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Editorial Results (free)

1. Chism Readying 2018 Bid for County Mayor -

Former Shelby County Commissioner Sidney Chism wants to be the Democratic nominee for Shelby County mayor in 2018, and he plans to begin his campaign after the November presidential election.

2. Last Word: Two Paths, Council Day, Conley Writes and WIGS Debut -

Two ways to look at the Fourth of July in Memphis. It was either soggy or the fireworks began early.

For probably less than a minute, the mother accused to killing four of her children last week in southeast Shelby County will make her first court appearance Tuesday morning either in person at 201 Poplar Ave. or by video link from Jail East.

3. 4 Children Fatally Stabbed in Memphis; Mother Charged -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Four young children were stabbed to death in a gated apartment complex in suburban Memphis on Friday, and the Shelby County Sheriff's Department has charged their mother, Shanynthia Gardner, with first degree murder as well as other charges.

4. Shelby County Budget Shuffle Endures -

By the end of Shelby County government’s budget season, a lot of paper was being passed around the County Commission chambers.

It was in keeping with the rules set by chairman Terry Roland going into the Wednesday, June 29, session that stretched on for seven hours: All amendments had to be put in written resolution form.

5. County Budget Done – Mostly -

Shelby County commissioners put most of their budget season to rest Wednesday, June 29, with $5 million from the county’s reserve fund after they added $13 million in amendments to the $1.1 billion county operating budget during a seven-hour session.

6. Lack of Major State Races Tempers Political Picnic -

'Hot' can be a political term. It can describe a close race or a very competitive race for elected office. When former Shelby County Commissioner Sidney Chism held his 16th annual political picnic Saturday, June 11, it was hot. And few of those at the Westwood gathering, other than perhaps the candidates, would describe this election season that way.

7. Haslam Signs Law That Overhauls Higher Education Boards -

COOKEVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – In a move that will transform higher education in Tennessee, Gov. Bill Haslam signed a bill that overhauls the governing boards of some of the state's universities.

8. Local Democrats’ Differences Remain -

Local Democratic Party leaders who backed pursuing a criminal complaint against former party chairman Bryan Carson said last week they hope to put the controversy over party finances behind them.

9. Local Democrats’ Differences Remain -

Local Democratic Party leaders who backed pursuing a criminal complaint against former party chairman Bryan Carson said last week they hope to put the controversy over party finances behind them.

10. Pope New Democratic Chairman as Party Pursues Complaint Against Carson -

The interim chairman of the Shelby County Democratic Party became the new chairman of the party Thursday, June 2. And the local party’s leadership voted to file a criminal complaint with the District Attorney General’s office against former chairman Bryan Carson over party finances.

11. Pope New Democratic Chairman as Party Pursues Complaint Against Carson -

The interim chairman of the Shelby County Democratic Party became the new chairman of the party Thursday, June 2. And the local party’s leadership voted to file a criminal complaint with the District Attorney General’s office against former chairman Bryan Carson over party finances.

12. Downtown Memphis Commission Taking Safety Actions -

At its May 26 board meeting, discussions at the Downtown Memphis Commission dove into the death of a teenager who was shot at the corner of Second Street and Peabody Place.

“I feel this personally,” said Terence Patterson, president of the Downtown Memphis Commission. “We’re really focusing on it and making sure we’re doing everything we can, but we have to have collaboration with MPD (Memphis Police Department). But we know that we’ve got to do more.”

13. Council Tallies Damage in 'Day of Bad News' -

Memphis City Council member Berlin Boyd summed up City Hall’s attitude Tuesday, March 15, during the council’s executive session. “Today is the day of bad news,” he said after a briefing from Mayor Jim Strickland on the deannexation bill approved the night before by the Tennessee House.
That was followed by more details on the estimated $60 million it will cost to replace the entire radio system for local first responders from the radios to the towers used to transmit their signals.

14. Bratcher Shooting First Test of Local Pact With TBI -

The first fatal police shooting since local law enforcement and prosecutors adopted a policy of sending such cases to the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation is being watched closely.

And a quick initial account by the TBI is a change from the agency’s normal posture of not making any comments and abiding strictly by a state law that seals all of its records from the public unless by court order or subpoena.

15. Memorable Events of 2015 will Spill Into 2016 -

When you really get down to it, history is a collection of moments, moments that, when they fall one after the other over the long arc of time, eventually form the tapestry representing who we are.

16. Stewart Incident Triggers Systemic Shift -

For six months this year the Black Lives Matter movement in Memphis grew in an ebb and a flow governed largely by the growing list of fatal police encounters in other cities.

There was also an equally volatile and varied set of reactions by civic leaders in those cities as well as protestors.

17. Questions Remain About Effectiveness of CLERB Ordinance -

Before the Memphis City Council gave final approval Tuesday, Nov. 3, to a reconstituted Civilian Law Enforcement Review Board, councilman Alan Crone had a question that wouldn’t go away.

18. Armstrong Ponders Mayoral Transition -

When outgoing Memphis Mayor A C Wharton said last week that Memphis Police Department director Toney Armstrong plans to retire at year’s end, what followed was the best representation of the off-kilter relationship between the mayor’s office and police brass.

19. Nashville and Knoxville Police Oppose TBI Investigations -

The police chiefs of Nashville and Knoxville have come out against a proposed state law that would automatically send fatal police-encounter investigations to the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation.

20. DOJ To Monitor Darrius Stewart Investigation -

The U.S. Justice Department is monitoring the investigation into the fatal police shooting of Darrius Stewart, U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen announced Monday, Oct. 19.

21. Justice Department To Monitor Stewart Investigation -

The U.S. Justice Department is monitoring the investigation into the fatal police shooting of Darrius Stewart, U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen announced Monday, Oct. 19.

22. TBI Probe Of Fatal Police Shootings Becomes Policy -

The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation has become the go-to agency for the Memphis Police Department in the last year when it comes to investigations of police conduct. And that’s a policy.

MPD director Toney Armstrong, Shelby County Sheriff Bill Oldham and District Attorney General Amy Weirich announced Thursday, Oct. 14, they have signed an agreement with the TBI to automatically turn all such investigations over to the TBI.

23. County Term-Limit Changes Proposed -

Just as the ballot was set for the October Memphis elections last week, some politicos were laying the groundwork for the 2016 election season in Shelby County.

That foundation includes two proposed amendments that would undo two Shelby County government charter amendments approved by voters in 2008.

24. Madeline Patterson Joins Burson Campaigns -

Madeline Patterson has joined the Memphis office of Burson Campaigns, the corporate issues management unit of Burson-Marsteller, as a vice president. In her new role, Patterson will work with Burson clients on issues and crisis management, communications strategy, and integrated marketing and communications campaigns.

25. Chism Political Picnic Offers Pre-Campaign Snapshot -

Memphis mayoral contender Jim Strickland saw a face he didn’t recognize Saturday, June 13, in the southwest Memphis crowd at former County Commissioner Sidney Chism’s annual political picnic.

26. County Budget Session To Return To Schools -

Shelby County Commissioners meet again Monday, May 18, with Shelby County Schools officials in the ongoing county budget season.

Commission budget chairwoman Heidi Shafer called the 3 p.m. session to specifically look at the school system’s benefits liabilities as well as state funding of schools and what that means for the level of county funding.

27. County Budget Season Reflects Priorities, Angst -

It’s that time of year in Downtown’s Civic Center Plaza.

In late April, May and into June, the budget committee sessions of the Memphis City Council and Shelby County Commission become the stage for the priorities – political and financial – of both bodies.

28. County Budget Proposal Includes $6 Million Dilemma -

Some of the numbers crucial to the bottom line of Shelby County’s budget for the upcoming fiscal year are still expected with about four months left in the fiscal year.

But at the outset of county commission budget hearings that begin Wednesday, April 8, here’s what the dollar figures look like.

29. Luttrell's $1.1 Billion Budget Plan Goes to Commission Wednesday -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell takes a $1.18 billion budget proposal to Shelby County Commissioners in Wednesday, April 8, committee sessions.

30. Undercover Jail Sting Exposes Problem -

With the indictment last week of four Shelby County deputy jailers on charges of drug possession with intent to distribute, federal and local law enforcement leaders went public with an undercover sting that began in July.

31. ‘Wake-Up Call’ -

Last week, Joel Hobson, broker-owner of Memphis-based Hobson Realtors, posted notes in the workplace and a message on the company’s website notifying clients that they may have to meet sales staff at the office or provide proof of identification.

32. Commission Balks at Ford Appointments -

When the Shelby County Commission moved back into its renovated chamber at the Vasco Smith Administration Building this month, the new chairman of the body, Justin Ford, had a new seating arrangement for the 13 members, including six newly elected commissioners.

33. Events -

Volunteer Mid-South will hold a volunteer expo Tuesday, Sept. 23, from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Oak Court Mall, 4465 Poplar Ave. Dozens of Mid-South nonprofits will on hand to discuss programs and volunteer opportunities. Visit volunteermidsouth.org.

34. Events -

Volunteer Mid-South will hold a volunteer expo Tuesday, Sept. 23, from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Oak Court Mall, 4465 Poplar Ave. Dozens of Mid-South nonprofits will on hand to discuss programs and volunteer opportunities. Visit volunteermidsouth.org.

35. Latino Political Profile Continues Rise -

When Latino Memphis held its first annual Leadership Luncheon last week in East Memphis, the ballroom at the Holiday Inn University of Memphis included political and business leaders among the group of 800 people.

36. County Leaders Make Transition to Governing -

For government officials, the oath of office marks the boundary between the ability to get elected and the ability to govern.

But it’s not always apparent to those taking the oath what they have gotten themselves into.

37. Democratic Chairman Apologizes as Party Parses Defeats -

Democrats don’t consider it a successful campaign season unless there is some kind of intra-party dust up, the political axiom goes.

That conventional political wisdom loses its validity the more Republicans win, and it suggests that when the differences within the party aren’t mended by a Democratic victory, a bigger skirmish is likely on the horizon.

38. Democratic Divide Widens in Election Results -

Democrats have retained their seven-vote majority on the new single-district Shelby County Commission that takes office Sept. 1.

That and the re-election victory of Democratic incumbent Cheyenne Johnson in the race for Shelby County Assessor of Property were the only bright spots for a divided local Democratic Party that lost every other countywide partisan elected position to Republicans in the Aug. 7 county general election, just as they lost every countywide position to Republicans four years earlier.

39. Cohen Prevails, Incumbents Dominate -

Democratic U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen held off Thursday, Aug. 7, the most serious electoral challenge he’s faced since winning the Congressional seat in 2006, in the form of attorney Ricky E. Wilkins.

40. Cohen, Luttrell, Weirich, Harris Take Early Vote -

Democratic U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen has taken the early vote over challenger Ricky Wilkins in the hard fought Democratic Congressional primary on Thursday’s Shelby County election ballot.

41. Republicans Rally In Bartlett -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam told a group of several hundred Republicans in Bartlett Monday, Aug. 4, that he would like to see a statewide turnout in the August Republican primaries of 750,000.

Haslam and U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander have been on a statewide bus tour since last week to pump up overall Republican turnout even as they face opposition in the GOP primaries for governor and the U.S. Senate. The goal is to also boost the turnout for Republican candidates in local general election races on the ballot.

42. Multiple Choice -

It could have been an election about the local criminal justice system. The set of once-every-eight-years judicial races was the perfect frame for competitive races for district attorney general and juvenile court judge as the main events.

43. Democratic Sample Ballot Omits Some Names -

Not every candidate who claimed the Democratic nomination in the May county primaries is on the Shelby County Democratic Party’s endorsement ballot that hits the streets this week.

With early voting underway in advance of the Aug. 7 election day, the sample ballot does not include Juvenile Court clerk candidate Henri Brooks, Circuit Court clerk nominee Rhonda Banks, Probate Court clerk candidate William Chism and County Clerk nominee Charlotte Draper.

44. Weirich: Brown ‘Out of Touch With Reality’ -

Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich says a video posted Tuesday on the campaign website of Democratic challenger Joe Brown questioning her sexual orientation represents a “sad day” in local politics.

45. Brown’s Campaign Has Included Many Turns -

Democratic Party leaders bet a lot politically at the outset of the 2014 election season on retired Criminal Court Judge Joe Brown as more than just the party’s nominee for district attorney general.

46. Weirich Says Brown ‘Out of Touch With Reality’ -

Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich says a video posted Tuesday on the campaign website of Democratic challenger Joe Brown questioning her sexual orientation represents a “sad day” in local politics.

47. Sheriff’s Race Reflects Different Law Enforcement Cultures -

Bennie Cobb remembers how he got his first job in the local criminal justice system.

It was 1980, and Cobb – then 19 years old – went to apply for a job at the old City Jail.

48. Chism Picnic Reflects Summer Campaign Tone -

From the stage at County Commissioner Sidney Chism’s annual political picnic Saturday, June 21, you could almost see the Aug. 7 election day.

49. Events -

The sixth annual Man of the House mentoring event for 12- to 18-year-old boys will be held Saturday, June 14, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the National Civil Rights Museum, 450 Mulberry St. A “power lunch” at noon will feature remarks from Sheriff Bill Oldham and Memphis business leaders. Cost is free. Register at manofthehouse.net or email manofthehousementoring@gmail.com.

50. Events -

The U.S. Attorney’s Office, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law and National Bar Association will hold a continuing legal education program titled “Remaking America: 50 Years of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act” Friday, June 13, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law, 1 N. Front St. Call 544-0122 for more information.

51. Events -

National Hispanic Professional Organization – Memphis will meet Thursday, June 12, from noon to 1 p.m. at the Hilton Memphis, 939 Ridge Lake Blvd. Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and Sheriff Bill Oldham will speak. On-site registration begins at 11:30 a.m. Cost is free for members and $20 for nonmembers. Email info@nhpomemphis.us.

52. Events -

Greater Memphis Chamber and the New Memphis Institute will hold a Celebrate What’s Right lunch Wednesday, June 11, at noon at the Holiday Inn University of Memphis, 3700 Central Ave. Chamber President and CEO Phil Trenary and members of the Chairman’s Circle will discuss the chamber’s five “moon mission” initiatives. Tickets are $30. Visit newmemphis.org.

53. Both Parties Launch General Election Efforts -

On a Saturday afternoon with a crowded calendar of political events, state Rep. G.A. Hardaway invited the winners and losers from the May Democratic county primaries and local Democrats who are on the August ballot to stand together at an airport-area meeting room of about 100 people.

54. August’s ‘Big Ballot’ Awaits County’s Voters -

With the unofficial results in the Shelby County primary elections in, get ready for the “big ballot.”

The candidates who won the Democratic and Republican primaries in Tuesday’s elections advance to the August ballot where they will join a much larger group of candidates and races that once every eight years produce the largest ballot of any election cycle in Shelby County politics.

55. Primary Choices -

Shelby County voters will begin the process Tuesday, May 6, of electing a majority of new members to a Shelby County Commission that will also change to a set of 13 single-member districts when the winners take office on Sept. 1.

56. Rape Kit Backlog Report Tracks Complex Path -

The former federal prosecutor investigating the city’s untested rape kit backlog says clearing the backlog will mean more than an investment in testing the rape kits for DNA.

“Stop and think. These kits are going to be tested,” said former U.S. Attorney Veronica Coleman-Davis on the WKNO-TV program “Behind The Headlines.”

57. Oldham Catches Criticism for County’s Rape Kit Backlog -

Shelby County Sheriff Bill Oldham took fire at a weekend political forum over his department’s backlog of 300 untested rape kits, which Oldham revealed during budget hearings before the Shelby County Commission earlier in the week.

58. Ongoing Rape Kit Backlog Fallout Expands -

The ongoing fallout from the backlog of untested rape kits is beginning to develop some boundaries and dividing lines as it moves into federal court and expands outside court to include a backlog of 300 rape kits by the Shelby County Sheriff’s Department.

59. Early Voting Opens in County Primaries -

Shelby County voters begin deciding Wednesday, April 16, who holds 11 countywide offices, including Shelby County mayor and district attorney general, as well as 13 seats on the Shelby County Commission drawn with new single-member district lines.

60. Brown Contempt Jailing Maps Political Challenge -

The arrest of the Democratic nominee for Shelby County district attorney general Monday, March 24, is the best indication yet of the tumult within the local Democratic Party as it attempts to win countywide offices four years after losing every race to Republicans.

61. Shelby County Party Heads Look Ahead to Primaries -

As Shelby County Democrats try to improve on losing every countywide office to Republicans in the 2010 county elections, party leaders are also warning political figures who identify as Democrats not to cross party lines.

62. Criminal Justice Issues Likely to Dominate Races -

Expect to hear a lot between now and August about how the local criminal justice system does or does not work.

With Thursday’s filing deadline for candidates in the May 6 county primaries, two races for offices that are part of the system advanced to the August ballot.

63. Roland ReElected At Filing Deadline, Two Countywide Races Set For August -

One of the six Shelby County Commission incumbents seeking re-election this year was effectively elected to a new four-year term in a new district with the noon Thursday, Feb. 20, filing deadline for candidates in the May county primaries.

64. Democratic Commission Majority Could Be Safe in Elections -

With a week to the filing deadline for candidates in the May 6 Shelby County primary elections, it looks as if Democrats will retain their seven-member majority on the Shelby County Commission.

The commission switches to a set of 13 single-member districts with the 2014 elections instead of the current structure of one single-member district and four districts each represented by three commissioners.

65. Fields Begin to Gel for May and August Ballots -

With two weeks to the filing deadline for candidates in the May Shelby County primary elections and two months to the deadline for those in the August state and federal primaries and county nonpartisan elections, the fields have solidified enough that some political players are weighing their prospects for a late entry before the filing deadlines.

66. Commission Debates Pay for County Offices -

Shelby County Commissioners appear to have another deadlock similar to the one that spilled over from 2011 into 2012 on drawing new district lines for the 13-member body.

This time the issue is what to pay those holding six countywide elected offices once all of the votes are counted next August in the county general elections.

67. County Commission Approves Three More Schools Pacts -

Shelby County Commissioners on Monday, Dec. 2, approved agreements for suburban school districts in Millington, Collierville and Bartlett, with little discussion at a special meeting of the body.

The commission approved similar agreements with elected leaders in Arlington and Lakeland in November.

68. Oldham Opens Sheriff Re-Election Bid -

Shelby County Sheriff Bill Oldham opened his re-election campaign Saturday, Nov. 2, with something he didn’t have four years ago: a record.

69. Sheriff Oldham Begins Re-Election Campaign -

Shelby County Sheriff Bill Oldham was scheduled to kick off his re-election campaign Saturday, Nov. 2, at the Balinese Ballroom in the Pinch District.

70. Cohen Moves On From Week of Controversy -

With a two-year term of office, members of Congress are never far from re-election mode.

The odd-numbered years are off-election years but not years with time off from politics or the incumbent’s advantage of a record in Washington to tout.

71. Events -

Memphis Rotary Club will meet Tuesday, July 30, at noon at the University Club of Memphis, 1346 Central Ave. Shelby County Sheriff Bill Oldham will speak. Cost for nonmembers is $18. R.S.V.P. to Taylor Hughes at taylor@memphisrotary.org.

72. Events -

Memphis Rotary Club will meet Tuesday, July 30, at noon at the University Club of Memphis, 1346 Central Ave. Shelby County Sheriff Bill Oldham will speak. Cost for nonmembers is $18. R.S.V.P. to Taylor Hughes at taylor@memphisrotary.org.

73. Chism Pushing for Younger Democratic Contenders -

Candidates in the 2014 elections for Shelby County Commission emerged at Commissioner Sidney Chism’s political picnic over the weekend.

74. Commission Receives Schools Financials -

Shelby County Commissioners formally get the financials of Shelby County’s two public school systems Monday, May 6, in an action that is not expected to generate much debate.

But the financial statements for the fiscal year that ended June 30 is another step along the path toward the formal merger of both school systems effective at the end of the current fiscal year.

75. Paper, Drug Disposal Nets 298 Pounds of Pills -

MEMPHIS (AP) – The Shelby County sheriff's office has collected more than 5 tons of paper and nearly 300 pounds of prescription drugs at a shredding and disposal event.

The sheriff's office and the Tennessee Division of Consumer Affairs invited residents in Memphis and the rest of the county to drop off documents that contained personal information that could be used for identity theft and any unneeded prescription drugs so they could be disposed of safely.

76. Lessons Learned -

What happened 15 years ago outside the Shelby County Courthouse between the seated figures of justice and wisdom informed much of what happened Saturday, March 30, when a different Ku Klux Klan group, the American Knights, came to Memphis and rallied at the other southern entrance to the courthouse – between the seated figures of authority and liberty.

77. Klan Rally, Heavy Police Presence Mix With Rain -

A group of 60 robed Ku Klux Klan members and swastika flag bearing members of the National Socialist Movement rallied Saturday, March 30, outside the Shelby County Courthouse.

The protest and a counter protest came with chilly temperatures and a rain that alternated between a mist and a downpour over several hours.

78. Hopson Seeks $57 Million Owed Schools -

Interim Memphis City Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson hopes to meet with Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. next week about $57 million.

That is the amount of money the school system won in two court decisions – trial and appellate level – from the city while Hopson was general counsel to the school system.

79. Schools Security Plan Emphasizes Consistency -

While many of the most controversial issues of the coming merger of Memphis City Schools and Shelby County Schools are still to be decided, the issue of how to handle school security appears to be settled.

80. Bartlett Zoning Case Tops Commission Agenda -

Shelby County Commissioners take up a proposed assisted living facility at their meeting Monday, Nov. 5, that doesn’t yet require approval from the city of Bartlett but which is in an area Bartlett is seeking to annex.

81. In Remembrance -

The Bluff City Tuesday, Sept.11, joins communities across the United States in honoring local firefighters and remembering the nearly 3,000 people who lost their lives in the terrorist attacks that shook the nation 11 years ago on this day.

82. Events -

The Black Business Association of Memphis will hold a small-business loan workshop Monday, Sept. 10, at 5:30 p.m. at Renaissance Business Center, 555 Beale St. Cost is free, and pre-registration is not required. Visit bbamemphis.com or call 526-9300.

83. New Gang Unit Takes All-Out Approach -

There are few pieces of gang graffiti that are a more certain indicator of gang activity than the word Hoover.

Pitchforks and multi-pointed stars and certain numbers could be the work on bona fide gang members or those who aspire to gang membership – called “wannabes” by police.

84. Law Enforcement Agencies Launch New Gang Unit -

Local, state and federal law enforcement officials formally launched Monday, July 23, a new “Multi-Agency Gang Unit.”

But the unit will operate differently than the past gang unit that was a consolidation of efforts by the Memphis Police Department and the Shelby County Sheriff’s Department.

85. Metro Gang Unit Unveiling Monday -

A new Metro Gang Unit will be unveiled Monday, July 23, by local, state and federal law enforcement officials.

But the unit will operate differently than the past gang unit that was a consolidation of efforts by the Memphis Police Department and the Shelby County Sheriff’s Department.

86. Sheriff's Office Withdraws Request for Drone Helicopter -

The Shelby County Sheriff’s Office has withdrawn its request to buy two miniature helicopter drones capable of real-time video surveillance.

Sheriff’s office chief administrative officer Chuck Fox told Shelby County Commissioners Wednesday, May 16, that Sheriff Bill Oldham was withdrawing the request to use part of $400,000 in federal Homeland Security funding for the unmanned devices.

87. Copter Drones Dominate Commission Debate -

A plan by the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office to buy two miniature helicopter drones hit some political turbulence Monday, May 7, among Shelby County Commissioners concerned about privacy issues.

“The potential for abuse is great,” said Commissioner Brent Taylor. “They could peer into our private spaces without a warrant.”

88. County Commission Debates, Delays Drones -

Shelby County Commissioners had little trouble Monday, May 7, approving the first of three readings of a redistricting plan.

There were a few questions about procedure as the commission makes its fourth try at setting new district lines for itself. But commissioners didn’t get into any of the specifics of a plan. That should change on second reading in two weeks.

89. Group Weighs Schools Logistics -

The city charter requires Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division to provide water to the Memphis City Schools system at no charge.

When MCS consolidates with the Shelby County Schools system in 2013, the merged system may have to pay a water bill as well as electric and gas bills. Or the free water may flow to the former county schools as well.

90. Officials Increase Crime Prevention Programs -

Just as statistics have driven the Blue CRUSH anti-crime strategy, U.S. Justice Department officials in Memphis this week said they are confident other statistics can point to strategies that will prevent crime.

91. City Police, County Sheriff Revive Joint Gang Unit -

After years of separate efforts to fight gangs, the Memphis Police Department and Shelby County Sheriff’s Office are about to bring back a joint gang unit that will also include participation by federal agencies and the district attorney general’s office as well as the Memphis City Schools system.

92. Hiring Squeeze Highlights Budget -

The Luttrell administration takes a set of proposed budget cuts to Shelby County commissioners Wednesday, June 1, that will mean no 2 percent raise for county employees next fiscal year, no increase in health insurance for county employees and a tighter squeeze on county hiring.

93. Dodging the Deluge -

The last time the Memphis river gauge was this high, Memphis was a much different place. In 1937 when the Mississippi River at Memphis topped 48.7 feet, Mud Island was really an island with no levee connecting it to the city and the Wolf River flowing between it and the city proper. Parts of the city were still rural as was the county outside Memphis. Today’s suburban development was a long way off, and Millington was still a few years away from getting the Naval Air Station.

94. Flood Experts Watch Wolf and Loosahatchie Warily -

Gov. Bill Haslam met with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers officials Friday morning during one of several stops in Memphis.

As the Mississippi River continued to rise toward a projected 45-foot crest on May 10, the tributaries – the Wolf and Loosahatchie Rivers – remained the main source of street flooding in east Shelby County and even along Humphreys Boulevard in East Memphis as well as Wolf River Boulevard between Riverdale and Wolf River Circle.

95. County Sheriff's Office is Reaccredited -

The Shelby County Sheriff’s Office has been reaccredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies.

The office was fully accredited for the second consecutive time based on policies, procedures, management, operations and support services.

96. Employee Benefits Issue Plays Out Locally -

The debate the Wisconsin Legislature is having about public employee benefits is an issue familiar to local elected leaders.

As Wisconsin’s stormy and emotional debate, which includes a generous helping of collective bargaining controversy not present in any of the local discussions, has played out nationally, the local efforts are moving ahead again.

97. Old Cop, New Cop -

Until 2006, about the only things that cops in Memphis considered “high-tech” were the radio receivers they attached to their shirts.

Older cops considered the latest gadgets in crime fighting as a departure from proven police methods. They still relied on written reports – a bureaucratic requirement in case there were repercussions later – even though there was no guarantee the paper could be found. The closest thing to digital was the reel-to-reel recordings of radio dispatches.

98. Commission Considers IT Consolidation, New Position -

Shelby County commissioners take up the issue of consolidation once again at Monday’s meeting of the body.

It’s not consolidation of city and county governments, though. Voters dealt with that on the Nov. 2 ballot.

99. Sheriff’s Department Now on Facebook -

The Shelby County Sheriff’s Office is on Facebook to stay. The department began experimenting with a presence on the social media site in July during the tenure of Sheriff Mark Luttrell.

100. Oldham Fills Top Sheriff's Positions -

Shelby County Sheriff Bill Oldham has named William S. Cash as his chief deputy and Robert L. Moore as interim director of the Shelby County Jail.