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Editorial Results (free)

1. Council Gives Administration Nod, Honors 1968 Workers -

The painted image of the late Henry Loeb was mostly ignored Tuesday, May 22, at City Hall as the Memphis City Council honored surviving city sanitation workers from 1968 with its 25th annual Humanitarian of the Year Awards.

2. Last Word: Bike Second Line Protest, Loeb's Portrait and SCS Budget Notes -

“Get on your bikes and ride.” The local bike share program begins Wednesday at 60 different Explore Bike Share stations at different points around town. The bike rental program is considered a milestone in the city’s bicycle culture. And like all milestones there has to be a ceremony. This effort to make it easier to mix bikes into your daily journeys will kick off Wednesday morning in Court Square at 9:30 a.m.

3. April 13-19, 2018: This week in Memphis history -

1968: Striking Memphis sanitation workers vote to accept a pay raise of 15 cents an hour from the city, ending their strike after 64 days. Ten cents of the raise will go into effect in May, with the other 5 cents being added on Sept. 1.
The amount has come up before in the negotiations, which are being watched closely by The White House and federal labor officials following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on April 4. Memphis Mayor Henry Loeb balks at the proposal presented by his team, saying he would agree to a raise effective with the new fiscal year beginning July 1 and not before. He also says the raise will be less than 15 cents an hour. Philanthropist Abe Plough secretly agrees to pay the difference needed for the entire pay raise starting May 1, contributing a total of $60,000 to cover the cost. Plough’s role remains a secret until his death in 1984.

4. A Memphis Parable -

HOWARD AND BILL. One of my first columns was this very Memphis story. It’s time to tell it again. 

In the ’60s, Howard Robertson was a black postal carrier moonlighting as a waiter at the capital of white money dining in Memphis, Justine’s, housed in an antebellum mansion. Bill Loeb was a successful white businessman, owner of ubiquitous laundry branches about town, and the brother of Henry Loeb, mayor during the 1968 sanitation strike. Loeb lived in a home literally bordering the Memphis Country Club. Robertson lived in the other Memphis those of us who grew up white then never really acknowledged.

5. Religious Leaders Recount Catechism of 1968 Memphis -

Rev. James Lawson, the architect of nonviolent resistance who counseled Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on it, walked in a circle last week around the new “I Am A Man” bronze and stainless steel sculpture. As he walked with his head down, still and video photographers scrambled for the best angle to capture the seminal strategist of the civil rights era, seemingly deep in thought.

6. Last Word: MLK50s Surprise Ending, Senate Race Shake Up and EDGE Insights -

Does the NBA need a version of the mercy rule for this meaningless part of the season for teams that have already made the second season – I mean, the playoffs – and those who are looking to lose their way to the top draft pick? The Grizz played their last home game of the season Sunday at the Forum. Grizz over the Pistons 130 – 117.

7. Duran Arrest Highlights Uncertain Immigration Nexus -

Nine people were arrested by Memphis Police last week during MLK50 protests. One of those arrests has focused new attention on the nexus between federal immigration policies and local law enforcement.

8. Strickland Jeered Over Duran Arrest During MLK50 Event -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland was jeered Saturday, April 7, and called a “coward” and “liar” at a rally as part of a “Cathedral to City Hall” MLK50 event outside City Hall.

9. The Aftermath: Memphis' Political Journey Since 1968 -

For 50 years and counting, April 4 has been an important day in the life of Memphis.

To some Memphians, it is a holy day; to others, it’s a day of reflection, or perhaps one of action and service.

10. MLK50 Events: A Roundup of Memphis Happenings -

Here's a selection of events in Memphis marking the 50th anniversary of the 1968 sanitation workers' strike and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. April 3 is the 50th anniversary of King’s last speech – the “Mountaintop” speech at Mason Temple, while April 4 is the 50th anniversary of his assassination on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel.

11. MLK 50 Years Later -

Bernard Lafayette remembers being in Memphis April 3, 1968, and a dejected Martin Luther King Jr. being roused from his room at the Lorraine Motel to speak at Mason Temple on a rainy night.

12. Strickland Talks of Work To Be Done 50 Years After Strike -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says the hardest part of growing black-owned business, and thereby black wealth in the city, is increasing the number of minority-owned firms in certain sectors.

13. Last Word: The Memphis Hub Modernization, Gun Protests and MLK 50 Plans -

Back in January, the FedEx board approved a $3.2 billion package that had pay raises, bonuses and similar items that have become the corporate reaction to federal tax reform that set a lower rate of taxation for companies that repatriate money they have overseas. There was a mention of $1.5 billion for the Indianapolis hub and unspecified plans for the Memphis hub to come later. And later was yesterday in a pretty modest announcement at Signature Air given the scope of what FedEx has planned for its Super Hub here.

14. Dedication Of Plaza Among King Observances -

The city will formally dedicate a plaza in honor of the 1968 striking sanitation workers at an April 5 ceremony, one of numerous events surrounding the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination.

15. Novel Approach -

The smallest of the city’s 17 public libraries is also one of its most used. The Frayser Branch library is a brick-and-glass rectangle on a half-acre at 3712 Argonne St. With some modest columns and shrubs, a few planters and cinderblock lattice work, it is shoe-horned into the side of a hill in a residential neighborhood a block from the commercial corridor of North Watkins Road still dominated by churches.

16. Progress Since Sanitation Strike Questioned 50 Years Later -

There was no “reverse march” this past weekend. But there are signs on the Main Street Mall that trace the route of striking sanitation workers from Clayborn Temple to City Hall 50 years ago.

17. Rye Calls City To Task For Lack Of Progress 50 Years After MLK -

The keynote speaker at the city’s commemoration Saturday, Feb. 24, of the 1968 sanitation workers strike took the administration of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland to task for its treatment of today’s protesters.

18. Attorney, Former Political Activist Lewis Donelson Dies at 100 -

In a century of life that began in Memphis, Lewis Donelson was many things including an attorney, politician and strategist. In all of those pursuits and others, he was one of the city’s most influential citizens and a force in some of the most historic moments in the city’s history as well as the state’s history.

19. Mayor’s Critics Have Their Own Plans for Strike Anniversary -

When the 1968 sanitation workers strike ended in April 1968, Cleophus Smith didn’t feel like the formal city recognition and a minimal pay raise he and other sanitation workers had gained was something to be celebrated.

20. Touliatos Set To Make Run For Shelby County Mayor -

Since her office is not term limited, Juvenile Court Clerk Joy Touliatos could stay for a while in the clerk’s position she has held for nearly two terms.

Instead, Touliatos is running as a Republican for Shelby County Mayor in 2018 on a platform calling for cooperation among elected officials, lower taxes and smaller government.

21. Resolution, Dollar-Figure Miscues Raise Sanitation Workers’ Grants by $20,000 -

After all of these years, maybe what happened Tuesday, July 25, to the city’s plan to pay the 14 surviving sanitation workers from 1968 a grant of $50,000 each was part of the larger narrative of the enduring turmoil of that historic time.

22. Malco Pulls Additional Building Permit for Downtown Theater -

Malco Theatres’ Downtown movie theater continues to take shape, with the Memphis-based cinema chain seeking its second multimillion-dollar building permit for the project in recent months.


45 E. G.E. Patterson Ave.
Memphis, TN 38103
Permit Amount: $5 million

23. Malco Pulls Additional Building Permit for Downtown Theater -

45 E. G.E. Patterson Ave.

Memphis, TN 38103

Permit Amount: $5 million

Project Cost: $55 million

Application Date: July 2017

Owner: Henry Turley Co. and Community Capital

24. Final Budget, Tax-Rate Votes Lead Council Agenda -

Memphis City Council members are poised to end their budget season Tuesday, June 6, with a set of votes on four resolutions and six ordinances that are up for third and final reading.

The resolutions and ordinances would approve a roughly $680 million city operating budget and a $77.8 million capital budget, hikes in stormwater and sewer fees and take the city property tax rate from $3.40 to $3.27.

25. Barbecue Decoy Surfaces As Overton Square Protest -

Several dozen people staged a street theater protest in Overton Square Saturday, May 20, after a decoy call for a protest Downtown at the Memphis In May International Barbecue Cooking Contest.

“So while they (police) deployed their resources at BBQ fest, CCC was at Overton Square highlighting the real obscenities,” Al Lewis, a member of the Memphis Coalition of Concerned Citizens, posted on Facebook Saturday afternoon.

26. Barbecue Decoy Surfaces As Overton Square Protest -

Several dozen people staged a street theater protest in Overton Square Saturday, May 20, after a decoy call for a protest Downtown at the Memphis In May International Barbecue Cooking Contest.

“So while they deployed their resources at BBQ fest, CCC was at Overton Square highlighting the real obscenities,” Al Lewis, a member of the Memphis Coalition of Concerned Citizens, posted on Facebook Saturday afternoon.

27. Barbecue Decoy Surfaces As Overton Square Protest -

Several dozen people staged a street theater protest in Overton Square Saturday, May 20, after a decoy call for a protest Downtown at the Memphis In May International Barbecue Cooking Contest.

“So while they deployed their resources at BBQ fest, CCC was at Overton Square highlighting the real obscenities,” Memphis Coalition of Concerned Citizens leader Al Lewis posted on Facebook Saturday afternoon.

28. Last Word: Gasol on Gasol, Detroit's Riverfront and Governor's Race Shifts -

Gasol on Gasol in San Antonio this Easter weekend where the Spurs ran away with game one Saturday of the first round playoff matchup 111 – 82. Game 2 and vengeance is Monday in San Antonio with a Thursday evening game on Beale.

29. Racist Phone Tirade Prompts Reactions, Denials -

A recorded racist telephone tirade purportedly by a former membership programs and services director of the Greater Memphis Chamber and her husband directed at the staff of a restaurant in Turks & Caicos went viral Friday, April 14, a week ahead of the chamber’s announcement of a new minority business effort.

30. Racist Phone Tirade Prompts Reactions, Denials -

A recorded racist telephone tirade purportedly by a former membership programs and services director of the Greater Memphis Chamber and her husband directed at the staff of a restaurant in Turks & Caicos went viral Friday, April 14, a week ahead of the chamber’s announcement of a new minority business effort.

31. Racist Phone Tirade Prompts Reactions, Denials -

A recorded racist telephone tirade purportedly by a former membership programs and services director of the Greater Memphis Chamber and her husband directed at the staff of a restaurant in Turks & Caicos went viral Friday, April 14, a week ahead of the chamber’s announcement of a new minority business effort.

32. Racist Phone Tirade Prompts Reactions, Denials -

A recorded racist telephone tirade purportedly by a former membership programs and services director of the Greater Memphis Chamber and her husband directed at the staff of a restaurant in Turks & Caicos went viral Friday, April 14, a week ahead of the chamber’s announcement of a new minority business effort.

33. Last Word: New Rhodes President, Billy Hyman and the Fast Track -

The biggest political betting pool of the post-election season ends Tuesday as President elect Donald Trump said Monday by Twitter that he would name his nominee for Secretary of State Tuesday morning.

34. September 23-29: This week in Memphis history -

1995: George Strait and Faith Hill at the Mid-South Coliseum.

1966: President Lyndon Johnson nominates Memphis Circuit Court Judge Robert McRae as judge for the U.S. District Court of the Western District of Tennessee. McRae, who is an attorney in private practice as well as an assistant city attorney, fills the vacancy created by the retirement of Federal Judge Marion Speed Boyd. The nomination goes to the U.S. Senate for hearings and McRae is confirmed by the Senate the next month. He takes senior status 20 years later.

35. Artspace Begins $17M Affordable Housing Project -

138 & 120 St. Paul Ave.

Memphis, TN 38103

Permit Amount: $10.5 million

Project Cost: $17 million

36. Last Word: The Evolution of Michael Rallings, Mediation Confidential and Council Day -

The appointment of Michael Rallings as the permanent Memphis Police Director goes to the Memphis City Council Tuesday for what is expected to be a unanimous vote.

Rallings and Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland talked about the appointment – the only major appointment in Strickland’s inner circle left seven months into his term as mayor – during a press conference Monday morning in the Hall of Mayors.

37. $21.6 Million in Construction Headed to Graceland -

1064 Craft Road

Memphis, TN 38116

Permit Amount: $18.1 million

Project Cost: $21.6 million

38. Tickled Pink -

MEMPHIS IN BLACK AND WHITE. AND PINK. I’m glad Billy Orgel got engaged at Justine’s because that inspired his family to save it, not because they miss the crystal and crabmeat but because the place is personal.

39. Last Word: A Dog Named Elvis, Soulville's Change and Highlander Politics -

For those who stopped watching in the fourth quarter, The Grizzlies lost to the Spurs 106-74 in San Antonio Sunday to open the NBA's second season. If you put together the second and fourth quarters it would have been close. But oh the first and third quarters.

40. This Week in Memphis History: April 15-21 -

2014: Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong announces he will retire in 2017 and has enrolled in the city’s deferred retirement option plan. The retirement date depends on Memphis Mayor A C Wharton winning re-election in 2015 or Wharton’s successor keeping Armstrong on until retirement.
Wharton loses his re-election bid, and in November 2015, new mayor Jim Strickland names Armstrong interim police director while searching for a replacement. Armstrong left in February to become director of security for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

41. Southland Mall Sells In Foreclosure -

1215 E. Shelby Drive
Memphis, TN 38116
Sale Amount: $4.3 million

Sale Date: March 31, 2016
Buyer: 1215 East Shelby Drive Holdings LLC
Seller: Southland Mall Shopping Center LLC
Details: Southland Mall, Memphis’ first enclosed mall when it opened 50 years ago, has sold for $4.3 million in foreclosure.

42. Mix It Up -

Memphis’ development eye is turning inward and upward as mixed-use projects are becoming more common than ever before.

Usually a mode of survival for densely packed cities, residential, office, retail and even manufacturing are cohabitating in single mixed-use buildings or lots as a way to recoup Memphis’ sprawl. Downtown and Midtown are being combed for infill and adaptive reuse possibilities as millennials are moving to the urban core in droves.

43. Tumult of 1968 Leaves Indelible Mark on Memphis’ Legal, Political Figures -

When attorney David Caywood thinks about the pivotal events of the 1968 sanitation workers strike in Memphis, there is usually a big “what if” moment.

44. Daily News Names Managing Editor -

Jane A. Donahoe has joined The Daily News Publishing Co. as managing editor. In her new role, she oversees award-winning coverage of business and government news for both The Daily News and The Memphis News.

45. Attorneys Recall Role of Law in Events of 1968 -

David Caywood still remembers the memorandum of understanding that almost settled the 1968 sanitation workers strike before Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination.

46. Events -

The Center City Revenue Finance Corp. will meet Tuesday, Feb. 10, at 9 a.m. in the Downtown Memphis Commission conference room, 114 N. Main St. Visit downtownmemphiscommission.com.

47. Plans Emerge for Universal Life Building -

In major Downtown news, the on-again, off-again redevelopment of the Universal Life Insurance Co. building Downtown appears to be on.

48. September 5-11: This Week in Memphis History -

2004: Open house for the new FedExForum, the new $250 million arena south of the Beale Street entertainment district.

1981: Ozzy Osbourne at the Orpheum with Def Leppard opening the show. Osbourne was touring with a band that featured guitarist Randy Rhoades who would die less than a year later in a plane crash. The Memphis show finished abruptly when Osbourne had to stop performing because of a broken rib he sustained earlier on the tour after falling off stage.

49. County Leaders Make Transition to Governing -

For government officials, the oath of office marks the boundary between the ability to get elected and the ability to govern.

But it’s not always apparent to those taking the oath what they have gotten themselves into.

50. We’re All Invited -

MEMPHIS, SERVED IN THE SHELL. Following up last week’s column, this from a reader:

“We have no civic pride, half the population is intent on killing as many as they can and the other part lives behind walls or gates. There was a time in the fifties when you could leave your front door unlocked and keys in the car.”

51. Lakecrest II Sells for $4.6 Million -

The Lakecrest II office building in East Memphis has changed hands again.

Southland Primacy LLC acquired the 129,104-square-foot office building at 6055 Primacy Parkway from Jefferson-Pilot Investments Inc. Feb. 28 for $4.6 million.

52. Former City Official Pearson Remembered -

Claude Pearson, the director of sanitation services and labor negotiator for the city of Memphis, was remembered Wednesday, Oct. 2, in a funeral service.

53. October 4-October 10, 2013: This week in Memphis history -

2012: Robert J. Pera, the new majority owner to be of the Memphis Grizzlies was assembling his local partners for the ownership group. The names included NBA and University of Memphis basketball star Anfernees “Penny” Hardaway, pop star Justin Timberlake and former U.S. Rep. Harold Ford Jr.

54. Former City Official Pearson Remembered -

Claude Pearson, the director of sanitation services and labor negotiator for the city of Memphis, was remembered Wednesday, Oct. 2, in a funeral service.

55. Tommy Bronson Sporting Goods Stays True to Roots in New Spot -

For Tommy Bronson Sporting Goods, cooler temperatures in the air mean one thing – hunting season.

56. Rock’n Dough Pizza Opening in Jackson -

The little Memphis pizzeria that could will soon be opening a new location in Jackson, Tenn.

The Rock’n Dough Pizza Co., owned by Jeremy and Amanda Denno, is slated to open a new restaurant and microbrewery at the Jackson Walk development in Jackson in October. The Dennos will team up with veteran local brewer Ben Pugh to create signature suds at the 4,100-square-foot restaurant.

57. Turley Shows Interest in Developing Central Station -

A partnership consisting of Henry Turley and Community Capital is the only entity so far to express interest in the management and development of Central Station.

58. Historic Preservation -

Tom Jennings, the director of “MLK: The Assassination Tapes,” and his colleagues heaped praises on the Special Collections staff at the University of Memphis, whose efforts helped the documentary about the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. win the prestigious Peabody Award.

59. King Documentary Wins Prestigious Peabody Award -

A documentary about the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. has won the prestigious Peabody Award, with the help from the University of Memphis Libraries.

60. King Documentary Wins Prestigious Peabody Award -

A documentary about the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. has won the prestigious Peabody Award, with the help from the University of Memphis Libraries.

61. Core Focus -

The Great Recession silenced construction crews throughout the Memphis area, and that was especially evident Downtown, where ambitious, skyline-changing projects were put on hold, reconfigured or scrapped altogether.

62. April 12-18: This Week in Memphis History -

2012: The largest solar farm in the state opened in Haywood County along Interstate 40. The West Tennessee Solar Farm has 21,000 solar panels, and its opening in Haywood County came one day after Agricenter International formally opened its solar farm, a 998,400 watt photovoltaic system on five acres.

63. Then and Now -

Jay Bailey pictured marching bands and floats when his mother told him he was going on a march.

“We thought of it as a parade,” said Bailey, who was 6 years old in March 1968. “We thought of it as something fun.”

64. Holtzclaw on Front Line of Myriad Real Estate Projects -

Anna Holtzclaw’s footprint is on property all over Memphis.

Since 2001, the real estate marketing entrepreneur has worked to promote properties developed and designed by the likes of the Henry Turley Co., LRK Inc. and Loeb Properties Inc.

65. Gen X Inks State’s First Location on Austin Peay -

A trendy Vernon, Calif.-based retailer has inked its first Tennessee location in Austin Peay Plaza.

Gen X Clothing Inc. signed a 35,000-square-foot lease at 3252 Austin Peay Highway. The space was formerly occupied by Big Lots.

66. Highpoint Church Buys Briarcrest’s East Memphis Campus -

After seven years of leasing space for its worship services, Highpoint Church has acquired Briarcrest Christian School Systems Inc.’s property at 6000 Briarcrest Ave. for $7.25 million.

67. Holtzclaw Joins Urban Land Institute as District Coordinator -

Anna Holtzclaw has joined Urban Land Institute Memphis as district council coordinator, a part-time role where she will focus on programming, membership and sponsorship development.

Holtzclaw brings a blend of real estate and nonprofit experience, with past working experience with Henry Turley Co., LRK Inc., Loeb Properties Inc., Metropolitan Inter-Faith Association (MIFA), the Salvation Army KROC Center and the New Ballet Ensemble.

68. New Panera Underscores Midtown’s ‘Tipping Point’ -

Panera Bread Co. is coming to one of Midtown’s busiest streets following years of site selection in the area.

69. ‘A Different View’ -

When the Memphis City Council got involved in the 1968 sanitation workers strike it forever changed the relationship between the council and the mayor.

Lewis Donelson, a member of that council and founder and shareholder of Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz PC, writes in his new autobiography, “Lewie,” that the council’s actions have affected every council and mayor since then.

70. Public Servants -

The two winners of the 2012 Bobby Dunavant Public Service Awards thanked their coworkers Wednesday, Feb. 22, as they were honored by the family of the late Probate Court clerk and the Rotary Club of Memphis East.

71. Loeb Tells Rotary About Overton Square Plans -

Among the first of Bob Loeb’s comments when he addressed the Memphis Rotary Club Tuesday, Jan. 10, was that when his firm finishes the redevelopment of Overton Square, the hope is to pass the Rotarian Four-Way Test.

72. That's a Wrap -

If the grand sweep of 2011 could be captured on celluloid and presented to an audience on the big screen, all the components of a great film would be readily apparent.

There was drama, in the form of a deluge and historic flooding that led the Mississippi River to crest at nearly 48 feet early in the year. One of the year’s big surprises saw President Barack Obama give the commencement address for the Booker T. Washington High School class of 2011 at the Memphis Cook Convention Center.

73. New Dishes -

Memphis’ eyes were bigger than its stomach in 2011, but in a good way.

Some local restaurateurs launched completely new concepts; others entered new submarkets with additional stores. Even a handful of national retailers entered the Memphis market after having locations elsewhere in Tennessee for years.

74. Beyond Square One -

Memphis City Council’s approval for spending $16 million to improve Midtown’s Overton Square marked a milestone for neighborhood supporters, grassroots leaders and financial stakeholders – especially Loeb Properties Inc.

75. Voters Decide District 7 Runoff Thursday -

Voters in Memphis City Council District 7 on Thursday, Nov. 10, will settle the last election of 2011 as they select the only new member of the 13-member council.

Lee Harris, a professor in the University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law, faces actress Kemba Ford in the runoff election that grew more intense toward the end of the early-voting period.

76. New Façades -

Local architecture firms have run the gamut with realignment strategies in combating the economic downturn, from reduction of footprints and overhead to reorganizing and rebranding.

In late 2009, Memphis-based Looney Ricks Kiss Architects Inc. filed a Chapter 11 bankruptcy petition. The news sent shockwaves throughout the industry, as one of the city’s most prominent firms – behind landmark projects like AutoZone Park and AutoZone corporate headquarters, Riverside Drive, FedExForum, Harbor Town and the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library, to name a few – was being forced to reorganize.

77. Pieces of the Puzzle -

Memphis City Council members left the city property tax rate at $3.19 Tuesday, June 21, as they ended their budget season.

But they added 18 cents to the tax rate on a one time basis with a separate resolution.

78. Loeb Builds Success on Long History, Strong Team -

In 1887, a T-shirt maker named Henry Loeb, great-grandfather of Robert “Bob” Loeb and Louis “Lou” Loeb of LOEB Properties, opened a Laundromat on Main Street. His entrepreneurial spirit transpired four generations, officially reaching the Loeb brothers in the early 1980s.

79. Popular Burger Chain Moves Into Memphis -

After years of Five Guys Burgers and Fries having a presence in the Nashville and Knoxville areas, the chain is setting up shop in one of Memphis’ most densely populated areas.

Jubilee Restaurant Group LLC, owner of the franchise, signed a 2,882-square-foot lease in Primacy Place, 1615 Ridgeway Road.

80. Rock Legend’s Visit Highlights Memphis’ Musical Importance -

Robert Plant is no stranger to Memphis or to the city’s musical heritage. In the years since his former band Led Zeppelin became history, Plant has played Memphis often.

During his trips to the city, he’s usually left plenty of time to visit North Mississippi and explore the places where the blues began and bluesmen lived hard lives that informed what they created.Plant played Memphis again this month with the fourth incarnation of Band of Joy – the band he was in before Led Zeppelin. The day before the gig he got a star on The Orpheum’s walk of fame and a proclamation from Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. proclaiming it “Robert Plant Day” in the city.

81. Rout Brings Experience, Leadership To BankTennessee -

Jim Rout was an elected official in Shelby County for nearly 30 years and served two terms as the county’s mayor, beginning in 1994.

It’s safe to say he’s a very experienced public speaker, but back in 1961, as a freshman at then-Memphis State University, the prospect of speaking in front of a few of his college classmates was so daunting that he walked out of the class and never came back.

82. Howard and Bill: Two Halves Make a Whole -

In the ‘60s, Howard Robertson was a black postal carrier moonlighting as a waiter at Justine’s, the capital of white money dining housed in an antebellum mansion.

83. A Mayor’s Race to Remember: Candidates pump up the drama as election nears -

The field is set at 25 candidates and Memphians start voting Sept. 25 in a mayor’s race that has been neither a surprise nor the expected.

But there’s no guarantee the election will settle what the post-Willie Herenton era will look like. Too many other events still have to be decided.

84. Mayor’s Race Gets ‘Crazy’ As Election Day Approaches -

“It’s crazy now,” Memphis Mayor Pro Tem Myron Lowery told members of the Downtown Neighborhood Association last week.

Lowery was contemplating the possibility of more than 30 candidates in the Oct. 15 special election for mayor. He described it as “the circus that’s getting ready to happen in this city.”

85. One Week Later: Historic Mayoral Era Turns to New Beginnings -

Just more than a week ago, Methodist minister Frank McRae opened a gathering at City Hall that was Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton’s farewell.

McRae talked about what he termed the “passing parade of politicians.”

86. Sisson Remembered For Spunk, Humor -

Thomas E. “Pete” Sisson’s political career in Memphis and Shelby County spanned more than 50 years in which he witnessed more change than most politicians.

Sisson, who died last week at age 81, was remembered this week at a funeral service in Cordova.

87. Charter Commission Wrangles With Contract Issues -

Members of the Shelby County Board of Commissioners today will move into the final stages of their work on proposed County Charter changes. Today's commission agenda includes a vote on the second of three readings of charter changes that will go to voters in an Aug. 7 referendum.

88. Herenton Moves Ahead With 'Doctoral Thesis' On Schools -

Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton served notice last week that he is putting a lot of work and political capital into his coming plan for changing the Memphis City Schools.

Herenton made a lengthy speech and answered questions in City Council chambers Thursday before about 60 members of a Leadership Memphis class. He begged off any specifics of the plan that he will present May 6 to the City Council. The plan could resolve lingering questions about whether Herenton will leave City Hall before the end of his term in 2012.

89. 40 Years Later: Remembering a Tragedy in Memphis -

Editor's Note: Senior reporter Bill Dries remembers where he was 40 years ago today, the day Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in Memphis.

The first time I saw Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., he was an image on a television screen. My brothers, my sister and I had been playing in our backyard one April afternoon when I heard the phone ring through the kitchen window screen. It was a brief phone call and when it was over we all hurried inside and turned on the television.

90. Law School For Journalists to Focus On King, Civil Rights -

It is one of the last pictures taken of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

The day before his 1968 assassination on the balcony of Downtown's Lorraine Motel, King is shown in the courtyard there being served legal papers by a U.S. Marshal.

91. What Now? -

Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton's three predecessors in office each left for lives far from the intense political spotlight that comes with being the city's chief executive officer.

Herenton has been like Dick Hackett, Wyeth Chandler and Henry Loeb in his status as a political loner who sometimes has been solitary in the pursuit of his goals. It's the nature of the office and a trait that Memphis voters have returned to from election year to election year.

92. Turley Looks East But Keeps an Eye Downtown -

Downtown developer Henry Turley is going east these days. The developer of Harbor Town, South Bluffs, parts of South Main and other Downtown projects is touting the Mid-South Fairgrounds these days.

93. City Council Looks Ahead To Biggest New-Blood Transfusion In Almost 40 Years -

A year after voters shuffled the County Commission, it appears the City Council is about to be dealt the same hand.

With a month until the filing deadline for the October ballot, the city election year already promises more change than the council has seen in 36 years.

94. The Next Chapter Unfolds in Tale of Two Bookstores -

The numbers he was crunching seemed too good to ignore.

Hugh Hollowell - a former financial planner-turned-bookstore owner - wanted to expand Midtown Books, the small used book shop he once operated across the street from Blue Monkey on Madison Avenue.

95. Archived Article: Small Biz - By Andy Meek

Downtown Store Offers Break From Routine

ANDY MEEK

The Daily News

Time seems to move at a slower pace inside Memphis Tobacco Bowl.

Downtown oasis. Proprietor Richard Alley compares his store to a Downtown oasis, where att...

96. Archived Article: Lead - By Andy Meerk

Wolf River Gets New Medical Tenant

Doctors office latest venture in growing medical corridor

ANDY MEEK

The Daily News

Dr. William Light, a specialist in internal medicine who has operated in a facility adjacent to Baptis...

97. Archived Article: Lead - By Andy Meek

Kroger Marks Retail Growth in Arlington

New rooftops lead to increased commercial development

ANDY MEEK

The Daily News

Construction will begin soon on a 50,000-square-foot Kroger store in Arlington, part of an area expans...

98. Archived Article: Real Review - Germantown apartments Germantown apartments sell for $20 million The Grove at Germantown Apartments, a 280-unit property at 7865 Grove Court West in the Cordova/Germantown apartment submarket of Memphis, was sold March 13 for $20.2 million or $72,14...

99. Archived Article: Real Focus Justine's - JUSTINES CHANGES HANDS AGAIN Memphis landmark changes hands again By MARY DANDO The Daily News A piece of Memphis history is to change hands again shortly when the Italianate Victorian mansion known to its many patrons over the years as Justines Res...

100. Archived Article: Ms Lee Lj - lj 10/5 cates From mumblety-peg to the Internet Historic Memphis nursery school prepares for 21st century By LAURIE JOHNSON The Daily News A Memphis nursery school that opened its doors during the first quarter of the 20th century is upgrading its f...