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Editorial Results (free)

1. Digest -

Upgrades, New Manager Come to Celtic Crossing

Celtic Crossing Irish Pub and Restaurant has made a new hire, added menu items and made exterior improvements.

Christopher Darling has been named manager of the Midtown bar. Prior to joining Celtic full-time, Darling worked as general manager of Jim’s Place Restaurant and Bar.

2. The Daily News Publishing Co. Acquires Paper In Chattanooga -

The Daily News Publishing Co. announced it has acquired The Hamilton County Herald, a 100-year-old Chattanooga-based paper of record that adds another holding to the newspaper properties the Memphis-based company now owns across the largest markets in Tennessee.

3. County Leaders Face New Budget Anxiety -

Shelby County commissioners meet in special session Wednesday, July 23, to cross the last “t” of the spring budget season some 27 days after the start of the new fiscal year.

That’s “t” for taxes.

4. Editorial: Compromise, Potential And Parkland Changes -

Maybe a certain amount of distrust will always be present in the affairs of the park that stopped an interstate.

There certainly is a good amount of “trust but verify” sentiment now that the Memphis City Council has approved the Overton Park compromise that evaded one mediation deadline and stretched right up to a second deadline before its details were set in stone.

5. Zoo and OPC Reach Compromise in Greensward Controversy -

The Memphis Zoo and the Overton Park Conservancy reached agreement Monday, July 18, on a compromise to end the zoo’s overflow parking on the Greensward that fills in some of the blanks left in Mayor Jim Strickland’s proposal and changes some of the terms.

6. Overton Park Shuttle Terms Continue To Be Negotiated -

The mediation effort to resolve the Overton Park Greensward controversy is over.

But all of those involved are still talking privately.

Those talks are centered around a park plan proposed July 1 by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland, who acted when the mediation failed to produce a comprehensive settlement by the end of June – Strickland’s deadline for mediation.

7. Greensward Plan Awaits Shuttle Details -

The Overton Park Greensward controversy is still moving although it is much closer to a resolution with last week’s proposal by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland, said City Council chairman Kemp Conrad and councilman Worth Morgan, whose district includes the park.

8. Mayor, DA Discuss Approach To Curb Crime -

Much of the attention in local crime statistics this year goes to the jump in the city’s homicide rate.

But that rate pales in comparison to aggravated assaults.

From January through May, there were 492 aggravated assaults per 100,000 people in Memphis, according to statistics from the Memphis-Shelby County Crime Commission.

9. Dean: Cities Need Transit Solutions for Growth -

During a busy day in Memphis last week, former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean stopped at City Hall to talk with Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland about a long-range city plan Strickland announced the following day.

10. Greenprint ‘Movement’ Taking Hold Regionally -

It wasn’t that long ago that the land which is now Shelby Farms Park was up for grabs.

There was some sentiment to make it a park. There was probably more sentiment to develop it as residential, office or retail space, or all three.

11. Last Word: Farewell Northside, Roland's Stand and Wayne Jackson -

Northside High School is no more. The Klondike-Smoky City institution graduated its last class last month.

The Shelby County Schools board had voted that same month to give the high school one more school year.

12. Greenprint Summit Gauges Community Support -

It’s not easy being green. That is, until people begin to see projects like the Shelby Farms Greenline and Wolf River Greenway taking shape.

13. Fairgrounds Revitalization Efforts Start Slow and Anew -

The Fairgrounds and the Mid-South Coliseum aren’t a priority of the new administration at City Hall.

And that’s fine with groups trying to chart a future for both.

“The building is in good shape. It’s not in a condition that can’t be mothballed for awhile,” said Chooch Pickard of the Coliseum Coalition. “We can take our time in planning for the Coliseum and the Fairgrounds and do it right. There’s no need to rush. We can take our time, find out what everyone really wants to do with it and raise the money.”

14. DMC Wants to Connect Successful South End to South City -

For the past 15 years, the Downtown Memphis Commission has concentrated its development efforts in the South Main area. The fruits of that labor, which turned an abandoned stretch of Main Street into a blossoming haven for retail and restaurants, is spilling over onto South Front Street.

15. Council Auctions Old Police Building -

The city holds a rare auction at the Tuesday, May 17, session of the Memphis City Council, selling the old Central Police building at 128 Adams Ave. to the highest bidder.

16. Shelby County Schools Board Eyes Wheel Tax to Bridge Budget Gap -

Shelby County Schools board members are looking at the county wheel tax to bridge some, but not all of the $27 million gap in their still tentative budget for the new fiscal year.

The specific solution they are looking at is the half of the $32 million in annual revenue from the wheel tax that Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has proposed go instead to capital projects across all seven public school systems in Shelby County. The new fiscal year begins July 1.

17. Mayor Opposes City Funds for Mud Island -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says the city may be willing to help fund a $9 billion expansion of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital that is mostly private capital.

18. Overton Traffic Plans On Display Saturday -

All roads in Overton Park except the one in front of the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art will be one-way streets Saturday, May 7, as the Overton Park Conservancy tries out some traffic and parking remedies on a busy day in the park.

19. Council Members Express Doubts About Solidifying Overton Park Boundaries -

Two months after the Memphis City Council approved a resolution giving the Memphis Zoo control of two-thirds of the Overton Park Greensward, the votes are still there to set park boundaries in stone.

20. Shelby Farms Park Transformation Started With Plan -

Two years ago this summer, the Shelby Farms Park Conservancy had raised $52 million to start its “Heart of the Park” work that is scheduled to open in the late summer and early fall.

21. Greensward Talks Getting Complex -

A week ago, the board of the Overton Park Conservancy had a visitor at its meeting – Richard Smith, the Memphis Zoo’s representative in the ongoing private mediation talks between the conservancy and the zoo.

22. Rapid Transit Option, Route Changes Designed To Make MATA More Relevant -

Budget season is looming, and the Memphis Area Transit Authority is angling for an additional $8 million in operating funds and $5 million in capital improvement dollars to prevent significant cuts to service.

23. Greensward Controversy Shows Complex Mix of Groups -

No one from the Memphis Zoo or City Hall showed up for the Greensward box luncheon Saturday, April 9, despite the invitations sent out by Citizens to Preserve Overton Park.

CPOP leaders nevertheless gathered on the other side of the metal parking barrier in place on the Greensward for the second weekend. They dutifully stacked the box lunches and set a vase of flowers on another table near plastic cups and a glass pitcher of water.

24. Zoo Offers Parking Plan, Devotes Parking Fees to Long-Range Parking Solution -

The Memphis Zoo is suggesting the city general services maintenance yard on the east side of the park be used as a parking area and a second greensward with “eco-friendly options” that “are not disruptive to the park” to get zoo patrons from there to the zoo.

25. Last Word: A Day In The Park, Fashion Week and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame -

The skid is over. The Grizzlies beat the Bulls at home and the post-season possibility drama continues in the land of Griss and the one year and done college home of Derrick Rose.

26. Overton Parking-Traffic Study Sees Future Garage -

An Overton Park traffic and parking study released Tuesday, April 5, recommends a phased-approach to creating more parking in and around the park, better coordination of traffic patterns and then a likely move to a 300-space, $7.8 million parking deck on Prentiss Place Drive off McLean Boulevard at the end of 2017.

27. Lawsuit Seeks to Void City Decision on Greensward -

A lawsuit filed in Shelby County Chancery Court Tuesday, April 5, seeks to void the March 1 Memphis City Council vote that gave the Memphis Zoo undisputed control of most of the Overton Park Greensward.

28. Lawsuit Seeks to Void City Decision on Greensward -

A lawsuit filed in Shelby County Chancery Court Tuesday, April 5, seeks to void the March 1 Memphis City Council vote that gave the Memphis Zoo undisputed control of most of the Overton Park Greensward.

29. Conrad Call for De-Annexation Talks Draws Favorable Reviews -

Memphis City Council Chairman Kemp Conrad wants to open talks with county commissioners on possible voluntary de-annexations.

And County Commission Chairman Terry Roland said he is open to the idea.

30. Blight Fight Touts New Pathway, Partnerships -

The local effort to fight blight has been in recent years a machete-like action to cut through bureaucratic red tape and get possession of the most blighted properties.

So there have been a lot of press conferences where bulldozers are featured prominently to demolish the targeted property.

31. Medical Center Planner To Talk District Remake -

It’s the place where about 16,000 employees go to work every day and where 8,000 students are taking courses at some of the city’s premier educational institutions.

Yet even though the Memphis Medical Center is home to major anchors like Regional One Health, the Memphis Bioworks Foundation and Southern College of Optometry, among others, and though it includes some a few hundred acres of property within its boundaries, its potential is only just now beginning to be tapped.

32. Memphis Lags on State Minority Contracts -

The state of Tennessee did $400 million in business with minority- and women-owned businesses in 2015. It’s a share local minority business and civic leaders judge as a good number, considering the state spends $2.5 billion in contracts a year.

33. Editorial: Greensward Controversy Enters New Chapter -

Even if you agree with the Memphis City Council’s decision on the Overton Park Greensward, you should have reservations about how the council went about this.

Nine council members don’t sponsor a controversial resolution like this without more than someone wordlessly circulating a draft resolution and them signing their names – also without any discussion.

34. Green Sword -

First it was a rumor – there would be a move by the Memphis City Council aimed at putting a quick end to the long-simmering Overton Park Greensward controversy.

It would come quickly and just before the start of the third spring of protests against the Memphis Zoo's use of the northern part of the Greensward for overflow parking.

35. Hedgepeth Defends Greensward Action, Conservancy Moves to Mediation -

Memphis City Council member Reid Hedgepeth says the body's Tuesday, March 1, vote to give the Memphis Zoo control of part of the Overton Park Greensward was an attempt to “rectify a mistake.”

36. Shameful Performance -

SHAME ON US. This week, the Memphis City Council ran over a whole room of citizens and a whole city and parked right on top of something they care about.

Every council member should be ashamed.

37. Council Gives Zoo Authority Over Greensward Parking -

The next step in the Overton Park Greensward controversy is up to the Overton Park Conservancy now that the Memphis City Council has given the Memphis Zoo control of the northern part of the Greensward.

38. Council Approves Zoo Control of Overton Greensward Section -

Memphis City Council members voted 11-1 Tuesday, March 1, to grant the Memphis Zoo control of the northern part of the Overton Park Greensward.

The control comes in a resolution that surfaced earlier in the day Tuesday after a weekend of rumors about such a move by some on the council.

39. City Council to Discuss Greensward Controversy -

The next setting for the Overton Park Greensward controversy isn’t the park. It is City Hall.

Memphis City Council members have an executive session “discussion of Overton Park” on their committee list at 1:45 p.m. for Tuesday, March 1.

40. Hopson: Help ASD Improve, At Least for Now -

The state-run Achievement School District has a problem in how it engages with the public, especially in areas where it is about to take over a school.

But Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson isn’t ready to say it is time for the state to pick a winner and a loser and fund either the ASD or Innovation Zone schools run by SCS.

41. Overton Park Greensward Controversy Moves To City Hall Tuesday -

The next setting for the Overton Park greensward controversy isn’t the park. It is City Hall.

Memphis City Council members have an executive session “discussion of Overton Park” on their committee list for Tuesday, March 1.

42. Medical Area Ready For Residential Development -

Every week day, 16,000 people go to work in the two-and-a-half square mile area that is the Memphis Medical Center District.

Add the 8,000 students to the workers at the eight major institutions in the district and you have more than a sell-out crowd for an event at FedExForum in that area every working day.

43. Claim Adds to Greensward Controversy -

Legal counter claims, parking study options and lots of old maps with even more long-filed plans have become the complex face of the Overton Park Greensward controversy.

As spring-like temperatures over the weekend mixed with cloudy skies, all fronts of the controversy were moving. The official arrival of spring to come in less than a month is the park’s busiest season.

44. Editorial: A Call for More Conservancies -

When you look at the physical changes currently underway at Shelby Farms Park, it can be easy to miss the rise of conservancies as forces that are changing the landscape of our city.

45. Strickland Wants Contract, Pay Boost for Memphis' Next Police Director -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland wants to offer the next Memphis Police Department director a multi-year contract for more than the $150,000 the city is currently paying interim police director Michael Rallings.

46. Workforce Effort Leaders Talk About Skills Gap -

Before Olympus Corp. announced last month its plan to locate a service and distribution center in Bartlett, a bigger medical device manufacturing company was on the hook for the town.

47. Wade: Shelby County’s New-Home Inventory Not Meeting Demand -

Jules Wade, principal broker with Coldwell Banker Collins-Maury, is happy with residential real estate prices in 2015.

Last year the average sales price of a Shelby County home rose 6 percent over 2014, and the average residential sales price matched the previous high of 2006.

48. Packed Overton Park Traffic Town Hall Seeks View Beyond Greensward -

Architect and urban planner Steve Auterman stood before a standing-room-only crowd at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art Tuesday, Feb. 2, and made the case for a broader vision of Overton Park.

To Auterman, of Looney Ricks Kiss, it’s a still-developing plan that’s larger than the volatile issue of the Memphis Zoo’s overflow parking on the greensward.

49. Zoo Distances Self From Overton Park Traffic Study -

Unusually warm temperatures over the weekend brought out more visitors to Overton Park and the Memphis Zoo, offering a preview of what the spring could be like on the greensward.

Overflow zoo parking on the grass mixed with pedestrian park patrons beyond the border of orange cones the zoo uses to mark off the parking.

50. New Superintendent Says ASD Not Monolithic -

The superintendent of the state-run Achievement School District says critics of the district for the state’s lowest-performing schools don’t understand that the organization doesn’t operation conventionally.

51. Morgan: Permanent Overton Park Fix Will Take Time -

The Memphis City Council member whose district includes Overton Park says there is no immediate permanent fix for the greensward controversy beyond the zoo continuing to park cars there.

“Short term, there’s really nothing that can quickly move that number of cars,” council member Worth Morgan said on the WKNO-TV program “Behind the Headlines.”

52. Memphis Zoo CEO: Mediation, Court Action Can Coexist in Greensward Dispute -

The Memphis Zoo’s move to Chancery Court next week in the Overton Park greensward controversy does not damage the mediation process between the zoo and the Overton Park Conservancy.

That’s what zoo president and CEO Chuck Brady said as attorneys on both sides of the controversy prepare to make their cases in court.

53. Zoo Goes To Court Over Greensward -

The Memphis Zoo has gone to Chancery Court seeking undisputed legal control of the northern section of the Overton Park greensward.

Attorneys for the zoo filed the suit Thursday, Jan. 21, seeking a declaratory judgment in the dispute with the Overton Park Conservancy.

54. Strickland Proposes Mediation in Greensward Controversy -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is asking leaders of the Memphis Zoo and the Overton Park Conservancy to enter voluntary mediation over parking in the Overton Park Greensward.

55. Haslam: No Gas Tax Push, For Now -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam confirmed Thursday, Jan. 14, that there won’t be a state gas tax hike proposal in this year’s session of the Tennessee Legislature.

But Haslam, who previously said he wasn’t necessarily pushing for such a tax hike as a solution to funding road projects, said that is the most likely future option.

56. Memphis Zoo Removes Trees From Overton Park Greensward -

When the Overton Park Conservancy’s staff noticed 27 trees had been removed from the north end of the park’s greensward Monday, they immediately called Memphis Police.

The conservancy then began calling the other institutions in the park and found the Memphis Zoo had removed the trees donated to and planted by the conservancy four years ago.

57. Memphis Zoo Removes Trees From Overton Park Greensward -

When the Overton Park Conservancy’s staff noticed 27 trees had been removed from the north end of the park’s greensward Monday, they immediately called Memphis Police.

The conservancy then began calling the other institutions in the park and found the Memphis Zoo had removed the trees donated to and planted by the conservancy four years ago.

58. Luttrell: State Likely to Mandate $1B Liability -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell said the state of Tennessee will most likely move to require Shelby County Schools to fully fund its $1.5 billion liability for health insurance and similar employee benefits.

59. Greensward Controversy Revived With New Year’s Eve Legal Opinion -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says a New Year’s Eve legal opinion on the use of the Overton Park greensward does not speak for his administration.

60. Immigration Policies to Have Local Impact -

Not that it wasn’t already complicated, but U.S. immigration policy and its enforcement is about to get more complicated.

Recent reports indicate that federal officials are preparing for a series of January immigration raids specifically targeting Central American families in the country illegally for the last year. The raids will reportedly target families already ordered deported by immigration court judges.

61. Norris: Gas Tax Proposal Not Happening in 2016 -

Don’t look for a gas tax hike in the 2016 session of the Tennessee legislature, says the state Senate majority leader.

“We’re not going to do a gas tax in 2016,” Rep. Mark Norris of Collierville said on the WKNO-TV program “Behind The Headlines.” “We are going to have to address it soon enough and these conversations are very important.”

62. Weirich: Police Cameras Come With Complexities -

If a picture is worth a thousand words, local law enforcement and criminal justice officials are finding cameras on police officers are worth many more questions about what happens to the video they produce.

63. County Commission Attorney Dispute Deepens -

Shelby County Commission chairman Terry Roland says the commission’s dispute with county Mayor Mark Luttrell over hiring its own attorney could wind up in Chancery Court after the holidays.

64. Juvenile Court Reforms Changing System Slowly, Leaders Say -

Two years into reforms of the local juvenile justice system, three leaders in those reforms say there has to be more contact with teenagers before and after they go through Juvenile Court.

And those leaders warn against a reliance on programs once a child is in custody as a total solution to juvenile crime.

65. Conrad: Mike Williams ‘Should Be Fired’ -

Incoming Memphis City Council chairman Kemp Conrad thinks the city should consider firing Mike Williams, president of the Memphis Police Association, for helping recruiters from other police forces set up job fairs in Memphis.

66. RVC's Cates Speaks Out on Mud Island Plan -

Keep the Riverwalk and amphitheater. Maybe extend Greenbelt Park into Mud Island River Park with camping on the southern end of the island. Bring in food trucks instead of restaurants.

Those are some of the ideas Andy Cates has for Mud Island, which he talked about in detail for the first time Thursday, Nov. 12.

67. LeMoyne-Owen’s Miller To Chart New Course -

The new president of LeMoyne-Owen College says the historically black college is going to change under her leadership – in its philosophy, goals and size.

“I think that LeMoyne-Owen as it is today has to be very different if it is going to be viable and if we are going to be able to compete with the rest of the colleges and universities in the area,” Andrea Lewis Miller said on the WKNO-TV program “Behind The Headlines.” “What really excited me about coming back was the opportunity to transform the school into something very different.”

68. Overton Park Moves Toward Traffic Plan -

All sides in the parking dispute at Overton Park have agreed to hire a planner to coordinate a traffic plan as well as mediate talks among them.

And for the first time there will be a set of public hearings on the matter.

69. Memphis Literacy Leaders Tout Efforts -

The leaders of three Memphis literacy efforts are working to encourage those with newfound reading skills to write their own stories and build a local literary culture.

Kevin Dean, executive director of Literacy Mid-South, says the literary arts should have a place with music, dance and the visual arts.

70. Publisher’s Letter: Ch-Ch-Ch-Changes -

When we launched The Memphis News more than seven years ago, some people thought I was crazy. “Print is dead,” they told me. “Within a couple of years, everything’s going to be read on a tablet.”

71. Strickland: Expect Smaller Memphis City Hall Administration -

Several city division directors under outgoing Memphis Mayor A C Wharton have told Mayor-elect Jim Strickland they do not intend to seek reappointment in the new administration.

72. Interstate 55 Roundabout Delay Creates Frustration -

Lauren Crews admits that the old, vacant motel he owns on the border between Interstate 55 and the French Fort neighborhood is an eyesore.

73. Grizzlies Bites: October 2-8 -

FedExForum Increases Security for Grizzlies Games: Walk-through magnetometers (metal detectors) have been installed at all entrances to FedExForum, and will be standard practice for entering fans starting with the Memphis Grizzlies’ first preseason game Tuesday, Oct. 6, vs. the Houston Rockets.

74. Earlier Conversions Leave Lessons for Foote Homes Project -

The coming redevelopment of Foote Homes will be different from previous public housing conversions, incorporating lessons learned from relocating residents.

The last phase of neighboring Cleaborn Homes’ conversion to a mixed-use, mixed-income development is under construction on the other side of Lauderdale Street. It will create 67 multifamily units and should be completed by the end of the year.

75. Hotel Density Fuels Memphis Convention Center Ambitions -

The best indicator that the national recession was lifting in Memphis was the emergence this year of numerous plans for new hotels and motels.

But aside from Whitehaven’s 450-room, $90 million Guest House at Graceland, most of the planned projects are small. And the smaller hotels do little to resolve the long-standing chicken-and-egg question about which should come first – more hotel rooms or more and better convention space.

76. Final Memphis Mayoral Debate Begins at 8 pm on WKNO -

On the road to the last televised debate in the Memphis mayor’s race, the four major candidates know each other well.

They each know the speeches of their rivals, as well as their own, and the ability to catch the other guy off guard becomes more difficult as a result.

77. Memphis Mayoral Candidates to Face Off Thursday in Last Televised Debate -

On the road to the last televised debate in the Memphis mayor’s race, the four major candidates know each other well.

They each know the speeches of their rivals, as well as their own, and the ability to catch the other guy off guard becomes more difficult as a result.

78. Shifting Memphis Media Market, Like Every Other, In Flux -

Lauren Lee never picks up a newspaper. Which isn’t much of a surprise because she’s 33 years old, works in marketing, and has the technological savvy and finger dexterity to operate a smartphone.

79. Small-Business Tips: Research, Network and Have Cash -

Small business ideas – dreams, if you will – take time. To create, to develop, to implement and to sustain.

Until recently, Jennifer McCullough’s entrepreneurial dream was just starting to heat up. She had not yet become the successful seafood brand now known as Chef Jenn that spans 18 products in about 1,200 mostly Kroger and Wal-Mart stores.

80. Luttrell Pushes Budget Summit for New Commission Chair -

When Shelby County Commissioners meet Monday, Sept. 14, the group will have a new chairman – but not a permanent one – and will try to set a date for a budget summit.

Chairman pro tempore Van Turner will be the acting head as the 13-member body tries to do what it couldn’t at its Aug. 10 meeting: elect a leader for the next year. Outgoing chairman Justin Ford’s one-year term ended Sept. 1.

81. Mid-South Book Fest Brings Authors, Readers Together -

Traveling city to city, visiting bookstore after bookstore is how Harrison Scott Key spent the summer marketing his debut novel, “The World’s Largest Man: A Memoir.”

It can be challenging, Key said, to go from store to store, never knowing how many people might actually show up. But that method of marketing shifts to the book festival circuit, which runs roughly from Labor Day through Memorial Day at spots across the U.S., including the second edition of the Mid-South Book Festival, Sept. 9-13, in Memphis.

82. Memphis Mayoral Debate Participants Announced -

The field is set for an upcoming televised Memphis mayoral debate scheduled for the eve of early voting.

The four mayoral contenders who will participate in the Sept. 17 debate, sponsored by The Daily News and Urban Land Institute Memphis, are incumbent Mayor A C Wharton, city council members Harold Collins and Jim Strickland and Memphis Police Association president Mike Williams.

83. Effectiveness Of ‘No More’ Campaign Debated -

Surveys and focus groups that are a key part of the “No More” campaign to build awareness and change attitudes on rape, sexual assault and domestic violence are and will be a baseline to gauge how well the campaign does its job.

84. Lenoir: ‘Is It Time for a Tax Decrease?’ -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir says the $22 million extra in property tax revenue his office collected during the past fiscal year appears to be a trend of improving health in the local economy.

85. Wolf River Greenway Targets Raleigh Riverbend -

At the northernmost bend of the Wolf River in Shelby County, the Wolf River Conservancy has plans for a boat ramp onto the Wolf and a nature center that together promise to change the surrounding area of Raleigh where the river turns.

86. Germantown Eyes Area South of Poplar for Elementary School -

Germantown leaders are looking for land south of Poplar Avenue in Germantown for a new elementary school for the Germantown Municipal School District.

“South of Poplar we want to have a community school, an elementary school,” Germantown Municipal School District superintendent Jason Manuel said on the WKNO TV program “Behind The Headlines.”

87. Memphis in May Faces Decisions in Offseason -

The stages in Tom Lee Park are down. Any leftover picnic blankets are long gone. The barriers at each end of Riverside Drive have given way to the return of traffic.

88. Televised Memphis Mayoral Forum Set for September -

There could be a lot of candidates for Memphis Mayor in the Oct. 8 city elections. And much of the attention in the run up to active campaigning has focused on the field’s size.

But as campaigning begins the focus will shift to issues at play in the mayor’s race, from the city’s path to economic growth and the efficiency and fiscal health of city government to the perennial issues of crime and blight.

89. Editorial: Striking a Balance in Overton Park -

The Memphis Zoo has come a long way since a bear named Natch was chained to a tree in Overton Park a few years into the 20th century.

But that move by Robert Galloway, architect of the city’s park system, established the undeniable link between the park and the zoo.

90. Wild Side -

No chance of being attacked by a hippo, which despite its size can outrun a man and is responsible for more human deaths in Africa than any other large animal.

No chance of being caught between the powerful jaws of a Nile crocodile and dragged underwater, drowned and devoured like a wildebeest in a National Geographic video.

91. Memphis' Cost for Non-Pension Benefits Still Controversial -

The amounts are roughly the same at about $1 billion, but there’s a difference between City Hall’s liability for pension and non-pension benefits, including health insurance, for city of Memphis employees.

92. Memphis Finance Gurus Retrace City’s Fiscal Path -

Mayors come and go at City Hall and what was a priority for one administration can change with the next. But one constant is finance.

It defines a city’s overall health, no matter who is in office, and thus its ability to borrow money to fund those priorities and then pay off that debt.

93. Airport Leaders Talk Post-Delta Era -

Two years ago this month, Delta Air Lines executives told officials at Memphis International Airport that Memphis would no longer be a Delta hub, an announcement that came after a series of cuts in the number of daily flights.

94. Aitken Makes Case for Collierville’s New $99 Million School -

There is the effort to sell Collierville residents on the specific plan for a $99 million comprehensive high school for 3,000 students. And then there is the effort to avoid a referendum on the $99 million bond issue that could follow approval of a property tax hike for the new school construction.

95. Municipal Schools Leaders Assess First Year -

Not so fast with those state achievement test quick scores that went out with some students’ last report cards. Tennessee Department of Education officials said earlier this month that the figures are in most cases rosier than expected.

96. Hopson, Barbic Look Ahead to New School Year -

Dorsey Hopson and Chris Barbic are comparing notes on the new school year that begins in August, the first in three years in which the structure of public education in Shelby County essentially will remain the same.

97. Harris Pushes For Insure Tennessee Comeback -

State Senate Democratic leader Lee Harris of Memphis will be on the campaign trail this summer.

Harris and other Democratic leaders in the majority Republican Tennessee legislature will campaign across the state this summer for the comeback of the Insure Tennessee proposal in the 2016 legislative session.

98. THE PRESENT: Overton Square Development Going Strong -

As Overton Square prepares to blow out 45 candles as part of a milestone anniversary celebration May 23, development activity at the Midtown landmark is still going strong.

Bob Loeb, president of square developer Loeb Properties, says “another performing arts existing provider in town” wants to relocate to the square, something addressed as part of a local Urban Land Institute technical advisory panel convened earlier this month to look at that prospect, among other issues.

99. Economic Microscope -

Back in 2012, Century Wealth Management president and founder Jay Healy was telling the firm’s clients that the U.S. stock market was behaving like a coiled spring.

100. Norris Says TennCare Review ‘Essential’ -

The majority leader of the Tennessee State Senate says the legislature is not done with a proposed expansion of Medicaid.

But Republican Sen. Mark Norris of Collierville is quick to add that the expansion proposed by Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam should be part of a larger re-examination of the existing TennCare program.