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Editorial Results (free)

1. Overton Mediation Leads To Two Parking Agreements -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says the mediation process between the Memphis Zoo and the Overton Park Conservancy has produced two agreements – reconfiguring the zoo parking lot and on-street parking on North Parkway.

2. Reaction to the Death of Civil Rights Leader Rev. Samuel Billy Kyles -

Rev. Samuel Billy Kyles died Tuesday in Memphis after a long illness. Here's a roundup of reaction from local leaders, Kyles' associates and the National Civil Rights Museum...

3. Commission Debates Full Bill for Police Body Cameras -

Most Shelby County commissioners expressing an opinion say they favor body cameras for Memphis Police.

But the opinions begin to differ significantly when comes to who pays for the back-office system to handle the recordings and how much the whole bill will be.

4. CBHS Gets $1 Million Gift, Names Business Program -

Christian Brothers High School has announced its business program will be called the Bill and Carol Marr Department of Business and Economics. The program is named in honor of the $1 million gift from alumnus Bill Marr, CBHS Class of 1964.

5. Council Members Express Impatience with Minority Contracting Complexity -

Some Memphis City Council members want to challenge City Hall’s existing minority business system as its minority business effort is being streamlined.

The possible challenge includes questioning the idea of percentage goals in contracting based on a complex formula that includes multipliers.

6. Last Word: Prince, Violent Crime Numbers, and a Parkside Post Script -

Prince. It’s hard to think of a musician with a more complete knowledge of music as a social and cultural force and the ability to let that force inhabit his music and what he wanted to accomplish.
It is that knowledge and its use from obscurity to the pinnacle of fame and acclaim to his own journey for personal fulfillment that, to me, defines what has been lost.
Music mattered to Prince unlike it had ever mattered before. All of the influences analyzed and synthesized by someone born in rock and roll’s first wave pushed forward in a sound that combined rock and roll and rhythm and blues and funk with purpose and confidence.
It wasn’t a denial or downplaying of any of those music categories – all were present sonically and culturally. No juggling or quick changes.
That was his talent and it’s hard to think of anyone who has been as knowledgeable, intentional and successful -- commercially and artistically – in that combination.
Prince is remembered here for not only playing the city’s largest arenas but for his legendary after shows on Beale Street that brought an entertainment insider cachet the district has rarely seen since its early 1980s reopening.
His was an intensity and sense of purpose rarely seen and possessed in such a way in the 60 years since rock and roll started in this very city, kicked off by both Rocket 88 and That’s Alright Mama.
So why couldn’t the city’s rock radio stations do more than talk about Prince into commercial breaks after another Nickelback rock block and actually play some of his music to acknowledge such a huge genre crossing artist?
Not cool.

7. Bridging a Divide -

The Mid-South is united by more than the Mississippi River, but that’s what it took to get the region’s mayors in the same room.

In the aftermath of the 2011 Mississippi River flood, damage stretched from Millington’s naval base to Memphis’ Beale Street. Leaders of the affected municipalities had to come together to apply for FEMA grants and plot their way out of devastation.

8. CBHS Receives $1 Million Gift, Names New Business Program -

Christian Brothers High School has announced its business program will be called the Bill and Carol Marr Department of Business and Economics. The program is named in honor of the $1 million gift from alumnus Bill Marr, CBHS Class of 1964.

9. Memphis’ Shrinking Population Cause for Concern -

Even as Memphis has grown larger through annexing surrounding communities, its population has steadily dwindled due to outmigration to the surrounding suburbs. Inner-city struggles will become more pronounced if this region’s wealthiest tax base continues that outward pattern, national experts say.

10. Strickland in New Seat for Budget Give-and-Take -

When Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland finished his budget address to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, April 19, council member Edmund Ford had a film clip he wanted Strickland and the rest of the council to watch.

11. City Budget Season Begins With the Basics -

The Memphis City Council Budget Committee begins its work next week with afternoon sessions that lead to a goal of a June 7 council vote on Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s first budget proposal.

12. Last Word: Budget Basics, A Peak At Greensward Mediation and Elvis & Nixon -

Spurs 94 – Grizzlies 68 in game 2 of the NBA playoffs. The TNT post-game show just showed the highlights of the game while Shaq and Charles Barkley talked about how big the women are in San Antonio. I’m not making this up. They didn’t even try to talk about the game. This is just grim.

13. Strickland Defines 'Brilliant at the Basics' $667M Budget Plan -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland took a $667 million operating budget proposal to Memphis City Council members Tuesday, April 19, that keeps the property rate stable at $3.40.

14. Last Word: When To Heal, Budget Day at City Hall and Cheese Steak Pondering -

After Sunday’s thrashing of the Grizzlies by the Spurs in their 2016 NBA playoff debut, there is a school of thought among Grizz watchers that the sooner this is over the better.
But there are others who would have a more content off season if the Grizz could win just one game in the series as they go down and then proceed back to the cave for some summer healing.
Either way, Game 2 is Tuesday in San Antonio and then FedExForum Friday for Game 3.

15. Strickland’s First Budget Includes Police Raise -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland presents his first budget proposal Tuesday, April 19, to the Memphis City Council just four months after taking office as mayor.

16. The Week Ahead: April 18-24 -

Let’s get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the dreaded federal income tax filing day, to the scheduled end of the Tennessee Legislature for this session, to a couple of big round-ball games at FedExForum beginning Friday.

17. Tubby Smith's Hire Comes With 'Highest Expectations' -

Wearing a University of Memphis lapel pin on his suit jacket, Tubby Smith was introduced on the floor of FedExForum Thursday, April 14, as the 18th head coach in Tigers history.

University president M. David Rudd called it a “historic hire” for the school and said Smith arrived as the “most accomplished coach” to lead the program (take that, John Calipari).

18. Last Word: Tubby Time, Haslam's Veto and Africa in April's 30th Year -

It was just four weeks ago that all of this talk about change at the top of the Tiger basketball chart was put to rest. Coach Josh Pastner’s performance was reviewed by the University of Memphis administration and he was staying at least for another season. Four weeks to the day of that announcement, Pastner is the new coach at Georgia Tech and we are in the first day of the Tubby Smith era at the U of M.

19. Lot Availability, Prices Putting Home Construction Behind Demand -

The recent uptick in the residential real estate market is devouring what’s left of lot development that lagged during the recession, and tight supply is raising home prices in the Memphis area.

20. This Week in Memphis History: April 15-21 -

2014: Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong announces he will retire in 2017 and has enrolled in the city’s deferred retirement option plan. The retirement date depends on Memphis Mayor A C Wharton winning re-election in 2015 or Wharton’s successor keeping Armstrong on until retirement.
Wharton loses his re-election bid, and in November 2015, new mayor Jim Strickland names Armstrong interim police director while searching for a replacement. Armstrong left in February to become director of security for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

21. Parkinson: OK to ‘Go A Little Bit Extreme’ to Get Job Done -

With U.S. Marine Corps training, Rep. Antonio Parkinson knows how to grab people’s attention.

He did that earlier this year when he sponsored legislation to kill the Achievement School District, Tennessee’s solution for turning around struggling schools.

22. Last Word: Tubby Fever, School Closings and March Real Estate Numbers -

The Tigers basketball grapevine is nothing but Tubby Smith as of Wednesday when the speculation was joined by torrent of rumors about contact between the Texas Tech coach and the University of Memphis.
Smith has now acknowledged he’s talking with the U of M.
More background on Smith from The Sporting News and Mike DeCourcy, a former sports reporter at The Commercial Appeal, that came out before everything went Tubby here.

23. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

24. Last Word: Lipscomb's Successor, MATA School Buses and Roland's Big Breakfast -

Paul Young gets a lot more attention these days than he did when he was the first director of the city-county Office of Sustainability. The attention comes with being the city director of Housing and Community Development where virtually all of the funding comes from the federal government.
That federal funding has changed the face of public housing in the city in the last 25 years. There is only one large public housing project left in the city as a result of the federal funding and its use by Young’s predecessor, Robert Lipscomb.
And what Lipscomb did with the job combined with being the executive director of the Memphis Housing Authority is why a lot of people want to get to know Paul Young these days.
Our centerpiece story by Madeline Faber in Tuesday’s edition makes clear that Young has no desire to wield that kind of power. And it is unlikely anyone in the near future will have the kind of autonomy Lipscomb did.
But beyond that there is still the flow of a lot of federal dollars and Young has some ideas based on his experience in government and finance prior to coming to HCD – everything in government is initials.
It’s a much different experience than Lipscomb’s. Lipscomb coined the phrase “ending public housing as we know it” and at times that slogan wasn’t followed with a lot of detail about what came after public housing was demolished, especially with the first of the projects to fall.
The last public housing project, Foote Homes, will be demolished on Young’s watch which makes his tenure important if more limited than Lipscomb’s tenure.

25. Roland Starts 2018 Bid for County Mayor -

The 2018 Shelby County general elections are more than two years away. The 2016 county elections that decide races for General Sessions Court Clerk, five of the nine seats on the Shelby County Schools board and two judicial positions are still to come in August.

26. State Halts City Board From Issuing Bonds -

The city of Memphis entity that sold $12 million in municipal bonds on behalf of Global Ministries Foundation has been told it can no longer conduct such business.

The Tennessee Housing Development Agency has temporarily de-authorized the Health, Educational & Housing Facility Board of the city of Memphis to sell bonds. The decision is related to the withdrawal of federal subsidies going to Global Ministries Foundation’s portfolio and a subsequent downgrading of those bonds as well as leadership changes at the Health & Ed Board.

27. Zoo Offers Parking Plan, Devotes Parking Fees to Long-Range Parking Solution -

The Memphis Zoo is suggesting the city general services maintenance yard on the east side of the park be used as a parking area and a second greensward with “eco-friendly options” that “are not disruptive to the park” to get zoo patrons from there to the zoo.

28. State Halts Memphis Health & Ed Board From Doing Business -

The city of Memphis entity that sold $12 million in municipal bonds on behalf of Global Ministries Foundation has been told it can no longer conduct such business.

The Tennessee Housing and Development Agency has temporarily de-authorized the Health, Educational and Housing Facility Board of the city of Memphis to sell bonds. The decision is related to the withdrawal of federal subsidies going to Global Ministries Foundation’s portfolio and a subsequent downgrading of those bonds as well as leadership changes at the Health & Ed Board.

29. Wastewater Leak Stopped, McKellar Cleanup Continues -

The boat ramp on McKellar Lake at theA bypass around a raw sewage leak into Cypress Creek and McKellar Lake was up and running Thursday, April 7, according to the city of Memphis.

The bypass ends a leak in the main wastewater line to the T.E. Maxson Wastewater Treatment Plant that was discovered March 31 and triggered a large fish kill of more than 10,000 in McKellar Lake.

30. Last Word: Pastner's Georgia Tech Post-Season, Who Filed and Greensward Invitations -

Not so fast with the off-season. There is a Memphis post-season after all.

And the Grizz found it Thursday like a light at the end of a long-tunnel where a lot of people slipped and fell and can’t get up.
The light was Houston flaming out at home to Phoenix without the Grizzlies having to make a basket.
It’s all about the math. Stay in school, young people.

31. Cypress-McKellar Wastewater Leak Stopped, Cleanup Continues -

A bypass around a raw sewage leak into Nonconnah Creek and McKellar Lake was up and running Thursday, April 7, according to the city of Memphis.

The bypass ends a leak in the main wastewater line to the T.E. Maxson Wastewater Treatment Plant that was discovered March 31 and triggered a large fish kill of more than 10,000 in McKellar Lake, which Nonconnah Creek runs into.

32. City Council Debates Idea of De-Annexation Compromises -

A proposal to form a joint city-county group to explore voluntary de-annexation and the city’s footprint goes to the Memphis City Council for a vote in two weeks.

But there is vocal sentiment on the council against the city giving up any of its turf, including the most recently annexed areas of south Cordova and Southwind-Windyke.

33. Lawsuit Seeks to Void City Decision on Greensward -

A lawsuit filed in Shelby County Chancery Court Tuesday, April 5, seeks to void the March 1 Memphis City Council vote that gave the Memphis Zoo undisputed control of most of the Overton Park Greensward.

34. Lawsuit Seeks to Void City Decision on Greensward -

A lawsuit filed in Shelby County Chancery Court Tuesday, April 5, seeks to void the March 1 Memphis City Council vote that gave the Memphis Zoo undisputed control of most of the Overton Park Greensward.

35. Last Word: Policing The Greensward, A Rural Oasis and Gene Chips -

The city of Memphis had 88 police staff and other city employees working an Overton Park detail Saturday and another 33 working Sunday on the same detail, according to the Strickland administration’s accounting on Monday.

36. Conrad Call for De-Annexation Talks Draws Favorable Reviews -

Memphis City Council Chairman Kemp Conrad wants to open talks with county commissioners on possible voluntary de-annexations.

And County Commission Chairman Terry Roland said he is open to the idea.

37. City Council Sets Stage for Budget Season -

Two weeks before Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland presents his first budget proposal to the Memphis City Council, the council and administration are setting the stage for the budget season to come.

38. MPD Officer Schilling Gets Disability Retirement -

The city of Memphis pension board granted a line-of-duty disability retirement Thursday, March 31, to Memphis police officer Connor Schilling.

Schilling is the officer who shot and fatally wounded Darrius Stewart in July during a traffic stop in Hickory Hill.

39. Amended Senate De-annexation Bill Faces More Debate -

The de-annexation bill whose defeat became City Hall’s top priority in March is off the political frontburner.

But Memphis Democrats in the Tennessee Legislature who opposed the de-annexation by referendum measure expect that this isn’t the end of the concept or the move to make it law.

40. Memphis Presence Helps Turn Tide on Controversial Legislation -

The Tennessee Legislature’s de-annexation debate is over for now. But the bill’s effect on the Memphis-Capitol Hill relationship has left a larger political imprint than the proposal.

That’s saying a lot considering the proposal dealt with the possibility of territory and citizens rearranging the city’s boundaries to put them and the taxes they pay outside the city limits.

41. Officer Involved in Darrius Stewart Shooting is Retiring -

The city of Memphis pension board granted a line-of-duty disability retirement Thursday, March 31, to Memphis police officer Connor Schilling.

Schilling is the officer who shot and fatally wounded Darrius Stewart in July during a traffic stop in Hickory Hill.

42. Memphis Leaders Pleased With 'Reprieve' on De-Annexation Bill -

The de-annexation by referendum legislation pending in the Tennessee Legislature was sent to a summer study committee Wednesday, March 30, in the state Senate, effectively killing the proposal for the legislative session.

43. MATA Board Approves Significant Route Changes -

Sixteen bus route changes will take effect in May at the Memphis Area Transit Authority.

The changes, which were approved at the March 29 meeting of the MATA board of commissioners, mark the first significant batch of route changes since MATA CEO Ron Garrison took the position in 2014.

44. Mud Island Proposals Advance to More Scrutiny -

The two finalists working with a Riverfront Development Corp. committee to redevelop Mud Island River Park will have their plans further reviewed by the administration of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland.

45. RDC Doubles Down With Two Mud Island Finalists -

A working group of the Riverfront Development Corporation is recommending that the city and a new subcommittee of the RDC work with both of the finalists it has selected to run Mud Island River Park.

46. Amendments Cloud Issue of De-Annexation -

Tennessee state senators go back to work Tuesday, March 29, in Nashville on a modified de-annexation bill.

The Senate State and Local Government Committee will be reviewing a set of amendments to their version of the bill, which changed substantially from the House version in a committee session last week.

47. Greensward Crowd Limits Zoo Overflow Parking -

The first Saturday of the spring in Overton Park drew a crowd on the park Greensward that outnumbered the cars parked on the Greensward.

And the group of several hundred park-goers blocked the overflow zoo parking on the Greensward briefly Saturday, March 26.

48. Cleaning House -

Every neighborhood in Memphis and Shelby County has the right to be free from the negative effects of vacant, abandoned and blighted properties. That’s the battle cry of the Memphis Blight Elimination Charter, a 23-page pledge that will steer policy and programs dedicated to blight eradication.

49. De-Annexation Bill Still Alive, Now In Two Versions -

At week’s end in Nashville, a bill to allow de-annexation by referendum was still on the tracks to passage. But there were significant differences in the Senate and House versions as the Tennessee Legislature heads for adjournment for the year in early April.

50. Last Word: The De-Annexation Express, Return of The Curb Market and Different Fuel -

When time ran out Wednesday on the state Senate’s state and local government committee in Nashville, de-annexation legislation was still on the tracks as the Tennessee Legislature draws closer to adjournment for the year.

51. De-Annexation Bill Amended But Still on Path to Passage -

A state Senate committee considering amendments to the de-annexation bill pending in the Tennessee Legislature has amended it to allow for de-annexation by referendum anywhere in the state.

The committee got through two of 13 proposed amendments Wednesday, March 23, and will resume work on the amendments next week.

52. Memphis Fights Back: Senate Poised To Do Real Damage via De-Annexation -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland makes a persuasive argument against de-annexation legislation now being considered by the state Legislature, providing a long list of figures to show it would devastate the Bluff City.

53. Expungement Fees Get Legislative Scrutiny -

It’s become a rallying cry in the movement for changes in the local criminal justice system – raising private money to pay the $450 expungement fee to wipe away the criminal records of those convicted of single, non-violent offenses who have stayed out of trouble for five years.

54. Opposers Fight De-Annexation Another Day -

When the state Senate’s State and Local Government Committee convenes at noon Wednesday, March 21, in Nashville, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and his administration will have been working Capital Hill for about a day and a half.

55. De-Annexation Bill Sent Back to Legislative Committee -

The de-annexation bill pending in the Tennessee Legislature was sent back to a Senate committee in Nashville Monday, March 21, after those favoring the bill raised numerous questions about amendments to it.

56. Roadmap to Attacking Blight Awaits City and County Approval -

Blighted properties, overgrown lots and abandoned buildings are not unique to Memphis. But Memphis is the only city with a blight elimination charter that affirms cross-sector commitment to uproot the causes of blight and prevent further decline.

57. Harris, Towns Hope to Delay Monday De-Annexation Vote -

Memphis Democrats in the Tennessee Legislature are hoping to delay a scheduled Monday, March 21, state Senate floor vote on a deannexation bill that cleared the state House a week ago.

“This train is moving very fast,” Democratic Sen. Lee Harris said Friday, March 18. “The city of Memphis has never made a significant presentation about the city of Memphis’ finances to the relevant committees or to the Senate members,” he added. “Minimally, we need to send this back to committee so that we can have some airing out of what the facts are and what the known consequences are. … Minimally, if you are going to devastate a city, you should know exactly what that means and what you are doing.”

58. County Commission Questions City Figures on Deannexation -

Some Shelby County Commissioners are skeptical about City Hall’s estimate of how much city government would lose in revenue if a deannexation bill in the Tennessee Legislature becomes law.

The commission’s discussion at Wednesday, March 16, committee sessions came as Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland was in Nashville to lobby against the bill in the state Senate.

59. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

60. Potential Revenue Loss Stirs Deannexation Options -

As a potentially damaging deannexation bill moves to the state Senate for a possible vote soon, city officials are considering options to combat the expected loss of revenue should the bill pass.

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland estimates the state deannexation law could cost City Hall $27.7 million on the low end but as much as $80 million if all Memphis annexations dating back to 1998 were negated by voters in those areas.

61. Council Tallies Damage in 'Day of Bad News' -

Memphis City Council member Berlin Boyd summed up City Hall’s attitude Tuesday, March 15, during the council’s executive session. “Today is the day of bad news,” he said after a briefing from Mayor Jim Strickland on the deannexation bill approved the night before by the Tennessee House.
That was followed by more details on the estimated $60 million it will cost to replace the entire radio system for local first responders from the radios to the towers used to transmit their signals.

62. RDC Hints at Beale Landing Expansion for River Cruises -

It takes $2.25 million a year to cover the bond payments on what it cost to build Beale Street Landing – $43 million.

And the overnight cruise boats that currently dock at the landing generate $4.7 million in local taxes each year.

63. Sparks Fly In Nashville Over Deannexation -

The Tennessee Legislature’s debate about a proposed deannexation law isn’t a case of Memphis against the rest of the state.

It’s a debate within the Shelby County legislative delegation and with a few exceptions, most of the critics of the measure that would allow referendums to undo annexations that are in some cases 18 years old are Memphis legislators.

64. Last Word: Deannexation, Pastner Past the Season and Chewing Gum and Walking -

The much-discussed deannexation bill in the Tennessee Legislature always had the votes Monday evening in the House with Memphis Democrats succeeding only in delaying the outcome in Nashville by about two hours.
The bill passed by a wide margin after a debate that was for the most part Memphis against the rest of the state starting just outside the city limits with Republicans in the Shelby County legislative delegation.
And there is some dispute between the bill’s sponsor from the Chattanooga area and Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland. Strickland puts the potential loss of tax revenue to the city at $80 million. Rep. Mike Carter says it is more like $27 million.

65. Tennessee House Approves Deannexation Bill -

The Tennessee House approved a deannexation bill Monday, March 14, in a 68-25 vote after an emotional debate and a tide of amendments that were all voted down on the floor.

Republican state Representative Mike Carter of Hamilton County also disputed Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s claim that the city of Memphis stands to lose approximately $80 million in sales and property tax revenues.

66. Finances Will Be in Focus at City Council -

The list of financial surprises that Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland presented to Memphis City Council members two weeks ago tops council discussions Tuesday, March 15.

67. Last Word: Tiger Drumbeat, Eye on Drones and Shelby County Biggest Home Sale -

Let the coaching drumbeat resume after the Tigers Sunday post-season collapse one game past Tulsa.
A confession here – I am so sports challenged that I thought UConn was a team from Alaska until I saw it spelled out.
In my defense, who associates Huskies with Connecticut?
My point is what happens next isn’t just about basketball. It’s about a change with a good track record of being emotional in the worst way.
It’s linked to how we want to be known for treating people and what they think of us as a result of that.
In those two areas, it’s never just business. It’s always personal.
Josh Pastner’s four predecessors were each very different case studies in this regard.
It could have been any stop in any city with a basketball court and a one-and-done star he could find and recruit to John Calipari. But he still had to hide under a blanket in the back seat of a car on the way to the airport and lie about it long after everyone knew.
Knew about the Kentucky job that is. The mess he left at the university would surface shortly thereafter.
Tic Price was two fast seasons and the proof that the Memphis job isn’t just about what happens on the court and the attendance at games.
Price was clearly excited about coming to Memphis. He clearly understood the importance and heritage of Tigers basketball and valued it. And he wasted no time at all getting lost in the Memphis that is not a part of that all encompassing world.
It was the only job Larry Finch wanted and ultimately the job he couldn’t continue to have. That after ignoring conventional wisdom as a player and coming from Melrose High to Memphis State, bringing a beloved team with him and then picking Memphis again in the ABA over the Lakers in the NBA.
None of that was considered in pushing him out the door and then naming a building after him.
Dana Kirk
wanted to be the hustler John Calipari was. He was certainly impersonal enough about it and he took the team to an era where a post-season NCAA bid was expected and is still expected to this day.
But his impersonality exacted a high cost and he paid most of that cost. Although you could argue the experience for his team that produced some legendary players also made some of them legendary casualties of his emotional distance. It didn’t allow him to go elsewhere because he never figured out that he was being underestimated just as much as the team whose needs he ignored was in the national view of college basketball.
While Calipari dodged big trouble twice, Kirk wasn’t even in Calipari’s league when it came to ducking and timing.
We are past our inferiority complex. That’s what the last NFL drive of the 1990s did for us.
But it’s not necessarily a bad thing that we see the people chosen to occupy these very public positions as a reflection to the world of who we are.

68. Politics of Deannexation Proposal Grows More Complex -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is heading to Nashville Wednesday, March 16, to talk with legislators about what he considers City Hall’s highest priority in the 2016 session of the Tennessee Legislature – defeating a deannexation proposal.

69. The Week Ahead: March 14-20, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the first look at the Greater Memphis Chamber’s proposed diversity program to a truly Irish celebration of St. Paddy’s Day.

70. City Has Offer On Adams Police Station -

The realty group that proposed a short-lived Hotel Overton for Overton Square in 2015 has offered the city of Memphis $1.1 million for the old Central Police Station building at 128 Adams Ave.

71. Last Word: Mudslide, The Deannexation Storm and Kilzer at Calvary -

Lots of news on a very rainy day including the flooding from the constant rain that closed some schools and cancelled a lot of other events. And then there was a mudslide on Riverside Drive from the bluff overlooking Tom Lee Park and the Mississippi River. The rain has also pushed the Wolf River to the point that it is now over some parts of the greenway in Germantown.

72. City Has Offer On Adams Police Headquarters -

The realty group that proposed a short-lived Hotel Overton for Overton Square in 2015 has offered the city of Memphis $1.1 million for the old Central Police Station building at 128 Adams Avenue.

73. Strickland Makes Defeating Deannexation Bill Top Priority -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is downplaying but not ruling out a move toward local government consolidation as a response to a deannexation proposal in the Tennessee legislature.

74. Strickland Downplays Consolidation Response to Deannexation Bill -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is downplaying a move toward local government consolidation as a response to a deannexation proposal pending in the Tennessee legislature.

75. City Crews Work Overtime on Rain Overflow -

Street flooding across Memphis, Shelby County outside the city and north Mississippi on the third day of a rainy week Thursday, March 10, has city public works crews working overtime.

And Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland said Thursday, March 10, all city agencies are on alert.

76. City Crews Work Overtime on Rain Overflow -

Street flooding across Memphis, Shelby County outside the city and north Mississippi on the third day of a rainy week has city public works crews working overtime.

And Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland said Thursday, March 10, all city agencies are on alert.

77. Last Word: Cubits Anyone, The G-Word and The TV News Crime Block -

How long is a cubit? After a day in which many of you got about four to five inches of rain and more to come Thursday, it seems an appropriate and timely question.
And yes, there is a cubit conversion chart on line for converting that and other really old units of measurement no longer in use like the mina, drachma or the synodic month.
So the average cubit, which is supposed to be the length of a forearm, is 18 inches or a foot and a half. That’s 0.4572 of a meter, which might as well be an ancient unit of measurement.
Someone had to say it.
According to biblehub.com – I’m not making up websites – the book of Genesis sets God’s instructions to Noah as an arc with the dimensions of 300 cubits long, 50 cubits wide and 30 cubits tall. And it was to be made out of gopher wood and covered inside and out with pitch.
The New Living Translation and Holman Christian Standard Bibles convert that to an arc 450 feet long, 75 feet wide and 45 feet high.

78. Strickland Backs No-Gang Zones in Legal Challenge -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says court-ordered zones that forbid alleged gang members from gathering or associating in public within the zone are working as a crime-fighting tactic.

79. Last Word: Redbirds Sold, Memphis Burning and When Old Dominick Was Young -

Grizzlies over the Cavaliers 106-103 Monday evening in Cleveland despite the pre-game injury story dominating up to tip-off.

80. St. Louis Cardinals Sell Majority Stake in Memphis Redbirds -

Less than two years ago, the St. Louis Cardinals finalized their purchase of their Triple-A affiliate, the Memphis Redbirds. Now, the Cardinals, pending full approval from the Pacific Coast League, have announced on Monday, March 7, that they have reached an agreement to sell a majority interest in the Redbirds to Peter B. Freund, the Principal Owner of Trinity Baseball Holdings.

81. Greensward Dispute Mediation Begins -

The city-backed mediation effort between the Memphis Zoo and the Overton Park Conservancy begins Tuesday, March 8, following a busy weekend in Overton Park that brought out large crowds for the zoo as well as the park in general.

82. Strickland Outlines $136.1M In Capital Expense Surprises -

The city has to put up $30 million over five years to match a $30 million federal grant the city got in 2015 for the South City development, including demolition and redevelopment of the Foote Homes public housing development.

83. Green Sword -

First it was a rumor – there would be a move by the Memphis City Council aimed at putting a quick end to the long-simmering Overton Park Greensward controversy.

It would come quickly and just before the start of the third spring of protests against the Memphis Zoo's use of the northern part of the Greensward for overflow parking.

84. Last Word: Hedgepeth Speaks, Josh Pastner's Future and Big Box Liquor -

Where else is there to begin but the Greensward controversy.
And we start with an email from Memphis City Council member Reid Hedgepeth in what is rapidly becoming a Last Word tradition and institution – the email in full.

85. Strickland Backs MATA's Cost-Neutral Plan -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is backing the plan by the Memphis Area Transit Authority to make some short-term adjustments to its route system later this year.

86. Strickland Outlines $136.1M in Capital Surprises -

The city has to put up $30 million over five years to match a $30 million federal grant the city got in 2015 for the South City development, including demolition and redevelopment of the Foote Homes public housing development.

87. Council Gives Zoo Authority Over Greensward Parking -

The next step in the Overton Park Greensward controversy is up to the Overton Park Conservancy now that the Memphis City Council has given the Memphis Zoo control of the northern part of the Greensward.

88. Last Word: Trump, Clinton and Stanton, The Greensward Vote and Cover Letters -

This will be a relatively short edition of Last Word given the crush of an exceptional Tuesday in which a day at City Hall was more exciting than the state’s presidential primaries.

89. Strickland Says $136.1 Million In Capital Surprises 'Kick in the Shin' -

The city has to put up $30 million over five years to match a $30 million federal grant the city got in 2015 for the South City development, including demolition and redevelopment of the Foote Homes public housing development.

90. RVC, Mansion to Give More Specifics on Mud Island Plans -

The CEO of RVC Outdoor Destinations of Memphis says his company is “ready to invest $10 million of our own capital that is currently available and ready to deploy.”

Andy Cates made the assurance in the company’s proposal to the Riverfront Development Corp. that was one of the two finalists picked Monday, Feb. 29, by an RDC committee.

91. Council Approves Zoo Control of Overton Greensward Section -

Memphis City Council members voted 11-1 Tuesday, March 1, to grant the Memphis Zoo control of the northern part of the Overton Park Greensward.

The control comes in a resolution that surfaced earlier in the day Tuesday after a weekend of rumors about such a move by some on the council.

92. City Council to Discuss Greensward Controversy -

The next setting for the Overton Park Greensward controversy isn’t the park. It is City Hall.

Memphis City Council members have an executive session “discussion of Overton Park” on their committee list at 1:45 p.m. for Tuesday, March 1.

93. Mud Island Management Search Narrows to Two -

A committee reviewing proposals to manage the Mud Island River Park has narrowed the field of four contenders down to two.

The Riverfront Development Corp. working committee has narrowed the field to RVC Outdoor Destinations of Memphis and Mansion Entertainment and Media LLC.

94. Overton Park Greensward Controversy Moves To City Hall Tuesday -

The next setting for the Overton Park greensward controversy isn’t the park. It is City Hall.

Memphis City Council members have an executive session “discussion of Overton Park” on their committee list for Tuesday, March 1.

95. Last Word: Presidential Distractions, Dude Perfect and The Kirby Farm House -

When it comes to political surprises, the presidential contenders may be the next group on the ballot locally. But they need to up their game if they are going to hold the attention of Memphis voters.
With three of the Republican contenders on their way to Shelby County this weekend and probably more making plans, the attention Tuesday shifted dramatically to the open 8th District Congressional seat that isn’t on the ballot until the August primaries.

96. IBM Team Gathers Data on Memphians’ 911 Use -

Six IBM professionals arrived in Memphis on Feb. 22 to gather data and propose solutions to better streamline Memphis’ emergency services in the face of the city’s “health care crisis.”

For many Memphians, 911 is the lifeline to any medical care. In response to rising call volume and costs, the Memphis Fire Department is expanding its role to include preventative care for Memphis’ poor, elderly and mentally ill, which will in turn decrease the frequency of their 911 calls.

97. Extra City Funding for MATA Faces Long Odds -

After a year and a half as leader of the Memphis Area Transit Authority, Ron Garrison has emerged with a start on the bus system he wants that won’t cost the city anything more.

98. Strickland to Sign Police Director Search Contract -

It will cost the city $30,000 to $40,000 for the national search for a Memphis police director.

That is the estimate from the International Association of Chiefs of Police, which will be conducting the search for the city.

99. Trailblazer -

Carolyn Chism Hardy is a trailblazer, a success story, an advocate for the poor and middle class, and now she’s one of the most influential people in the private sector.

100. I-Team Veteran Takes Reins Of Innovate Memphis -

Two years ago, when Justin Entzminger found a job that combined his background in entrepreneurship with his dedication to the public realm, he jumped at the chance to join the Mayor’s Innovation Delivery Team.