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Editorial Results (free)

1. Overton Gateway Compromise Approved By Council -

Memphis City Council members approved the Overton Gateway mixed residential development Tuesday, July 25 in a pair of unanimous votes – one for the plans on the north side of Sam Cooper Boulevard at East Parkway and the other for the plans on the south side of Sam Cooper at East Parkway.

2. Overton Gateway Compromise Approved By Council -

Memphis City Council members approved the Overton Gateway mixed residential development Tuesday, July 25 in a pair of unanimous votes – one for the plans on the north side of Sam Cooper Boulevard at East Parkway and the other for the plans on the south side of Sam Cooper at East Parkway.

3. Juvenile Court Oversight Issue Spills Into Larger Criminal Justice Reform Debate -

Talking Monday, July 24, about criminal justice reform, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael mentioned the formal written request he, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and Sheriff Bill Oldham made to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions in June to end Justice Department oversight of the court.

4. Juxtaposing Views Greet Voting Change -

Memphis City Council members Edmund Ford Jr. and Patrice Robinson have each been on the winning side of a council runoff election and share a district border along Elvis Presley Boulevard in Whitehaven.

5. Last Word: The Old Auto Inspection Station, Beale Field Trip and Re-Democrating -

Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton has a different version of his 2016 plan to build two youth development centers for juvenile offenders to go to instead of detention at the Wilder Youth Development Center in Somerville. About a year ago, Herenton had tentative plans for two of the New Path centers in Shelby County that would be centers where the offenders could live.

6. ‘Fed Up’ Campaign Warns Of Tougher Gun Penalties -

The Memphis Shelby Crime Commission and the city of Memphis have launched a marketing campaign to warn would-be offenders about tougher state penalties and possible federal prosecution for violent criminals possessing a gun.

7. Revival of Ranked Choice Voting Marks Phillips’ Attention to Detail -

The use of Ranked Choice Voting or instant-runoff voting in Memphis elections was a moot point even before Memphis voters approved it in 2008 in a city charter amendment.

The Shelby County Election Commission had concluded before the charter referendum that its voting systems couldn’t accommodate a method of voting that ranked candidates in a single race by a voter’s preference, instead of a voter picking one and only one candidate.

8. Riverfront Concept Plan Intersects With Many Others About Key City Asset -

The Memphis riverfront is hardly a blank canvas. But you would never know that from the number of plans there have been over several decades to make it more of a “front door” for the city – to borrow a phrase from more than a few of those reports.

9. Riverfront Concept Plan Emphasizes Connections, River Access -

A pedestrian bridge between the southern tip of Mud Island and Riverside Drive, more pedestrian use of Riverside Drive, a pavilion at Tom Lee Park and greater access to the edge of the Mississippi River are among the elements of a riverfront concept plan outlined Tuesday, July 18, by a Chicago architecture and urban design firm.

10. Last Word: Rachel Heck, Beale Street's Cover and The Old Peabody -

The “fifth wave” of judicial appointments by President Donald Trump, as The White House termed them, are already causing some political ripples here primarily from state Senator Mark Norris’s appointment to the federal bench.

11. On National Summer Learning Day, Memphis Takes Stock of Programs for Kids -

When it comes to summer learning, it’s been a better year for Memphis, where a range of new programs have helped to stem learning loss that hits hard in communities with a high number of low-income students.

12. Memphis Joins Bloomberg’s ‘What Works Cities’ Effort -

Memphis is one of five new cities selected to join Bloomberg Philanthropies’ What Works Cities initiative, Major Jim Strickland’s administration announced Wednesday, July 12.

13. Thomas & Betts to Invest $20.7 Million in Expansion -

Thomas & Betts plans to add 75 employees and invest $20.7 million in its headquarters relocation in Memphis and is seeking a 15-year payment-in-lieu-of-taxes (PILOT) incentive to help defray those costs.

14. Summer in the City -

Saturday night on Beale Street is more than a catch phrase for businesses there.

It is chapters in old, out-of-print books like Lt. George W. Lee’s “Where The Blues Began” that you can only see in the Memphis-Shelby County Room of the Central Library. You can’t check the book out because of its rarity and age. But you can also find references to the lore of Saturday nights on Beale Street on plaques in the entertainment district that current patrons walk past without even noticing.

15. Memphis to Join Bloomberg’s ‘What Works Cities’ Initiative -

Memphis is one of five new cities selected to join Bloomberg Philanthropies’ What Works Cities initiative, Major Jim Strickland’s administration announced Wednesday, July 12.

16. New Memphis Plans to Expand Programming for Millennials -

Through the end of this month, the New Memphis Institute is continuing the yearly Summer Experience it hosts each year that’s comprised of free events for local and visiting college students and recent graduates, all with a view toward encouraging them to put down roots in Memphis.

17. Additional Sanitation Workers May Get Benefits -

The city of Memphis had 1,100 sanitation workers when the historic strike began in February 1968, with close to 1,000 of them walking off the job following the grisly deaths of two of their own trapped in the grinder of a garbage truck in East Memphis.

18. Council Approves Sanitation Workers Benefits -

There may be more than 14 city sanitation workers from 1968 who are still alive. And the city is double-checking its list as the Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, July 11, the payment of $50,000 grants to 14 of the workers it has already identified including four still working for the city.

19. Last Word: Marathon County Budget Session, New Chandler Numbers and Confluence -

As we post this edition of Last Word, there is still some confusion about the KC-130 Marine cargo plane that crashed near the Leflore-Sunflower County line in Mississippi Monday evening.

All 16 people on board were killed in the crash.

20. Bridge Protest Anniversary Draws More Action, Reflection -

A year after the spontaneous protest march that ended with more than 1,000 people shutting down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge for several hours, the leader of that effort was again moving north along B.B. King Boulevard on Sunday, July 9.

21. Council Takes Up Sanitation Worker Benefits -

Memphis City Council members vote Tuesday, July 11, on grants of $50,000 each for the 14 surviving city sanitation workers from the 1968 strike along with a supplemental retirement plan for sanitation workers hired after the strike.

22. Last Word: Rumors, The Return of Tyreke Evans and Broadband in Millington -

There is a popular saying attributed to Winston Churchill that goes like this: “A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth has a chance to get its pants on.” Even before social media, that was certainly the case in this part of the world called Memphis. The part of our history that doesn’t fit in books is littered with rumors that turned the city upside down in a much shorter period of time than it took to repair the damage done. That is what happened this weekend with Memphis Light Gas and Water.

23. Saturday Legal Aid Clinic To Celebrate 10 Years -

A ceremony and reception will be held Saturday, July 8, to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the 2nd Saturday Legal Aid Clinic, or 2SLAC, serving the Memphis community.

The event will be from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library, 3030 Poplar Ave.

24. City Plan Closes Retirement Gap for Sanitation Workers, Keeps Social Security -

Over nearly four decades, different city council and mayors have grappled with a legacy of the 1968 sanitation workers strike.

It has endured as history has come to terms with the strike and its violent end and the site of Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination has become a museum.

25. Patterson Resignation Comes as Council Examines DMC’s Role -

Terence Patterson exited the Downtown Memphis Commission last week as the Memphis City Council is about to discuss replacing or restructuring not only the DMC, but the Riverfront Development Corp.

26. Last Word: Vince Carter Leaves, Fairgrounds and Pulling the Plug on Green Tech -

Vince Carter joins Zach Randolph with the Sacramento Kings next NBA season with an $8 million one-year pact for Carter. Still no word on Tony Allen’s free agency status as we put this up. The Grizz plan to retire Randolph’s jersey.

27. Memphis Announces Grants for Remaining 1968 Sanitation Workers -

A group of 14 city sanitation workers from 1968 – four still working for the city and 10 who are retired – will be getting $50,000 grants from the city, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland announced Thursday, July 6.

28. 2nd Saturday Legal Aid Clinic To Celebrate 10 Years -

A ceremony and reception will be held Saturday, July 8, to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the 2nd Saturday Legal Aid Clinic, or 2SLAC, serving the Memphis community.

The event will be from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library, 3030 Poplar Ave.

29. McCalla Keeps Police Surveillance Lawsuit -

A Memphis federal judge has dropped four citizens as plaintiffs in a lawsuit alleging the city violated a 1978 federal consent decree barring police from conducting surveillance of protesters, saying the citizens don’t have standing.

30. Fairgrounds Movement Triggers Liberty Bowl Questions -

For a prime piece of real estate that is supposed to be in a holding pattern, there is a lot of recent activity on and about the Mid-South Fairgrounds. And even when Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium isn’t the immediate topic, it is an undeniable presence.

31. McCalla Keeps Police Surveillance Lawsuit, Drops Protester Plaintiffs -

A Memphis Federal Judge has dropped four citizens from a lawsuit alleging the city violated a 1978 federal consent decree barring police from conducting surveillance of protesters saying they don’t have standing.

32. Appling Road Greenline Access Awaits Funding -

There is a plan designed and ready for an Appling Road access point to the Shelby Farms Greenline and if the response to last week’s opening of the Perkins Road access point is any indication, it shouldn’t be too difficult.

33. Gibson Becomes First African-American Woman Partner at Burch, Porter & Johnson -

Tannera Gibson knew she wanted to be more than an attorney. She wanted to be an attorney at Burch, Porter & Johnson PLLC, one of the city’s oldest law firms with a deep history in and out of court and the business of law.

34. Last Word: Health Care Plan React, Treasury Footprint and Tom Bowen - Take Two -

It’s like they aren’t even looking at the same legislation. That’s one explanation of the very different reviews the Senate health care bill got Thursday as it was unveiled in Washington. Illustrating the contrast, the reactions of Republican U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee and Democratic U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen of Memphis.

35. Strickland Pushes Economic Breakthrough Outside City's Current Hot Spots -

The city of Memphis has to grow economically outside of the Poplar Avenue corridor of East Memphis, Midtown and Downtown if the city is to prosper, and Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland said that economic breakthrough can start in Whitehaven.

36. Last Word: Cyber Attacks, Second Farmers Market Downtown and The Council Way -

It’s on. Shelby County commissioners coming out Wednesday in committee against the idea of ending Justice Department oversight of Juvenile Court. And the discussion was, as always, an interesting one including not only critics like commissioner Van Turner but commissioner Terry Roland and County Mayor Mark Luttrell.

37. City Council Pushes Back at Administration -

Sometimes there are seven votes. Other times there aren’t. But Memphis City Council debates increasingly point to different thoughts about the city’s course as outlined by the administration of Mayor Jim Strickland.

38. City Council Approves DROP Freeze, Delays Stormwater and Sewer Fee Votes -

The city has its third voluntary freeze on retirements in two years with a Tuesday, June 20, vote by the Memphis City Council. But it came after lots of council debate about whether the freeze might have the opposite overall effect of stabilizing the Memphis Police force at the top for future growth in the ranks below or whether it will prompt the middle ranks to exit quicker if they can’t rise in the ranks.

39. Council to Shore Up Budget Loose Ends, Talk Beale Street, DROP and UrbanArt -

Memphis City Council members have done most of the heavy lifting and taken votes on the major items that end the budget season at City Hall.

But they still have a few loose ends to wrap at their Tuesday, June 20, session.

40. Lawmakers: Talk, Action On Crime Don’t Match -

State Senate Minority Leader Lee Harris of Memphis says some of the rhetoric about criminal justice reform – not locking up as many nonviolent offenders for longer sentences – doesn’t match the push for legislation in Nashville.

41. Labor Activists, Memphis Agree to Settle Civil Rights Suit -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Activists pushing for higher wages at fast-food restaurants have settled a lawsuit that claimed police in Memphis, Tennessee, threatened protesters with arrest and followed labor organizers home after meetings.

42. Railgarten Could Be Back At Memphis City Council -

The Memphis City Council may have more questions about the Railgarten bar/restaurant in Midtown.

The council questioned the development’s addition of intermodal containers and an outside area after the council approved a special use permit earlier this year.

43. After the ‘Tom Lee Storm’: A Look At Recovery Efforts, What's Next -

Eleven days after the May 27 storm that knocked out power to 188,000 homes and businesses, Memphis Light, Gas and Water officials declared victory in the recovery with a Wednesday, June 8, late afternoon Tweet: “Update: Restored.”

44. Railgarten Could Be Back At Memphis City Council -

The Memphis City Council may have more questions about the Railgarten bar/restaurant in Midtown.

The council questioned the development’s addition of intermodal containers and an outside area after the council approved a special use permit earlier this year.

45. City Council Settles Budget, But Other Issues Remain -

The budget season at City Hall is over with the Tuesday, June 6, Memphis City Council vote approving a $680 million city operating budget, an $81.3 million capital budget and a $3.27 city property tax rate.

46. City Council Completes Budget Season, Says Larger Issues of Priorities Remain -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, June 6, a $680 million city operating budget for the fiscal year that starts July 1, an $81.3 million capital budget and a $3.27 city property tax rate.

47. Last Word: Don McMinn, Frayser's Recovery and The Clean Line -

Back in the late 1970s when Beale Street was still rotting and behind chain link fences and Downtown Memphis was in recovery in every sense of the word, there was a poster of Don McMinn standing in front of the statue of W.C. Handy on Beale with his back to the camera spreading open the raincoat he was wearing in Handy’s direction. The caption was something about exposing the world to the blues. That’s not the only image that comes to mind of those times with word Sunday that McMinn has died.

48. Last Word: Don McMinn, Frayser's Recovery and The Clean Line -

Back in the late 1970s when Beale Street was still under construction and Downtown Memphis was in recovery in every sense of the word, there was a poster of Don McMinn standing in front of the statue of W.C. Handy on Beale with his back to the camera spreading open the raincoat he was wearing in Handy’s direction. The caption was something about exposing the world to the blues. That’s not the only image that comes to mind of those times with word Sunday that McMinn has died.

49. Frayser Recovery Efforts Before Storm Continue Afterward -

Recovery efforts in Frayser aren’t just about the weather and they didn’t just start after the Memorial Day weekend storm that did plenty of damage in neighborhoods with old, large trees.

50. Last Word: Recovery Day 6, Trezevant Allegations Resurface and Memphis Is Hard -

There is some debate about how the Memorial Day weekend storm compares to the Ice Storm of 1994 and Hurricane Elvis in 2003. A city public works supervisor who is a veteran of both earlier incidents weighed in this week as Mayor Jim Strickland stopped by Collins Yard to rally the city’s troops in the recovery effort. Rodney Wakefield also had a lot to say about what motivates city workers to tackle this hard work in a sweltering spring and do it as quickly and as safely as possible.

51. Memphis' First Storm Damage Estimate Tops $9 Million -

One of the more striking sites Rodney Wakefield has seen since Saturday’s storm that raked the city was a “for sale” sign in a yard where a large tree had fallen after being uprooted from the ground near the sign.

52. Long-Awaited Demolition at Foote Homes Begins -

Foote Homes, the last large public housing project in Memphis, began coming down Tuesday, May 30, with a formal ceremony marking the start of demolition toward the broader South City redevelopment.

53. City Council Weighs $7.3M Cut in Police Budget -

Memphis City Council members will likely be discussing possible amendments to the city budget right up to the final June 6 votes on the budget and tax rate resolutions and ordinances.

In a council budget committee wrap-up session Tuesday, May 30, that drew nine of the 13 council members, the group considered but took no action on a proposal by council member Martavius Jones to cut $7.3 million in funding for the Memphis Police Department.

54. Crews Move To Smaller Areas, Storm Damage Estimates Grow -

Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division’s response to the Saturday storm that knocked out power to 188,000 homes and businesses will cost the utility at least $7 million.

“We will spend in excess of $7 million and it could be well in excess of $7 million,” said MLGW president Jerry Collins.

55. Last Word: Your Neighbor Has Power, City Budget Wrap Take One and BBQ -

We are at the point in our storm recovery where the novelty and sense of adventure have reached the end of their very short lives in areas where the power is still out. And the restoration of that service is at a point where you now have people on one side of a street with power and those on the other side may still be in the dark and the heat.

56. City Council Discusses $7.3 Million Cut in Police Budget -

Memphis City Council members will likely be discussing possible amendments to the city budget right up to the final June 6 votes on the budget and tax rate resolutions and ordinances.

In a council budget committee wrap-up session Tuesday, May 30, that drew 9 of the 13 council members, the group considered but took no action on a proposal by council member Martavius Jones to cut $7.3 million in funding for the Memphis Police Department.

57. Strickland Taps City Reserves For $6 Million In Storm Debris Removal -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is asking the Memphis City Council for up to $6 million from the city’s reserve fund for cleanup from the May 27 storm.

58. Strickland Taps City Reserves For $6 Million In Storm Debris Removal -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is asking the Memphis City Council for up to $6 million from the city’s reserve fund for cleanup from the May 27 storm.

59. Full Restoration After Smaller 'Hurricane Elvis' To Take More Than a Week -

The storm that raked Memphis with 80 mile-an-hour winds Saturday evening was similar to the 2003 storm nicknamed “Hurricane Elvis” but not quite as widespread.

“It did have some similar characteristics to Hurricane Elvis,” said Gary Woodall, warning coordination meteorologist at the National Weather Service Memphis. “Fortunately, this go around it was not quite physically as large as it was.”

60. Full Restoration After Smaller 'Hurricane Elvis' To Take More Than a Week -

The storm that raked Memphis with 80 mile-an-hour winds Saturday evening was similar to the 2003 storm nicknamed “Hurricane Elvis” but not quite as widespread.

“It did have some similar characteristics to Hurricane Elvis,” said Gary Woodall, warning coordination meteorologist at the National Weather Service Memphis. “Fortunately, this go around it was not quite physically as large as it was.”

61. Full Restoration After Smaller 'Hurricane Elvis' To Take More Than a Week -

The storm that raked Memphis with 80 mile-an-hour winds Saturday evening was similar to the 2003 storm nicknamed “Hurricane Elvis” but not quite as widespread.

“It did have some similar characteristics to Hurricane Elvis,” said Gary Woodall, warning coordination meteorologist at the National Weather Service Memphis. “Fortunately, this go around it was not quite physically as large as it was.”

62. Full Restoration After Smaller 'Hurricane Elvis' To Take More Than a Week -

UPDATE: As of 9 a.m. Monday, May 29, 125,000 Memphis Light Gas and Water Division customers were without power. And 32 people were staying at the Red Cross shelter at the Orange Mound Community Center. City Public Works has hired more contractors to help clear downed trees and other debris from roads.

63. City Council Members: Beale Bucks Evolving -

Beale Street’s new $5 weekend night cover charge still has a few details to work out, says Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd.

“We’re not putting a period there, we’re putting a comma because we are taking a pause,” Boyd said on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

64. Last Word: Sessions Notes, Lakeland Elects and Golf Classic Turns 60 -

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions doesn’t stick with the script he has when he makes a speech, like the one he gave Thursday at the federal building to a room full of federal prosecutors and local and state law enforcement. Some of that comes from his background as a former U.S. Attorney and Alabama’s Attorney General, not to mention his tenure as a U.S. senator.

65. Crime & Punishment -

Federal prosecutors have the discretion to pass on charging a defendant with every possible criminal charge that can be made.

But U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions told a room full of federal prosecutors in Memphis Thursday, May 25, that he will enforce his directive that they pursue “the most serious, readily provable offense … with judgment and with fairness.”

66. Last Word: Sessions Visit, Election Day and Beale Street's Journey -

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions in Memphis Thursday to talk about crime in a city whose record homicide count in 2016 Sessions has recently mentioned. Sessions is in town to talk with local, state and federal prosecutors and law enforcement. When the Attorney General comes to town, he or she is usually coming with policy talking points from the White House.

67. Beale Street Cover Charge Cut, Larger Debate Remains -

The Saturday night summer cover charge on Beale Street is going from $10 to $5 next month. But the discussion about the Beale Street Bucks program is hardly over. And the crowd control measure is certain to raise longer-term questions about who controls the city-owned district.

68. Council Sets Stage for City Employee Pay Raises -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, May 23, a 1 percent across-the-board pay raise for all city employees setting the stage for a final vote on budget matters at the June 6 council session.

69. Council Sets Stage for Raise, Keeps Railgarten and Cuts Beale Cover -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, May 23, a 1 percent across the board pay raise for all city employees setting the stage for a final vote on budget matters at the June 6 council session.

70. Small Fitness Centers Fight Tax Exemption for Larger Competitors -

Jeff Rose and his wife Nancy sank their entire life savings, more than $500,000, into opening the Orangetheory Fitness center in Lakeland in 2015.

71. Past, Present Converge at Lynching Centennial -

The only thing that runs through the area where the Macon Road bridge stood 100 years ago are power lines on wooden poles that take them over the oxbow lake, thick kudzu and two bridge supports almost overtaken by undergrowth on the edge of a thickly-wooded area.

72. Council Faces Railgarten, Beale Bucks, Police Overtime -

Memphis City Council members have a rare evidentiary hearing Tuesday, May 23, at the top of their agenda on an unusual development case the council approved several months ago.

The council holds an evidentiary hearing on the Railgarten bar and restaurant on Central Avenue east of Cooper Street that the council granted a special use permit for. The council moved to possibly revoke that permit after Railgarten added some intermodal containers and an outside area to the development.

73. Last Word: Centennial, Hackett Retires -- Sort Of and Baseball Dreams -

Monday marks 100 years since a mob took Ell Persons off a train and to the Macon Road Bridge across the Wolf River and burned him alive. It was the lynching that gave birth to the Memphis Branch NAACP one month later. The national NAACP field office investigator who came to Memphis at great personal peril to investigate Person’s death was none other than James Weldon Johnson, the man who also composed “Lift Every Voice and Sing.”

74. Present Day Issues Surface in Centennial of Persons Lynching -

The interfaith prayer ceremony Sunday, May 21, marking the centennial of the lynching of Ell Persons included several mentions of the removal of Confederate monuments in the last month in New Orleans.

75. Barbecue Decoy Surfaces As Overton Square Protest -

Several dozen people staged a street theater protest in Overton Square Saturday, May 20, after a decoy call for a protest Downtown at the Memphis In May International Barbecue Cooking Contest.

“So while they (police) deployed their resources at BBQ fest, CCC was at Overton Square highlighting the real obscenities,” Al Lewis, a member of the Memphis Coalition of Concerned Citizens, posted on Facebook Saturday afternoon.

76. Barbecue Decoy Surfaces As Overton Square Protest -

Several dozen people staged a street theater protest in Overton Square Saturday, May 20, after a decoy call for a protest Downtown at the Memphis In May International Barbecue Cooking Contest.

“So while they deployed their resources at BBQ fest, CCC was at Overton Square highlighting the real obscenities,” Al Lewis, a member of the Memphis Coalition of Concerned Citizens, posted on Facebook Saturday afternoon.

77. Barbecue Decoy Surfaces As Overton Square Protest -

Several dozen people staged a street theater protest in Overton Square Saturday, May 20, after a decoy call for a protest Downtown at the Memphis In May International Barbecue Cooking Contest.

“So while they deployed their resources at BBQ fest, CCC was at Overton Square highlighting the real obscenities,” Memphis Coalition of Concerned Citizens leader Al Lewis posted on Facebook Saturday afternoon.

78. Last Word: Carousel Preview, New Crime Stats and EDGE Does Multi-Family -

The group Friends of the Fairgrounds got together Thursday evening at the Children’s Museum of Memphis and got the first group tour of the Grand Carousel center under construction at CMOM. This is as the museum focuses more on fundraising for the $6 million project that has already raised the money for the restoration of the carousel itself and now sets about the task of paying for the building around it including a banquet hall. Here’s a look from our Facebook page with more to come on CMOM and the Fairgrounds for the Monday edition that will probably go up on line Friday.

79. EDGE to Test Multifamily Tax Abatements -

The Economic Development Growth Engine of Memphis and Shelby County has approved a trial run of a new payment-in-lieu-of-taxes program aimed at encouraging development of multifamily housing the city of Memphis feels it needs to break free of the cycle of stagnant population growth.

80. 'War' on Blight -

Attorney Steve Barlow has been working on blight issues for 20 years, which is to say he’s been working for two decades almost exclusively on the maze of rules, regulations and procedures that make blight possible and sustainable.

81. Last Word: Issues or Elections, City Impasse Decisions and Memphis Sk8s -

Those active in the Republican and Democratic parties at the local, state or national level will tell you their job is to elect candidates of their party to office at all levels of government. It's even in writing in just about any party's mission statement. And the inability of the local Democratic party to do that in countywide partisan elections is one of several factors that led to the state party disbanding the local party last year.

82. New Documentary Tells Story of Tobey Skate Park -

A new documentary on the 6-year-old Memphis Skate Park at Tobey Park takes a look at skate culture in Memphis and the struggle to get the park to reality after securing a grant that ran out and then securing city capital funding for it.

83. CLERB Prepares Response to Rallings’ Rejection of Police Misconduct Claims -

Members of the city Civilian Law Enforcement Review Board said Thursday, May 11, Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings’ dismissal of their three recommendations to reprimand or discipline police officers accused of misconduct will not be the last word on the cases. Even if Rallings’ decisions stand.

84. Jackson Visits City Hall In Push for Career Education -

At the top of the Tuesday, May 9, Memphis City Council session, the council heard from civil rights leader and two-time presidential contender Rev. Jesse Jackson.

85. Airbnb, City of Memphis Reach Tax Agreement -

Airbnb has announced it has entered into a tax agreement with the city of Memphis to collect and remit taxes on behalf of its Memphis hosts.

The agreement, which will take effect June 1, will automatically collect and remit local taxes for all Airbnb bookings in Memphis, including a 3.5 percent Memphis Short Term Room Occupancy Tax as well as a Tourism Improvement District Assessment of $2 per bedroom per night.

86. Airbnb, City of Memphis Reach Tax Agreement -

Airbnb has announced it has entered into a tax agreement with the city of Memphis to collect and remit taxes on behalf of its Memphis hosts.

The agreement, which will take effect June 1, will automatically collect and remit local taxes for all Airbnb bookings in Memphis, including a 3.5 percent Memphis Short Term Room Occupancy Tax as well as a Tourism Improvement District Assessment of $2 per bedroom per night.

87. Airbnb, City of Memphis Reach Tax Agreement -

Airbnb has announced it has entered into a tax agreement with the city of Memphis to collect and remit taxes on behalf of its Memphis hosts.

The agreement, which will take effect June 1, will automatically collect and remit local taxes for all Airbnb bookings in Memphis, including a 3.5 percent Memphis Short Term Room Occupancy Tax as well as a Tourism Improvement District Assessment of $2 per bedroom per night.

88. Jackson Visits City Hall In Push for Career Education -

At the top of the Tuesday, May 9, Memphis City Council session, the council heard from civil rights leader and two-time presidential contender Rev. Jesse Jackson.

89. Beale Street Issues Deepen and Grow -

The issue of who controls what in the Beale Street entertainment district has come to the forefront after the abolition of the Beale Street Tourism Development Authority.

The Memphis City Council abolished the authority in April and has now moved into a deepening debate about the Beale Street Bucks program used by merchants and the street’s interim manager, the Downtown Memphis Commission, as a crowd control measure.

90. Council Hears Railgarten Dispute in 2 Weeks, Appoints Impasse Panels -

Memphis City Council members will hold an evidentiary hearing in two weeks to sort out a Midtown restaurant-bar that ran afoul of the approvals needed to open with annexes including intermodal containers and an outdoor area.

91. Commission Chair: Not Enough Votes To Pass Tax Cut -

Shelby County Commission budget chairman Steve Basar doesn’t count seven votes on the commission at this point for a cut in the county property tax rate.

“I don’t think there’s seven votes right now to go lower than the certified tax rate,” Basar said Monday, May 8, following a weekend budget summit among commissioners at Shelby Farms Park.

92. Last Word: Railgarten Redux, Raleigh Springs Mall and Forrest Author Speaks -

Railgarten II, Son of Railgarten, Railgarten, Beyond the Board of Adjustment, Railgarten, Enter The City Council … Take your pick of sequel titles. Railgarten goes back to the City Council Tuesday for at least a committee discussion in which the council considers whether it should take back the special use permit it granted the bar-restaurant. This is a follow up to the Board of Adjustment decision last month to delay any action on approving the other annexes of the business for 30 days.

93. Memphis City Council Could Act to Revoke Railgarten's Permit -

Memphis City Council members are considering a hearing that could lead to revoking the special-use permit that allowed the Midtown restaurant/bar Railgarten to open just last month.

The council approved a special-use permit for Railgarten on Central Avenue east of Cooper Street, but code enforcement officers closed down two annexes to the business using intermodal containers shortly after it opened in April to large crowds.

94. Boyd’s Move for Police Overtime Cut Has Deeper Roots -

Of 10 Memphis City Council members present Thursday, May 4, for the ongoing review of the city budget proposal, half favored a move to cut police overtime and half did not.

Two efforts by council chairman Berlin Boyd to cut the $22.4 million line item – first by $5 million and then by $2.7 million – failed on tie votes both times, with some council members switching sides from one vote to the next.

95. Boyd Police Overtime Cut Approved -

Of 10 Memphis City Council members present Thursday, May 4, for the ongoing review of the city budget proposal, half favored a move to cut police overtime and half did not.

The two efforts by council chairman Berlin Boyd to cut the $22.4 million line item – first by $5 million and then by $2.7 million – failed on tie votes both times with some council members switching sides from one vote to the next.

96. Boyd: Memphis Public Safety Spending Out of Balance -

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd says the city budget is lopsided when it comes to its priorities.

And Boyd called Wednesday, May 3, for a shift away from public safety spending – specifically city spending on police – the largest single part of the operating and capital budgets as well as the largest division in city government.

97. 'Who is a Democrat?' -

Through two meetings in less than a week, the leader of a reorganization of the Shelby County Democratic Party has heard one discussion more than any other issue raised in the gatherings.

“Who is a Democrat?” attorney and former local party chairman David Cocke said in defining the issue at the start of the second forum in Midtown Wednesday, May 3.

98. Last Word: Three Gs React, More CA Changes and the Forrest Controversy Defined -

The day after Germantown leaders offered his school system $25 million for Germantown Elementary, Middle and High Schools, SCS superintendent Dorsey Hopson was fielding calls from parents of students at the schools – the “three Gs” as they are known.

99. Council Moves to Operating Budget Examination -

Memphis City Council members open budget hearings Thursday, May 5, on Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s $680 million operating budget proposal for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

100. Council Opens City Hall Budget Season -

With an eye on the clock in the City Council committee room and rap of a gavel, council budget committee chairman Edmund Ford Jr. opened city budget hearings Tuesday, May 2.

“This is going to be kind of boring,” Ford said of the two afternoons spent by the committee on Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s capital budget -- $158.9 million in spending on one-time non-recurring items, mostly construction projects done in several phases over several years.