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Editorial Results (free)

1. Edmund Ford Jr. Sticks to Council, Commission Seats As He Pursues Transit Fee -

Edmund Ford Jr. is pushing for a dedicated revenue stream for the Memphis Area Transit Authority and road projects while holding seats on the Memphis City Council and the Shelby County Commission.

And it could take him through the 90 days he has before he must give up the council seat, Ford said this week.

2. Historic District Compromise Tabled Over State 'Threats' -

After months of discussions, compromises and amendments, the city council member sponsoring an ordinance giving the council more oversight of the local Landmarks Commission tabled the measure on third and final reading.

3. Seivers in College Hall? Yeah, Sure, Why Not? -

Don’t look for any campaign propaganda to be mailed out. There won’t be any personal stumping. Heck, Larry Seivers even refused to fluff up his own bio.

If the former University of Tennessee two-time All-America wide receiver finds his way into the College Football Hall of Fame, it will happen because of the numbers and the memories that made him one of the game’s best in the 1970s.

4. Last Word: Our Un-Signature, City Hall Beat Down and Lamar Avenue -

The first thing most people notice when they realize there is lots of development going on in Memphis but that its quite different than Nashville’s brand of development is that you don’t see nearly as many construction cranes here as you do there. It’s become an un-signature of sorts for what is an ongoing remake of Memphis. We adapt and use for new purposes. We also move institutions around, it turns out.

5. Council Gives Administration Nod, Honors 1968 Workers -

The painted image of the late Henry Loeb was mostly ignored Tuesday, May 22, at City Hall as the Memphis City Council honored surviving city sanitation workers from 1968 with its 25th annual Humanitarian of the Year Awards.

6. A Look Back At UT’s History In NCAA Tourney -

Basketball coach Rick Barnes was fired by Texas in late March of 2015 when he refused to fire members of his coaching staff.

7. Election Methods, Murals Dominate City Council Session -

Memphis City Council members doubled down Tuesday, Feb. 20, on calling for a cover-up of six murals near Lamar Avenue. And the council’s attorney said ranked-choice, or instant-runoff voting, isn’t needed in Memphis.

8. Election Methods and Murals Dominate Light Council Day -

Memphis City Council members doubled down Tuesday, Feb. 20, on calling for a cover-up of six murals near Lamar Avenue. And the council’s attorney said ranked-choice or instant-runoff voting isn’t needed in Memphis.

9. Kele Adds Rob Benson As Chief Sales Officer -

Rob Benson has been appointed chief sales officer at Kele Inc., a Memphis-based distributor of building automation products and controls solutions around the world. Benson, who will lead Kele’s sales efforts, brings with him three decades of experience with building automation products and systems at Johnson Controls.

10. Mystery Surrounds Super Bowl Ads -

In another record-breaking year, with ad costs exceeding $5 million per 30-second spot, big brands are, once again, putting it all on the line. Some will score big and others will be answering to their boards about their multimillion-dollar blunders.

11. Council Reopens MLGW Rate Hike Consideration, Approves Term Limit Referendum -

Memphis City Council members decided Tuesday, Jan. 23, to take a second look at the gas and electric rate-hike proposals they rejected two weeks ago, but put off any new votes on the matter until February.

12. Council Reopens MLGW Rate Hike Consideration, Approves Term Limit Referendum -

Memphis City Council members decided Tuesday, Jan. 23, to take a second look at the gas and electric rate hike proposals they rejected two weeks ago. But they put off any new votes on the matter until the first council meeting in February after what is expected to be a lengthy discussion in committee earlier that same day at City Hall.

13. Last Word: Shutdown Over?, Glen Farms Plans and Billy Richmond - Wing Guru -

The federal government shutdown for many of us outside the Beltway amounted to a message on a website saying the agency we were looking up was closed Monday. And Monday was the third and final day of the most recent shutdown. But the immigration policy known as DACA – Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals – is the issue to be explored by Congress in the three weeks that the continuing resolution covers. It’s an issue that there has been plenty of local discussion about

14. Shelby County Prekindergarten Push Remains in General Terms for Now -

Nearly six years after voters defeated two ballot questions in as many years that would have provided a tax revenue steam for universal prekindergarten, the pre-K quest is back.

The return of a coordinated civic and political push for pre-K comes about five years after a combination of state and federal funding as well as a shift of county government’s early childhood Head Start contract to Shelby County Schools.

15. After Disaster of 2017, New Year Looking Good for Vols -

Vol Nation should celebrate. It’s a new year. It’s got to be better than 2017. Tennessee athletics had a bad year, one of the worst ever. It was rough for fans, alumni and boosters.

16. Last Word: Bredesen's Return, Ford's Exit and Otis Redding 50 Years On -

Former Tennessee Gov. and Nashville mayor Phil Bredesen formally entered the 2018 race for the U.S. Senate Thursday via a YouTube video. AP on Bredesen’s entry and his background. Republican partisans are already assuming Bredesen is the Democratic nominee and Democratic partisans are already assuming U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn is the Republican nominee. And the expectation of such a match up automatically went on the list of midterm races that those on both sides and pundits inbetween will be watching to get a read on national trends.

17. Collins Leaving as City's Chief Financial Officer -

City of Memphis chief financial officer Brian Collins is leaving the post he’s held for the last five years across two mayoral administrations to become executive director of the Illinois Municipal Retirement Fund, Collins announced Friday, Nov. 17. He is leaving City Hall in January and starts his new job Jan. 8.

18. Chain Reaction: Memphis Builds on National Restaurant Trend -

Morgan Hughes is a 22-year-old college student who regularly spends more than $100 a week going out to eat. Sometimes it’s a trip to Sonic, other times it’s a meal at Next Door in Crosstown Concourse, still other times it’s food from the restaurant where she works, Hog & Hominy.

19. Amazon Offers Both Sides Of Recurring Incentives Debate -

Memphis City Council member Martavius Jones calls it “ironic” that Memphis is competing with cities nationwide for Amazon’s $5 billion headquarters project even as Amazon executives have already picked Memphis for the site of a distribution center.

20. Beale Street Cover Charge Issue Returns to Life -

In two weeks, a move to scrap any Beale Street cover charge is going to collide with a recommendation from a Beale Street Task Force to keep it in some form.

There is also the question of what the cover charge money collected so far should be used for and whether it should be used to pay for private security.

21. Last Word: GPAC's Grove, Fairgrounds Tea Leaves and Grizz Money Matters -

The Germantown Performing Arts Center has plans for an open-air performance center to be called “The Grove at GPAC” – the latest consideration in what is becoming a vibrant discussion about the capacity for concerts within Shelby County. And it is also a discussion about concert venues that can do other things like festival and movies.

22. Boyd Drops Beale Contract, But Says It Wasn’t Conflict of Interest -

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd ended his company’s fundraising contract with the Beale Street Merchants Association Tuesday, Sept. 19. But he again insisted the contract was not a conflict of interest in his duties as a council member voting on items involving the entertainment district.

23. Grizzlies’ Grind City Media Expands Into Football Coverage -

Last September, the Memphis Grizzlies launched their new in-house digital news and information platform: Grind City Media.

Now, Grind City Media is trying to drive that initiative farther down the field, as it were, by adding college football coverage.

24. Council Mulls Legal Options To Move Park Monuments -

Memphis City Council members are exploring new options for the Confederate monuments in city parks that include boarding up statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis as nuisances, to prevent them from being vandalized and maintain public order, or by citing a provision of the state’s Civil Rights Act.

25. Council Considers Other Legal Options on Confederate Monuments -

Memphis City Council members are exploring new options for the Confederate monuments in city parks that include boarding up statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis as nuisances, to prevent them from being vandalized to maintain public order, or by citing a provision of the state’s Civil Rights Act.

26. Last Word: The Orange Mound Way, Midtown Apartments and 'I Am A Man' Plaza -

First day of school redux on Tuesday for students in Memphis Catholic Schools and it is a half-day. The first day of classes in most of the county’s other schools Monday went smoothly. Shelby County Schools reports more than 6,000 students registered on the first day of school despite another concerted effort at numerous events to register students in advance. That’s in a school system of approximately 96,000 students.

27. ‘Doors Always Open’ for Titans, Help Dodd Ease Injury Angst -

The NFL can be a cold and cruel business. In such a high-risk business, one injury or a sudden drop in production can put a player’s very livelihood in jeopardy. NFL, in such situations, really can mean “Not For Long.”

28. Last Word: More Intermodals, 20 Years After the Oilers In Memphis and New Path -

The "skinny" repeal of Obamacare comes up short in the U.S. Senate in an after midnight Friday vote in D.C. And it appears U.S. Senators Bob Corker and Lamar Alexander of Tennessee voted for the repeal measure that came up short. Here are the basics early Friday morning from The New York Times.

29. Overton Gateway Developers, Neighbors Reach Tentative Compromise -

It may have taken the mediation of a Memphis City Council member and two hours of negotiation, but representatives from a local development group and a coalition of concerned Midtown residents were able to reach a tentative compromise on the fate of a massive project at the doorstep of Overton Park.

30. Last Word: Overton Gateway Talks, Norris of the Governor's Race and Coach O -

Shelby County Commissioners have quite the disagreement going in several ways as they try to put another budget season in the books and let the ink dry. As we’ve reported, the commission approved a $1.2 billion county government budget Monday and there is no taking that back – at least as a budget. That now becomes an important detail because in committee sessions Wednesday in advance of next week’s meeting of the full commission, there were five votes to change the proposed county property tax rate from $4.10 to $4.13.

31. Saturday Legal Aid Clinic To Celebrate 10 Years -

A ceremony and reception will be held Saturday, July 8, to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the 2nd Saturday Legal Aid Clinic, or 2SLAC, serving the Memphis community.

The event will be from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library, 3030 Poplar Ave.

32. Last Word: Health Care Plan React, Treasury Footprint and Tom Bowen - Take Two -

It’s like they aren’t even looking at the same legislation. That’s one explanation of the very different reviews the Senate health care bill got Thursday as it was unveiled in Washington. Illustrating the contrast, the reactions of Republican U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee and Democratic U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen of Memphis.

33. Last Word: Disaster Paperwork, The Whitehaven Plan and Juvenile Justice -

On its way to Washington is the paperwork for a federal disaster declaration sent Wednesday by Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam. It includes Shelby County and 11 other Tennessee counties. This is essentially federal funding that will reimburse local government for money they spend up front for these kinds of disasters. The state’s request also includes a call for individual assistance to Shelby County homeowners and business owners whose property was damaged in the Memorial Day weekend storms.

34. City Council Settles Budget, But Other Issues Remain -

The budget season at City Hall is over with the Tuesday, June 6, Memphis City Council vote approving a $680 million city operating budget, an $81.3 million capital budget and a $3.27 city property tax rate.

35. Gladney’s Career Path Leads to New Role at Commercial Bank & Trust -

When she was a freshman in high school, an English teacher identified Andrea Gladney’s writing talent and encouraged it. She loved to read and write, so it only seemed logical to start her college life at Ole Miss as an English major.

36. Gladney’s Career Path Leads Her To New Role at Commercial Bank & Trust -

When she was a freshman in high school, an English teacher identified Andrea Gladney’s writing talent and encouraged it. She loved to read and write, so it only seemed logical to start her college life at Ole Miss as an English major.

37. Wide Receiver U? That’s So 20 Years Ago -

At the 2015 SEC Media Days, Tennessee coach Butch Jones referred to his school as “the original Wide Receiver U.”

The reference goes back to the days when the Vols were loaded with fast, talented pass receivers on the perimeter. In a heady stretch from 1982-91, UT had six wide receivers selected in the first round of the NFL draft – Anthony Hancock, Willie Gault, Clyde Duncan, Tim McGee, Anthony Miller and Alvin Harper.

38. Beale Street Issues Deepen and Grow -

The issue of who controls what in the Beale Street entertainment district has come to the forefront after the abolition of the Beale Street Tourism Development Authority.

The Memphis City Council abolished the authority in April and has now moved into a deepening debate about the Beale Street Bucks program used by merchants and the street’s interim manager, the Downtown Memphis Commission, as a crowd control measure.

39. Boyd: Memphis Public Safety Spending Out of Balance -

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd says the city budget is lopsided when it comes to its priorities.

And Boyd called Wednesday, May 3, for a shift away from public safety spending – specifically city spending on police – the largest single part of the operating and capital budgets as well as the largest division in city government.

40. Last Word: DNA Unit Trouble, 100 Years After Ell Persons and Gas Tax Hike Redux -

The suspension of Ouita Knowlton, the Memphis Police detective overseeing the MPD's DNA Unit, appears to involve more than alleged violations of police policies. The unit oversees testing and processing of all current rape kits and those left unprocessed for decades that the city is currently working its way through five years after the admission. The District Attorney General’s office is part of the investigation of Knowlton, the office confirmed Monday. There are no specifics about what is involved here. But the police investigation will go to District Attorney General Amy Weirich who will then determine if criminal laws were violated and if there is a case to be made.

41. Memphis Gets Nod for New Hotel Tax, Nashville Having Pipeline Problems -

The state Senate approved legislation enabling the Memphis City Council to consider an ordinance to create a new hotel/motel tax of no more than an aggregate of 5 percent to go toward the city-owned Memphis Cook Convention Center.

42. Memphis Gets Nod for New Hotel Tax, Nashville Having Pipeline Problems -

The state Senate has approved legislation enabling the Memphis City Council to consider an ordinance to create a new hotel/motel tax of no more than an aggregate of 5 percent to go toward the city-owned Memphis Cook Convention Center.

43. 3 Women to be Honored at Legends Luncheon -

Three women who have made huge contributions to local women and families will be honored at the Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis (WFGM) 2017 Annual Tribute Luncheon on Thursday, April 27, at the Memphis Cook Convention Center.

44. Bohannon to Lead Cumulus Media-Memphis -

Cumulus Media has appointed radio broadcasting executive Morgan Bohannon to vice president/market manager for Cumulus Media’s four-station group in Memphis.

45. The Week Ahead: April 11-17 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! For those so inclined, get out your John Calipari hate towels because he will be featured in an ESPN 30 for 30 documentary this week. It’s also time for some Memphians to vote again and the Grizzlies wrap up the regular season on the way to a first-round playoff series against the San Antonio Spurs, a rival that will not be getting a key to the city.  

46. Bohannon to Lead Cumulus Media-Memphis -

Cumulus Media has appointed radio broadcasting executive Morgan Bohannon to vice president/market manager for Cumulus Media’s four-station group in Memphis.

47. Councilmen Draw Lines On Safety, Deannexation -

Attorneys for the city of Memphis have filed a motion to combine two federal court lawsuits over a City Hall surveillance list and have them brought before the same federal judge.

And U.S. District Judge Jon P. McCalla has granted the motion of the American Civil Liberties Union of Tennessee to intervene in the lawsuit on the plaintiff’s side.

48. Last Word: Changes on EP Boulevard, March Madness at Rhodes and Cheffies -

I don’t think it worked out this way on purpose – but the $45 million, 200,000 square foot entertainment complex “Elvis Presley’s Memphis” opens the same day that episode two of “Sun Records” airs on CMT.

49. February 3-9, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

1997: On the front page of The Daily News, Belz Enterprises tops out the tower of its new Peabody Place office building. Scheduled to open May 1, it is first new speculative office building in Downtown since the Morgan Keegan building of the mid-1980s, more than a decade earlier. Construction on the Peabody Place mall directly south of The Peabody hotel is to begin at the end of 1997 with an opening date of 1999.

50. Trump Leaving His Global Business – To Be Run By His Sons -

NEW YORK (AP) – Breaking with presidential precedent, Donald Trump said Wednesday he will continue to profit from his global business empire after he enters the White House this month.

51. Titaned Up: Success Found In Big Moves, Smallest Details -

Most critics of last year’s Tennessee Titans saw unsettled ownership, a revolving door of coaches and a lack of talent at key positions.

Jon Robinson saw weeds.

52. Memphis Adopts Version of Ceasefire -

A gun and gang violence program pioneered in Boston 20 years ago is coming to Memphis in the wake of a record year for homicides.

What is known nationally as Operation Ceasefire will be called the “Group Violence Initiative” in Memphis, said Memphis-Shelby Crime Commission president Bill Gibbons on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

53. Last Word: Pro-Memphis On Different Terms, Trump's Pledge and Phil Gagliano -

Be honest. How many of you are even at work Friday? And if you are, how many of you know there are cookies or egg nog in the break room? "He sees you when you are sleeping. He knows when you're awake."

54. The Alamo? No, Vols Rally Around Loss to Vandy -

Tennessee’s football team can’t afford to get too merry when it goes into Christmas break this weekend. Not with the way it finished the 2016 regular season, and not with a chance for some redemption.

55. Homegrown Titan Players Find First Taste of Success -

Those looking at the Tennessee Titans’ season thus far as half-empty see a 6-6 team with enough flaws to offset many of the positive steps that have been taken this year.

But for those looking at the Titans’ season as half-full, it is hard not to notice that the same 6-6 record that speaks volumes about this season has Tennessee in an honest-to-goodness division title race for the first time in eight years.

56. Expanding Care -

With the arrival of the holiday shopping season, dozens of major retailers – brands from Best Buy to Williams-Sonoma to Brooks Brothers and New York & Co. – as well as the consumers who patronize them will also be turning their attention to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

57. Haslam Appoints 8 to New University of Memphis Board -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has appointed eight business leaders, including a former University of Memphis interim president and the CEO of J.C. Penney Co., to the newly formed governing board of the University of Memphis.

58. Pot Vote Seen as Foothold in Memphis Criminal Justice Changes -

There were two gateway debates in Memphis City Council chambers Tuesday, Oct. 4, as it debated and then approved an ordinance that gives Memphis Police the discretion to write a ticket with a $50 fine for possession of a half ounce or less of marijuana.

59. Morgan Tate Promoted At River City Land Co. -

Morgan Tate has been named principal property manager of River City Land Co.’s property management division. A fourth-generation real estate professional, Tate joined the team at River City Land Co. in 2008 and began working for the firm’s property management division in 2012. 

60. Virtual Fun: VR Technology Comes to Rec Room -

The Broad Avenue arcade bar Rec Room already boasts a suite of video game consoles for players to essentially rent, everything from old school Nintendo to Xbox and Playstation consoles whose games can be projected onto the space’s giant walls.

61. Council Mends CLERB Rules, Questions Future Role -

One of the last major acts of the Memphis City Council that left office at the end of 2015 was passage of an ordinance that reconstituted the Civilian Law Enforcement Review Board.

The November 2015 passage was applauded by groups including the Mid-South Peace & Justice Center and Memphis United as giving the nearly 20-year-old board more teeth in investigating allegations of police conduct.

62. Morrison Orchestrates Overton Park Compromise -

Before the Tuesday, July 19, Memphis City Council vote approving the Overton Park compromise, council member Worth Morgan commended fellow council member Bill Morrison for taking up the torch of trying to find a consensus between the Memphis Zoo and the Overton Park Conservancy.

63. Greensward Plan Awaits Shuttle Details -

The Overton Park Greensward controversy is still moving although it is much closer to a resolution with last week’s proposal by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland, said City Council chairman Kemp Conrad and councilman Worth Morgan, whose district includes the park.

64. Last Word: Democrats Settle, Scotty Moore and the Top Cop Search -

Tennessee Democratic Party Chairman Mary Mancini ordered the Shelby County Democratic Party to settle its differences with former local party chairman Bryan Carson Tuesday and accept his offer to repay the party $6,000 at $100 a month..

65. Executive Women’s Day Panelists Offer Career Advice -

The discussion is different than it was once, and yet it is ever the same. The PGA Tour Executive Women’s Day program is in its fourth year now and the panel discussion held Tuesday, June 7, at TPC Southwind, site of this week’s FedEx St. Jude Classic, played to a full audience.

66. Strickland’s Leadership Style Emerging -

Five months into his four-year term as Memphis mayor, Jim Strickland has his first budget and all but one of his major appointments made – Memphis Police director. The budget cleared the Memphis City Council Tuesday, June 7, with a few minor amendments from council members, next to no debate and no dissenting council votes.

67. Council Committee Probes Grant Requests -

Memphis City Council Budget Committee Chairman Edmund Ford Jr. likens it to the television show “Shark Tank.”

Instead of entrepreneurs, leaders of nonprofits made their pitches to the budget committee Tuesday, May 24, for grants from the council as part of the budget process.

68. Tennessee Leads the Nation in Bankruptcies -

Tennessee has a model program for financial literacy in its public schools. All high school students must pass a personal finance course to graduate, and even kindergartners are learning about money under a new initiative to extend the curriculum to primary school.

69. Council Members Express Doubts About Solidifying Overton Park Boundaries -

Two months after the Memphis City Council approved a resolution giving the Memphis Zoo control of two-thirds of the Overton Park Greensward, the votes are still there to set park boundaries in stone.

70. Council Approves Overton Boundary Ordinance on First Reading -

Memphis City Council members approved an ordinance Tuesday, May 3, on the first of three readings to set boundaries in Overton Park including the use of the park Greensward.

But some council members who supported a March 1 resolution that gave the Memphis Zoo control of the greensward were much more hesitant about the ordinance two months later.

71. Financial Adviser, To Millennial Investors: Don’t Rush -

As a financial adviser with Morgan Stanley Global Wealth Management in Memphis, Kevin Kimery’s vantage point gives him visibility into the full spectrum of investment behaviors and client types – as well as common mistakes he sees new investors make.

72. Careful What You’re Being Sold -

ZOO DOO IS BACK. In the early ’90s, an enterprise started in Memphis to market recycled zoo dung – talk about organic – called the Zoo Doo Compost Co. A pungent and powerful fertilizer, raw product supplied seven days a week, a clever name, a great promotional headline, “Gardeners Love This Crap.”

73. World Series of Drag Racing Moves to Memphis -

IRG Sports & Entertainment and the Memphis Convention and Visitors Bureau have announced that the World Series of Drag Racing will make its debut at the Memphis International Raceway on Aug. 26-27.

74. World Series of Drag Racing Moves to Memphis -

IRG Sports & Entertainment and the Memphis Convention and Visitors Bureau have announced that the World Series of Drag Racing will make its debut at the Memphis International Raceway on Aug. 26-27.

75. Higher-Ed Shuffle Stokes Fears of UT-TSU Merger -

Anthony Joshua, who moved to Nashville from Madison, Wis., to attend Tennessee State University, says he’s worried his historically black institution could be in for serious change – for the worse.

76. Green Sword -

First it was a rumor – there would be a move by the Memphis City Council aimed at putting a quick end to the long-simmering Overton Park Greensward controversy.

It would come quickly and just before the start of the third spring of protests against the Memphis Zoo's use of the northern part of the Greensward for overflow parking.

77. Changes to Memphis Airport Passenger Experience On the Way -

Some big changes are in the works at Memphis International Airport to modernize and improve the passenger experience, with a slew of new amenities planned.

They include a frequent parking program meant to give regular fliers like business travelers a way to get in and out faster.

78. Council Gives Zoo Authority Over Greensward Parking -

The next step in the Overton Park Greensward controversy is up to the Overton Park Conservancy now that the Memphis City Council has given the Memphis Zoo control of the northern part of the Greensward.

79. U of M Athletics Reaches New Five-Year Radio Deal -

University of Memphis Athletics and Learfield’s Tiger Sports Network have agreed to a new five-year partnership with Rock 103 (WEGR-FM 102.7) and WREC-AM 600.

The two stations, which are owned by iHeartMedia, will provide coverage of Tiger sports in the greater Memphis area. Through the 2020-21 athletic season the stations will carry football and men’s basketball game broadcasts, as well as football and basketball coaches’ shows.

80. Rare Wins for Democrats on Guns, Outsourcing -

Legislative Democrats got a chance to beat their chests a little bit after a proposal to allow guns in the state Capitol and Legislative Plaza failed, and they hope to do the same with outsourcing.

81. U of M Athletics Reaches New Radio Deal -

University of Memphis Athletics and Learfield’s Tiger Sports Network have agreed to a new five-year partnership with Rock 103 (WEGR-FM 102.7) and WREC-AM 600.

The two stations, which are owned by iHeartMedia, will provide coverage of Tiger sports in the greater Memphis area. Through the 2020-21 athletic season the stations will carry football and men’s basketball game broadcasts, as well as football and basketball coaches’ shows.

82. Debate Rages Over Reasons For Rising Higher-Ed Costs -

When figures are presented detailing a 456 percent increase in tuition and fees at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville over the last 20 years, the result is usually some serious sticker shock.

That’s what happened recently when state Sen. Dolores Gresham presented the Tennessee Tuition Stability Act, a measure designed to rein in tuition growth and make it easier for students and parents to pay for a four-year degree.

83. Massey to Lead Memphis' Consolidated Minority Business Office -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is combining the two city offices overseeing minority business efforts into one agency.

84. New Brass -

Just days before Toney Armstrong was off the city payroll, his successor as interim director of the Memphis Police Department, Michael Rallings, was getting used to the attention and ring kissing that comes with being the city’s top cop.

85. Complex path to higher-ed reform -

Only half a year after taking on the presidency of Motlow State Community College, Anthony Kinkel is trying to keep his eye on the pea.

The task of running one of the state’s fastest-growing community colleges is becoming increasingly complex, and it has nothing to do with thousands more students enrolling to take advantage of free tuition through the Tennessee Promise scholarship program.

86. Complex Path to Higher-Ed Reform -

Only half a year after taking on the presidency of Motlow State Community College, Anthony Kinkel is trying to keep his eye on the pea.

The task of running one of the state’s fastest-growing community colleges is becoming increasingly complex, and it has nothing to do with thousands more students enrolling to take advantage of free tuition through the Tennessee Promise scholarship program.

87. Last Word: Kroger Disses Clarence Saunders, Mud Island Plans and The Australians -

What is old has become new again. And judging by your reaction to Andy Meek’s story on the Kroger plans for online ordering of groceries, what is old has gone viral as well.
Here are the basics:
You order from a list of items and Kroger fills the order and has it waiting for you to pick up.
When you think about the idea of supermarkets, which originated here in Memphis with Piggly Wiggly, it’s enough to make the Piggly Wiggly founder himself, Clarence Saunders, spin in his grave.
Before he came up with the idea of taking store shelves from behind the counter and putting them out there for you to get your own stuff from them, you would tell your grocer what you wanted and he would write it down on a paper bag and get it for you, wrap it up and present it to you.
Saunders changed all of that as you know if you’ve seen the Pink Palace’s child-sized replica of a Piggly Wiggly store from the start of the 20th century.
A century later, no paper bags and you can still walk among the shelves if you wish.
Perhaps this isn’t that extreme. Maybe this is simply a swing of the pendulum, back toward the middle ground.
Saunders tried to push it even further with his Keedoozle stores that followed Piggly Wiggly. In those stores, the items were lined up in what amounted to vending machines with shoppers releasing an item from the vertical row with a key.
Here Saunders went too far. He mashed the bread.

88. Last Word: Overton Park's Restless Winter, Across The Harahan and Higher Ed -

It may be chilly outside, but it might as well be July on the Overton Park greensward with all of the political heat that is building.
The thermometer spiked when more than two dozen trees donated to the Overton Park Conservancy in 2012 were removed this week by the Memphis Zoo which is preparing for large crowds in March.
That’s when its new Zambezi Hippo River Camp exhibit opens to much anticipation and much fanfare.
That and the New Year’s Eve legal opinion favoring the zoo’s position on its use of the greensward for overflow parking set the stage for a dispute the administration of Mayor Jim Strickland has had to mediate at less than two weeks in office.

89. Chancellor Steps Aside, Avoids Fight -

Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to restructure higher education didn’t take long to shake up the hierarchy.

It led to the early retirement of Board of Regents Chancellor John Morgan, who blasted the proposal in a letter to the governor, before legislation even hit the printing press. The longtime state official said he would rather step down than support a plan he feels will be detrimental to colleges and universities.

90. Last Word: The Crest, OPEB Fever, Armstrong Leaves and An Elvis Warning -

The crest is here and it is not quite 40 feet on the Mississippi River gauge. The projections Thursday evening going into Friday’s crest of the river at Memphis changed a bit from the 40.3 foot level. The crest is 39.8 feet.
No reports of major damage anywhere in Shelby County, according to the Shelby County Office of Prepardness.
But the river’s high water is still a sight to behold.

91. After First Meeting, Personality of New Council Emerges -

The judgments began early for the new Memphis City Council, which met for the first time Tuesday, Jan. 5, at City Hall.

State Sen. Lee Harris, on hand to be honored as a former city council member, called the group the “Kumbaya Council,” as it approved 13 appointees by Mayor Jim Strickland, 11 of them with unanimous votes.

92. Rotten to the Core: Titans Fail to Develop Talent -

As the Tennessee Titans sink toward the end of another lackluster season, they head into the off-season with still more holes to fill for 2016.

Some of that, of course, is inevitable with any team as an NFL roster. Even on the best teams can have a 20 percent roster turnover in the off-season due to injuries, free agency and new draft picks coming on board.

93. Council's New Crop -

They ran in the considerable shadow of the most competitive Memphis mayoral race in a generation. The new Memphis City Council that takes office with Mayor-elect Jim Strickland in January isn’t necessarily a generational shift. It doesn’t signify a wholesale ousting by the electorate, either.

94. A List of Mayor-Elect Jim Strickland’s Appointments So Far -

Memphis Mayor elect Jim Strickland still has some appointments to make, but he is methodically filling key positions in his administration ahead of taking office Jan. 1.

95. Autonomy Comes With Risk for State’s Universities -

Tennessee officials are lauding Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to restructure higher education in an effort to meet his goals for the Drive to 55.

The FOCUS Act proposed recently by the Republican governor to make sure 55 percent of Tennesseans hold a degree or postsecondary certificate by 2025 promises to launch a new era for the state’s colleges and universities.

96. Creating A Commercialization Culture -

How to Create a Culture Where You Can Capitalize on Innovation: A presentation by Jay Morgan, VP Global Innovation Bayer Consumer Care, given at the Back end of Innovation Conference, October 2015.

97. Mariota’s Toughness an Edge as Colts Come Calling -

Two games in, it is still a bit too early to declare Marcus Mariota the franchise savior for the Tennessee Titans.

But one thing that stood out is that we may have learned as much or more about Mariota’s makeup in last Sunday’s loss to the Cleveland Browns than we did in his week one shellacking of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

98. Is State’s Role to Provide a Service or Turn a Profit? -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam appears to be on the brink of privatizing state government. But he won’t be able to do it without a battle, especially from university unions and Democratic lawmakers.

99. Fisher, Other Familiar Faces Return for Preseason Play -

The Tennessee Titans welcome back a familiar face Sunday night when Jeff Fisher rolls back into Nashville as coach of the St. Louis Rams.

100. Salomon Joins Harkavy Shainberg -

Jason D. Salomon, one of the 25 lawyers in Tennessee certified as an estate planning specialist, has joined Harkavy Shainberg Kaplan & Dunstan PLC as a member of the firm.
Salomon focuses his practice primarily in the areas of estate planning, trust implementation and probate administration. He also addresses issues regarding disability planning, elder law, nonprofits and small-business succession.