» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation Links
Search results for 'Jim Strickland' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:9
Shelby Public Records:27
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:0
Middle Tennessee:36
East Tennessee:12
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Commission Again Delays Convention Center Hotel-Motel Tax Flow To City -

Shelby County Commissioners again delayed passage Monday, Sept. 25, of a resolution that allows the city of Memphis to use surplus hotel-motel tax revenue to go toward Memphis Cook Convention Center renovations.

2. Last Word: The No Compete, Liberty Bowl Blues and Assessing the ASD -

The calendar says fall but the weather says summer and in Arlington the flags and notices say election day. The polls at the two polling places in Arlington open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday in municipal elections – the only regularly scheduled election of 2017 in Shelby County, which in our politics is frequently regarded as an invitation for departures and vacancies in other office that cause the scheduling of special elections. We’ve already had those earlier this year for a spot on the Lakeland commission and a state House seat.

3. Boyd Drops Beale Contract, But Says It Wasn’t Conflict of Interest -

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd ended his company’s fundraising contract with the Beale Street Merchants Association Tuesday, Sept. 19. But he again insisted the contract was not a conflict of interest in his duties as a council member voting on items involving the entertainment district.

4. Boyd Drops Beale Contract, But Says It Wasn't A Conflict of Interest -

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd ended his company’s fundraising contract with the Beale Street Merchants Association Tuesday, Sept. 19. But he again insisted the contract was not a conflict of interest in his duties as a council member voting on items involving the entertainment district.

5. City Hall Stands Ready to Assist Brooks Museum -

The Memphis Brooks Museum of Art’s first and only home is owned by the city of Memphis, and the institution is the state’s largest art museum. Those two facts make city government more than an interested onlooker in what happens next as the museum’s board explores possibly moving out of Overton Park to a newly built facility elsewhere in the city.

6. Last Word: The Monument Letter, Soulsville Gateway and Gas Tax Hike Regrets -

The Redbirds take Game 1 of the Pacific Coast League Championship series Wednesday evening with a 6-4 win over El Paso at AutoZone Park. Game 2 is noon Thursday at B.B. King and Union.

7. Touliatos Set To Make Run For Shelby County Mayor -

Since her office is not term limited, Juvenile Court Clerk Joy Touliatos could stay for a while in the clerk’s position she has held for nearly two terms.

Instead, Touliatos is running as a Republican for Shelby County Mayor in 2018 on a platform calling for cooperation among elected officials, lower taxes and smaller government.

8. Power of Art -

From the nationwide study “Arts and Economic Prosperity V” came overwhelming evidence that the arts make a financial impact. But of all the data accumulated in a yearlong collection effort launched by Americans for the Arts, one number leaped out at Elizabeth Rouse, who is president and CEO of ArtsMemphis: in 2015 in Shelby County, the arts supported 6,138 jobs (full-time equivalent).

9. More Than 150 Clergy Call for Removal of Forrest Statue -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland has posted a letter from 153 local clergy members in the Memphis area backing the city’s call for a waiver from the Tennessee Historical Commission next month to allow the city to remove Confederate monuments from city parks.

10. City Proposes 12 More Grants to Surviving ’68 Sanitation Workers -

The city administration has identified a dozen more recipients for grants of $70,000 each to surviving city sanitation workers from 1968. That brings the total receiving the one-time payments to 26, with council action on the new grants scheduled for its Sept. 19 session.

11. Does Memphis Have Right Mojo for Amazon HQ? -

Amazon.com’s announcement last week that it is actively searching for a second headquarters location caught the attention of governors, mayors and development officials from all over the country hoping to hit the jackpot.

12. Strickland: Memphis to Make Bid for Amazon HQ -

Hours after Amazon’s Thursday, Sept. 7, announcement that it plans to open a second North American headquarters, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland said the city will be putting its name in the hat.

13. Last Word: The Amazon Competition, Millington Shelters and Grizz Ownership Drama -

With a social media post Thursday morning, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland said the city is ready to compete in a very public competition for the $5-billion second North American headquarters Amazon.com announced earlier Thursday. Some context here. The $5 billion investment by Amazon in what it calls HQ2 compares to the $9 billion St. Jude is investing in its expansion including about $1 billion in capital costs and the rest research, technology and other development costs included in what is more than a physical expansion.

14. Lane Touts Luttrell Endorsement in Sheriff's Race -

Republican contender for Shelby County Sheriff Dale Lane is touting the support of every suburban mayor in the county, current Shelby County Mayor and former sheriff Mark Luttrell, and former county mayor Jim Rout.

15. Strickland: Memphis to Make Bid for New Amazon HQ -

Hours after Amazon.com announced its plans to open a second North American headquarters, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland said the city will be putting its name in the hat.

16. Right Response -

For many people in the Mid-South with barriers to getting to the appropriate health care professionals, sometimes a 911 call has seemed like their only option. That’s all changing now thanks to a new collaborative effort between the Memphis Fire Department’s Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and local health care organizations, area hospitals, nonprofits and philanthropists.

17. Strickland to Make Bid for New Amazon HQ -

Hours after Amazon.com announced its plans to open a second North American headquarters, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland said Memphis will be putting its name in the hat.

18. New Class of Police Recruits Begin Training -

A new group of 76 Memphis Police recruits began training Monday, Aug. 28, at the police training academy, with a group of 24 more recruits, including police service technicians, joining the class in October.

19. Whitehaven Boom Gets Arena Catalyst -

As she looked across Elvis Presley Boulevard from the parking lot of the new Tri-State Bank headquarters at Elvis Presley and Farrow Road last week, Memphis City Council member Patrice Robinson took in the view of the new five-bay retail strip and looked north at another new strip soon to come online, and talked about a third in the works.

20. Strickland Seeks $21.5M to Begin Work on Convention Center, Gateway -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is seeking $21.5 million in immediate funding for pre-construction and early construction work on two projects on Downtown's north end: the long-awaited renovation of the Memphis Convention Center and to begin specific planning, land acquisition and construction for the Bicentennial Gateway project that includes the convention center and the Pinch District area north of it.

21. Experts Differ on Convention Center Hotel Financing -

At the end of the final hour-long panel discussion during the two-day Southern Lodging Summit Downtown, Chad Crandell, the managing director and CEO of CHM Warnick – one of the best-known hotel asset management firms and advisers to hotel owners – made his pitch.

22. Last Word: Game Day, Corker at Southwind on Taxes and Trump and Hotel Stats -

The game is on rain or shine at the Liberty Bowl Thursday. And the start of the Tigers football season could be a very soggy start with remnants of Hurricane Harvey arriving. So while tailgating on Tiger Lane may involve umbrellas, none are allowed in the Liberty Bowl itself. Ponchos it is for your face time on CBS Thursday evening.

23. Hotel Summit Panel Differs On Ways to Finance Convention Center Hotel -

At the end of an hour-long panel discussion at the very end of the two-day Southern Lodging Summit Downtown, Chad Crandell – the managing director and CEO of CHM Warnick, one of the best known hotel asset management firms and advisors to hotel owners in the business -- made his pitch.

24. Latino & Local -

Mauricio Calvo has heard the saying “all politics is local” in the course of making and maintaining connections through the Latino Memphis organization he leads. But prior to this year, political connections for the organization were more about getting needed services and building long-term relationships over time.

25. New MPD Recruit Class Begins Training -

A new group of 76 Memphis Police recruits began training Monday, Aug. 28, at the police training academy, with a group of 24 more recruits, including police service technicians, joining the class in October.

26. Tri-State Hosts Grand Opening of Banking HQ -

Tri-State Bank CEO Thomas Felder estimates that the more than 70-year-old institution – which has shifted its retail bank headquarters from Downtown to Whitehaven – will have a $2.5 million economic impact on the neighborhood surrounding it.

27. Joy Touliatos Will Run For Shelby County Mayor -

Juvenile Court Clerk Joy Touliatos formally announced Thursday, Aug. 24, she is running for Shelby County mayor in the May 2018 Republican primary.

Touliatos is serving her second term as clerk, elected in 2010 and 2014, and has been a county employee for 22 years.

28. 9/01 in the 901 -

What started as an esoteric online conversation five years ago has grown into a massive citywide event to celebrate all the best parts of the Bluff City.

Though only in its second official year, attendance is expected to be high for Exposure at 901 Day, a free event that will be held at AutoZone Park from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on, you guessed it – Sept. 1.

29. Joy Touliatos to Run for Shelby County Mayor -

Juvenile Court Clerk Joy Touliatos formally announced Thursday, Aug. 24, she is running for Shelby County mayor in the May 2018 Republican primary.

Touliatos is serving her second term as clerk, elected in 2010 and 2014, and has been a county employee for 22 years.

30. State Panel Sheds New Light on Racial Atrocities -

State Rep. Johnnie Turner has seen what can happen when old wounds are never allowed to heal.

She’s seen it most recently in clashes between neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klansmen and white supremacists and those who resisted their hatred in Charlottesville, Virginia, where a counter-protester was killed and 19 were injured when a car was intentionally driven into a group of counter protesters. Two state troopers also died in a helicopter crash that weekend.

31. Council Mulls Legal Options To Move Park Monuments -

Memphis City Council members are exploring new options for the Confederate monuments in city parks that include boarding up statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis as nuisances, to prevent them from being vandalized and maintain public order, or by citing a provision of the state’s Civil Rights Act.

32. Council Considers Other Legal Options on Confederate Monuments -

Memphis City Council members are exploring new options for the Confederate monuments in city parks that include boarding up statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis as nuisances, to prevent them from being vandalized to maintain public order, or by citing a provision of the state’s Civil Rights Act.

33. Council Considers Other Legal Options on Confederate Monuments. -

Memphis City Council members are exploring new options for the Confederate monuments in city parks that include boarding up statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis as nuisances, to prevent them from being vandalized, to maintain public order or by citing a provision of the state’s Civil Rights Act.

34. Crosstown Concourse Opens With High Hopes -

With the First Baptist Church – Broad choir singing “Amazing Grace,” the $200 million mixed-use Crosstown Concourse development opened Saturday, Aug. 19, 90 years to the month that the building opened as a Sears, Roebuck & Co. store and distribution center.

35. Confederate Monuments Controversy Comes to City Hall -

The question of timing in removing two Confederate monuments from city parks arrives at City Hall Tuesday, Aug. 22.

A Memphis City Council resolution that would instruct the city administration to immediately remove and/or sell Confederate monuments in city parks is scheduled for discussion at the 2:15 p.m. executive session and could be added to the council agenda or voted on later at the first council session in September.

36. Last Word: Crosstown & Forrest, Eclipse Day and The Problem With Day Care -

As an organizer of Saturday’s “Take Them Down” rally at Health Sciences Park walked toward Union Avenue where Memphis Police had taken one of the protesters arrested there, he looked at another organizer and said, “It’s time to make the call.” The call was bail money for the five, soon to be six people arrested. These were the first arrests of the last week of new momentum for an issue that has risen and subsided for decades now in our city.

37. Charges Vary In Forrest Statue Arrests as Issue Moves to City Hall -

Only two of the six people arrested on misdemeanor charges Saturday, Aug. 19, during demonstrations at the Nathan Bedford Forrest statue in Health Sciences Park were charged with trying to wrap a banner around the monument and only one of the two was charged with “desecration of a venerated object.”

38. Crosstown Concourse Opens in 'Resurrection' -

With the First Baptist Church – Broad choir singing “Amazing Grace,” the $200-million mixed-use Crosstown Concourse development opened Saturday, Aug. 19, 90 years to the month that the building opened as a Sears-Roebuck store and distribution center.

39. City Council To Take Up Monument Removal Resolution -

Memphis City Council members will discuss and possibly vote Tuesday, Aug. 22, on a resolution that directs the city to act on the “immediate removal and/or sale of Nathan Bedford Forrest statue from Health Sciences Park and statue of Jefferson Davis and related artifacts from Memphis Park.”

40. Last Word: Ouster History, Lake District in Foreclosure and Crosstown -

Five of the seven flags that fly on the southern tip of Mud Island River Park are folded and stored as of Thursday. The Riverfront Development Corporation took down the five flags that have flown over the turf we now call Memphis – before and since it became a city – including a version of the Confederate flag – leaving only the U.S. flag and the Tennessee flag. This was a reaction to the week-long and counting aftermath from the violence in Charlottesville.

41. Monument Effort Reflects Differing Strategies -

The call to remove Confederate monuments in Memphis city parks is increasingly meeting with local officials pointing toward Nashville and state officials. And local activists are pointing to a clock.

42. Last Word: Monuments Pace Quickens, Campaigning on Opioids and High Heels -

The financial services company that is a crucial tenant for the Bakery project between the Medical District and Downtown is Orion, which would move to the space in and around the old Wonder Break bakery building on Monroe from its Bartlett HQ.

43. Mayor's Office Says Confederate Monument Protesters Asking City To Break Law -

Jefferson Davis was surrounded this week, first by a group of more than 100 citizens seeking to remove his statue from Memphis Park and then by police after the Tuesday, Aug. 15, protest.

The gathering, heavy with religious leaders, was coordinated by several groups that have been active about various community issues the past year and a half and pursuing the removal of Confederate monuments.

44. Prayer Circle Demands Removal of Confederate Statues, Vows to Continue Protests -

More than 100 citizens including local religious leaders called Tuesday, Aug. 15, for the city and state to remove statues of Confederate leader Jefferson Davis and Confederate general, slave trader and Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard Nathan Bedford Forest from city parks.

45. Interest High in Fairgrounds Fast Track -

The shorter, more compressed drive to a Fairgrounds redevelopment plan feels, at the outset, more certain and much less tentative than versions that surfaced during the administrations of previous mayors Willie Herenton and A C Wharton.

46. Local Leaders React To Charlottesville Violence -

Violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend drew more than 100 people to Health Sciences Park Saturday, where they gathered around the statue of Confederate general, slave trader and Ku Klux Klan grand wizard Nathan Bedford Forrest.

47. Charting a Course -

Daphne Large, founder, CEO and president of Data Facts Inc., didn’t have her company certified as a woman-owned business for 25 years. “I don’t want to be chosen because I’m a woman, but because I’m the best,” Large said, voicing a sentiment that many women business owners agree with.

48. Last Word: Charlottesville Reaction, Stax & Atlantic Together Again and MEMFix -

The violence in Charlottesville, Virginia over the weekend will be on a lot of minds in a lot of other places including Memphis as this week begins. And the discussion here in Memphis is already underway. The gathering point Saturday just hours after a suspected white supremacist drove his car into a group of counter protesters in Charlottesville really didn’t even need a lot of billing or explanation.

49. The Week Ahead: Aug. 14-20 -

Hello, Memphis! School was the big opening last week, but this week it’s the majestic Crosstown Concourse, the 1.5 million-square-foot tower on Cleveland Street at North Parkway. It is hosting a six-hour extravaganza of tours, music, food and the arts. Check out the details, plus more Elvis Week events and other need-to-know happenings in The Week Ahead...

50. Memphis Police Department Adds 85 New Officers -

The Memphis Police Department has 85 new officers who were acknowledged at a graduation ceremony Thursday, Aug. 10, marking the first of two classes to go through the Memphis Police Academy this year.

51. Women-Owned Businesses Chart Progress of Diversity Contracting Efforts -

Daphne Large, founder, CEO and president of Data Facts Inc., didn’t get her company certified as a woman-owned business for 25 years.

52. The King's Castle: Graceland, Whitehaven open 40th anniversary Elvis Week -

It begins with a trivia contest and a sock hop. Those are the first two events Friday, Aug. 11, at the top of a crowded Elvis Week itinerary that marks 40 years since Elvis Presley died at Graceland.

53. Fairgrounds Crosses Liberty Bowl Playbook -

As the city starts anew the planning process for a more active Fairgrounds with more attractions, city council members want the Liberty Bowl to be more active as well.

The council approved Tuesday, Aug. 8, a new five-year contract with the University of Memphis for Tigers football home games. And the council will probably consider similar contracts later this month for the use of the Liberty Bowl by the AutoZone Liberty Bowl and Southern Heritage Classic.

54. Council Approves 5-Year Pact with University for Liberty Bowl Lease -

Just in time for an Aug. 31 football season opener, the University of Memphis has a new five year contract with the city of Memphis for the use of the Liberty Bowl and surrounding Fairgrounds area.

55. Crosstown Concourse Reopening to Include Open Houses, Performances, More -

The formal dedication of the redeveloped Sears Crosstown building next week will include tours of the different uses of the 1.5-million-square-foot building and 20 musical acts as well as a banner drop.

56. Collins Exiting MLGW After 10 Years -

One of the most scrutinized, criticized and well paid jobs in local government is going to be open at the end of 2017.

Jerry Collins announced Friday, Aug. 4, that he will retire as president and CEO of Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division effective Dec. 19 at the end of a five-year appointed term of office.

57. Council Reviews New Beale Hotel, U of M Stadium Contract -

Memphis City Council members take up a hotel on Beale Street and a new lease with the University of Memphis to use Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium at their Tuesday, Aug. 8, session.

The council votes on the proposed hotel project at 404 Beale St. by KNM Development Group.

58. Collins To Retire as Head of MLGW -

Memphis Light Gas and Water Division president Jerry Collins will retire as president and CEO of the utility company effective Dec. 19, Collins announced Friday, Aug. 4.

59. Plaque Honoring Franklin Placed at Former Home -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland has dedicated a plaque marking the childhood home of soul singer Aretha Franklin.

60. City Reopens Fairgrounds Planning Process -

About two weeks after unveiling a concept plan for Memphis riverfront development, Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration has reactivated a dormant city move to redevelop the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

61. Strickland Reopens Fairgrounds Redevelopment Planning -

By the end of the year, the administration of Mayor Jim Strickland plans to have a specific enough plan for Fairgrounds redevelopment to take an application for a Tourism Development Zone to state officials for approval.

62. Plaque Honoring Aretha Franklin Placed at Former Home -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – The mayor of Memphis, Tennessee, has dedicated a plaque marking the childhood home of soul singer Aretha Franklin.

Mayor Jim Strickland unveiled the plaque at the small wooden home on Wednesday morning.

63. Wilkins Launches MEMPOWER For Black Political Empowerment in Memphis -

Ricky E. Wilkins says he’s not upset about his 2014 loss in the Democratic congressional primary. He calls his loss to incumbent U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen “an education.”

64. Binghampton, Uptown Redevelopment Efforts Move Forward While Waiting for the CRA -

If Binghampton can get a proposal for tax increment financing (TIF) approved by the end of the year, it would mean an immediate $332,000 in capital and an estimated $26 million over the 30-year life of the TIF zone to sustain and further grow commercial and residential development in the area.

65. ‘Fed Up’ Campaign Warns Of Tougher Gun Penalties -

The Memphis Shelby Crime Commission and the city of Memphis have launched a marketing campaign to warn would-be offenders about tougher state penalties and possible federal prosecution for violent criminals in possession of a gun.

66. Resolution, Dollar-Figure Miscues Raise Sanitation Workers’ Grants by $20,000 -

After all of these years, maybe what happened Tuesday, July 25, to the city’s plan to pay the 14 surviving sanitation workers from 1968 a grant of $50,000 each was part of the larger narrative of the enduring turmoil of that historic time.

67. Overton Gateway Compromise Approved By Council -

Memphis City Council members approved the Overton Gateway mixed residential development Tuesday, July 25 in a pair of unanimous votes – one for the plans on the north side of Sam Cooper Boulevard at East Parkway and the other for the plans on the south side of Sam Cooper at East Parkway.

68. Overton Gateway Compromise Approved By Council -

Memphis City Council members approved the Overton Gateway mixed residential development Tuesday, July 25 in a pair of unanimous votes – one for the plans on the north side of Sam Cooper Boulevard at East Parkway and the other for the plans on the south side of Sam Cooper at East Parkway.

69. Juvenile Court Oversight Issue Spills Into Larger Criminal Justice Reform Debate -

Talking Monday, July 24, about criminal justice reform, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael mentioned the formal written request he, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and Sheriff Bill Oldham made to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions in June to end Justice Department oversight of the court.

70. Juxtaposing Views Greet Voting Change -

Memphis City Council members Edmund Ford Jr. and Patrice Robinson have each been on the winning side of a council runoff election and share a district border along Elvis Presley Boulevard in Whitehaven.

71. Last Word: The Old Auto Inspection Station, Beale Field Trip and Re-Democrating -

Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton has a different version of his 2016 plan to build two youth development centers for juvenile offenders to go to instead of detention at the Wilder Youth Development Center in Somerville. About a year ago, Herenton had tentative plans for two of the New Path centers in Shelby County that would be centers where the offenders could live.

72. ‘Fed Up’ Campaign Warns Of Tougher Gun Penalties -

The Memphis Shelby Crime Commission and the city of Memphis have launched a marketing campaign to warn would-be offenders about tougher state penalties and possible federal prosecution for violent criminals possessing a gun.

73. Revival of Ranked Choice Voting Marks Phillips’ Attention to Detail -

The use of Ranked Choice Voting or instant-runoff voting in Memphis elections was a moot point even before Memphis voters approved it in 2008 in a city charter amendment.

The Shelby County Election Commission had concluded before the charter referendum that its voting systems couldn’t accommodate a method of voting that ranked candidates in a single race by a voter’s preference, instead of a voter picking one and only one candidate.

74. Riverfront Concept Plan Intersects With Many Others About Key City Asset -

The Memphis riverfront is hardly a blank canvas. But you would never know that from the number of plans there have been over several decades to make it more of a “front door” for the city – to borrow a phrase from more than a few of those reports.

75. Riverfront Concept Plan Emphasizes Connections, River Access -

A pedestrian bridge between the southern tip of Mud Island and Riverside Drive, more pedestrian use of Riverside Drive, a pavilion at Tom Lee Park and greater access to the edge of the Mississippi River are among the elements of a riverfront concept plan outlined Tuesday, July 18, by a Chicago architecture and urban design firm.

76. Last Word: Rachel Heck, Beale Street's Cover and The Old Peabody -

The “fifth wave” of judicial appointments by President Donald Trump, as The White House termed them, are already causing some political ripples here primarily from state Senator Mark Norris’s appointment to the federal bench.

77. On National Summer Learning Day, Memphis Takes Stock of Programs for Kids -

When it comes to summer learning, it’s been a better year for Memphis, where a range of new programs have helped to stem learning loss that hits hard in communities with a high number of low-income students.

78. Memphis Joins Bloomberg’s ‘What Works Cities’ Effort -

Memphis is one of five new cities selected to join Bloomberg Philanthropies’ What Works Cities initiative, Major Jim Strickland’s administration announced Wednesday, July 12.

79. Thomas & Betts to Invest $20.7 Million in Expansion -

Thomas & Betts plans to add 75 employees and invest $20.7 million in its headquarters relocation in Memphis and is seeking a 15-year payment-in-lieu-of-taxes (PILOT) incentive to help defray those costs.

80. Summer in the City -

Saturday night on Beale Street is more than a catch phrase for businesses there.

It is chapters in old, out-of-print books like Lt. George W. Lee’s “Where The Blues Began” that you can only see in the Memphis-Shelby County Room of the Central Library. You can’t check the book out because of its rarity and age. But you can also find references to the lore of Saturday nights on Beale Street on plaques in the entertainment district that current patrons walk past without even noticing.

81. Memphis to Join Bloomberg’s ‘What Works Cities’ Initiative -

Memphis is one of five new cities selected to join Bloomberg Philanthropies’ What Works Cities initiative, Major Jim Strickland’s administration announced Wednesday, July 12.

82. New Memphis Plans to Expand Programming for Millennials -

Through the end of this month, the New Memphis Institute is continuing the yearly Summer Experience it hosts each year that’s comprised of free events for local and visiting college students and recent graduates, all with a view toward encouraging them to put down roots in Memphis.

83. Additional Sanitation Workers May Get Benefits -

The city of Memphis had 1,100 sanitation workers when the historic strike began in February 1968, with close to 1,000 of them walking off the job following the grisly deaths of two of their own trapped in the grinder of a garbage truck in East Memphis.

84. Council Approves Sanitation Workers Benefits -

There may be more than 14 city sanitation workers from 1968 who are still alive. And the city is double-checking its list as the Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, July 11, the payment of $50,000 grants to 14 of the workers it has already identified including four still working for the city.

85. Last Word: Marathon County Budget Session, New Chandler Numbers and Confluence -

As we post this edition of Last Word, there is still some confusion about the KC-130 Marine cargo plane that crashed near the Leflore-Sunflower County line in Mississippi Monday evening.

All 16 people on board were killed in the crash.

86. Bridge Protest Anniversary Draws More Action, Reflection -

A year after the spontaneous protest march that ended with more than 1,000 people shutting down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge for several hours, the leader of that effort was again moving north along B.B. King Boulevard on Sunday, July 9.

87. Council Takes Up Sanitation Worker Benefits -

Memphis City Council members vote Tuesday, July 11, on grants of $50,000 each for the 14 surviving city sanitation workers from the 1968 strike along with a supplemental retirement plan for sanitation workers hired after the strike.

88. Last Word: Rumors, The Return of Tyreke Evans and Broadband in Millington -

There is a popular saying attributed to Winston Churchill that goes like this: “A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth has a chance to get its pants on.” Even before social media, that was certainly the case in this part of the world called Memphis. The part of our history that doesn’t fit in books is littered with rumors that turned the city upside down in a much shorter period of time than it took to repair the damage done. That is what happened this weekend with Memphis Light Gas and Water.

89. Saturday Legal Aid Clinic To Celebrate 10 Years -

A ceremony and reception will be held Saturday, July 8, to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the 2nd Saturday Legal Aid Clinic, or 2SLAC, serving the Memphis community.

The event will be from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library, 3030 Poplar Ave.

90. City Plan Closes Retirement Gap for Sanitation Workers, Keeps Social Security -

Over nearly four decades, different city council and mayors have grappled with a legacy of the 1968 sanitation workers strike.

It has endured as history has come to terms with the strike and its violent end and the site of Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination has become a museum.

91. Patterson Resignation Comes as Council Examines DMC’s Role -

Terence Patterson exited the Downtown Memphis Commission last week as the Memphis City Council is about to discuss replacing or restructuring not only the DMC, but the Riverfront Development Corp.

92. Last Word: Vince Carter Leaves, Fairgrounds and Pulling the Plug on Green Tech -

Vince Carter joins Zach Randolph with the Sacramento Kings next NBA season with an $8 million one-year pact for Carter. Still no word on Tony Allen’s free agency status as we put this up. The Grizz plan to retire Randolph’s jersey.

93. Memphis Announces Grants for Remaining 1968 Sanitation Workers -

A group of 14 city sanitation workers from 1968 – four still working for the city and 10 who are retired – will be getting $50,000 grants from the city, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland announced Thursday, July 6.

94. 2nd Saturday Legal Aid Clinic To Celebrate 10 Years -

A ceremony and reception will be held Saturday, July 8, to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the 2nd Saturday Legal Aid Clinic, or 2SLAC, serving the Memphis community.

The event will be from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library, 3030 Poplar Ave.

95. McCalla Keeps Police Surveillance Lawsuit -

A Memphis federal judge has dropped four citizens as plaintiffs in a lawsuit alleging the city violated a 1978 federal consent decree barring police from conducting surveillance of protesters, saying the citizens don’t have standing.

96. Fairgrounds Movement Triggers Liberty Bowl Questions -

For a prime piece of real estate that is supposed to be in a holding pattern, there is a lot of recent activity on and about the Mid-South Fairgrounds. And even when Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium isn’t the immediate topic, it is an undeniable presence.

97. McCalla Keeps Police Surveillance Lawsuit, Drops Protester Plaintiffs -

A Memphis Federal Judge has dropped four citizens from a lawsuit alleging the city violated a 1978 federal consent decree barring police from conducting surveillance of protesters saying they don’t have standing.

98. Appling Road Greenline Access Awaits Funding -

There is a plan designed and ready for an Appling Road access point to the Shelby Farms Greenline and if the response to last week’s opening of the Perkins Road access point is any indication, it shouldn’t be too difficult.

99. Gibson Becomes First African-American Woman Partner at Burch, Porter & Johnson -

Tannera Gibson knew she wanted to be more than an attorney. She wanted to be an attorney at Burch, Porter & Johnson PLLC, one of the city’s oldest law firms with a deep history in and out of court and the business of law.

100. Last Word: Health Care Plan React, Treasury Footprint and Tom Bowen - Take Two -

It’s like they aren’t even looking at the same legislation. That’s one explanation of the very different reviews the Senate health care bill got Thursday as it was unveiled in Washington. Illustrating the contrast, the reactions of Republican U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee and Democratic U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen of Memphis.