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Editorial Results (free)

1. Madonna Learning Center Gets IT Makeover -

Madonna Learning Center will get a $30,000 makeover of its office technology with a grant from Unistar-Sparco Computers Inc.

2. Memphis Health Center Gets $4.5M Federal Grant -

Memphis Health Center has been awarded a $4.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen announced Thursday, June 7.

3. Council Drops Referendum From November Ballot -

There will be no referendum question on the Nov. 6 election ballot that would change a basic structural feature of city government.

The Memphis City Council rejected on third and final reading Tuesday, June 5, a referendum question that, if approved by city voters, would have required council approval of city contracts.

4. Putting the ‘Power’ in Power of Attorney -

When I discuss estate planning with people, I am usually met with one of two responses: “I haven’t gotten around to it,” or, “I don’t need any.”

Estate planning, or financial and health preparedness, is often presumed to be only for the elderly or the wealthy. In truth, however, thoughtful planning can enable any legally competent adult to make their financial and health care decisions before they become incapacitated or pass away, sparing themselves or their loved ones the expense and complication of trying to resolve those questions later.

5. Last Word: Our Un-Signature, City Hall Beat Down and Lamar Avenue -

The first thing most people notice when they realize there is lots of development going on in Memphis but that its quite different than Nashville’s brand of development is that you don’t see nearly as many construction cranes here as you do there. It’s become an un-signature of sorts for what is an ongoing remake of Memphis. We adapt and use for new purposes. We also move institutions around, it turns out.

6. City Council Approves $685M City Budget, Takes City Tax Rate to $3.19 -

The Memphis City Council gave final approval Tuesday, June 5, to a $685 million city operating budget, an $87 million capital budget and a $3.19 city property tax rate.

The votes ended City Hall’s budget season with few changes by the council to the budget proposed by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

7. The Week Ahead: June 4-10 -

Good morning, Memphis. Or should we say, “Hush, y’all.” It’s time again for the annual FedEx St. Jude Classic golf tournament, a Memphis tradition that spans 60 years and has been funneling millions of dollars into the doors at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. 

8. Burnett Finds Satisfaction Sharing Le Bonheur’s Story -

Originally from Arkansas, Sara Burnett, director of community and public relations at Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital, made her way to Washington, D.C., and East Tennessee before firmly planting her roots here in Memphis.

9. Last Word: Monuments Ruling, The Open Council Seat and Not So Great Streets -

It is likely just the first round. But the city of Memphis prevailed on every major point in the Wednesday ruling out of Nashville by Chancellor Ellen Hobbs Lyle upholding the removal of Confederate monuments this past December from two city parks.

10. Grant Awarded For Auto Museum -

A facade improvement grant for a new automotive museum near Sun Studio was approved by the Downtown Memphis Commission’s Center City Development Corp. on Wednesday, May 16, clearing the way for Richard Vining’s $1.4 million renovation project at 645 Marshall Ave. to begin.

11. Last Word: The Bus to Shelby Farms, Sports Gaming In Tunica and Tom Lee's Story -

It hasn’t been this hot in 30 years … to the day. The high Monday of 93 degrees eclipsed the old record for the day of 91 degree in 1988. I’m not much of a thermometer watcher. But this did get my attention because I was imagining all of the big hair emergencies 30 years ago. Guys going to their closets to break out the Miami Vice pastel t-shirts and linen blazers. And of course California Raisins hysteria. And I do find it not entirely coincidental that we break a record from 1988 as there is talk of a remake of the movie “Willow.” We could break another record for all of this Tuesday and we’ll see what my mind does with the year of the old record if that’s the case.

12. Week Ahead: May 14-20 -

Go hog wild, Memphis! One of the most anticipated community events of the year kicks off this week when Tom Lee Park again becomes ground zero for the Memphis in May World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest. Teams from around the world will try to win over judges with their savory renditions of all things pig. It will be a lip-smackin’ good time win or lose, though. 

13. AutoZone Expanding Downtown, One Commerce Square Hits Market -

40 S. Main St.

Memphis, TN 38103

Property: One Commerce Square Building 

Seller: Memphis Commerce Square Partners LLC

Details: One Commerce Square, the fourth-largest building in Memphis, has hit the market.

14. UTHSC Gets $717,765 Research Grant -

The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health announced a $717,765 grant Wednesday, May 9, to the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

The grant is to advance research on angiotensins and prostaglandins-adrenergic interactions. U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen of Memphis said the grant advances the “important work they are doing.”

15. UTHSC Gets $717,765 Research Grant -

The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health announced a $717,765 grant Wednesday, May 9, to the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

The grant is to advance research on angiotensins and prostaglandins-adrenergic interactions. U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen of Memphis said the grant advances the “important work they are doing.”

16. Local Schools Awarded Grants For Educational Food Gardens -

Tennessee Sen. Mark Norris joined United Health Foundation and Whole Kids Foundation at a kickoff event Wednesday, May 2, at Nexus STEM Academy in Memphis to announce grants totaling $81,000 to 39 Tennessee schools and youth organizations to build or expand existing vegetable gardens, salad bars or beehives, and provide educational resources about agriculture, caring for the environment and maintaining healthy lifestyles.

17. Christ Community Health Services Nears Completion of Major Projects -

Christ Community Health Services is about two months away from wrapping up a pair of major projects, one of which is the completion of a renovation and expansion of its clinic at 2861 Broad Ave.

18. A First View -

Whenever the leadership at Opera Memphis maps out the lineup for a new season of music, general director Ned Canty has a specific audience member in mind. He’s thinking about that concertgoer who’s attending their very first opera, who’s never been roused by Carmen or had their passion stirred by La Traviata, The Magic Flute, Rigoletto and so many other classics of the genre.

19. Young Says Construction About to Begin on South City Residential -

South City is about to begin construction east of Danny Thomas Boulevard and the road to construction has had some unexpected turns. “There’s a certain amount of anxiety when you talk about these big projects because people don’t know whether it’s actually going to happen or not,” Memphis Housing and Community Development Division director Paul Young said on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

20. Strickland Responds to Graceland Push for Arena Approval -

UPDATE: Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland responded Friday, April 27, to comments made by Graceland Holdings managing partner Joel Weinshanker Thursday evening at a town hall meeting about Graceland's expansion plans. Here is the statement in full.

21. Luttrell Vetoes One Resolution, Refuses to Sign Another -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has vetoed a resolution for attorney and former County Commissioner Julian Bolton to continue in his role as legislative policy adviser to the commission.

22. Luttrell Vetoes One Resolution, Refuses to Sign Another -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has vetoed a resolution for attorney and former county commissioner Julian Bolton to continue in his role as legislative policy advisor to the commission.

23. April 13-19, 2018: This week in Memphis history -

1968: Striking Memphis sanitation workers vote to accept a pay raise of 15 cents an hour from the city, ending their strike after 64 days. Ten cents of the raise will go into effect in May, with the other 5 cents being added on Sept. 1.
The amount has come up before in the negotiations, which are being watched closely by The White House and federal labor officials following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on April 4. Memphis Mayor Henry Loeb balks at the proposal presented by his team, saying he would agree to a raise effective with the new fiscal year beginning July 1 and not before. He also says the raise will be less than 15 cents an hour. Philanthropist Abe Plough secretly agrees to pay the difference needed for the entire pay raise starting May 1, contributing a total of $60,000 to cover the cost. Plough’s role remains a secret until his death in 1984.

24. Council Gets First Look At MATA Route Changes -

A task force looking to overhaul the city’s bus system presents a draft report Tuesday, April 10, to Memphis City Council members.

The Memphis 3.0 transit plan goes to the council at a 1 p.m. committee session for discussion.

25. AP-NORC Poll: 50 Years After MLK, Civil Rights Goals Unmet -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Fifty years after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., only 1 in 10 African Americans think the United States has achieved all or most of the goals of the civil rights movement he led, according to a new poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

26. Community LIFT Looking to Build $5 Million Loan Pool Amid Growth -

An organization that pursues sources of financial, human and intellectual capital to strategically revitalize neighborhoods wants to build a $5 million loan pool for investing in Memphis communities and leaders.

27. Football Can’t Arrive Soon Enough for Vols Fans -

Thank goodness Tennessee spring football is here. Vol Nation needs a diversion with all that’s happened the past couple of weeks, like the men’s basketball team losing to Loyola-Chicago in the NCAA Tournament’s second round, and Loyola advancing to the Final Four.

28. UTHSC Professor Awarded $418,000 Research Grant -

Dr. Brian Peters, a researcher at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, has been awarded $418,000 to continue his research repurposing compounds to fight against inflammation that results from what’s commonly referred to as a yeast infection.

29. Prescription for Tragedy -

He has his own GPS, an internal shield that keeps him from driving anywhere near 637 Poplar Ave. Home to the Memphis morgue. That’s where they showed Jerry Davidson his 22-year-old son, Oliver, his eyes closed and his lips purple.

30. Mixed Emotions as Vols, Lady Vols Exit Postseason -

Wait till next year. Again. Hope for better. It’s going to be a long offseason for Tennessee basketball.

The Vols were seeded No. 3 in the NCAA Tournament’s South Region and were upset by No. 11 seed Loyola-Chicago, 63-62, in the second round in Dallas.

31. Council to Discuss City Pre-K Funding Proposal -

Memphis City Council members have their first discussion Tuesday, March 20, on Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland ’s proposal to provide $6 million in city funding to expand prekindergarten programs by 2020.

32. Memphis Medical Orgs Get $1.2M in Research Grants -

More than $1.2 million in federal grant money is on its way to Memphis for medical research efforts.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has awarded new research grants to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and Healthchart LLC, a Memphis firm that manufactures diagnostic medical equipment.

33. Federal Grant of Almost $400K Headed to UTHSC -

The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases has awarded a grant of $392,494 to the University of Tennessee Health Science Center for developmental research on treatments for osteoporosis.

34. Federal Grant of Almost $400K Headed to UTHSC -

The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases has awarded a grant of $392,494 to the University of Tennessee Health Science Center for developmental research on treatments for osteoporosis.

35. Memphis Medical Orgs Get $1.2M in Research Grants -

More than $1.2 million in federal grant money is on its way to Memphis for medical research efforts.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has awarded new research grants to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and Healthchart LLC, a Memphis firm that manufactures diagnostic medical equipment.

36. Novel Approach -

The smallest of the city’s 17 public libraries is also one of its most used. The Frayser Branch library is a brick-and-glass rectangle on a half-acre at 3712 Argonne St. With some modest columns and shrubs, a few planters and cinderblock lattice work, it is shoe-horned into the side of a hill in a residential neighborhood a block from the commercial corridor of North Watkins Road still dominated by churches.

37. ‘Gym Rat’ Building Another Winning Program -

Tennessee’s basketball team is rolling into March Madness.

Amazing.

The 16th-ranked Vols (22-7, 12-5 SEC) entered this week second in the SEC standings and having clinched a double-bye in the March 7-11 SEC tournament with one regular-season games remaining, Saturday against Georgia at Thompson-Boling Arena (6 p.m. ET, SEC Network).

38. College Awarded Training Grant for Nurses for Crisis Situations -

The College of Nursing at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, in collaboration with Regional One Health, has been awarded a $16,000 grant to train area nurses to handle and diffuse crisis situations in hospitals and other health care settings.

39. 3 Downtown Projects Approved for DMC Grants -

Three Downtown commercial infill projects were awarded exterior improvement grants by the Center City Development Corp. Wednesday, Feb. 21.

40. Week Ahead: Feb.19-25 -

It seems the only thing consistent about this hot again, cold again weather is the rain. As we enter another week of the waning winter, there are plenty of events to keep you entertained. But don’t forget the umbrellas, Memphis!

41. Signing Class Disappointing, But Groundwork Laid -

Tennessee football fans are hoping for a better National Signing Day in 2019. This year’s was a relative dud.

New coach Jeremy Pruitt, hired on Dec. 7, signed six players on Feb. 7 but whiffed on several high-profile recruits he and his staff were pursuing. He had signed 14 players during the first-ever early signing period Dec. 20-22.

42. DCA Planning to Add Community Amenities To Downtown HQ -

Creative communications consulting firm DCA has submitted plans to the Downtown Memphis Commission for some upgrades and new community-oriented amenities at its South Main headquarters.

DCA founder Doug Carpenter bought the 100-year-old former Nabisco warehouse at 11 W. Huling Ave. last April and relocated the firm there in December.

43. First User Moving Into Innovation Lab at UTHSC -

Dr. Monica Jablonski, a professor in the Department of Ophthalmology in the University of Tennessee Health Science Center’s College of Medicine, has been moving into a new office in recent days, just down the street.

44. Next-Level Arts -

DeltaARTS had its beginnings in 1972, in the home of founder of Bobbi Dodge. Then came years in a storefront that, as executive director Amelia Barton described it, was “right across from the bowling alley and next to the cleaners.” Now, not only is the nonprofit in its own freestanding facility in West Memphis but the building, known as the Glenn P. Schoettle Arts Education Center at 301 S. Rhodes St., will be getting technology upgrades through a capacity-building grant from the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis.

45. DCA Unveils New-Look Downtown HQ -

Creative communications consulting firm DCA has submitted plans to the Downtown Memphis Commission for some upgrades and new community-oriented amenities at its South Main headquarters.

DCA founder Doug Carpenter bought the 100-year-old former Nabisco warehouse at 11 W. Huling Ave. last April and relocated the firm there in December.

46. Headed in The Right Direction -

With this column we share with you the story of Lane College and its recent fundraising successes. Located in Jackson, Tennessee, Lane is a historically black college that needed – and wanted – to increase its fundraising.

47. Rhodes’ Hass Defends Liberal Arts Education -

The president of Rhodes College says trade schools, associate degrees and certification in specific skills can’t be the city’s only economic driver.

“I think we can all agree that we do not and cannot foresee an economy in which the trades are the only drivers,” said Rhodes president Marjorie Hass on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

48. Memphis Development Group Awarded Boulder Fund Grant -

The developer of Eden Square in Hickory Hill is among the first cohort of a new national grant fund supporting education innovation.

Derwin Sisnett, the founder of Maslow Development Inc. and leader of Gestalt Community Schools, the charter organization that founded the Power Center Academy Schools in the Eden Square development and surrounding Hickory Hill area, was awarded a “six-figure” grant from the Boulder Fund of Education Leaders of Color, according to an announcement last week by the national nonprofit.

49. The Week Ahead: Feb. 12-18, 2018 -

Good morning, Memphis! The 50th anniversary of the historic sanitation workers’ strike is remembered this week, a Pulitzer Prize winning author visits to speak about innovation and we get to hear the first declaration of “Play Ball” this year by an umpire at FedExPark. Oh, and don’t forget the waffles.

50. Bill Could Expand Residential PILOT -

In an effort to encourage residential infill and density beyond the confines of Downtown and Midtown, new legislation is making its way through the Tennessee Senate and House of Representatives that would allow Shelby County to offer tax incentives to multifamily and hotel developers outside of the central business district.

51. Bill Introduced to Expand EDGE’s Residential PILOT Boundaries -

In an effort to encourage residential infill and density beyond the confines of Downtown and Midtown, new legislation is making its way through the Tennessee Senate and House of Representatives that would allow Shelby County to offer tax incentives to multifamily and hotel developers outside of the central business district.

52. Events -

Agape Child & Family Services will hold a career fair Wednesday, Feb. 7, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at its offices, 3160 Directors Row. The nonprofit is hiring for more than 30 open positions. Hiring managers from Agape will be on site for informal interviews, and candidates should bring a current resume. Visit agapemeanslove.org for details and requirements for the open positions.

53. Harwell Plans to Back Faison’s Medical Marijuana Legislation -

House Speaker Beth Harwell is supporting medical marijuana legislation, saying she believes Tennesseans “deserve” an option to dangerous opioids.

54. Trader Joe’s Seeking First Official Approval from Germantown -

The saga of Trader Joe’s in Germantown has had more than its fair share of ups and downs over the last several years, but those all appear to be in the rear view mirror, as the first tangible plans listing the highly sought-after grocer have surfaced.

55. Events -

Novel will host “Edge of the Wind” author James E. Cherry for a discussion and signing Tuesday, Feb. 6, at 6 p.m. at the bookstore, 387 Perkins Road Extended. Visit novelmemphis.com.

56. Events -

Novel will host “Edge of the Wind” author James E. Cherry for a discussion and signing Tuesday, Feb. 6, at 6 p.m. at the bookstore, 387 Perkins Road Extended. Visit novelmemphis.com.

57. Last Word: Closing the Loophole, Skeleton Hotel Update and Jubilee Conversion -

The state legislator who sponsored the most recent version of the law making it much more difficult to remove Confederate monuments acknowledges that the city of Memphis found a legitimate loophole in the 2016 law he crafted. Republican Steve McDaniel, of Parkers Crossroads, tells our Nashville correspondent Sam Stockard that he has a bill in the House to close the loophole. But it won't undo what happened here. Although there is still a court fight over that taking shape.

58. UT Defies Expectations, Projected as No. 4, 5 Seed -

You won’t find a lot of star power on Tennessee’s basketball team. You will find a roster of players buying into the system of third-year coach Rick Barnes.

59. Resiliency Concept Goes Broader With Master Plan -

With three projects about to start moving dirt and $60 million in federal funding to do them, the concept of resiliency in Shelby County is moving, even though it’s in the shadows of other plans such as the Mid-South Greenprint and the development of the Wolf River Greenway.

60. The Week Ahead: Jan. 29-Feb. 4 -

Good morning, Memphis! Proceedings related to the city’s removal of Confederate statues from two parks get underway, just one of many events on a busy Monday. Check our rundown of all the happenings you need to know about in The Week Ahead…

61. Christ Community Health Expanding on Broad Ave. -

Christ Community Health Services has received a $1 million federal capital grant to expand and renovate its Broad Avenue Health Center, 2861 Broad Ave., a project that includes a 2,480-square-foot addition and renovation of the existing 8,000-square-foot facility.

62. Baptist Women’s Hospital Receives Hugging Grant -

Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women is one of four hospitals receiving a $10,000 grant from Huggies to support or establish volunteer hugging programs for newborns in neonatal intensive care units.

63. Baptist Women’s Hospital To Receive Hugging Grant -

Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women is one of four hospitals receiving a $10,000 grant from Huggies to support or establish volunteer hugging programs for newborns in neonatal intensive care units.

64. Christ Community Health Expanding Broad Ave. Clinic -

Christ Community Health Services has received a $1 million federal capital grant to expand and renovate its Broad Avenue Health Center, 2861 Broad Ave., a project that includes a 2,480-square-foot addition and renovation of the existing 8,000-square-foot facility.

65. Despite Need, Expanding Health Care Not in Cards -

Springfield resident Felicity Palma struggled mightily when she moved to Tennessee from Florida two years ago after suffering health problems and losing her job.

The 47-year-old former social worker became homeless for a period when she came here, and now she finds herself in a health insurance coverage gap as she tries to get treatment for ulcers, sciatica, fibroids and thyroid disease. Debt is piling up on her, too, for the care she does receive.

66. Christ Community Health Services Expanding Broad Ave. Clinic -

Christ Community Health Services has received a $1 million federal capital grant to expand and renovate its Broad Avenue Health Center, at 2861 Broad Ave., a project that includes a 2,480-square-foot addition and renovation of the existing 8,000 square foot facility.

67. Last Word: Second Snow Day, The Post-King Generation and Cohen's Cadillac -

A second snow day awaits Wednesday on this short week for many but not all of us. And there is some grumbling about the approach to treating roads off the main thoroughfares that may, in this city where a cut-through detour is a real thing and the reason for speed humps, still see a lot of traffic.

68. After Disaster of 2017, New Year Looking Good for Vols -

Vol Nation should celebrate. It’s a new year. It’s got to be better than 2017. Tennessee athletics had a bad year, one of the worst ever. It was rough for fans, alumni and boosters.

69. Exit Strategy -

When Kroger’s Delta Division announced last week it would shutter its stores at 1977 S. Third St. in the Southgate shopping center and 2267 Lamar Ave. near Airways Boulevard, there was already a considerable history of what might follow the Feb. 2 closing.

70. Last Word: Mural Madness, Madison Plans and New Judges -

Maybe this discussion was bound to happen in a city where murals have been going up at a pretty good clip for several years now. At first, it was a rather startling form of civic witness in a new kind of Memphis boosterism that was a reaction to years of downing Memphis as the dominant civic monologue. And it rapidly became about how much the murals could speak to the real Memphis – in other words pro-Memphis but with an edge and more than a nod to the city’s reality. That’s a lot for a mural to pull off.

71. Madison Hotel Owners Seeking Grant to Renovate Ground Floor Commercial Space -

Aparium Hotel Group, the owners of the Madison Hotel, are requesting an improvement grant from the Downtown Memphis Commission to overhaul an adjacent commercial building it owns at the corner of Main Street and Madison Avenue.

72. Moore Named Executive Director of Explore Bike Share -

Trey Moore has been named executive director of Explore Bike Share, the Memphis nonprofit that is preparing to launch a local bike-share system with 600 bicycles and 60 stations. Moore, who is returning to Memphis from Atlanta, Georgia, will lead Explore Bike Share’s staff in operations, fund development and community engagement activities in partnership with the organization’s board of directors.
As executive director, he also is committed to bicycling as a sustainable transportation option with access to as many Memphians as possible, and will help promote a bike-friendly culture in Memphis while encouraging exercise and healthy lifestyles.

73. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some Who Died in 2017 -

They made music that inspired legions of fans. Rock 'n' roll founding fathers Chuck Berry and Fats Domino, rockers Tom Petty and Gregg Allman, grunge icon Chris Cornell, country superstar Glen Campbell and jazz great Al Jarreau were among the notable figures who died in 2017, leaving a void in virtually every genre of music.

74. Haslam Considering Changes to UT Board of Trustees -

Gov. Bill Haslam is considering reducing the number University of Tennessee Board of Trustees members and trimming the number of finalists presented for top leadership positions in the UT system, Lt. Gov. Randy McNally has confirmed.

75. Council Delays MLGW Rate Hike Vote to Wednesday -

Memphis City Council members meet again Wednesday, Dec. 20, to vote on Memphis Light Gas and Water Divisions proposals to raise water, gas and electricity rates starting next month.

The council was debating the 1.05 percent water rate hike proposal at its regularly scheduled Tuesday session when chairman Berlin Boyd announced the meeting would recess until 4 p.m. Wednesday at City Hall. It came as council members had a lot of questions about possible alternatives to the rate hikes across all three sectors of the publicly-owned utility.

76. 2017 a Year of Expansion for Memphis Banks -

The biggest banks in Memphis made aggressive pushes this year to raise their profiles and expand footprints, as competition in the sector heats up and the industry continues winning back the strength it enjoyed before the bust of 2008.

77. Legislators Not Shy in Pushing ‘Model’ Bills -

The group that brought Tennessee the voter photo ID law could be on the brink of spawning another kink on the voting process, one that cross-checks jury service with voter rolls.

At the behest of the American Civil Rights Union, legislators across the nation who belong to the American Legislative Exchange Council could be sponsoring bills in the next couple of years requiring local election commissions to take a closer look at people who miss jury duty.

78. Piece by Piece: Construction Projects Flourishing Throughout Mid-South -

With $11 billion spread out among more than 300 active projects in the Memphis area, according to data from brokerage firm Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors, it’s safe to say business in the region is good.

79. Pay for No Play: Paying Millions to Former Coaches -

Tennessee’s bungled search for a football coach will come at a cost for the university. A big cost.

There are buyouts everywhere. A potential lawsuit looms. And a rift between boosters caused by the botched search may be the costliest item of all for the university long term.

80. Avoid 401(k) Loans -

Ray’s Take Many employers offer 401(k) plans that grant participants the option to take out a loan. And when times are tough – or maybe you really, really want to renovate your kitchen – it’s tempting to withdraw money from your 401(k) for a loan.

81. Coalition Taps Green & Healthy Homes Initiative -

Leaders from Memphis and Shelby County and representatives from nearly 25 partner organizations signed an agreement Thursday morning, Nov. 30, at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library in East Memphis to work together on Tennessee’s first Green & Healthy Homes Initiative (GHHI) led by the Baltimore-based organization.

82. Coalition Signs on With Green & Healthy Homes Initiative -

Leaders from Memphis and Shelby County and representatives from nearly 25 partner organizations signed an agreement Thursday morning, Nov. 30, at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library in East Memphis to work together on Tennessee’s first Green & Healthy Homes Initiative (GHHI) led by the Baltimore-based organization.

83. Trustee’s Office Promotes Financial Education and Counseling -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir will tell you that the myriad financial education programs and initiatives his office is involved with – covering everything from helping improve consumer credit to financial counseling – are what he sees as part of his job as the “banker for the county.”

84. UTHSC Researchers Studying Why People Grow Old -

A group of researchers led by a University of Tennessee Health Science Center assistant professor is in the midst of a study focused on aging: the science behind it, why it happens, and the scientific framework behind why everyone starts slowing down, going gray and needing more medical care as they get older.

85. Last Word: The Year of Tyreke Evans, Opioid Ruling and Installing a Jumper -

The Tigers basketball home opener is a come from behind win Tuesday at the Forum over Little Rock 70-62. Still not enough to determine where this new team in so many ways is bound. But that won’t stop the early speculation … or the later speculation starting with the New Orleans game at the Forum in another week. The Grizz take their turn Wednesday with the Pacers kicking off a Grizz home stand followed by the Rockets Saturday for the third time in this young season, Trail Blazers Monday and Mavericks Wednesday. But let’s not get too far ahead here.

86. Shelby Farms Draws $142 Million, 71-Acre Development -

Elmington Capital Group has submitted plans for a 71-acre senior housing, apartment and single-family development next to Shelby Farms Park. Dwell at Shelby Farms is a new $142 million development to be located on the north side of Raleigh-LaGrange Road near the intersections of Trinity and Fischer Steel roads.

87. U of M Hooks Institute Given $10,000 Grant -

The Benjamin L. Hooks Institute at the University of Memphis has received a $10,000 grant from the Ingersoll Rand Foundation to support the Hooks African-American Male Initiative. The Hooks Institute launched HAAMI in 2015 to increase the retention and graduation rates of African-American male students at the U of M.

88. Education Dept. Could Scale Back Help on Loans -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Education Department is considering only partially forgiving federal loans for students defrauded by for-profit colleges, according to department officials, abandoning the Obama administration's policy of erasing that debt.

89. Education Grant To Boost Child Care at Southwest -

The U.S. Department of Education has awarded a grant of nearly $800,000 to Southwest Tennessee Community College to fund care for 45 children, ages 2 ½ to 5 years old, of Pell-eligible students pursuing an associate degree.

90. Making the List -

With black-and-white images from Memphis in conflict circa 1968 projected larger than life on a video screen behind him, Kirk Whalum stood in the sanctuary of Clayborn Temple earlier this week talking about growing up in Memphis in that era.

91. U.S. Dept. of Education Grant Aids Child Care at Southwest -

The U.S. Department of Education has awarded a grant of nearly $800,000 to Southwest Tennessee Community College to fund care for 45 children, ages 2 ½ to 5 years old, of Pell-eligible students pursuing an associate degree.

92. Rodney Baber Park To Be Expanded -

The city of Memphis is preparing to expand and raise part of flood-prone Rodney Baber Park in Frayser.

The city hasn’t done any maintenance on the park, which has eight softball fields, since it was heavily damaged in 2011 flooding when the Mississippi River at Memphis reached its highest level since 1937. The park is north of the Wolf River, one of the local tributaries that also flooded that spring, and the park has seen high water periodically since then.

93. U of M Files $33.5M Permit for Land Bridge -

570 Houston St. 

Memphis, TN 38111

Permit Amount: $33.5 million

Owner: University of Memphis

Details: The University of Memphis has filed a $33.5 million building permit application with the Office of Construction Code Enforcement to move forward with a parking garage and a long-awaited land bridge over the Southern Avenue railroad track.

94. Christ Community Health Services Gets Perfect Score on Comprehensive Audit -

Christ Community Health Services CEO Shantelle Leatherwood has checked off one of the major items on her immediate to-do list that confronted her upon taking the top job earlier this year.

The organization – which has a collection of health centers and provides care for the uninsured, among other services – earned a perfect score on a major audit in recent weeks that it’s required to undergo every three years. That perfect score puts CCHS in the top 1 percent of similar organizations – federally qualified health centers, of which there are about 1,500.

95. City Lays Out Numerous Options in Confederate Monuments Controversy -

The city administration and Memphis City Council laid out numerous paths forward in the Confederate monuments controversy Tuesday, Oct. 17, that include closing Health Sciences Park entirely or building a memorial to lynching victims in the park plaza where a statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest is now the centerpiece.

96. Rodney Baber Park To Be Expanded -

The city of Memphis is preparing to expand and raise part of flood-prone Rodney Baber Park in Frayser.

The city hasn’t done any maintenance on the park, which has eight softball fields, since it was heavily damaged in 2011 flooding when the Mississippi River at Memphis reached its highest level since 1937. The park is north of the Wolf River, one of the local tributaries that also flooded that spring, and the park has seen high water periodically since then.

97. Pettit Joins Food Bank As Chief Development Officer -

Attorney Peter Pettit has joined Mid-South Food Bank as chief development officer following his recent retirement as a partner in the Memphis office of Bass, Berry & Sims PLC. In his new role, Pettit works closely with food bank leaders to develop strategies and relationships with major gift donors, and specifically is working to complete the $12.5 million “Hunger to Hope” capital campaign.

98. Monuments, Elections, TDZ Expansion All Before Council -

Memphis City Council members take a third and final vote Tuesday, Oct. 17, on an ordinance directing the administration to act on “immediate” removal of Confederate monuments from two city parks.

99. Steele Joins Southern Growth Studio’s Anthropology Team -

April Steele has joined Southern Growth Studio as a business anthropologist, responsible for collecting and analyzing data to evaluate existing and potential products and services. Steele’s hire comes as the Memphis-based innovation consulting firm grows its applied anthropology practice. Using qualitative social research methods like ethnography, the anthropology team steers the innovation process, conducting primary research to distill and communicate key insights to clients.

100. Foundation Supports St. Jude Scientist Research -

Dr. Mark Hatley, a pediatric oncologist at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, is on the front lines of trying to change the fact that almost 2,000 children die of cancer each year in the U.S.