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Editorial Results (free)

1. Memphis Awards $55K In Crime-Fighting Grants -

Most of the 23 neighborhood groups getting city grants totaling $55,000 want them for some form of surveillance cameras in their neighborhoods.

The grants announced by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings Monday, Jan. 9, are administered by Memphis Area Neighborhood Watch and funded by the Neighborhood Crime Prevention Fund. The fund was created from revenues generated by the city’s red light cameras.

2. Last Word: Humes Next, Top ZIPs in Residential and Payback in the Legislature -

Add Dave & Buster’s to the list of "it" retail hot spots. The restaurant-arcade has inked a lease in Cordova by Wolfchase Galeria with plans to open later this year, probably fourth quarter.

3. Memphis Awards $55K In Crime-Fighting Grants -

Most of the 23 neighborhood groups getting city grants totaling $55,000 want them for some form of surveillance cameras in their neighborhoods.

The grants announced by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings Monday, Jan. 9, are administered by Memphis Area Neighborhood Watch and funded by the Neighborhood Crime Prevention Fund. The fund was created from revenues generated by the city’s red light cameras.

4. Last Word: The Elvis Tradition, Cordova Brewery and Parkside Path -

For about three decades now, there has been a cultural and political tradition around the birthday of Elvis Presley. It used to be a proclamation by the Shelby County Mayor and the Memphis Mayor on the steps of Graceland with a birthday cake.

5. Convention Center Hotel Plan Hinges on Financing -

For years the Memphis convention and tourism industry has known which comes first in the chicken-and-egg argument about drawing more convention business. More hotel rooms with meeting space take top priority in an environment where there is just enough political will for a $60 million renovation of the Memphis Cook Convention Center but not enough to build and finance a new convention center.

6. Overton Parking Committee To Meet Thursday -

The committee working out the exact design of an expansion of Memphis Zoo parking in Overton Park meets Thursday, Jan. 5, at City Hall.

The meeting at 3:30 p.m. in the fifth floor conference room is the first of the year for the group formed in 2016 as part of the compromise between the Memphis Zoo and the Overton Park Conservancy.

7. Herenton, Cohen Keynote Dec. 31 Prayer Breakfasts -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen and former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton will be the keynote speakers at two New Year’s Eve Prayer Breakfasts on Saturday, Dec. 31.

8. Herenton, Cohen Keynote Dec. 31 Prayer Breakfasts -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen and former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton will be the keynote speakers at two New Year’s Eve Prayer Breakfasts on Saturday, Dec. 31.

9. Presidential Election Tops Busy Year for Memphis Voters -

2016 was an eventful election year in Shelby County, ending with the most popular voting cycle in Shelby County politics: the U.S. presidential general election in November. Slightly more than 60 percent of the county’s voters cast a ballot either during early voting in October or on the Nov. 8 Election Day.

10. Arrests, Metal Barriers, Lawsuits All Played Role in Greensward Parking Compromise -

Spring at City Hall is budget season and it can be stormy for a new mayor, not to mention a city council with six new members. But that wasn’t the case in 2016.

The real spring political storm was the Overton Park Greensward – specifically overflow parking from the Memphis Zoo on the greenspace south of the zoo.

11. Awards Recognize Highest Ideals of Public Service -

Public service is a worthy legacy, and one that the Rotary Club of Memphis East wants to recognize and encourage in the next generation.

The annual Bobby Dunavant Public Servant Awards recognize one elected official and one non-elected public employee who have exemplified the virtues of former Probate Court Clerk Bobby Dunavant, for whom the award is named.

12. Kelsey Proposes $50M Sales Tax Shift to Memphis -

State Sen. Brian Kelsey of Memphis is proposing a shift in state sales tax revenue that could mean at least $50 million in additional sales tax revenue for the city of Memphis.

13. Memphis Adopts Version of Ceasefire -

A gun and gang violence program pioneered in Boston 20 years ago is coming to Memphis in the wake of a record year for homicides.

What is known nationally as Operation Ceasefire will be called the “Group Violence Initiative” in Memphis, said Memphis-Shelby Crime Commission president Bill Gibbons on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

14. Last Word: Pro-Memphis On Different Terms, Trump's Pledge and Phil Gagliano -

Be honest. How many of you are even at work Friday? And if you are, how many of you know there are cookies or egg nog in the break room? "He sees you when you are sleeping. He knows when you're awake."

15. Kelsey Proposes $50M Sales Tax Shift to Memphis -

State Sen. Brian Kelsey of Memphis is proposing a shift in state sales tax revenue that could mean at least $50 million in additional sales tax revenue for the city of Memphis.

16. Last Word: St. Jude Dollar Amounts, Fred's On The Move and The Treble Clef -

Grizz over the Trailblazers 88 – 86 Thursday evening at the Forum. At the end of the first half, Grizz coach David Fizdale had to be restrained by players on the way off the court after a technical was called on him. And welcome to Memphis, Toney Douglas. We love what you are doing with the fourth quarter.

17. Last Word: Boca, Poe Killed by Politics and Embedding In The Real Memphis -

BOCA BOWL – As expected, the University of Memphis Tigers football team is going south for the post season. They got and accepted Sunday the formal invitation to play in the Boca Raton Bowl on Dec. 20 against Western Kentucky. Ticket information should be forthcoming Monday for those of you who didn’t get enough during the Emerald Coast Classic with the basketball Tigers not too long ago.

18. Last Word: Fires In the East, Corker at Trump Tower and The Toll of the Cure -

As our week here began very windy and very rainy with clouds all day Monday, there was a different kind of overcast day unfolding in East Tennessee. And by the time of this post the National Guard was patrolling parts of Gatlinburg and Pigeon Forge where wildfires had forced evacuations of both towns – all of Gatlinburg and Pigeon Forge, according to the city manager of Pigeon Forge.

19. Memphis-Area Leaders Unveil Five-Year Crime-Fighting Plan -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is anticipating a “net increase” in the size of the Memphis Police Department a year from now, as officers complete training and the city can begin to address a department he says is “hundreds of officers short.”

20. New, More Compact 5-Year Anti-Crime Plan to Be Unveiled -

When local law enforcement and criminal justice system leaders unveil a new five-year plan Tuesday, Nov. 10, for reducing crime and making Shelby County safer, it will be more focused than their previous effort.

21. Strickland to Make Decision On Retiree Health Insurance -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland will make a decision Tuesday, Nov. 8, on city health insurance coverage for retirees that could involve a private health care exchange.

22. Last Word: An Early Voting Challenge, Raleigh Settlement and Rocky Top Tumult -

Early voting in Shelby County ended with some lines Thursday at several of the 21 sites. We should have the final turnout numbers Friday morning and you can get the totals first @tdnpols, www.twitter.com/tdnpols.

23. Justice Department to Review Memphis Police Department -

The part of the U.S. Justice Department that oversees community policing initiatives as well as funding for those initiatives is set to review the Memphis Police Department. U.S. Attorney Ed Stanton will announce the review Wednesday, Oct. 26, along with Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings.

24. Last Word: The Politics of Animal Welfare, SCS On Gestalt and Chandler Numbers -

It’s not that the Memphis Animal Shelter would change as much as services outside the shelter would change and their relationship to the shelter would change. That’s what two consultants from the national nonprofit Target Zero told about 80 Memphians at the Central Library this week.

25. Last Word: Haslam on Trump, Midtown Apartment Blitz and Beyond Parks -

Trump vs. Clinton or Giants vs. Packers? America Chooses.

While there is so much discussion – and rightfully so – about the unprecedented direction this Presidential campaign as a whole has taken in so many ways, the speed of the conduct of the campaign and news cycle reaction has also become a factor. Many of you are probably reading this at a point in which the reaction to what happened over 90 minutes before 10 p.m. on a Sunday night has already made parts of the debate irrelevant or old news.

26. Mayor Starts Post-Protest Community Meetings -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland will kick off a series of community meetings Oct. 25 in the wake of the Black Lives Matter protests in July and August.

27. October 7-13, 2016: This week in Memphis history -

2015: City Council member Jim Strickland upsets incumbent Memphis Mayor A C Wharton, taking 42 percent of the vote in the mayor’s race to 20 percent for Wharton. Wharton becomes only the second incumbent mayor to lose a re­election bid in the history of the mayor-council form of government. And Strickland becomes only the second mayor elected from a seat on the council.

28. Mayor Starts Post-Protest Community Meetings -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland will kick off a series of community meetings Oct. 25 in the wake of the Black Lives Matter protests in July and August.

29. Council Passes Pot Ordinance 7-6 -

The Memphis City Council gave final approval Tuesday, Oct. 4, to an ordinance that gives Memphis Police the discretion to write a ticket with a $50 fine for possession of a half ounce or less of marijuana.

30. City Council Approves MATA Funds, Airbnb Tax -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, Sept. 20, a set of six resolutions totaling $7.5 million in capital funding for the Memphis Area Transit Authority. The largest of the resolution is $5 million in city funding to buy 11 new buses. The remaining $2.5 million is the local match to federal funding for other MATA needs, including paratransit buses and public transportation infrastructure including technology.

31. City Council Approves MATA Funds, Airbnb Tax -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, Sept. 20, a set of six resolutions totaling $7.5 million in capital funding for the Memphis Area Transit Authority. The largest of the resolutions is $5 million in city funding to buy 11 new buses. The remaining $2.5 million is the local match to federal funding for other MATA needs, including paratransit buses and public transportation infrastructure including technology.

32. Memphis Homicides Surpass Total for All of 2015 -

With the fatal shooting Wednesday, Sept. 15, of a man outside a Frayser convenience store, Memphis’ homicide count for 2016 reached 161 – more than the total number of homicides in all of 2015.

33. Strickland Used Polls to Hone Campaign Strategy -

Political strategist Steven Reid calls Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s campaign “the perfect example” of using polling to win an election.

34. The Fading Accuracy of Political Polling -

Joe Carr says he couldn’t believe the deficit when U.S. Rep. Diane Black trounced him in the August election to recapture Tennessee’s 6th Congressional District seat.

35. Library Card Month Encourages Online Sign Up -

The Memphis Public Library & Information Center is encouraging students returning to school to sign up for a library card online and then come by any library branch to pick it up.

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is honorary chairman of National Library Sign-Up Month in Memphis, which also encourages adults to get a library card if they don’t already have one.

36. Last Word: Busy Council Day, Crosstown High and Local Democratic Post Mortem -

There aren’t any terms yet. But it would appear that there is enough common ground between the owners of Wiseacre Brewing and the administration of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland to take what amounts to a letter of intent on the Mid-South Coliseum to the City Council Tuesday.

37. Last Word: Bearwater's Week, Deannexation's Return and City Hall's Transparency -

Former President Jimmy Carter and his wife and first lady Rosalynn Carter arrived in the city Sunday for a week of work in North Memphis on the Habitat for Humanity subdivision Bearwater Park.

38. Local Task Force Prepares For Return of Deannexation Issue -

You might call it round two of the deannexation battle.

In Nashville Monday, Aug. 22, a summer study committee of legislators picks up where the debate on a deannexation proposal during the Tennessee Legislature’s regular session ended earlier this year.

39. Council Confirms Rallings, Delays Residency Vote -

With no debate, Memphis City Council members voted Tuesday, Aug. 9, to approve the appointment of Michael Rallings as the city’s permanent police director at a salary of $219,000 a year.

Still to be worked out is undoing Rallings previously set retirement date so that he can fulfill a pledge to serve through 2019, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s current term of office.

40. Council Confirms Rallings, Delays Residency Vote -

With no debate, Memphis City Council members voted Tuesday, Aug. 9, to approve the appointment of Michael Rallings as the city’s permanent police director at a salary of $219,000 a year.

Still to be worked out is undoing Rallings previously set retirement date so that he can fulfill a pledge to serve through 2019, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s current term of office.

41. Mediation Confidential -

One of the two mediators in the Overton Park Greensward controversy says although there was no settlement produced by the mediation in June, the process nonetheless paved the way for its resolution in July.

42. Red State, Blue Mayors -

Nashville Mayor Megan Barry, a Democrat in Tennessee’s sea of red, finds herself adapting to the control Republicans hold over the state Legislature.

43. Council Urges Strickland To Make Rallings Top Cop -

Interim Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings told city council members Tuesday, July 19, that if he is appointed permanent police director by Mayor Jim Strickland, he would commit to serve for the duration of Strickland’s current four-year term of office.

44. Last Word: Return of the Balloon Note, SCS and Migrant Teens & Greensward Doubts -

One of the prime culprits in the housing bubble burst that played a role in the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression is back – the adjustable rate mortgage.

Numbers from Chandler Reports, the real estate information company that is part of The Daily News Publishing Co. Inc, show the number of such loans has spiked in the first half of this year and are the highest they’ve been since 2008, the year after the bubble burst nationally.

45. Council Urges Strickland To Make Rallings Top Cop -

Interim Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings told city council members Tuesday, July 19, that if he is appointed permanent police director by Mayor Jim Strickland, he would commit to serve for the duration of Strickland’s current four-year term of office.

46. Morrison Orchestrates Overton Park Compromise -

Before the Tuesday, July 19, Memphis City Council vote approving the Overton Park compromise, council member Worth Morgan commended fellow council member Bill Morrison for taking up the torch of trying to find a consensus between the Memphis Zoo and the Overton Park Conservancy.

47. City Council Approves Overton Park Compromise -

Memphis City Council members unanimously approved Tuesday, July 19, the plan to create 415 new parking places for the Memphis Zoo at its front entrance and end zoo overflow parking on the Overton Park Greensward by January 2019.

48. After The Bridge -

Four and a half hours after it began Sunday, July 10, the city's most significant and largest Black Lives Matter protest ended with police in riot gear slowly walking a group of around 100 protesters off the Hernando DeSoto Bridge and south on Front Street.

49. Police Director Lawsuit Moves to Discovery -

A Chancery Court lawsuit seeking to make public the list of applicants for Memphis Police director is moving toward a July 20 hearing before Chancellor Walter Evans.

50. Council Likely to Vote On Pinch Plan in 90 Days -

A plan for the redevelopment of the Pinch area is essentially complete and Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration is rounding up grant funds and other financing for elements of the plan, according to Memphis City Council member Berlin Boyd.

51. Council Likely to Vote On Pinch Plan in 90 Days -

A plan for the redevelopment of the Pinch area is essentially complete and Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration is rounding up grant funds and other financing for elements of the plan, according to Memphis City Council member Berlin Boyd.

52. Last Word: Being Veep, Greensward Still Active and Tuition Goes Up -

On one of the most eventful days yet in the 2016 Presidential general election campaign, U.S. Sen. Bob Corker was on the campaign trail with presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump. First there was a private meeting in New York where he was reportedly being vetted for the vice president’s position including a look at his financials – and then a Trump rally in Raleigh, N.C., where he was being road tested.

53. Last Word: Two Paths, Council Day, Conley Writes and WIGS Debut -

Two ways to look at the Fourth of July in Memphis. It was either soggy or the fireworks began early.

For probably less than a minute, the mother accused to killing four of her children last week in southeast Shelby County will make her first court appearance Tuesday morning either in person at 201 Poplar Ave. or by video link from Jail East.

54. Mayor, DA Discuss Approach To Curb Crime -

Much of the attention in local crime statistics this year goes to the jump in the city’s homicide rate.

But that rate pales in comparison to aggravated assaults.

From January through May, there were 492 aggravated assaults per 100,000 people in Memphis, according to statistics from the Memphis-Shelby County Crime Commission.

55. Chamber Names Simmons Director of Public Policy -

Haley Simmons has joined the Greater Memphis Chamber as the director of public policy, a new position in the chamber’s community development department. In this role, Simmons will be focused on enhancing the chamber’s advocacy efforts to inform and engage its members on important policy issues, and he’ll also be responsible for growing the chamber’s role in education initiatives.

56. Local, State Leaders to Make Lamar Avenue Announcement Tuesday -

The Lamar Avenue road project waiting for years to get started could be about to emerge from the planning stage to construction with a federal grant.

State and local leaders will gather in the heart of the busy freight corridor Tuesday, June 21, for a “major announcement.”

57. Last Word: ServiceMaster Details, Loflin Yard Changes and Bridge Lighting -

The ServiceMaster local incentives for the new Peabody Place headquarters have cleared the first hurdle.

That was the Center City Revenue Finance Corporation’s Tuesday meeting. It’s on to the Center City Development Corporation Wednesday and then EDGE.

58. Six Groups Inspect Mid-South Coliseum -

Six groups from Memphis and elsewhere inspected the Mid-South Coliseum this week, taking the city of Memphis up on an offer of four hours each to look over the mothballed 12,000-seat arena.

The city made the offer after it allowed a tour of the arena by the Coliseum Coalition and architects as the group pursues a plan to possibly restore or renovate the coliseum for future use.

59. Council Accepts Donations For Bridge LED Lighting -

Two of the four bridges crossing the Mississippi River will be framed with LED lighting for a fall debut on the city’s riverfront with the October formal opening of the Big River Crossing.

The Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, June 7, accepting $12 million in private donations for the lighting of the Harahan Bridge as well as a conversion of the existing lighting on the Hernando DeSoto Bridge to LED lighting.

60. Six Groups Inspect Mid-South Coliseum -

Six groups from Memphis and elsewhere inspected the Mid-South Coliseum this week, taking the city of Memphis up on an offer of four hours each to look over the mothballed 12,000-seat arena.

The city made the offer after it allowed a tour of the arena by the Coliseum Coalition and architects as the group pursues a plan to possibly restore or renovate the coliseum for future use.

61. Council Accepts Donations for Bridge LED Lighting -

Two of the four bridges crossing the Mississippi River will be framed with LED lighting for a fall debut on the city’s riverfront with the October formal opening of the Big River Crossing.

The Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, June 7, accepting $12 million in private donations for the lighting of the Harahan Bridge as well as a conversion of the existing lighting on the Hernando DeSoto Bridge to LED lighting.

62. City Council Weighing Budget Amendments -

The Memphis City Council budget committee plan to wrap up its work Tuesday, May 31, on the city operating and capital budget proposals for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

The committee meets Tuesday, May 31, at 3 p.m. and will hear from nonprofit agencies seeking city grants. Council members also will propose amendments to the budget proposals from Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration.

63. ServiceMaster Disrupting Its Culture With Move Downtown -

ServiceMaster is converting Peabody Place into a corporate headquarters that would rival a Silicon Valley tech outfit.

On Friday, June 3, ServiceMaster laid to rest months of speculation about whether the company would relocate to a larger city like Atlanta or Dallas. Memphis’ available Class A office space can’t currently accommodate ServiceMaster’s needs, so it looked to the retail sector for its new home.

64. City Council Weighing Budget Amendments -

The Memphis City Council budget committee plan to wrap up its work Tuesday, May 31, on the city operating and capital budget proposals for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

The committee meets Tuesday, May 31, at 3 p.m. and will hear from nonprofit agencies seeking city grants. Council members also will propose amendments to the budget proposals from Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration.

65. City Council to Wrap Up 2016-2017 Budget Sessions -

The Memphis City Council’s budget committee meets Tuesday, May 24, for wrap-up sessions on the operating and capital budget proposals from Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland.

66. Crime Stats Chronicle Recent Spike in Violent Crime -

Myneishia Johnson’s funeral was the day before she was supposed to graduate from high school.

The teenager’s death at the corner of Second Street and Peabody Place on May 22 came on one of the first busy Downtown weekends of the spring not connected to a Memphis in May International Festival event.

67. City Council to Wrap Up Budget Sessions -

The Memphis City Council’s budget committee meets Tuesday, May 24, for wrap-up sessions on the operating and capital budget proposals from Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland.

68. Memphis Police Partner With NextDoor Network -

Memphis Police and the city of Memphis are partnering with NextDoor, the social media network, to better communicate with residents.

Mayor Jim Strickland and interim Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings announced the partnership Thursday, May 19, at City Hall.

69. Memphis Police Partner With NextDoor Network -

Memphis Police and the city of Memphis are partnering with NextDoor, the social media network, to better communicate with residents.

Mayor Jim Strickland and interim Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings announced the partnership Thursday, May 19, at City Hall.

70. Last Word: Mud Island Money, Elvis Mystery and Beyond Barbecue -

It looks like the dry rub will be in order for Memphis in May's barbecue weekend with a shower or two keeping the dust down in Tom Lee Park Wednesday.

If you can see it through the smoke, Mud Island might strike a first-tme observer as a marked contrast to all of the activity in Tom Lee Park that goes right up to the bluff's edge.

71. RVC Outdoors Seeks Strickland’s Commitment -

Andy Cates, CEO of Memphis-based RVC Outdoor Destinations, said his redevelopment plan for Mud Island won’t require significant public dollars, but he’s looking for a commitment from the city to move forward.

72. Haves, Have-Nots Get Varied Tax Relief -

Amid the rancor of bathroom and counseling bills, two major pieces of legislation slipped through the General Assembly this session with hardly a peep – elimination of the Hall tax and a partial revitalization of property tax relief for seniors and disabled veterans.

73. Last Word: Behind Grit N Grind, Brooks at 100 and Massacre -

This is a 12-month-a-year basketball town. There’s the season, possibly a post season, which by NBA standards is a second season. (Yep, they are still playing.) And then there is the rest of the year when whatever has been about to boil over behind the façade of sports clichés finally begins to spill out into the open.

74. Raleigh Mall Demolition Signals Change After Delays -

The crowd of several hundred people on the south end of the Raleigh Springs Mall Saturday, May 7, was larger than the crowd inside the mall to shop.

They came to watch the beginning of the end.

75. Demolition Begins On Raleigh Springs Mall Property -

With the business end of a Volvo crawler excavator, Memphis City Council member Bill Morrison kicked off the start of demolition Saturday, May 7, at the Raleigh Springs Mall.

76. Trustee’s Conference Meets in Memphis -

County trustees from across Tennessee will meet in Memphis for their annual conference on Tuesday through Thursday, May 10-12, at the Sheraton Memphis Downtown.

77. Last Word: Mall Demo, Defining 'Fringe Element' and Herenton's New Path -

Once upon a time there were three “town centers” planned by the city of Memphis.

City facilities like libraries and police precincts would be the anchors and encourage private retail development in them.

78. Norris Recounts Path to Majority Status, Dunavant Award -

Good government isn’t a bowl of cherries. There will be controversy even with the best of intentions and with everything done by the numbers. And that applies to those who win awards like state Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville.

79. Norris, Geater Named Dunavant Award Recipients -

Tennessee State Senate Republican Leader Mark Norris of Collierville and Lisa Geater, chief of staff to Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland, are the recipients of the annual Bobby Dunavant Public Servant Awards to be presented in May by the Rotary Club of Memphis East.

80. Commission Debates Full Bill for Police Body Cameras -

Most Shelby County commissioners expressing an opinion say they favor body cameras for Memphis Police.

But the opinions begin to differ significantly when comes to who pays for the back-office system to handle the recordings and how much the whole bill will be.

81. CBHS Gets $1 Million Gift, Names Business Program -

Christian Brothers High School has announced its business program will be called the Bill and Carol Marr Department of Business and Economics. The program is named in honor of the $1 million gift from alumnus Bill Marr, CBHS Class of 1964.

82. Bridging a Divide -

The Mid-South is united by more than the Mississippi River, but that’s what it took to get the region’s mayors in the same room.

In the aftermath of the 2011 Mississippi River flood, damage stretched from Millington’s naval base to Memphis’ Beale Street. Leaders of the affected municipalities had to come together to apply for FEMA grants and plot their way out of devastation.

83. CBHS Receives $1 Million Gift, Names New Business Program -

Christian Brothers High School has announced its business program will be called the Bill and Carol Marr Department of Business and Economics. The program is named in honor of the $1 million gift from alumnus Bill Marr, CBHS Class of 1964.

84. Last Word: Budget Basics, A Peak At Greensward Mediation and Elvis & Nixon -

Spurs 94 – Grizzlies 68 in game 2 of the NBA playoffs. The TNT post-game show just showed the highlights of the game while Shaq and Charles Barkley talked about how big the women are in San Antonio. I’m not making this up. They didn’t even try to talk about the game. This is just grim.

85. Last Word: When To Heal, Budget Day at City Hall and Cheese Steak Pondering -

After Sunday’s thrashing of the Grizzlies by the Spurs in their 2016 NBA playoff debut, there is a school of thought among Grizz watchers that the sooner this is over the better.
But there are others who would have a more content off season if the Grizz could win just one game in the series as they go down and then proceed back to the cave for some summer healing.
Either way, Game 2 is Tuesday in San Antonio and then FedExForum Friday for Game 3.

86. Last Word: Tubby Time, Haslam's Veto and Africa in April's 30th Year -

It was just four weeks ago that all of this talk about change at the top of the Tiger basketball chart was put to rest. Coach Josh Pastner’s performance was reviewed by the University of Memphis administration and he was staying at least for another season. Four weeks to the day of that announcement, Pastner is the new coach at Georgia Tech and we are in the first day of the Tubby Smith era at the U of M.

87. Parkinson: OK to ‘Go A Little Bit Extreme’ to Get Job Done -

With U.S. Marine Corps training, Rep. Antonio Parkinson knows how to grab people’s attention.

He did that earlier this year when he sponsored legislation to kill the Achievement School District, Tennessee’s solution for turning around struggling schools.

88. Last Word: Tubby Fever, School Closings and March Real Estate Numbers -

The Tigers basketball grapevine is nothing but Tubby Smith as of Wednesday when the speculation was joined by torrent of rumors about contact between the Texas Tech coach and the University of Memphis.
Smith has now acknowledged he’s talking with the U of M.
More background on Smith from The Sporting News and Mike DeCourcy, a former sports reporter at The Commercial Appeal, that came out before everything went Tubby here.

89. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

90. Last Word: Lipscomb's Successor, MATA School Buses and Roland's Big Breakfast -

Paul Young gets a lot more attention these days than he did when he was the first director of the city-county Office of Sustainability. The attention comes with being the city director of Housing and Community Development where virtually all of the funding comes from the federal government.
That federal funding has changed the face of public housing in the city in the last 25 years. There is only one large public housing project left in the city as a result of the federal funding and its use by Young’s predecessor, Robert Lipscomb.
And what Lipscomb did with the job combined with being the executive director of the Memphis Housing Authority is why a lot of people want to get to know Paul Young these days.
Our centerpiece story by Madeline Faber in Tuesday’s edition makes clear that Young has no desire to wield that kind of power. And it is unlikely anyone in the near future will have the kind of autonomy Lipscomb did.
But beyond that there is still the flow of a lot of federal dollars and Young has some ideas based on his experience in government and finance prior to coming to HCD – everything in government is initials.
It’s a much different experience than Lipscomb’s. Lipscomb coined the phrase “ending public housing as we know it” and at times that slogan wasn’t followed with a lot of detail about what came after public housing was demolished, especially with the first of the projects to fall.
The last public housing project, Foote Homes, will be demolished on Young’s watch which makes his tenure important if more limited than Lipscomb’s tenure.

91. Roland Starts 2018 Bid for County Mayor -

The 2018 Shelby County general elections are more than two years away. The 2016 county elections that decide races for General Sessions Court Clerk, five of the nine seats on the Shelby County Schools board and two judicial positions are still to come in August.

92. Wastewater Leak Stopped, McKellar Cleanup Continues -

The boat ramp on McKellar Lake at theA bypass around a raw sewage leak into Cypress Creek and McKellar Lake was up and running Thursday, April 7, according to the city of Memphis.

The bypass ends a leak in the main wastewater line to the T.E. Maxson Wastewater Treatment Plant that was discovered March 31 and triggered a large fish kill of more than 10,000 in McKellar Lake.

93. City Council Debates Idea of De-Annexation Compromises -

A proposal to form a joint city-county group to explore voluntary de-annexation and the city’s footprint goes to the Memphis City Council for a vote in two weeks.

But there is vocal sentiment on the council against the city giving up any of its turf, including the most recently annexed areas of south Cordova and Southwind-Windyke.

94. Last Word: Policing The Greensward, A Rural Oasis and Gene Chips -

The city of Memphis had 88 police staff and other city employees working an Overton Park detail Saturday and another 33 working Sunday on the same detail, according to the Strickland administration’s accounting on Monday.

95. Conrad Call for De-Annexation Talks Draws Favorable Reviews -

Memphis City Council Chairman Kemp Conrad wants to open talks with county commissioners on possible voluntary de-annexations.

And County Commission Chairman Terry Roland said he is open to the idea.

96. MPD Officer Schilling Gets Disability Retirement -

The city of Memphis pension board granted a line-of-duty disability retirement Thursday, March 31, to Memphis police officer Connor Schilling.

Schilling is the officer who shot and fatally wounded Darrius Stewart in July during a traffic stop in Hickory Hill.

97. Amended Senate De-annexation Bill Faces More Debate -

The de-annexation bill whose defeat became City Hall’s top priority in March is off the political frontburner.

But Memphis Democrats in the Tennessee Legislature who opposed the de-annexation by referendum measure expect that this isn’t the end of the concept or the move to make it law.

98. Memphis Presence Helps Turn Tide on Controversial Legislation -

The Tennessee Legislature’s de-annexation debate is over for now. But the bill’s effect on the Memphis-Capitol Hill relationship has left a larger political imprint than the proposal.

That’s saying a lot considering the proposal dealt with the possibility of territory and citizens rearranging the city’s boundaries to put them and the taxes they pay outside the city limits.

99. Memphis Leaders Pleased With 'Reprieve' on De-Annexation Bill -

The de-annexation by referendum legislation pending in the Tennessee Legislature was sent to a summer study committee Wednesday, March 30, in the state Senate, effectively killing the proposal for the legislative session.

100. Amendments Cloud Issue of De-Annexation -

Tennessee state senators go back to work Tuesday, March 29, in Nashville on a modified de-annexation bill.

The Senate State and Local Government Committee will be reviewing a set of amendments to their version of the bill, which changed substantially from the House version in a committee session last week.