Mississippi River gauge. The projections Thursday evening going into Friday’s crest of the river at Memphis changed a bit from the 40.3 foot level. The crest is 39.8 feet.
No reports of major damage anywhere in Shelby County, according to the Shelby County Office of Prepardness.
But the river’s high water is still a sight to behold.

57. Luttrell: State Likely to Mandate $1B Liability -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell said the state of Tennessee will most likely move to require Shelby County Schools to fully fund its $1.5 billion liability for health insurance and similar employee benefits.

58. Mississippi River at Memphis Approaches Flood Stage -

As the Mississippi River was nearing flood stage at Memphis Saturday, Jan. 2, Memphis firefighters were preparing to go door-to-door in Harbor Town on Mud Island.

The visits are not an evacuation. They are “to notify residents about the high water threat,” said Dale Lane, director of the Shelby County Office of Preparedness.

59. Lowery’s Prayer Breakfast Marks 22nd Year -

Myron Lowery is leaving the Memphis City Council as of New Year’s Day.

But the outgoing council chairman will still be hosting a New Year’s Day Prayer Breakfast Friday, Jan. 1, at 9 a.m. on his first day out of office in 24 years.

60. McKinney Appointed as Shelby County Lobbyist -

Assistant County Attorney David E. McKinney is Shelby County government’s new director of legislative affairs.

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell announced McKinney’s appointment Tuesday, Dec. 29, to take effect Jan. 1.

61. Lowery’s Prayer Breakfast Marks 25th Year -

Though Myron Lowery’s 24-year tenure on the Memphis City Council ended Dec. 31, he planned to start 2016 with a familiar tradition: his New Year’s Day Prayer Breakfast.

62. McKinney Appointed as New County Government Lobbyist -

Assistant County Attorney David E. McKinney is Shelby County government’s new director of legislative affairs.

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell announced McKinney’s appointment Tuesday, Dec. 29, to take effect Jan. 1.

63. Luttrell Appoints Kneeland Deputy County Fire Chief -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has appointed Glen Kneeland as the Shelby County Fire Department’s deputy fire chief.

64. Luttrell Appoints Kneeland Deputy County Fire Chief -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has appointed Glen Kneeland as the Shelby County Fire Department’s deputy fire chief.

65. Young Named City HCD Director By Strickland -

Memphis Mayor-elect Jim Strickland has named Paul Young as the director of the city’s division of Housing and Community Development.

66. A List of Mayor-Elect Jim Strickland’s Appointments So Far -

Memphis Mayor elect Jim Strickland still has some appointments to make, but he is methodically filling key positions in his administration ahead of taking office Jan. 1.

67. Snapshot: Dirt Finally Moving at Ikea's Memphis Store Site -

Swedish furniture retailer Ikea officially broke ground Thursday, Dec. 11, on its Memphis store, the company's first in Tennessee.

Ikea representatives, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell, local officials and community leaders were on hand to mark the long-awaited occasion.

68. County Commission Ends Year With Nonprofit Grants -

Shelby County Commissioners met for the last time in 2015 Monday, Dec. 7, in an hour-long session void of any arguments about money or attorneys. They focused on a set of grants for local nonprofits instead.

69. County Commission Attorney Dispute Deepens -

Shelby County Commission chairman Terry Roland says the commission’s dispute with county Mayor Mark Luttrell over hiring its own attorney could wind up in Chancery Court after the holidays.

70. Ikea Memphis to Break Ground Next Week -

Ikea will break ground on its new Memphis-area store next week.

The Thursday, Dec. 10, event will take place at 11 a.m. at the site of the future Ikea store in Cordova off Germantown Parkway.

71. County Government Standoff Moves To Negotiations -

It was all smiles at the Shelby County Commission Monday, Nov. 23, between county Mayor Mark Luttrell and commission chairman Terry Roland.

72. The Week Ahead: Nov. 23, 2015 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from The Peabody’s 36-foot dessert table to your potential (fingers-crossed, maybe not) last chance to see Paxton Lynch at the Liberty Bowl…

73. Commissioners Override Veto Of Legal Counsel Resolution -

With a vote to spare Wednesday, Nov. 18, Shelby County commissioners overrode county Mayor Mark Luttrell’s veto of their resolution to hire their own legal counsel.

74. Commissioners Override Veto Of Legal Counsel Resolution -

With a vote to spare Wednesday, Nov. 18, Shelby County commissioners overrode county Mayor Mark Luttrell’s veto of their resolution to hire their own legal counsel.

75. County Commission Overrides Veto of Legal Counsel Resolution -

With a vote to spare Wednesday, Nov. 18, Shelby County commissioners overrode county Mayor Mark Luttrell’s veto of their resolution to hire their own legal counsel.

76. Greenprint Summit Shows Region’s Possibilities -

Trails and bike lanes aren’t the only path to regional success, but they’re playing a growing role in partnerships among communities that sometimes find themselves competing for jobs.

To date, 19 of those communities have adopted a 25-year, green-centric plan that was introduced earlier this year and has been endorsed by more than 50 organizations.

77. Time for Tuition Equality in Tennessee -

Tennessee has a unique opportunity to help the state economy and support education. Passage of the “Tuition Equality” bill in the upcoming state legislative session will provide a critical chance to educate thousands of Tennessee youth and narrow the skills gap that exists for Tennessee employers.

78. Commission Cancels Veto Override Meeting -

Shelby County Commissioners were set to meet in special session Thursday, Nov. 12, before calling off those plans less than 24 hours later.

The session was to consider overriding Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell’s veto of their plan to hire their own attorney.

79. Bank On Memphis Targets Smartphones -

For about five years now, a partnership between the city of Memphis and local banks and credit unions has been working to bring people who don’t have a checking or savings account into the mainstream banking sphere.

80. EDGE Still Explaining Itself To Memphis, Shelby County Elected Leaders -

Four years into its existence, Reid Dulberger is still explaining the basics of a group created by Memphis Mayor A C Wharton and Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell to streamline local economic development efforts.

81. Shelby County Commission Continues Quest for Legal Autonomy -

Shelby County commissioners have hired an attorney in their continued exploration of retaining their own permanent legal counsel independent of the county attorney’s office.

The body appointed former county commissioner Julian Bolton as special counsel in the matter Monday, Oct. 12. The commission has indicated Bolton is the attorney they’d like to hire on a permanent basis.

82. County Commission Weighs Apartment Conditions -

After a tour last week of three apartment complexes owned by Global Ministries Foundation, Shelby County Commissioners vote Monday. Oct. 12, on a resolution that asks GMF to show what it is doing to improve conditions at Goodwill Village Apartments, Tulane Apartments and Warren Apartments.

83. All Men’s Day Of Prayer Is Saturday -

The Memphis District Laymen are calling all men of faith to gather and pray for Memphis during the third annual All Men’s Day of Prayer.

The 2015 theme is “A State of Emergency Exists.” Several city officials and community leaders will address the men of Memphis and how they can help individually and collectively.

84. Shelby County Commission Agrees to Budget Summit -

Shelby County commissioners will meet with Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell in October to hold a budget summit.

85. Commission Confirms Orgel Appointment to DMC -

Shelby County commissioners confirmed Monday, Sept. 14, county mayor Mark Luttrell’s appointment of Benjamin Orgel to the Downtown Memphis Commission board.

86. County Commission Confirms Orgel Appointment to DMC -

Shelby County commissioners confirmed Monday, Sept. 14, county mayor Mark Luttrell’s appointment of Benjamin Orgel to the Downtown Memphis Commission board.

87. Roland Claims Shelby County Commission Chairmanship -

After Terry Roland took the chairman’s seat at the Monday, Sept. 14, Shelby County Commission meeting, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell congratulated him and pledged to work with him.

88. Roland Claims County Commission Chairmanship -

Three weeks after Steve Basar was elected – and an hour later un-elected – as chairman, the Shelby County Commission settled the discussion of who would be its leader next year by electing commissioner Terry Roland.

89. Luttrell Pushes Budget Summit for New Commission Chair -

When Shelby County Commissioners meet Monday, Sept. 14, the group will have a new chairman – but not a permanent one – and will try to set a date for a budget summit.

Chairman pro tempore Van Turner will be the acting head as the 13-member body tries to do what it couldn’t at its Aug. 10 meeting: elect a leader for the next year. Outgoing chairman Justin Ford’s one-year term ended Sept. 1.

90. Shelby County Budget Summit Call Begins With Different Priorities -

Shelby County government’s financial needs have changed in the nearly two months since the new fiscal year began.

And Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell called Monday, Aug. 24, for a “budget summit” with county commissioners and county trustee David Lenoir to explore the new budget realities.

91. Luttrell Calls For County Budget Summit In Economic Growth Climate -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell called Monday, Aug. 24, for a “budget summit” with county commissioners and county Trustee David Lenoir to look at new budget realities.

92. Lenoir: ‘Is It Time for a Tax Decrease?’ -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir says the $22 million extra in property tax revenue his office collected during the past fiscal year appears to be a trend of improving health in the local economy.

93. Keeney Is Newest Airport Authority Board Member -

Attorney Michael Keeney is the newest member of the Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority Board.

94. Tax Revenue Reopens Budget Wounds -

The largest portion of $22 million in extra tax revenue collected by Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir will go to local public education, county commissioners said Monday, July 27.

95. Commission Rejects Cordova Pay Day Loan Business, Spars Over Tax Collections -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, July 27, renaming the Shelby County Courthouse at 140 Adams Ave. in honor of the late Circuit Court Judge and civil rights activist D’Army Bailey.

96. County Term-Limit Changes Proposed -

Just as the ballot was set for the October Memphis elections last week, some politicos were laying the groundwork for the 2016 election season in Shelby County.

That foundation includes two proposed amendments that would undo two Shelby County government charter amendments approved by voters in 2008.

97. Keeney Is Newest Airport Authority Board Member -

Attorney Michael Keeney is the newest member of the Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority Board.

98. County Commission Friction Continues Beyond Budget Season -

Put Shelby County government’s budget season in the books for another year.

But the deliberations that ended Monday, July 6, with a stable county property tax rate and county government staying within its $6 million budget surplus weren’t quite as smooth as those decisions might suggest.

99. Commission Approves Tax Rate, But Longer-Range Budget Issues Linger -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a stable $4.37 county property tax rate Monday, July 6, on third and final reading and wrapped up other loose ends from its budget season. That included passage of $1.3 million in grant spending to be divided equally among the 13 commissioners at $100,000 each.

100. New Fitness Zone to Open in Audubon Park -

The city of Memphis is getting a permanent outdoor adult fitness zone at Audubon Park.

The park is a result of a year-long partnership between the city and Meta, a Procter & Gamble product line led by Metamucil. The fitness area of the park is expected to be open for public use by mid to late summer.