» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation Links
Search results for 'Grant Center' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:1
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:1
Middle Tennessee:0
East Tennessee:0
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Week Ahead: Feb.19-25 -

It seems the only thing consistent about this hot again, cold again weather is the rain. As we enter another week of the waning winter, there are plenty of events to keep you entertained. But don’t forget the umbrellas, Memphis!

2. Signing Class Disappointing, But Groundwork Laid -

Tennessee football fans are hoping for a better National Signing Day in 2019. This year’s was a relative dud.

New coach Jeremy Pruitt, hired on Dec. 7, signed six players on Feb. 7 but whiffed on several high-profile recruits he and his staff were pursuing. He had signed 14 players during the first-ever early signing period Dec. 20-22.

3. DCA Planning to Add Community Amenities To Downtown HQ -

Creative communications consulting firm DCA has submitted plans to the Downtown Memphis Commission for some upgrades and new community-oriented amenities at its South Main headquarters.

DCA founder Doug Carpenter bought the 100-year-old former Nabisco warehouse at 11 W. Huling Ave. last April and relocated the firm there in December.

4. First User Moving Into Innovation Lab at UTHSC -

Dr. Monica Jablonski, a professor in the Department of Ophthalmology in the University of Tennessee Health Science Center’s College of Medicine, has been moving into a new office in recent days, just down the street.

5. Next-Level Arts -

DeltaARTS had its beginnings in 1972, in the home of founder of Bobbi Dodge. Then came years in a storefront that, as executive director Amelia Barton described it, was “right across from the bowling alley and next to the cleaners.” Now, not only is the nonprofit in its own freestanding facility in West Memphis but the building, known as the Glenn P. Schoettle Arts Education Center at 301 S. Rhodes St., will be getting technology upgrades through a capacity-building grant from the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis.

6. DCA Unveils New-Look Downtown HQ -

Creative communications consulting firm DCA has submitted plans to the Downtown Memphis Commission for some upgrades and new community-oriented amenities at its South Main headquarters.

DCA founder Doug Carpenter bought the 100-year-old former Nabisco warehouse at 11 W. Huling Ave. last April and relocated the firm there in December.

7. Headed in The Right Direction -

With this column we share with you the story of Lane College and its recent fundraising successes. Located in Jackson, Tennessee, Lane is a historically black college that needed – and wanted – to increase its fundraising.

8. Rhodes’ Hass Defends Liberal Arts Education -

The president of Rhodes College says trade schools, associate degrees and certification in specific skills can’t be the city’s only economic driver.

“I think we can all agree that we do not and cannot foresee an economy in which the trades are the only drivers,” said Rhodes president Marjorie Hass on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

9. Memphis Development Group Awarded Boulder Fund Grant -

The developer of Eden Square in Hickory Hill is among the first cohort of a new national grant fund supporting education innovation.

Derwin Sisnett, the founder of Maslow Development Inc. and leader of Gestalt Community Schools, the charter organization that founded the Power Center Academy Schools in the Eden Square development and surrounding Hickory Hill area, was awarded a “six-figure” grant from the Boulder Fund of Education Leaders of Color, according to an announcement last week by the national nonprofit.

10. The Week Ahead: Feb. 12-18, 2018 -

Good morning, Memphis! The 50th anniversary of the historic sanitation workers’ strike is remembered this week, a Pulitzer Prize winning author visits to speak about innovation and we get to hear the first declaration of “Play Ball” this year by an umpire at FedExPark. Oh, and don’t forget the waffles.

11. Bill Could Expand Residential PILOT -

In an effort to encourage residential infill and density beyond the confines of Downtown and Midtown, new legislation is making its way through the Tennessee Senate and House of Representatives that would allow Shelby County to offer tax incentives to multifamily and hotel developers outside of the central business district.

12. Bill Introduced to Expand EDGE’s Residential PILOT Boundaries -

In an effort to encourage residential infill and density beyond the confines of Downtown and Midtown, new legislation is making its way through the Tennessee Senate and House of Representatives that would allow Shelby County to offer tax incentives to multifamily and hotel developers outside of the central business district.

13. Events -

Agape Child & Family Services will hold a career fair Wednesday, Feb. 7, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at its offices, 3160 Directors Row. The nonprofit is hiring for more than 30 open positions. Hiring managers from Agape will be on site for informal interviews, and candidates should bring a current resume. Visit agapemeanslove.org for details and requirements for the open positions.

14. Harwell Plans to Back Faison’s Medical Marijuana Legislation -

House Speaker Beth Harwell is supporting medical marijuana legislation, saying she believes Tennesseans “deserve” an option to dangerous opioids.

15. Trader Joe’s Seeking First Official Approval from Germantown -

The saga of Trader Joe’s in Germantown has had more than its fair share of ups and downs over the last several years, but those all appear to be in the rear view mirror, as the first tangible plans listing the highly sought-after grocer have surfaced.

16. Events -

Novel will host “Edge of the Wind” author James E. Cherry for a discussion and signing Tuesday, Feb. 6, at 6 p.m. at the bookstore, 387 Perkins Road Extended. Visit novelmemphis.com.

17. Events -

Novel will host “Edge of the Wind” author James E. Cherry for a discussion and signing Tuesday, Feb. 6, at 6 p.m. at the bookstore, 387 Perkins Road Extended. Visit novelmemphis.com.

18. Last Word: Closing the Loophole, Skeleton Hotel Update and Jubilee Conversion -

The state legislator who sponsored the most recent version of the law making it much more difficult to remove Confederate monuments acknowledges that the city of Memphis found a legitimate loophole in the 2016 law he crafted. Republican Steve McDaniel, of Parkers Crossroads, tells our Nashville correspondent Sam Stockard that he has a bill in the House to close the loophole. But it won't undo what happened here. Although there is still a court fight over that taking shape.

19. UT Defies Expectations, Projected as No. 4, 5 Seed -

You won’t find a lot of star power on Tennessee’s basketball team. You will find a roster of players buying into the system of third-year coach Rick Barnes.

20. Resiliency Concept Goes Broader With Master Plan -

With three projects about to start moving dirt and $60 million in federal funding to do them, the concept of resiliency in Shelby County is moving, even though it’s in the shadows of other plans such as the Mid-South Greenprint and the development of the Wolf River Greenway.

21. The Week Ahead: Jan. 29-Feb. 4 -

Good morning, Memphis! Proceedings related to the city’s removal of Confederate statues from two parks get underway, just one of many events on a busy Monday. Check our rundown of all the happenings you need to know about in The Week Ahead…

22. Christ Community Health Expanding on Broad Ave. -

Christ Community Health Services has received a $1 million federal capital grant to expand and renovate its Broad Avenue Health Center, 2861 Broad Ave., a project that includes a 2,480-square-foot addition and renovation of the existing 8,000-square-foot facility.

23. Baptist Women’s Hospital Receives Hugging Grant -

Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women is one of four hospitals receiving a $10,000 grant from Huggies to support or establish volunteer hugging programs for newborns in neonatal intensive care units.

24. Baptist Women’s Hospital To Receive Hugging Grant -

Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women is one of four hospitals receiving a $10,000 grant from Huggies to support or establish volunteer hugging programs for newborns in neonatal intensive care units.

25. Christ Community Health Expanding Broad Ave. Clinic -

Christ Community Health Services has received a $1 million federal capital grant to expand and renovate its Broad Avenue Health Center, 2861 Broad Ave., a project that includes a 2,480-square-foot addition and renovation of the existing 8,000-square-foot facility.

26. Despite Need, Expanding Health Care Not in Cards -

Springfield resident Felicity Palma struggled mightily when she moved to Tennessee from Florida two years ago after suffering health problems and losing her job.

The 47-year-old former social worker became homeless for a period when she came here, and now she finds herself in a health insurance coverage gap as she tries to get treatment for ulcers, sciatica, fibroids and thyroid disease. Debt is piling up on her, too, for the care she does receive.

27. Christ Community Health Services Expanding Broad Ave. Clinic -

Christ Community Health Services has received a $1 million federal capital grant to expand and renovate its Broad Avenue Health Center, at 2861 Broad Ave., a project that includes a 2,480-square-foot addition and renovation of the existing 8,000 square foot facility.

28. Last Word: Second Snow Day, The Post-King Generation and Cohen's Cadillac -

A second snow day awaits Wednesday on this short week for many but not all of us. And there is some grumbling about the approach to treating roads off the main thoroughfares that may, in this city where a cut-through detour is a real thing and the reason for speed humps, still see a lot of traffic.

29. After Disaster of 2017, New Year Looking Good for Vols -

Vol Nation should celebrate. It’s a new year. It’s got to be better than 2017. Tennessee athletics had a bad year, one of the worst ever. It was rough for fans, alumni and boosters.

30. Exit Strategy -

When Kroger’s Delta Division announced last week it would shutter its stores at 1977 S. Third St. in the Southgate shopping center and 2267 Lamar Ave. near Airways Boulevard, there was already a considerable history of what might follow the Feb. 2 closing.

31. Last Word: Mural Madness, Madison Plans and New Judges -

Maybe this discussion was bound to happen in a city where murals have been going up at a pretty good clip for several years now. At first, it was a rather startling form of civic witness in a new kind of Memphis boosterism that was a reaction to years of downing Memphis as the dominant civic monologue. And it rapidly became about how much the murals could speak to the real Memphis – in other words pro-Memphis but with an edge and more than a nod to the city’s reality. That’s a lot for a mural to pull off.

32. Madison Hotel Owners Seeking Grant to Renovate Ground Floor Commercial Space -

Aparium Hotel Group, the owners of the Madison Hotel, are requesting an improvement grant from the Downtown Memphis Commission to overhaul an adjacent commercial building it owns at the corner of Main Street and Madison Avenue.

33. Moore Named Executive Director of Explore Bike Share -

Trey Moore has been named executive director of Explore Bike Share, the Memphis nonprofit that is preparing to launch a local bike-share system with 600 bicycles and 60 stations. Moore, who is returning to Memphis from Atlanta, Georgia, will lead Explore Bike Share’s staff in operations, fund development and community engagement activities in partnership with the organization’s board of directors.
As executive director, he also is committed to bicycling as a sustainable transportation option with access to as many Memphians as possible, and will help promote a bike-friendly culture in Memphis while encouraging exercise and healthy lifestyles.

34. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some Who Died in 2017 -

They made music that inspired legions of fans. Rock 'n' roll founding fathers Chuck Berry and Fats Domino, rockers Tom Petty and Gregg Allman, grunge icon Chris Cornell, country superstar Glen Campbell and jazz great Al Jarreau were among the notable figures who died in 2017, leaving a void in virtually every genre of music.

35. Haslam Considering Changes to UT Board of Trustees -

Gov. Bill Haslam is considering reducing the number University of Tennessee Board of Trustees members and trimming the number of finalists presented for top leadership positions in the UT system, Lt. Gov. Randy McNally has confirmed.

36. Council Delays MLGW Rate Hike Vote to Wednesday -

Memphis City Council members meet again Wednesday, Dec. 20, to vote on Memphis Light Gas and Water Divisions proposals to raise water, gas and electricity rates starting next month.

The council was debating the 1.05 percent water rate hike proposal at its regularly scheduled Tuesday session when chairman Berlin Boyd announced the meeting would recess until 4 p.m. Wednesday at City Hall. It came as council members had a lot of questions about possible alternatives to the rate hikes across all three sectors of the publicly-owned utility.

37. 2017 a Year of Expansion for Memphis Banks -

The biggest banks in Memphis made aggressive pushes this year to raise their profiles and expand footprints, as competition in the sector heats up and the industry continues winning back the strength it enjoyed before the bust of 2008.

38. Legislators Not Shy in Pushing ‘Model’ Bills -

The group that brought Tennessee the voter photo ID law could be on the brink of spawning another kink on the voting process, one that cross-checks jury service with voter rolls.

At the behest of the American Civil Rights Union, legislators across the nation who belong to the American Legislative Exchange Council could be sponsoring bills in the next couple of years requiring local election commissions to take a closer look at people who miss jury duty.

39. Piece by Piece: Construction Projects Flourishing Throughout Mid-South -

With $11 billion spread out among more than 300 active projects in the Memphis area, according to data from brokerage firm Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors, it’s safe to say business in the region is good.

40. Pay for No Play: Paying Millions to Former Coaches -

Tennessee’s bungled search for a football coach will come at a cost for the university. A big cost.

There are buyouts everywhere. A potential lawsuit looms. And a rift between boosters caused by the botched search may be the costliest item of all for the university long term.

41. Avoid 401(k) Loans -

Ray’s Take Many employers offer 401(k) plans that grant participants the option to take out a loan. And when times are tough – or maybe you really, really want to renovate your kitchen – it’s tempting to withdraw money from your 401(k) for a loan.

42. Coalition Taps Green & Healthy Homes Initiative -

Leaders from Memphis and Shelby County and representatives from nearly 25 partner organizations signed an agreement Thursday morning, Nov. 30, at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library in East Memphis to work together on Tennessee’s first Green & Healthy Homes Initiative (GHHI) led by the Baltimore-based organization.

43. Coalition Signs on With Green & Healthy Homes Initiative -

Leaders from Memphis and Shelby County and representatives from nearly 25 partner organizations signed an agreement Thursday morning, Nov. 30, at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library in East Memphis to work together on Tennessee’s first Green & Healthy Homes Initiative (GHHI) led by the Baltimore-based organization.

44. Trustee’s Office Promotes Financial Education and Counseling -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir will tell you that the myriad financial education programs and initiatives his office is involved with – covering everything from helping improve consumer credit to financial counseling – are what he sees as part of his job as the “banker for the county.”

45. UTHSC Researchers Studying Why People Grow Old -

A group of researchers led by a University of Tennessee Health Science Center assistant professor is in the midst of a study focused on aging: the science behind it, why it happens, and the scientific framework behind why everyone starts slowing down, going gray and needing more medical care as they get older.

46. Last Word: The Year of Tyreke Evans, Opioid Ruling and Installing a Jumper -

The Tigers basketball home opener is a come from behind win Tuesday at the Forum over Little Rock 70-62. Still not enough to determine where this new team in so many ways is bound. But that won’t stop the early speculation … or the later speculation starting with the New Orleans game at the Forum in another week. The Grizz take their turn Wednesday with the Pacers kicking off a Grizz home stand followed by the Rockets Saturday for the third time in this young season, Trail Blazers Monday and Mavericks Wednesday. But let’s not get too far ahead here.

47. Shelby Farms Draws $142 Million, 71-Acre Development -

Elmington Capital Group has submitted plans for a 71-acre senior housing, apartment and single-family development next to Shelby Farms Park. Dwell at Shelby Farms is a new $142 million development to be located on the north side of Raleigh-LaGrange Road near the intersections of Trinity and Fischer Steel roads.

48. U of M Hooks Institute Given $10,000 Grant -

The Benjamin L. Hooks Institute at the University of Memphis has received a $10,000 grant from the Ingersoll Rand Foundation to support the Hooks African-American Male Initiative. The Hooks Institute launched HAAMI in 2015 to increase the retention and graduation rates of African-American male students at the U of M.

49. Education Dept. Could Scale Back Help on Loans -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Education Department is considering only partially forgiving federal loans for students defrauded by for-profit colleges, according to department officials, abandoning the Obama administration's policy of erasing that debt.

50. Education Grant To Boost Child Care at Southwest -

The U.S. Department of Education has awarded a grant of nearly $800,000 to Southwest Tennessee Community College to fund care for 45 children, ages 2 ½ to 5 years old, of Pell-eligible students pursuing an associate degree.

51. Making the List -

With black-and-white images from Memphis in conflict circa 1968 projected larger than life on a video screen behind him, Kirk Whalum stood in the sanctuary of Clayborn Temple earlier this week talking about growing up in Memphis in that era.

52. U.S. Dept. of Education Grant Aids Child Care at Southwest -

The U.S. Department of Education has awarded a grant of nearly $800,000 to Southwest Tennessee Community College to fund care for 45 children, ages 2 ½ to 5 years old, of Pell-eligible students pursuing an associate degree.

53. Rodney Baber Park To Be Expanded -

The city of Memphis is preparing to expand and raise part of flood-prone Rodney Baber Park in Frayser.

The city hasn’t done any maintenance on the park, which has eight softball fields, since it was heavily damaged in 2011 flooding when the Mississippi River at Memphis reached its highest level since 1937. The park is north of the Wolf River, one of the local tributaries that also flooded that spring, and the park has seen high water periodically since then.

54. U of M Files $33.5M Permit for Land Bridge -

570 Houston St. 

Memphis, TN 38111

Permit Amount: $33.5 million

Owner: University of Memphis

Details: The University of Memphis has filed a $33.5 million building permit application with the Office of Construction Code Enforcement to move forward with a parking garage and a long-awaited land bridge over the Southern Avenue railroad track.

55. Christ Community Health Services Gets Perfect Score on Comprehensive Audit -

Christ Community Health Services CEO Shantelle Leatherwood has checked off one of the major items on her immediate to-do list that confronted her upon taking the top job earlier this year.

The organization – which has a collection of health centers and provides care for the uninsured, among other services – earned a perfect score on a major audit in recent weeks that it’s required to undergo every three years. That perfect score puts CCHS in the top 1 percent of similar organizations – federally qualified health centers, of which there are about 1,500.

56. City Lays Out Numerous Options in Confederate Monuments Controversy -

The city administration and Memphis City Council laid out numerous paths forward in the Confederate monuments controversy Tuesday, Oct. 17, that include closing Health Sciences Park entirely or building a memorial to lynching victims in the park plaza where a statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest is now the centerpiece.

57. Rodney Baber Park To Be Expanded -

The city of Memphis is preparing to expand and raise part of flood-prone Rodney Baber Park in Frayser.

The city hasn’t done any maintenance on the park, which has eight softball fields, since it was heavily damaged in 2011 flooding when the Mississippi River at Memphis reached its highest level since 1937. The park is north of the Wolf River, one of the local tributaries that also flooded that spring, and the park has seen high water periodically since then.

58. Pettit Joins Food Bank As Chief Development Officer -

Attorney Peter Pettit has joined Mid-South Food Bank as chief development officer following his recent retirement as a partner in the Memphis office of Bass, Berry & Sims PLC. In his new role, Pettit works closely with food bank leaders to develop strategies and relationships with major gift donors, and specifically is working to complete the $12.5 million “Hunger to Hope” capital campaign.

59. Monuments, Elections, TDZ Expansion All Before Council -

Memphis City Council members take a third and final vote Tuesday, Oct. 17, on an ordinance directing the administration to act on “immediate” removal of Confederate monuments from two city parks.

60. Steele Joins Southern Growth Studio’s Anthropology Team -

April Steele has joined Southern Growth Studio as a business anthropologist, responsible for collecting and analyzing data to evaluate existing and potential products and services. Steele’s hire comes as the Memphis-based innovation consulting firm grows its applied anthropology practice. Using qualitative social research methods like ethnography, the anthropology team steers the innovation process, conducting primary research to distill and communicate key insights to clients.

61. Foundation Supports St. Jude Scientist Research -

Dr. Mark Hatley, a pediatric oncologist at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, is on the front lines of trying to change the fact that almost 2,000 children die of cancer each year in the U.S.

62. Widening The Path -

He asked to only be a small part of this story. But when you come up with an idea so good, so powerful, that it’s named as one of the top 20 ideas in the Forbes Change the World Competition, you are the story’s foundation.

63. Commission Delays Votes On Finance Ordinances -

Shelby County Commissioners delayed votes Monday, Sept. 11, on a set of three resolutions dealing with county finances, citing the need for further discussion and questions.

The first of the three is a supplement to the interlocal agreement on financing the Memphis and Shelby County Sports Authority to pay the debt on FedExForum. The agreement allows revenue from a 2015 increase in the hotel-motel tax to be used to finance renovations of the Memphis Cook Convention Center as well as the debt on the arena.

64. Commission Delays Votes On Finance Ordinances -

Shelby County Commissioners delayed votes Monday, Sept. 11, on a set of three resolutions dealing with county finances, citing the need for further discussion and questions.

The first of the three is a supplement to the interlocal agreement on financing the Memphis and Shelby County Sports Authority to pay the debt on FedExForum. The agreement allows revenue from a 2015 increase in the hotel-motel tax to be used to finance renovations of the Memphis Cook Convention Center as well as the debt on the arena.

65. County Commission Joins City Call to Remove Confederate Monuments -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a resolution Monday, Sept. 11, backing the city’s efforts to remove Confederate monuments with a waiver from the Tennessee Historical Commission. The resolution by commissioner Walter Bailey also backs the Memphis City Council’s move to an ordinance that could take down the monuments after the Oct. 13 decision if the historical commission does not grant the waiver.

66. Delete Personal Data from Rental Car Systems -

I only have occasion to rent a car once or twice a year and have never paid for navigation, Bluetooth, streaming music, or other newer technologies that may be available.

But people who do should heed an FTC alert titled “What is your phone telling your rental car?”

67. Top US Fall Destinations -

Fall is my favorite time of year. The cooling temperatures, changing colors and football season all combine to make for a fun time of year.

It’s also a great time to travel. Fall means shoulder season in many top destinations, making travel a bit more affordable. But there also are some destinations that just seem to make more sense from Labor Day to the start of the holiday season at Thanksgiving. Here are my top U.S. fall destinations on my radar for travel this year.

68. Trump Expected to Decide Soon on Fate of Young Immigrants -

WASHINGTON (AP) – After months of delays, President Donald Trump is expected to decide soon on the fate of young immigrants who were brought into the country illegally as children as he faces a looming court deadline and is digging in on appeals to his base.

69. What Memphis Parents Should Know About How Schools Share Student Information -

The sharing of student information is at the center of the latest squabble between Shelby County Schools and state-authorized charter schools — making it more important than ever for Memphis parents to know what’s at stake.

70. The Latest: University Barricades Confederate Statue -

The Latest on efforts to remove Confederate monuments and the nationwide fallout from a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia (all times local):

___

2:30 p.m.

Workers in a Florida city have started taking down a memorial to Confederate soldiers at a city-owned cemetery.

71. UTHSC Professor Wins $1.3 Million Grant -

Dr. Helena Parfenova, a professor in the Department of Physiology in the College of Medicine at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, has been granted a $1.3 million award to study harmful seizure-activated mechanisms in the neonatal brain.

72. 2017, The Musical -

“GRANT US WISDOM, GRANT US COURAGE.” Episcopalians sing every week, as I’m sure many of you do, but most of us aren’t listening to the words. Their familiarity has bred if not contempt at least complacence.

73. Crosstown High School Gets $2.5 Million XQ Institute Grant -

A year from opening, organizers of Crosstown High School have secured a $2.5 million, five-year grant from a national education reform group focused specifically on high schools.

“It puts us in a much greater financial position,” said Chris Terrill, Crosstown High executive director. “But more important than the financial revenue is the connection we make to the XQ network of people.”

74. County Mulls Garage For Long-Term Parking Fix -

Shelby County Jury Commission officials have points they always make with citizens on jury duty in Downtown Memphis. And it includes an apology for the parking situation around the Criminal Justice Center and the Judge D’Army Bailey Courthouse, where those called to be on juries will work for a week at a time.

75. County Commission Approves Sheriff's Office Parking Near CJC -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, Aug. 14, a couple of one-year contracts totaling $226,250 for 519 parking spaces near the Criminal Justice Center for the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office.

76. County Commission Approves Sheriff's Office Parking Near CJC -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, Aug. 14, a couple of one-year contracts totaling $226,250 for 519 parking spaces near the Criminal Justice Center for the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office.

77. Memphis-MidSouth Affiliate of Susan G. Komen Foundation Expanding Reach -

In 2017, there will be an estimated 252,710 new cases of invasive breast cancer and 40,610 breast cancer deaths. Those sobering numbers come from the Susan G. Komen Foundation, the largest nonprofit source of breast cancer research.

78. Monogram Foods Awards $25K to Memphis Nonprofits -

Memphis-based Monogram Foods is awarding a total of $25,000 to eight local nonprofits through its Monogram Loves Kids Foundation.

The grants are part of $250,000 the foundation is awarding this year to charities benefiting children and families in regions of the country where Monogram Foods operates.

79. Seeing the Light -

Four years ago, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell was in Knoxville for a college football game. But with several hours before kickoff, he took a side trip to view the green initiatives at the Knox County Jail.

80. New St. Jude Grad School Welcomes Inaugural Class -

Following years of planning, development of curriculum and recruitment of staff and faculty, the first class of a dozen students has begun studies at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital’s new Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences.

81. UTHSC Researcher Wins Grant to Fight Strep Throat -

Dr. James Dale, the Gene H. Stollerman Professor of Medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, has won a $3.9 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

82. Last Word: Repeal Votes, ServiceMaster Exit and Cooper-Young Apartments -

U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee was among the seven Republican Senators who voted Wednesday against a bill that would have repealed the Obama administration’s Affordable Care Act without an immediate replacement. U.S. Senator Bob Corker voted for the repeal. The bill failed.

83. Milford Joins Chamber As Programming, Events Director -

Ericka Milford recently joined the Greater Memphis Chamber as director of events and programming, a job in which she’s responsible for planning and executing chamber events and programs and for increasing engagement opportunities for members and the community. Milford’s new role marks her return to the chamber, where she served as events coordinator from 2007 to 2012 before taking a job with HigherVisibility.

84. Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence Adds 4 to Board -

The Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence has added four members to its board of directors.

The new members are Olliette Murry-Drobot, executive director of the Family Safety Center; Kiesha Davis, director of grant-making and capacity building at Memphis Music Initiative; Bonnie Hollabaugh, director of development for Christ Community Health Services; and Pat Mitchell Worley, owner of FanfareCR.

85. Summer Refreshers for Boards -

Calling all board members: Get ready for the flurry of fall activities that are a part of life within the nonprofit sector. Consider the following “board refreshers” as you enjoy – or hide from – the hot summer sun. Grab your board binder, put on your nonprofit sun visor, and let’s talk board engagement.

86. UTHSC Researcher Wins Grant to Fight Strep Throat -

Dr. James Dale, the Gene H. Stollerman Professor of Medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, has won a $3.9 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

87. Scene Change -

The sprawling mixed-use complex opening next month on North Cleveland in Midtown is a high-profile example of where Memphis’ art community finds itself at the halfway mark in 2017.

When Crosstown Concourse opens there Aug. 19, it won’t just represent a new beginning that turns a former Sears distribution center into a 1.5-million-square-foot community mainstay. With tenants like Crosstown Arts moving in, the development is also a representation of how the city’s arts landscape is changing this year.

88. The Week Ahead: July 17-23 -

Hello, Memphis! Young, local artists are in the spotlight this week with a couple of art shows where you can meet these talented youths and someday say, “I knew them before they were famous.” Check out details on those, plus more cool events and hot happenings in The Week Ahead…

89. Three Local Developers Seeking DMC Grants to Attract New Tenants -

Three new redevelopment projects are seeking Exterior Improvement Grants from the Downtown Memphis Commission in the hopes of attracting new tenants.

The first applicant, Janice Holder, is a retired Tennessee Supreme Court Justice, seeking to restore the façade of her building, located 55 S. Main St., back to its Gilded Age roots.

90. Last Word: Fifth Wave, Hidden Gem in OB and the Freeze Filibuster -

There is one less contender in the crowded field of potential and declared candidates for the Republican nomination for Governor in 2018. State Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville was nominated for federal court judge Thursday by President Donald Trump who also nominated Memphis attorney and former federal prosecutor Tommy Parker to the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Tennessee as well. Both are part of what The White House described as a “fifth wave” of judicial nominees.

91. UT, Vanderbilt to Help Study Haslam's Higher Education Push -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The University of Tennessee at Knoxville and Vanderbilt University will help study results from Gov. Bill Haslam's initiatives to increase the percentage of residents with higher education degrees.

92. County Budget Talks Reveal Political Divide -

When Shelby County Commissioners convene Monday, July 17, it will be their third meeting in a week – following committee sessions Wednesday and the special meeting to approve a county operating budget two days before that.

93. Last Word: Rumors, The Return of Tyreke Evans and Broadband in Millington -

There is a popular saying attributed to Winston Churchill that goes like this: “A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth has a chance to get its pants on.” Even before social media, that was certainly the case in this part of the world called Memphis. The part of our history that doesn’t fit in books is littered with rumors that turned the city upside down in a much shorter period of time than it took to repair the damage done. That is what happened this weekend with Memphis Light Gas and Water.

94. UTHSC Faculty Members Win $1.9M Grant for Project -

Two University of Tennessee Health Science Center faculty members have won a grant of about $1.9 million for the funding of a database and open-source software project for web-based genetics research.

95. Memphis Researchers Planning Big Upgrades to Online Genetics Database -

A pair of scientists in Memphis is using almost $2 million in grant money to make improvements to an online database and open-source software system called GeneNetwork, used by researchers to study genetic differences and evaluate disease risk.

96. MATA Eyes Greener Future, Prepares For Upcoming Service Changes -

Despite being hampered by a tight budget, the Memphis Area Transit Authority is making strides to be more green and environmentally sensitive, including participating in National Dump the Pump Day in June and offering reduced fares on “Ozone Days” throughout the year, as well as recently collaborating with the EPA to install air pollution-monitoring stations.

97. UTHSC Faculty Members Win $1.9M for Database Project -

Two University of Tennessee Health Science Center faculty members have won a grant of about $1.9 million for the funding of a database and open-source software project for web-based genetics research.

98. Redshirt Season Helps Johnson Improve Game -

Jalen Johnson’s first season on Tennessee’s basketball team didn’t go as planned. Now, he’s better for it.

The 6-foot-5 wing from Durham, North Carolina, arrived on campus last fall barely 170 pounds and competing for minutes with the likes of Robert Hubbs III, who led the Vols in scoring (13.7) and minutes (31.6) as a senior last season.

99. What Will Your References Say? -

When people want to know more about your nonprofit, who do they talk to? Who serves as a reference? How can you help ensure your references speak knowledgably and with specifics?

Don’t take your references for granted. Take time to talk with those you ask to serve as a reference. Ask if it is OK to use their name for a specific project or proposal. Permission is important, and references want to know when they may be contacted.

100. Downtown Core Attracting More Corporate Tenants -

Hamida Mandani, who with her husband Sunny owns City Market at the corner of Main Street and Union Avenue, is anticipating lots of potential new customers soon for her small grocery and deli enterprise.