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Editorial Results (free)

1. Herenton Acknowledges New Generation Politics, Criticism in Mayoral Bid -

Eight years and counting since he resigned as mayor of Memphis, Willie Herenton says he has heard the discussions about the city’s economic stagnation when it comes to growing black prosperity and wealth. Especially the part about how that remains the case despite having “black leadership.”

2. The Aftermath: Memphis' Political Journey Since 1968 -

For 50 years and counting, April 4 has been an important day in the life of Memphis.

To some Memphians, it is a holy day; to others, it’s a day of reflection, or perhaps one of action and service.

3. Memphis Genotyping Company Acquired by Private Equity Firm -

Transnetyx, a Memphis-based automated genotyping company that serves biomedical researchers around the world, has been acquired by a St. Louis-based private equity firm.

Thompson Street Capital Partners has struck a deal to acquire YX Genomics Holding Corp., the holding company of Transnetyx whose other wholly owned subsidiaries include YX Services and RobotYX. A Transnetyx spokesman said the purchase price is not being disclosed.

4. Children’s Central -

The first career choice a child has in mind isn’t always the right one. Stephanie Butler, who today is the new executive director of the Children’s Museum of Memphis, thought she wanted to be a doctor.

5. Children’s Museum Names New Executive Director -

The Children’s Museum of Memphis has announced the appointment of Stephanie Butler as its new executive director.

Butler will direct all facets of the museum, including education, community relations, operations and development. This will encompass raising funds for the museum’s recent expansion, which includes the restored Memphis Grand Carousel.

6. Children’s Museum Names New Executive Director -

The Children’s Museum of Memphis has announced the appointment of Stephanie Butler as its new executive director.

7. Last Word: Rising River, Driving The Dream and Harwell Advances Medical Pot -

The Mississippi River at Memphis should reach flood stage at any moment. As Last Word was going up online Wednesday evening the National Weather Service at Memphis put the river level here at 33.52 feet. Flood stage at Memphis is 34 feet. The river is forecast to crest some time next week at 38 feet, four feet over flood stage. Keep in mind that in April 2011, the river at Memphis crested 10 feet higher, at 48 feet on the Memphis river gauge – which turned to be the one on the support beams of the bridge over Beale Street at Riverside Drive. That was the second highest river level at Memphis ever recorded.

8. Driving the Dream -

The aim of United Way of the Mid-South’s “Driving the Dream” project is still the same: Provide the means for more people to lift themselves out of poverty and, over time, achieve self-sufficiency.

9. Nomination Deadline For Dunavant Awards Feb. 1 -

Memphis is lucky to have an abundance of residents with a passion for public service and it is time once again to honor their commitment to improving this community.

Each year the Rotary Club of Memphis East recognizes the importance of public service by hosting the Dunavant Public Servant Awards.

10. RCV Goes To Ballot, Term-Limit Change May Join It -

Memphis City Council members gave final approval Tuesday, Dec. 5, to a November 2018 referendum that would repeal the use of ranked-choice voting (RCV) in some city council races starting with 2019 city elections.

11. Chism Vows Democratic Primary Battle with Harris for County Mayor -

Former Shelby County Commissioner Sidney Chism kicked off his bid for county mayor last week by vowing to “beat up on” rival Democrat and state Sen. Lee Harris in the May 2018 countywide primary.

12. October 6-12, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

2016: On the cover of The Memphis News, the opening of the $52 million “Heart of the Park” project at Shelby Farms Park turns a lot of heads and prompts a lot of new traffic on land that was once a prison farm and had been slated in the 1970s for residential construction. “I feel like it’s a city that’s reinvented itself,” Shelby Farms Park Conservancy director Jen Andrews says in the cover story. “It didn’t change who it was, but it reinvented itself – a sprawling city that chose to reconnect itself. … Memphis has become a city that believes in making things better for the public realm.”

13. Sept 29-Oct 5, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

1991: Willie Herenton is elected mayor – the first African-American elected mayor in Memphis history. Herenton upsets incumbent Dick Hackett by 142 votes, the closest margin in a mayor’s race under the mayor-council form of government, but not the closest in the much-longer history of Memphis mayoral elections under various forms of municipal government.
The election also sees the election of an African-American majority to the 13-member Memphis City Council. It is a tumultuous election night in which the vote count goes past midnight. The Shelby County Election Commission before and after this election had always released absentee votes first. In this case, the absentee vote totals are not added until the election day totals had been tabulated. The delay prompts several hundred Herenton supporters gathered at The Peabody to come to the Downtown offices of the election commission. They follow U.S. Rep. Harold Ford Sr., with a Hackett team of advisers arriving as well to oversee the absentee vote count. Herenton went on to become the longest-serving Memphis mayor, resigning July 30, 2009.

14. Interest High in Fairgrounds Fast Track -

The shorter, more compressed drive to a Fairgrounds redevelopment plan feels, at the outset, more certain and much less tentative than versions that surfaced during the administrations of previous mayors Willie Herenton and A C Wharton.

15. Fairgrounds Movement Triggers Liberty Bowl Questions -

For a prime piece of real estate that is supposed to be in a holding pattern, there is a lot of recent activity on and about the Mid-South Fairgrounds. And even when Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium isn’t the immediate topic, it is an undeniable presence.

16. Last Word: Centennial, Hackett Retires -- Sort Of and Baseball Dreams -

Monday marks 100 years since a mob took Ell Persons off a train and to the Macon Road Bridge across the Wolf River and burned him alive. It was the lynching that gave birth to the Memphis Branch NAACP one month later. The national NAACP field office investigator who came to Memphis at great personal peril to investigate Person’s death was none other than James Weldon Johnson, the man who also composed “Lift Every Voice and Sing.”

17. Memphis’ Political History Reflects Changes With New Entries -

There was a moment during the March unveiling of former Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s portrait in the Hall of Mayors when the task of framing history gave way to the present.

It came when attorney Ricky E. Wilkins talked about the importance of Wharton and his predecessor, Willie Herenton – the only two black mayors in Memphis history – to the city’s political present. Wharton attended the event; Herenton was noticeably absent.

18. Political Past, Present Meet as Wharton’s Portrait Joins Hall of Mayors -

When A C Wharton Jr. was Memphis mayor, his relationship with the Memphis City Council wasn’t always good. And it would usually get worse whenever he’d call a press conference in the Hall of Mayors on a Tuesday the council was meeting. Some council members thought it was to draw attention from them.

19. Impasse Compromise Wins Council Approval, Union Acceptance -

No more lottery balls for the Memphis City Council in the spring. The council approved Tuesday, March 21, an overhaul of the city’s impasse procedures – the rules for the council settling stalled contract talks between the city’s municipal unions and the city administration.

20. Last Word: The Elvis Tradition, Cordova Brewery and Parkside Path -

For about three decades now, there has been a cultural and political tradition around the birthday of Elvis Presley. It used to be a proclamation by the Shelby County Mayor and the Memphis Mayor on the steps of Graceland with a birthday cake.

21. Last Word: New Rhodes President, Billy Hyman and the Fast Track -

The biggest political betting pool of the post-election season ends Tuesday as President elect Donald Trump said Monday by Twitter that he would name his nominee for Secretary of State Tuesday morning.

22. December 9-15, 2016: This week in Memphis history -

1986: Foreclosure proceedings are underway for the Downtown Radisson on the southeast corner of Third Street and Union Avenue. The $25 million, 284-room hotel had just opened the previous June after a renovation that incorporated the old eight-story Tennessee Hotel facing Third into a new 11-story tower east of that. The Radisson is the second Downtown hotel to have financial difficulties since the start of 1986. Chattanooga developer Franklin Haney had defaulted on interest payments for the Holiday Inn Crowne Plaza, the hotel connected to the Memphis Cook Convention Center, prompting a refinancing of the deal.

23. Transnetyx Thriving in Testing World for ‘the Smart People’ -

Bob Bean was an unlikely co-founder of the world’s first fully automated mouse genotyping firm. He earned an undergraduate degree in music at the University of South Carolina and then went to Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary.

24. November 11-17, 2016: This week in Memphis history -

2005: Premiere of the movie “Walk the Line” – the film bio of Johnny Cash that was made in Memphis.

25. Clayborn Reborn Effort Charts Different Pre-vitalization Path -

The hope has been that the redevelopment of Central Station in the South Main area would cause a ripple in development to the east and link up with the sprawling South City development that encompasses the Foote Homes public housing development, the area south of FedExForum, and go south of Crump Boulevard.

26. Last Word: Big River Weekend, Buying Local and The Rehabilitation of Lane Kiffin -

The city’s riverfront will be a very busy place Saturday with several events – the one getting the most attention is the opening of the Big River Crossing – the bicycle and pedestrian boardwalk across the Mississippi River on the north side of the Harahan Bridge.

27. September 2-8, 2016: This week in Memphis history -

2011: The Shelby County Commission has a list of 100 citizens interested in being appointed to seven positions on what will be a new 23-member countywide school board.
The board, which will serve in the move to a consolidated public school system for all of Shelby County, includes all nine current Memphis City Schools board members and all seven Shelby County Schools board members. Meanwhile, appointments are also being made to the Transition Planning Commission, which will make recommendations on the structure of the schools merger.

28. Last Word: The Evolution of Michael Rallings, Mediation Confidential and Council Day -

The appointment of Michael Rallings as the permanent Memphis Police Director goes to the Memphis City Council Tuesday for what is expected to be a unanimous vote.

Rallings and Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland talked about the appointment – the only major appointment in Strickland’s inner circle left seven months into his term as mayor – during a press conference Monday morning in the Hall of Mayors.

29. August 5-11, 2016: This week in Memphis history -

1986: Election day with nonpartisan Shelby County elections the main item of interest for voters. Shelby County Mayor Bill Morris easily wins a third term of office, defeating challengers Robert “Prince Mongo” Hodges and North Memphis political activist Charlie Morris. Incumbent Sheriff Gene Barksdale loses his re-election bid in an upset by Jack Owens, who runs for sheriff from the chairmanship of the Memphis City Council. The election draws a countywide turnout of 34.6 percent.

30. Chism Readying 2018 Bid for County Mayor -

Former Shelby County Commissioner Sidney Chism wants to be the Democratic nominee for Shelby County mayor in 2018, and he plans to begin his campaign after the November presidential election.

31. American Studio Hit-Maker Moman Dies -

He found the old South Memphis movie theater that became Stax Records. He recorded more than 100 hit records for numerous record labels in a 10-year period in a nondescript building at Danny Thomas Boulevard and Chelsea Avenue.

32. Last Word: Chips Moman, ServiceMaster Incentives and Crosstown High -

Chips Moman has died. Word of his death Monday at a hospice in Georgia came two years after Moman was honored for his contributions to Memphis music and the city's history.

Those contributions were substantial and for quite a while they were overlooked – even while he was running the definition of a hit factory at American Sound Studios, a non-descript recording studio on Danny Thomas Boulevard at Chelsea Avenue in North Memphis.

33. Beale Street Rolling Out Saturday Summer Cover Charge -

A $10 Saturday cover charge for the Beale Street Entertainment District returns this weekend as one of several measures to improve safety on the street.

The cash-only charge is in effect Saturdays after 10 p.m. through August and can be paid at one of five entrances into the district.

34. Hagler Launches Solo Practice as Real Estate Sector Picks Up -

Monice Moore Hagler grew up in a real estate family. Her father owned a real estate company and her brothers studied finance and real estate before going on to become brokers.

So of course it only made sense that she pursued a career in social work, where she worked with children on welfare and children who were placed for adoption. She worked closely with special needs adoptions, including older children who were more difficult to adopt.

35. Lisa’s Lunchbox Pursues Steady Growth -

Lisa Clay is cooking up an expansion-fueled future to go along with the sandwiches, smoothies and other staples of her nearly 10-year-old Lisa’s Lunchbox restaurant concept.

36. City Ready to Develop Master Plan for Pinch District -

The Pinch District, one of Memphis’ oldest neighborhoods, is getting its time in the spotlight.

The Downtown Memphis Commission, the city of Memphis Division of Housing & Community Development and the city-county Division of Planning & Development are coming together to develop the Pinch’s first master plan in to bring the area up to date with mixed-use buildings and streetscape improvements.

37. Former City Attorney Founds Hagler Law Group -

Monice Hagler, a longtime Memphis lawyer who served as city attorney during the administrations of Mayors Dick Hackett and Willie Herenton, has founded a new law practice.

The Hagler Law Group PLLC is focused on real estate-related economic development as well as small- and minority-business development.

38. Former City Attorney Founds Hagler Law Group -

Monice Hagler, a longtime Memphis lawyer who served as city attorney during the administrations of Mayors Dick Hackett and Willie Herenton, has founded a new law practice.

The Hagler Law Group PLLC is focused on real estate-related economic development as well as small- and minority-business development.

39. City Has Offer On Adams Police Station -

The realty group that proposed a short-lived Hotel Overton for Overton Square in 2015 has offered the city of Memphis $1.1 million for the old Central Police Station building at 128 Adams Ave.

40. City Has Offer On Adams Police Headquarters -

The realty group that proposed a short-lived Hotel Overton for Overton Square in 2015 has offered the city of Memphis $1.1 million for the old Central Police Station building at 128 Adams Avenue.

41. Last Word: Presidents Day In An Election Year, Minority Business and Spring Training -

Presidents Day in a presidential election year.
Consider the political kaleidoscope of a foggy office-bound or home-bound Monday in Memphis with former President George W. Bush on the tube in the late afternoon defending his brother’s presidential campaign without once uttering the word Trump.
No further word of a Trump appearance promised for Memphis and some of Donald Trump’s own statements Monday suggested that by the time Memphis is on his schedule, he might be running as an independent.
Then there is the obsession in one corner of social media with Supreme Court history in rich detail.
And heads were turned Monday evening by the excerpt on the Grammys from the Broadway musical about Alexander Hamilton – a founding father born in the West Indies who established the nation’s financial system and the Federalist party. He never became a president, in part, because the vice president killed him. Hamilton wasn’t the only one who had been talking bad about Aaron Burr. The top of the ticket, President Thomas Jefferson, had decided to dump Burr from the ticket in the next election and Burr was trying to transition to become governor of New York.

42. This week in Memphis history: January 1-7 -

1993: Production of the motion picture "The Firm" is underway in Memphis with Tom Cruise, Gene Hackman and Jeanne Tripplehorn in the city to film the adaptation of the John Grisham novel. Producers of the movie decide to shoot exterior scenes in the city as well and use the old International Harvester plant in Frayser, which includes a law library for the fictional law firm.

43. Little Fixins Kitchen Opens At Children’s Museum -

The Children’s Museum of Memphis recently opened its new Little Fixins Kitchen. Sponsored by Premier Countertops, the exhibit is built to look like a real kitchen – only smaller.

The little kitchen includes quartz countertops, counter lighting from The Lighting Source, lit double ovens, wooden cabinetry and sinks and tile from Quantum Showrooms with blue lighting and water sounds.

44. Little Fixins Kitchen Opens At Children’s Museum -

The Children’s Museum of Memphis recently opened its new Little Fixins Kitchen. Sponsored by Premier Countertops, the exhibit is built to look like a real kitchen – only smaller.

The little kitchen includes quartz countertops, counter lighting from The Lighting Source, lit double ovens, wooden cabinetry and sinks and tile from Quantum Showrooms with blue lighting and water sounds.

45. ULI’s Final Fairgrounds Report Adds Parking Details -

The final report from an Urban Land Institute panel that visited the Mid-South Fairgrounds in June has more to say about parking challenges and scenarios.

The 38-page report released Tuesday, Nov. 3, affirms the group’s June call to add new facilities at the fairgrounds while keeping the Mid-South Coliseum, possibly in an altered form. And it includes more specific drawings and plans for parking that would be adaptable for other uses outside of the eight games a year that are played at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium.

46. Memphis Mayoral Transition Begins -

The transition at City Hall begins this week from Mayor A C Wharton to Mayor-elect Jim Strickland.

Strickland won’t take office until January.

47. Election Day Beckons In Hard-Fought Memphis Mayor’s Race -

The most competitive Memphis mayor’s race in 24 years goes to the city’s 403,227 voters Thursday, Oct. 8, along with races for all 13 seats on the Memphis City Council and the race for City Court clerk.

48. Memphis Mayor's Race Poised For Close Finish -

A political summer dominated by the campaign for Memphis mayor begins turning toward fall Friday, Sept. 18, with the opening of the early voting period in advance of the Oct. 8 election day.

All 16 early voting sites are open weekdays from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Oct. 3.

49. Fairgrounds’ Future -

It’s hard to imagine that a 65,000-seat stadium could be overlooked. Perhaps it’s because the Liberty Bowl wasn’t in the center of the Mid-South Fairgrounds when the stadium was built in 1965; it was on the eastern side of 155 acres of city-owned land, with a rail spur running along its eastern boundary.

50. Campaign Strategies Shift As Mayoral Debates Begin -

It’s been a scrap from the start.

But with the first televised debate in the 2015 race for Memphis Mayor Monday, Aug. 10, more citizens got a first-hand look at what the top contenders have agreed is a milestone political race.

51. This Week in Memphis History: July 31-August 6 -

2009: After a false start earlier in the year, Willie Herenton’s resignation as mayor takes effect. He leaves office as the city’s longest-serving mayor two years after winning a fifth term.

52. Memphis Finance Gurus Retrace City’s Fiscal Path -

Mayors come and go at City Hall and what was a priority for one administration can change with the next. But one constant is finance.

It defines a city’s overall health, no matter who is in office, and thus its ability to borrow money to fund those priorities and then pay off that debt.

53. Splendid Steeds -

Six years ago, Todd W. Goings took apart the centenarian Grand Carousel at what had been the Libertyland amusement park and packed it into four semi-trailers, which were welded shut and taken to a nearby, undisclosed location.

54. Memphis Gets Greenlight to Relocate Police -

Now it’s all about closing the deal.

With no debate or discussion, the Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, May 19, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s proposal to buy the 13-story Donnelley J. Hill state office building at 170 N. Main St., just a stone’s throw from City Hall.

55. Avondale Partners Expands Into Memphis -

Avondale Partners, a Nashville-based boutique investment banking and wealth management firm, has opened a new office in Germantown with John Santi heading up the location as managing director.

The new office brings to the Mid-South investment banking and equity research focused on the health care, transportation, logistics and business services sectors as well as a fiduciary investment practice for individuals and institutions.

56. Wharton: Tourism Is Serious Business -

Sometimes in tourism, it is the little things that count. But “little” is relative. Consider the digital LED display screen on the west wall of the Memphis Cook Convention Center – big enough to be seen by eastbound traffic on the Hernando DeSoto Bridge – which local leaders debuted this month after three years of planning.

57. Justin Ford: ‘We’re On The Cusp Of Change’ -

Shelby County commission chairman Justin Ford is running for Memphis Mayor in 2015.

Ford announced his intention to challenge Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. Monday, Feb. 9, joining former county commissioner James Harvey, city council member Jim Strickland, and former University of Memphis basketball player Detric Golden in the growing field.

58. Wharton, Strickland Close In Campaign Balances So Far -

Close isn’t enough when it comes to winning elections. But it works when it comes to financing the campaigns leading to the elections.

And Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and his most vocal challenger so far, City Council member Jim Strickland, posted campaign dollar amounts this week that suggest a lively campaign later in this election year.

59. Size of Mayoral Field Shadows Race -

Nobody running for election on the Oct. 8 ballot can even pull a qualifying petition to get on the ballot until April, yet February is shaping up as the month when it is determined what kind of challenge and how many challengers incumbent Mayor A C Wharton Jr. will face.

60. This week in Memphis history: January 16-22 -

2005: Chandler Reports, the real estate data provider owned by The Daily News Publishing Co., launched its consumer website, providing real estate data to the public as well as companies.

61. Wharton Whirlwind -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. will ask the Memphis City Council to approve the approximately $30 million in city funding at the core of the settlement of the six-year-old schools funding controversy and lawsuit.

62. DeSoto County Supervisor Killed in ATV Accident -

HERNANDO, Miss. (AP) – DeSoto County Supervisor Harvey Wayne Lee has died an all-terrain vehicle accident south of Hernando, Mississippi.

County Coroner Jeff Pounders said the accident occurred Tuesday night on a county road. Pounders said the 54-year-old Lee was transported the emergency room at Baptist Memorial Hospital-DeSoto, where he died.

63. Cohen, Wilkins Feud Over Endorsements -

Candidates and political strategists who advise those candidates have a complex relationship with endorsements.

They have a value in building momentum for a campaign and in the case of organizations, they usually come with a check or in-kind contribution. But in and of themselves -- especially in a long list – their value in terms of influence has its limits.

64. This week in Memphis history: June 20-26 -

2013: FedEx Corp. executives watched as a 727 landed at Memphis International Airport, completing the last flight by a 727 for the company ending the use of the jets by the pioneering Memphis company after 35 years.

65. This week in Memphis history: May 9-15 -

1984: Jerome Ryans became director of the Memphis Housing Authority following the resignation of Lawrence Wade from the post. Ryans, who had been the Memphis City Council’s staff administrator prior to the appointment by the MHA board and backed by Memphis Mayor Dick Hackett, inherited what was considered a “troubled housing authority” by the federal department of Housing and Urban Development. Over several years, Ryans would reverse that, restore the confidence of the federal agency that supplied the bulk of funding to the MHA and begin to question the direction and role of public housing in Memphis.

66. Museum Milestone -

When the National Civil Rights Museum formally reopens Saturday, April 5, it will be with the “breaking” of a ceremonial chain at the new entrance to the building that was once the Lorraine Motel, where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in 1968.

67. Events -

The Association of Fundraising Professionals will meet Thursday, March 6, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Children’s Museum of Memphis education barn, 2525 Central Ave. Museum CEO Dick Hackett will present “Success Breeds Success.” Cost is $20 for members and $25 for nonmembers. Visit afpmemphis.org.

68. Events -

The Association of Fundraising Professionals will meet Thursday, March 6, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Children’s Museum of Memphis education barn, 2525 Central Ave. Museum CEO Dick Hackett will present “Success Breeds Success.” Cost is $20 for members and $25 for nonmembers. Visit afpmemphis.org.

69. Events -

The Shelby County Trustee’s office will hold a Project H.O.M.E. (Home Ownership Made Easier) Financial Literacy workshop Tuesday, March 4, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Whitehaven Community Center, 4318 Graceland Drive. Visit shelbycountytrustee.com.

70. Events -

Germantown Community Library will hold an e-book and e-audiobook demonstration Monday, March 3, from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the library, 1925 Exeter Road. Cost is free. Call 757-7323 or visit germantown-library.org.

71. Hackett to Address Fundraising Professionals -

The Association of Fundraising Professionals will host its monthly luncheon meeting Tuesday, March 6, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Children’s Museum of Memphis, 2525 Central Ave.

72. Hackett to Address Fundraising Professionals -

The Association of Fundraising Professionals will host its monthly luncheon meeting Tuesday, March 6, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Children’s Museum of Memphis, 2525 Central Ave.

73. Elkington’s Farewell -

It’s been more than three years since city leaders declared the next chapter of the Beale Street entertainment district was about to begin.

But it wasn’t until Monday, Dec. 16, that Beale Street developer John Elkington marked his coming farewell to the street at the end of this year.

74. Former City Official Pearson Remembered -

Claude Pearson, the director of sanitation services and labor negotiator for the city of Memphis, was remembered Wednesday, Oct. 2, in a funeral service.

75. October 4-October 10, 2013: This week in Memphis history -

2012: Robert J. Pera, the new majority owner to be of the Memphis Grizzlies was assembling his local partners for the ownership group. The names included NBA and University of Memphis basketball star Anfernees “Penny” Hardaway, pop star Justin Timberlake and former U.S. Rep. Harold Ford Jr.

76. Former City Official Pearson Remembered -

Claude Pearson, the director of sanitation services and labor negotiator for the city of Memphis, was remembered Wednesday, Oct. 2, in a funeral service.

77. Democrats ‘Roast’ Herenton, Look Ahead to 2014 -

Divisions within the local Democratic party took a backseat over the weekend as the Shelby County Democratic Party held the first of two large fundraisers for the 2014 election year.

But the look back for the party came with some advice for the future.

78. Evans Upholds Nineteenth Century Club Sale, Demolition -

Chancellor Walter Evans upheld the sale of the Nineteenth Century Club building on Union Avenue by the club to a private company and denied a request to permanently stop any demolition of the historic building.

79. Nineteenth Century Club Hearing Moves Into Second Day -

The Chancery Court hearing that will likely determine whether the Nineteenth Century Club building in Midtown Memphis stands or falls moves into Tuesday, Aug. 27, after a Monday in court of testimony from the plaintiffs trying to stop the transfer of ownership of the mansion and the building’s demolition.

80. City Council Approves Civil Service Referendum -

The Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, Aug. 20, a 2014 city referendum on a charter change that would change the city’s civil service board system.

Part of the proposal by council member Kemp Conrad is aimed at better staffing the review board, which decides employee appeals, to hear a current backlog of cases and resolve them more quickly. Under another change in the proposal, employees could be cited for – and appeal – performance issues, in addition to violations of policies.

81. City Council Approves Civil Service Referendum -

The Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, Aug. 20, a 2014 city referendum on a charter change that would change the city’s civil service board system.

Part of the proposal by council member Kemp Conrad is aimed at better staffing the review board, which decides employee appeals, to hear a current backlog of cases and resolve them more quickly. Under another change in the proposal, employees could be cited for – and appeal – performance issues, in addition to violations of policies.

82. Council Approves Smart Meters, Delays Vote on Solid Waste Fee and Plan -

Memphis City Council members approved a $10.1 million contract Tuesday, Aug. 20, for Memphis Light Gas and Water Division to buy 60,000 Smart Meters.

And the council delayed a final vote on setting a solid waste fee that is the starting point for changes over several years to the way the city collects garbage. The two-week delay in setting the fee also delays acting on a plan to provide sanitation workers with a retirement supplement of up to $1,000 a month funded with the savings from the changes in the services.

83. Police Changes Continue Amid Budget Talks -

With the start of the new year, Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong began a reorganization of the department that changed the boundaries of the city’s nine police precincts, evening out the amount of territory and calls each area handles.

84. Johnican Practiced Political Art of Coalition -

Minerva Johnican practiced the art of the coalition in a political career that spanned more than 40 years.

The former Shelby County Commissioner, Memphis City Council member and Criminal Court Clerk Minerva died Friday, March 8, at Methodist University Hospital at the age of 74.

85. Late Judge Higgs Changed Local Politics -

Funeral services for Shelby County Criminal Court Judge and Memphis mayoral contender Otis Higgs were pending and being planned Monday, Feb. 18, just days after his unexpected death.

86. Judge and Mayoral Contender Otis Higgs Dies -

Shelby County Criminal Court Judge W. Otis Higgs, whose two bids to become Memphis Mayor in the 1970s were important chapters in the city’s political and racial history, died Friday, Feb. 15, at the age of 75.

87. Dunavant Awards Honor, Discuss Good Government -

An award for elected and non-elected public officials marking its 10th anniversary this year began as a way to honor the late Probate Court Clerk Bobby Dunavant and to counter the damage done 10 years ago by the Tennessee Waltz federal public corruption investigation.

88. Lone Star Demolition Begins Thursday -

The city of Memphis begins demolition Thursday, Sept. 20, of the Lone Star Industries cement terminal at the foot of Poplar Avenue.

The city of Memphis bought the property for $10 million as part of city plans for redevelopment of the area around The Pyramid which is being converted to a Bass Pro Shops super store with other attractions in and around The Pyramid.

89. IP Looks to Future Following Temple-Inland Acquisition -

When International Paper Co. moved its headquarters to Memphis in 1987 it was an economic development milestone for Shelby County.

90. Nonprofit Center Could be New South Memphis Gateway -

The giant milk bottle will outlive the old dairy plant it stands atop in South Memphis. For more than 80 years, the giant milk bottle adorning a now old and crumbling dairy building on Bellevue Boulevard at Walker Avenue has been an icon.

91. Our River Reflects City’s Past, Future -

For decades, redevelopment of the city’s riverfront has been an elusive goal. Look at it over the years and you can see moves toward a goal of a riverfront that is once again busy – but busy for reasons different than those when the cobblestones represented the gateway to a 19th century logistics hub.

92. Gather at the River -

About a year ago Memphians were drawn to one spot in particular on the city’s riverfront.

At the foot of Beale Street, the Mississippi River had risen last May to a level where the muddy water covered the intersection of Riverside Drive and Beale, offering a view of an uninterrupted river stretching three miles from the intersection to the levees in West Memphis.

93. Wade Brings No-Nonsense Attitude to Council Work -

During the trial in 2009 between the city of Memphis and the Memphis City Schools district over a complicated funding dispute that has left ramifications even to this day, Allan Wade argued on behalf of the city.

94. ‘A Different View’ -

When the Memphis City Council got involved in the 1968 sanitation workers strike it forever changed the relationship between the council and the mayor.

Lewis Donelson, a member of that council and founder and shareholder of Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz PC, writes in his new autobiography, “Lewie,” that the council’s actions have affected every council and mayor since then.

95. Fate of Ramesses Statue Still Hangs in Balance -

The fate of the Ramesses statue outside The Pyramid was delayed for another two weeks at City Hall as a Memphis City Council member again derailed the effort to move the monolith to the University of Memphis campus.

96. Lease on Former Three Alarm Studio in Foreclosure Again -

The leasehold on a former Downtown Memphis fire station with a checkered 25-year history and a strategic location – 200 Linden Ave. – is facing foreclosure again.

97. Early Voting Kicks Off Friday in City -

Early voting begins Friday, Sept. 16, in advance of the Oct. 6 city of Memphis Election Day. Voters across the city can cast early ballots in the races for Memphis mayor, City Council, City Court clerk and City Court judges at 16 locations through Oct. 1.

98. Children’s Museum’s Reputation Built on Originality -

Dr. Seuss said sometimes the questions are complicated and the answers are simple, and the secret to the continued success of the Children’s Museum of Memphis (CMOM) seems to lie in the facility’s simple willingness to take heed of its visitors’ suggestions.

99. Patterson’s Legacy In Local Politics Looms Large -

J.O. Patterson Jr. was the city’s first African-American mayor. That’s the lead biographical item from any comprehensive history of Memphis political history to come.

His 20-day appointed tenure as interim mayor following the 1982 resignation of Wyeth Chandler, however, was a footnote to a 20-year career on the Memphis City Council that began when the city switched to the mayor-council form of government in 1968.

100. Festival Relocation to Impact Local Businesses -

When historic flooding forced a venue change for Memphis in May’s 34th annual World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest, Downtown and Midtown businesses began bracing to make the best of the sudden switch.