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Editorial Results (free)

1. Manafort's Defense Rests After Calling No Witnesses -

ALEXANDRIA, Va. (AP) — Paul Manafort's defense rested its case Tuesday without calling any witnesses in the former Trump campaign chairman's tax evasion and fraud trial. Manafort chose not to testify.

2. Gates, Star Witness Against Manafort, Concludes Testimony -

ALEXANDRIA, Va. (AP) — Paul Manafort's protégé wrapped up his testimony Wednesday after implicating the former Trump campaign chairman and himself in financial crimes while also enduring stinging attacks on his character and credibility.

3. Last Word: MemFix 4's Big Weekend, Early Voting Six Days In and Grizz Moves -

A big weekend to avoid the interstate with a rare closing of I-240 between the 385 split and the I-40 split and Poplar over I-240 also closed in both directions. This kicks in Friday evening and runs up to Monday morning’s rush hour as TDOT crews work to replace four bridges in East Memphis using a relatively new process in which parts of the bridges are assembled in advance and then moved into place. The bridges are both Poplar bridges, the Park Avenue bridge and the Norfolk Southern rail bridge. And this will happen all over again in about a week’s time using the same schedule, weather permitting. Weekenders on the interstate already have some experience with a milder version of this with the interstate projects on the south leg

4. 'Game of Thrones' Slays With a Leading 22 Emmy Nominations -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — "Game of Thrones" roared back onto the Emmy battlefield, topping Thursday's nominations with 22 bids but with a formidable opponent in last year's winner "The Handmaid's Tale," while a streaming platform made history by earning the most bids for the first time.

5. Pinnacle Continues to Ramp up Memphis Presence -

Pinnacle Bank is continuing to accelerate its growth in the Memphis banking market, with the opening in recent days of two new loan production offices, a new mortgage office, plus another mortgage office on the way soon in Southaven.

6. A Look Back At UT’s History In NCAA Tourney -

Basketball coach Rick Barnes was fired by Texas in late March of 2015 when he refused to fire members of his coaching staff.

7. Elvis’ Baby Grand Piano Returning to Graceland -

A white baby grand piano Elvis Presley bought for the music room of Graceland shortly after moving in is returning to the Whitehaven mansion after a restoration.

The refurbished 1912 Knabe, which features gold accents, will be unveiled at the mansion in December and played during shows at Elvis Presley’s Memphis – the entertainment complex across Elvis Presley Boulevard from the mansion – as part of a first-ever Graceland holiday concert weekend Dec. 15 and 16.

8. Elvis’ Baby Grand Piano Returning to Graceland -

A white baby grand piano Elvis Presley bought for the music room of Graceland shortly after moving in is returning to the Whitehaven mansion after a restoration.

The refurbished 1912 Knabe, which features gold accents, will be unveiled at the mansion in December and played during shows at Elvis Presley’s Memphis – the entertainment complex across Elvis Presley Boulevard from the mansion – as part of a first-ever Graceland holiday concert weekend Dec. 15 and 16.

9. St. Jude Ranked No. 1 Pediatric Cancer Hospital -

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital has reclaimed the title as the No. 1 pediatric cancer hospital in the nation, according to U.S. News & World Report’s 28th annual “Best Hospitals” list, which compared nearly 5,000 medical centers nationwide in 25 specialties, procedures and conditions.

10. St. Jude Ranked No. 1 Pediatric Cancer Hospital -

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital has reclaimed the title as the No. 1 pediatric cancer hospital in the nation, according to U.S. News & World Report’s 28th annual “Best Hospitals” list, which compared nearly 5,000 medical centers nationwide in 25 specialties, procedures and conditions.

11. Commission OKs Funding For Old Forensic Center -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a $4 million contract with Jaycon Development Corp. Monday, June 12, for the renovation of 1060 Madison Ave., which served as the county forensic center until 2012 and is slated to become the new location of the Rape Crisis Center and the Crime Victims Center.

12. Commission OKs Funding For Old Forensic Center -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a $4 million contract with Jaycon Development Corp. Monday, June 12, for the renovation of 1060 Madison Ave., which served as the county forensic center until 2012 and is slated to become the new location of the Rape Crisis Center and the Crime Victims Center.

13. Last Word: The Grizz Are Back, Bass Pro Shops Buys Cabela's and Stein at Amurica -

Some of you will remember the late George Lapides, whom I worked with for a time at WREC, had a policy about pre-season baseball games or what he called the “Grapefruit League.” It was that they didn’t exist. He wouldn’t acknowledge the games much less the scores.

14. Holding On -

The national outlook for traditional enclosed malls is bleak. No new enclosed mall has been built in the U.S. since 2006. More than 24 have closed since 2010, and an additional 60 are teetering on the edge, according to data from Green Street Advisors. Around 15 percent of malls nationwide are expected to close in the next decade.

15. Target Bringing 400-Job Project to Memphis -

Memphis is poised to land hundreds of new jobs and retain several hundred more. Target will seek incentives from Memphis and Shelby County as early as next week for an online fulfillment center that will create over 400 new jobs.

16. Young Volunteers Face Long Odds at Oklahoma -

Two games into the 2014 season, and it’s time for the University of Tennessee to play some big-boy football.

The Vols (2-0) took care of business at Neyland Stadium in the first two games against Utah State and Arkansas State.

17. County Leaders Make Transition to Governing -

For government officials, the oath of office marks the boundary between the ability to get elected and the ability to govern.

But it’s not always apparent to those taking the oath what they have gotten themselves into.

18. ‘Significant Headwinds’ -

When Gov. Bill Haslam joined local economic development and civic officials at FedExForum in January to announce that Conduit Global would open a call center in Shelby County that would employ 1,000 people over the next three to five years, it provided a much-needed boost to the local office real estate sector.

19. County Commission Discusses School Board Raises -

After a five-month delay, Shelby County Commissioners resumed action Monday, June 2, on an ordinance that would raise the pay of Shelby County Schools board members.

Commissioners approved Monday on the second of three readings an amended pay raise for school board members.

20. City Council Approves Shady Grove Development -

The Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, May 20, a 22-lot residential planned development at the southeast corner of Shady Grove Road and Interstate 240 by Greenbrier Partners LLC.

21. MalmoMemphis Completes Three Law Firm Leases -

Three Memphis law firms represented by MalmoMemphis Real Estate Inc. have renewed their office leases or leased new spaces.

22. ‘Growth Mode’ -

The fun, quirky vibe found at Memphis-based Web design company RocketFuel is readily apparent via things like remote-controlled helicopter jousting sessions between employees, and life-sized cutouts of figures like Spock in the office.

23. Weddle-West Voted GRE Board Chair-Elect -

Dr. Karen Weddle-West, dean of the graduate school, vice provost for academic affairs and director of diversity initiatives at the University of Memphis, has been voted chair-elect of the GRE (Graduate Record Examination) Board. The national board establishes all policies for the GRE program, the most widely used graduate-school admissions test, and oversees GRE assessments, services and research.

24. Intermodal Conference to Tackle Freight Issues -

The Intermodal Freight Transportation Institute at the University of Memphis will host its seventh annual Intermodal Freight Conference at the FedEx Institute of Technology on the University of Memphis campus Tuesday, Sept. 24.

25. Flood Insurance Changes Hit Resistance, Face Delay -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Hundreds of thousands of homeowners facing higher federal flood insurance premiums under reforms passed last year would win a temporary one-year reprieve under a measure that began its advance through the Senate on Tuesday.

26. Bumper Crop -

Unless you see the signs, it is hard to tell when you have crossed the Tennessee-Mississippi state line where Fayette County, Tenn., meets Marshall County, Miss., not too far from the southern city limits of Collierville.

27. Government Largesse -

These days, it seems like office real estate brokers are fighting tooth and nail to find office space for government tenants.

While office brokers are typically chasing new business to town or urging existing firms to grow, they’re now looking for office space for government agencies, which have emerged as prominent players in the local office real estate sector.

28. Events -

The Blues Foundation will host the 29th annual International Blues Challenge Tuesday, Jan. 29, through Saturday, Feb. 2, in Beale Street venues and other Downtown locations. Visit blues.org for a full schedule and tickets.

29. I-Bank Grows in Namesake East Memphis Office Tower -

Independent Bank has expanded its headquarters at I-Bank Tower to primarily accommodate its Mortgage Lending Division.

30. Highpoint Church Buys Briarcrest’s East Memphis Campus -

After seven years of leasing space for its worship services, Highpoint Church has acquired Briarcrest Christian School Systems Inc.’s property at 6000 Briarcrest Ave. for $7.25 million.

31. Nashville Company Buys Wolf River Medical Building for $11 Million -

8040 Wolf River Blvd.
Germantown, TN 38138
Sale Amount: $11 million

Sale Date: Oct. 9, 2012
Buyer: HRT of Tennessee Inc.
Seller: Bayrock Investment Co. LLC
Details: HRT of Tennessee Inc., an affiliate of Nashville-based Healthcare Realty Trust Inc., has paid slightly less than $11 million for the medical office building at 8040 Wolf River Blvd. in Germantown.

32. Lease Takes Appling Farms to Capacity -

A distributorship of Pella Corp. has inked 11,300 square feet in Appling Farms Corporate Park, 6972 Appling Farms Parkway.

33. McBroom Joins Indie Memphis as Director of Operations -

Mandy McBroom has been named director of operations for Indie Memphis, the first full-time staff member to hold the position. In her new role, she will oversee festival operations, shorts programming, volunteer opportunities and membership growth.

34. StyleCraft Signs Lease At Airways Building E -

Home decor company StyleCraft Home Collection Inc. has signed a 167,600-square-foot lease at Industrial Developments International’s Airways Distribution Center Building E.

35. Tax Factor -

A few months ago, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. was recounting to an audience of businessmen a recent breakfast he’d had with a site location agent.

That agent had a client out of California looking at sites in the Memphis area for a project. The location agent had drawn up what the financials for the project might look like – and it included $25,000 in attorney’s fees.

36. Commercial Advisors Grows CRE Portfolio -

Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors Asset Services LLC is on a roll, picking up various leasing and management assignments that have brought its office and industrial involvement to 17.8 million square feet.

37. Churchill Mortgage Growth Highlights Industry News -

Here’s a roundup of what some of the city’s banks and bankers, investment professionals, accountants and other financial services shops have been up to in recent weeks.

* Brentwood, Tenn.-based Churchill Mortgage, which has a retail office at 5384 Poplar Ave. that opened a little more than two years ago, is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year.

38. New Owner For Bartlett Car Wash Property -

A former car wash site in Bartlett has traded hands. Nyan Jaf acquired the 0.71-acre lot at 5960 Summer Ave. from Mr. Carwash LLC for $65,000.

39. Loeb Renews Leases for Two Upscale Restaurants -

Two local restaurateurs and tenants of Loeb Properties Inc. have renewed leases.

Bill Latham, owner of Interim Restaurant, has renewed his lease for 4,957 square feet at Sanderlin Place, 5040 Sanderlin Ave. Carey White, Loeb senior vice president of asset management, brokered the deal.

40. ‘Washington Courtyard’ Sells For $900K -

A trio of office buildings at Washington Avenue and Danny Thomas Boulevard has traded hands for $900,000.

Investment group 301 WA LTD LLC of Arizona purchased the assets from Gregory Realty GP. Brian Califf of NAI Saig Co. represented the seller.

41. Trane Signs Lease on Tradeport Drive -

Trane U.S. Inc. has finalized its 625,000-square-foot industrial lease in Southeast Memphis after the deal process initially began in January 2011.

42. That's a Wrap -

If the grand sweep of 2011 could be captured on celluloid and presented to an audience on the big screen, all the components of a great film would be readily apparent.

There was drama, in the form of a deluge and historic flooding that led the Mississippi River to crest at nearly 48 feet early in the year. One of the year’s big surprises saw President Barack Obama give the commencement address for the Booker T. Washington High School class of 2011 at the Memphis Cook Convention Center.

43. Nissan North America Renews Lease In SE Shelby -

Nissan North America Inc. has renewed its 413,000-square-foot lease in Southeast Shelby County.

44. Former C’ville Fitness Center Sells For $2.7M -

Memphis-based Hackmeyer Properties has bought the former Prairie Life Fitness Center at 3690 S. Houston Levee Road in Collierville from Prairie Life Fitness LLC for $2.7 million and is leasing the 57,264-square-foot facility to a new fitness company.

45. Obsidian PR Preps For South Main Move -

Obsidian Public Relations is relocating less than a mile from its current office, in efforts to establish a presence in the South Main Historic Arts District by having its own creative space that will allow plenty of room for growth.

46. Business of Barbecue -

The Memphis in May World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest is moving its celebration of a fine plate of pork from its established home in Tom Lee Park to Tiger Lane at the Mid-South Fairgrounds this year.

47. Menlo Deal Tops Noteworthy Leases -

The Daily News in September launched a new weekly column called “Inked” to spotlight Memphis’ commercial leasing landscape.

Despite tough times, local commercial real estate firms were able to ink plenty of deals in the past four months. Here’s a rundown of some of the most noteworthy commercial leases since Inked’s debut:

48. Colliers Sells Property to Union Forklift -

Colliers International recently sold an 18,750-square-foot building in the Perimeter Point Business Park, 2188 Spicer Cove.

49. Air Park Property Sells For $730,000 -

Crump Commercial LLC recently closed on a property at 3850 Air Park St., a deal that has been in the works for about six months.

50. A Sense of Place -

June West was born with a proverbial thick skin. She said her parents blessed her with an uncanny ability to take criticism in stride, an important trait for anyone who faces the verbal abuse that West routinely absorbs as executive director of the nonprofit Memphis Heritage Inc.

51. Charter Commission Takes Message to the People -

The Metro Charter Commission drew a crowd of 200 last week at the first of three public hearings on the consolidation proposal still taking shape.

The two-and-half-hour session at the Memphis Botanic Garden even included something the group hasn’t encountered much in public forums held by other groups – applause for the idea of consolidation.

52. Cohen Bill Elevates Aerotropolis Concept -

U.S. Rep Steve Cohen hopes his colleagues on Capitol Hill will soon become as familiar with the term “aerotropolis” as the constituents he represents in Tennessee’s 9th District.

53. Events -

The Greater Memphis Chamber will hold a breakfast forum today from 7:30 a.m. to 9 a.m. at the Memphis Marriott East, 2625 Thousand Oaks Boulevard. Meri Armour, president and chief executive officer of Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital, will speak. Cost is $25 for members and $35 for nonmembers. To register, contact Ericka Milford at 543-3518 or emilford@memphischamber.com.

54. Visible School Names Ellis To Modern Music Ministry Faculty -

Bill Ellis has been hired to the Visible School faculty in the Modern Music Ministry program.

Ellis will teach guitar, the history of pop music and hands-on courses in world music and ethnomusicology.

55. School Consolidation Nixed in Charter Talks -

Consolidating the Memphis and Shelby County public school systems is off the table as far as the Metro Charter Commission is concerned.

In its first vote on a charter issue since forming in October, the body voted unanimously last week to exclude the school systems from the charter or any charter discussions. The exclusion does not apply to the charter commission’s coming talks about how both school systems would be funded by one local government.

56. Foreclosures Slow After Subprime Spigot Begins to Trickle -

In the fight against foreclosure, even the smallest victories should be celebrated, from a family staying in its home to a predatory lender going out of business.

Go ahead and count the latest figures as another reason to cheer.

57. Deadline: What it's Really Like Inside the City's Big Daily - EDITOR’S NOTE: Bill Dries was a reporter at The Commercial Appeal from June 1997-October 2005. This story is based in part on his experiences there and more recent conversations with other CA staffers.

The fall evening six years ago when Chris Peck became the editor of The Commercial Appeal was treated with utmost secrecy inside the newspaper at 495 Union Ave.

Then-publisher John Wilcox was determined to prevent leaks of that night’s decision to any other media outlets. So not only would the choice be a secret to those outside the building, but inside as well.

Then-Metro editor Charles Bernsen camped out in his small office at one end of the newsroom with the blinds drawn across its large window. He emerged just before the regular 11 p.m. deadline to tell editors on the copy desk he was sending the story, written from home by a trusted reporter.

The article by Tom Charlier in the Oct. 9, 2002, edition described Peck as “a veteran journalist who built a national reputation for innovative leadership and unblinking coverage of difficult topics” as the editor of The Spokesman-Review newspaper in Spokane, Wash.

Otis Sanford, the CA’s deputy managing editor and the other finalist for the top job, was promoted to managing editor. It was the first of many changes in the past six years to the newspaper’s masthead, where its top leaders are listed.

New era dawns

Peck arrived in Memphis shortly after the article and, although he would officially take over in January after Angus McEachran’s retirement, there was a great deal of anticipation – and, uncharacteristically for a floor full of reporters – not much background checking on Peck.

Before selecting Peck, executives of the CA’s parent company, the E.W. Scripps Co., had set up a committee of CA employees and solicited their opinions on what they wanted to see in the next editor. Many said they wanted a new direction at the newspaper.

Peck came to Memphis from a short stint as the Belo Distinguished Chair in Journalism at Southern Methodist University in Dallas. He had served as editor at the Spokane Spokesman-Review just prior to the academic post.

Peck left that paper on the heels of a journalism controversy that got little play outside the Northwest and continued to linger as recently as two years ago. It concerned financing for a large public project involving the newspaper’s owners.

Meanwhile, hopes were high among some CA staff members that Peck would change the dysfunctional management style at the paper. Others believed no creative undertaking the size of a newspaper is possible without some level of dysfunction. And still others were leery about any optimistic assessment for any reason.

Bernsen was among the first to leave the CA after Peck’s hire. Louis Graham, who had been expected to head the Metro desk even if Sanford became the new top editor, replaced Bernsen.

Six years later, departing and current staffers describe the CA’s management style and newsroom atmosphere as “toxic.” They also complain that little has changed in terms of who runs the newspaper on a daily basis despite a frequent shuffling of the management chart.

None would talk with The Memphis News on the record for fear of reprisals. Even past staffers didn’t want their names used because of the prospect of doing freelance work for the newspaper. Those still in the newsroom and on the payroll wouldn’t talk on company phones.

Profits and losses

What ails The Commercial Appeal has a lot to do with what ails the newspaper industry in general these days. But that’s a black-and-white version that misses large colorful splotches unique to the institution.

Decisions made during the past six years to pursue a growth strategy targeting “suburban” readers, as well as longstanding practices for managing talent, have also helped bring the newspaper to where it is today.

Managers at the newspaper, in separate interviews with The Memphis News, insist it is stable, profitable and will remain a seven-day-a-week operation despite recent moves that severely cut the reporting staff, eliminated classified ads from the already thin Monday and Tuesday print editions and an admission that the newspaper probably won’t be covering less urgent topics in the future.

Asked if the demise of classified ad sections in the Monday and Tuesday editions could be a sign that the Monday and Tuesday print editions might vanish entirely, publisher Joe Pepe was unequivocal.

“No. That’s not going to happen, at least under my tenure here,” Pepe said. “A lot of the transactional classified business is done online anyway. Everything that you see in the paper every day of the week is also online. So putting the Monday and Tuesday (classifieds) online was essentially just a way for us to save on some newsprint costs while not taking away from the advertising.”

The CA is profitable, Peck and Pepe insist, although they won’t release any numbers.

“We’ve projected a profit for 2009,” Peck said. “We were profitable in 2008. So, I fully expect we’ll be profitable in 2009.”

Pepe responded, “Absolutely,” when asked if the CA is profitable. When asked if he would be more specific, he replied, “No. Good try.”

Doing less with fewer

The newspaper is not alone in its reluctance to give out specific financial data. Most businesses consider such information to be proprietary.

The optimistic assessment is in contrast to a letter subscribers got this month from Karl D. Wurzbach, vice president of circulation, saying subscription rates would go up by $2 a month effective Nov. 1.

“This is the only way we can continue to deliver to your home every day,” he wrote. “This increase is across the board, for everybody, with no exclusions.”

Wurzbach’s letter also noted that the CA had dropped home delivery to 11,600 subscribers in outlying areas during a five-month period. The weekday newsstand price had already increased from 50 cents to 75 cents.

“It was costing us more money to print and deliver than we earned in revenue,” he said in the letter. “No company can survive using that business model. … Simply put, we are making very difficult decisions to help our business survive.”

Both moves in the appearance and delivery of the paper came in the week after 20 reporters and editors faced the ultimate “difficult decision.”

The newspaper made the decision of whom to fire using a controversial system that ranks reporters in the particular section of the paper they work for. The key to the ranking is not reporting ability or even a byline count; it’s how a reporter gets along with his or her editor. It had already been a key to longevity at the CA before Peck arrived in Memphis and made it a formal part of employee evaluations.

“You have to grieve those who are no longer with us in a genuine way because they were great contributions,” Peck said. “But you really at that point also have to rather quickly turn your attention to the task at hand. That’s what we’re trying to do.”

But the veteran employees “grieved” by management are the same employees management had ranked as the least valuable in their respective departments.

That included Jimmie Covington, the longest-serving reporter at the paper until his dismissal in March after years of being shuffled from one suburban bureau to another. Covington was a veteran of the county government and Memphis City Schools beats.

The layoffs also included Frederic Koeppel and Christopher Blank, who provided much of the newspaper’s arts coverage and who apparently won’t be replaced with full-time reporters.

There’s now no mention of the “master narratives” Peck once included in his “blueprint” for the CA. They included long-form stories on race, the city’s musical heritage, barbecue and the river. It was to be a departure from the newspaper being what Peck referred to as a “news utility,” or all-purpose paper of record.

“What we have to do is prioritize our staff resources,” Peck said just weeks after 20 people in the CA newsroom either resigned or were fired in the latest series of cutbacks – the deepest to date for the editorial staff. “I think where that’s going to lead is making sure that we have the nuts and bolts of hard news coverage. That’s probably police reporting, court reporting, government reporting, school reporting. We want to make sure we’ve got those bases covered.”

Whatever is left of a full-time reporting staff will be devoted to issues and institutions such as FedEx, the University of Memphis Tigers basketball team, the Memphis Grizzlies, the economy and the medical center.

“If we run out of people at that point, then we’re going to turn to freelancers and more community-generated content,” Peck said. “I think we’ll be able to fill a lot of holes there if we need to and I think it will work out fine.”

Wanted: free (or reduced) labor

Pepe offered a basic definition of citizen journalism.

“All blogging is citizen journalism,” he told The Memphis News. “In a lot of cases it’s unsubstantiated. It’s not objective. It’s not edited content. It leans more toward opinion and subjectivity. Anytime we have citizen journalism, it’s still going to get edited. It’s still going to get verified. It’s going to get checked for facts before we post it. We apply the same rules to citizen-sponsored journalism as we do to our top line reporter.”

Sanford said citizen journalism “has its place” and has been discussed since the early 1990s. It shows up in the pages he governs in the form of opinion pieces and letters to the editor. Non-newspaper employees also serve on the CA’s editorial board.

“Now, I am a traditional, old-fashioned journalist,” Sanford said. “And I believe that while citizen journalism has its place, I’m not one – and maybe this is an old-fashioned view – but I’m not one to think that citizen journalism can ever take the place of the traditional journalism that I know and love. I just don’t believe that.”

The names of reporters and photographers cut in the most recent round of layoffs are already turning up in CA coverage as freelancers. Instead of a straight name with “The Commercial Appeal” below it, their names now appear with the phrase “special to The Commercial Appeal” and, of course, they receive no health benefits or regular paychecks from the newspaper.

Worldwide wakeup call

Before Peck’s arrival in Memphis, the CA was more than out of touch with the need for an Internet presence. The newspaper was hostile to such a move.

Posting a story on the Web site that was anything more than a teaser paragraph before the actual newspapers rolled of the presses and into delivery trucks was seen as handing the story to the competition.

It was a philosophy that had served the newspaper well in competing with television news, even with the rise of 24-hour cable news channels.

However, there have been consequences for being late to the Internet party, and financial consequences for not taking the Internet seriously.

“Right now all the revenue is generated off advertising,” Pepe said of print journalism’s gradual realization that it needed to be in the Web business as well. “Until search engines are firewalled – until all local media either together or individually start charging for content online – it’s going to continue to be a source of non-revenue in terms of content. That then means that revenue for all Internet ventures will be based on advertising.”

After Peck arrived, the move to unique content for the Web site was still slow in coming.

Editors exerted the same multi-tiered control over copy that might mean a story was not edited for Web or print until later in the day, closer to the print deadline.

Scraps often erupted over how copy was edited after it left the editors and went to the “new media” department. It might be a change in a few words or a new, snappier lead (first sentence), but some editors clearly didn’t like having their work changed as much as they might have imagined reporters liked having their work rearranged.

Reporters are expected to take such changes without protest, and protests are rare even when edits distort meaning. Reporters can always fall back on the excuse that the story got messed up after it was out of their hands.

But that brings into play another rule for newsroom survival – always, always make a hard copy of the story you turn in to your editor.

The anonymity of snark

The comments section on www.commercialappeal.com, where readers may post their thoughts at the bottom of stories, has been wildly successful if you look just at the number of comments some stories generate in a short amount of time.

But success isn’t the word that comes to mind if you start to read the comments on a regular basis.

They routinely crackle with racial tension and even racial slurs. When some staffers complained about the slurs and called for better policing of such comments, Peck reportedly asked for a list of what slurs should be considered cause for removing comments.

Sanford had a different take in March as he spoke at a University of Memphis panel discussion about race and the media.

“Please stop reading those comments,” Sanford told a crowd of 100 people on campus. “You’ve got … anonymous people who go on our stories … and make unbelievably goofy and stupid comments. And then that becomes, unfortunately, the reality. And we have to stop that. We can’t stop the comments because the Web people have told us, ‘Well, that’s how you get people in there.’ But please don’t listen to that.”

To civic groups and even individual citizens who contact the paper with complaints and concerns, Sanford is its face, voice and ears. When the CA participates in media forums, chances are the speaker will be Sanford.

For the past two years, Sanford has been in charge of the paper’s editorial board and Viewpoint section. It’s a position that evolved after editorial page editor David Kushma’s departure, when Kushma’s duties came to be included in Sanford’s.

“That just didn’t work right,” Sanford told The Memphis News. “We had a lot of discussions about this. Corporate was even involved in it. We agreed that the editorial pages, Viewpoint, the editorial board – we would sort of restructure the newsroom operation and the editorial board and the editorial opinions of the paper so that would fall directly under the publisher and I would be running that. I think that was a good thing to do.”

That means that Sanford works for Pepe, not Peck, as he did when he was managing editor.

Gum-popping good times

Peck met with each reporter in his office shortly after he arrived in Memphis. He appeared to be taking notes on a legal pad as he listened to their comments and suggestions.

However, trying to find Peck’s strategy over the years has been no simple matter. There wasn’t much beyond slogans that included “rebuilding the jet while flying it” or “building a 21st century newspaper.” The latter phrase was still being used six years into the new century.

One reporter who tried to get into Peck’s head in terms of management philosophy hit a brick wall with a thud, although he is still employed at the CA.

On that occasion, Peck was in no mood to discuss philosophy despite a casual-sounding e-mail asking if the reporter had a few minutes to talk. Instead of a dialogue, Peck gave the reporter $50 in cash and a list of books he could buy to read. He also sent the reporter back to the night cops beat for objecting to how a story was edited.

The editorial page and op-ed page were the first parts of the paper that changed. Peck wanted more letters to the editor. He also wanted to stop the practice of rigorously fact-checking letters.

This drew dissent from Kushma, who was eventually overruled and left in the first round of buyouts in 2003 that followed Peck’s arrival. Some of the other changes were in the Metro section – the hard news engine of the paper.

Reporters were switched around, which is a normal part of life at the city’s daily newspaper unless you are declared immune from such changes. The six or seven Metro editors were immune for the most part from the changes.

The newspaper’s home office in Cincinnati had long maintained that the paper was top heavy with such editors. Peck talked a lot about change, but didn’t change that.

At one of Peck’s first meetings with the Metro staff, a reporter asked Peck when there would be changes for the editors as well. Peck’s answer was to talk about Dentyne gum and how the company that makes it had allegedly improved its sales figures by repackaging the gum.

The analogy was that the CA was going to undergo a similar repackaging: What was under the wrapper would remain the same.

For weeks after the meeting, fellow reporters left numerous packages of Dentyne on the questioner’s desk.

Before Peck answered the question, some staffers remained hopeful because they saw most of the problems with the new management as a result of Peck having to answer to John Wilcox, the CA’s publisher. It was a key difference in the management structure.

Before Wilcox’s arrival, McEachran had served as editor and president – a title that gave McEachran near absolute power over everything the newspaper did, editorially and otherwise.

The Dentyne story showed that if there was a struggle between Wilcox and Peck, it wasn’t much of a difference of opinion. They essentially agreed on a newsroom strategy that continued to unfold.

Neighborly gestures

Of those at the top of the masthead, only Sanford has seen all of the changes unfold from one regime to the other.

“In terms of news, certainly the newspaper has changed dramatically under Chris,” Sanford told The Memphis News. “There have been significant changes in focus and really in newsroom culture.”

Asked to characterize whether the change has been good, bad or indifferent, Sanford said, “I’m not going to say. I’m going to let others decide that. The readers can determine that.”

Peck’s take on newsroom culture at the CA is almost as neutral.

“The culture is not one where people are necessarily beaming with big smiles every day because it’s a difficult time in the industry,” he told The Memphis News. “I think that I have tried to be very realistic with people with what’s going on in the business – and very realistic about our expectations of what we need from our staff, from my office all the way down to the last person who leaves at night.”

The Neighbors sections were abolished with Peck’s settling in – sections included every Thursday for each zone of the city that also contained honors rolls of all schools in and out of the zone, and other such listings. It had the kind of items that readers might like to cut out and post on their refrigerators. No matter where you lived in Memphis, you got a Neighbors section.

Peck wasted no time in making the refrigerator postings a rallying cry for what was to replace Neighbors. They would be hyper-local sections that would contain only news about that part of the county. Some would be written by a staffer, but most often written by citizens in that area. Often, the citizens were members of a group or organization that was the focus of the piece.

Soon the philosophy began to apply to the news that appeared in other parts of the particular delivery zone.

Not every section of the city got a suburban edition. Vast sections of North and South Memphis as well as Frayser and Raleigh were out of the loop.

Peck first pleaded ignorance to and has since repeatedly denied a central tenet of life in Memphis. Memphians often have family that might live in another part of town. Thus someone Downtown might want to see the honor roll of Tara Oaks Elementary School in Collierville or someone in Bartlett might be interested in what is happening in Arlington.

This often led to readers wondering what they missed in other parts of the city, and being suspicious of only receiving certain news.

New suburban bureaus were opened as full-time postings in Mississippi and Arkansas and state Capitol coverage from Jackson and Little Rock, respectively, was abandoned. Meanwhile, the newspaper’s greatest success in a suburban edition was being changed to make it fit the cookie-cutter mold of the new suburban bureaus.

Escape hatch

The newspaper’s DeSoto County edition opened late in McEachran’s tenure. It was one of the few times McEachran talked about marketing studies as he explained a concept to the newsroom. But it was because the data were clear.

DeSoto County readers wanted a newspaper that covered North Mississippi and did not mention Memphis, at least on the front page. The DeSoto County bureau had a separate sales and management staff. And the CA edition delivered in DeSoto County had its own front page that was DeSoto County-centric. It was even called The DeSoto Appeal. And it was a hit out of the box, with plans to duplicate the model in Tipton County while maintaining a different model within Shelby County because of the differences in attitudes clearly shown in the marketing study.

Peck wasn’t interested in the distinction.

When Pepe arrived as publisher in late 2005, the CA got someone with experience in such suburban editions. Pepe came to Memphis from St. Louis, where he headed the Suburban Journals – a collection of 38 weekly community newspapers.

Pepe said the CA’s suburban business strategy as modified several times over has worked. That strategy is to get advertising from small businesses in the community receiving the directed section – businesses whose reach and revenue can’t sustain a pitch to the paper’s larger audience.

“In St. Louis, they’ve been in place for 50 years,” Pepe said. “So they were humming. Here, we’ve had them in place for three or four years. I would suggest that if we’d not done this, that we would have even greater financial problems, only because the dependency on the larger advertisers would have been even greater than it is.”

“Zoning,” as it’s called, is now a three-day-a-week proposition.

“We still do zoning Wednesday, Friday and Sunday. We have a suburban, urban and a DeSoto zone. I think that’s where we need to be,” Peck said. “What we’re trying to do is balance the best of both worlds. Make sure our readers have the best of what’s going on in greater Memphis, but that we also provide a degree of zone content that is either geared toward the metro area, the suburbs or DeSoto County.”

But the practice has been much different than the theory behind the advertising and the needs of news consumers. As valued as the suburban coverage has been throughout Peck’s tenure, the bureaus have been places where reporters with troublesome attitudes toward editors have been exiled.

It was the next destination for many of those summoned for personal meetings with Peck as the first round of buyouts began in late 2003. In some cases, reporters have welcomed the assignment to be able to get out of the Downtown newsroom.

In the doghouse

The first round of buyouts under Peck in 2003 was brutal – even more ham-handed and graceless than anyone imagined possible. And the CA is not an organization noted for having an optimistic outlook.

All employees who were older than 40 and had been at the company 20 years or more got packets outlining the terms of the buyout. But within that group, Peck singled out about a dozen copy editors, reporters and photographers, including some of the most senior reporters and photographers in the organization. He had already begun discussions with several in the group who had been ill or had surgery.

Each got an e-mail from Peck asking if they had a few minutes to talk in his office. Peck would later quarrel with an assertion that he had threatened those in the group in the one-on-one talks. But he did tell each of them that if they didn’t take the buyout, they would be assigned more onerous duties.

One was told that if he didn’t take the buyout, he would be working nights and weekends. When the employee said he already worked nights and weekends, the meeting ended abruptly. A features reporter and another reporter each were told they would be working the night cops beat if they didn’t accept the buyouts.

The night shift started at 4:30 p.m. and ran until 1 a.m. or so. It involved listening to a police scanner and checking for such news that had to be written on deadline. The night cops reporter is the only news reporter on duty at the paper after 5p.m. unless there’s a late City Council meeting or someone on dayside decides they are on a roll and continues working.

Most papers have the night cops beat, and it is usually where beginning reporters start. It’s a good way to learn the basics of print reporting and determine whether a reporter can hold up under deadline pressure. At the CA, it is a beat assigned to reporters who are out of favor – firmly, decisively and usually terminally out of favor.

Under Peck, even summer interns don’t have to work night cops.

The Newspaper Guild, the union that represents reporters, photographers and copy editors, took the unusual move of passing a resolution that complained about Peck’s singling out employees. The same day the union passed the resolution, Peck called into his office the reporter who had made the proposal. I was that employee.

“I would really like for this not to find its way to Cincinnati,” was his reaction after he quarreled over whether his other talks with employees had amounted to threats.

The guild membership had voted unanimously for the resolution to be sent to Scripps management in Cincinnati. Peck later talked union leaders out of sending it, despite the membership vote.

Some of the squeezed employees took the buyout. Others stayed and were shuffled out to the suburban bureaus the following August, and were among those laid off this past March.

‘Treacherous ground’

The guild’s idea of a protest was to have reporters in the newsroom wear green on certain days of the week. This signaled that contract negotiations weren’t going well or weren’t going at all.

It’s been six years since the last labor contract expired that included guaranteed annual raises. Then the guild went to the idea of wearing green buttons – no words on the buttons, just green buttons that Scripps brass in town would see during their visits to Memphis. The brass never got near the newsroom. Still later, the guild kept the idea of the green color scheme but added the wording “We All Merit A Raise” to protest the company’s proposal of merit pay raises instead of a percentage raise guaranteed in the contract.

At one point, the guild was optimistic that the company was getting the message. So the guild urged members not to file grievances against management to keep the goodwill going.

In October 2007, the most visible sign of dissent in years came outside the framework of the guild and stalled contract talks. As the CA prepared to publish a series of articles on the impact of Memphis businesses around the world, a lead piece about FedEx to be sponsored by FedEx was ordered rewritten and the reporter, Trevor Aaronson, refused. The newspaper had approached FedEx about sponsoring that particular piece. Dozens of staff members, in a rare public move, signed a petition objecting to the practice Peck referred to as “monetizing content.” They felt it crossed the line separating the editorial part of the newspaper from sales. National trade magazines and blogs, which normally overlook the CA, took note of the flap.

Peck retreated, telling Editor & Publisher, a print trade magazine, “I went to our publisher and said, ‘We have probably gone half a step more than we should have gone on this project.’ It is treacherous ground when you start talking about having an advertiser in a section that has them in the reporting.”

Aaronson later left the CA, but has been quoted as saying he enjoyed the freedom he was given to pursue his own interests.

“I don’t care to talk about my experiences there,” Aaronson wrote in an e-mail.

The favored few

The stage for the latest round of layoffs that came in April was set with the release of fourth-quarter figures for Scripps.

Profits were way down. The chain ended the year with its share prices down 51 percent or $22. The chain announced it would freeze the pension plan, cutting 401(k) matching funds from the company. At the CA, the 401(k) match has always only applied to managers.

Mark Watson, head of the triumvirate of labor unions at the CA, including The Newspaper Guild, broke the news about the layoffs, calling it a “crisi-tunity.” He was among those laid off weeks later.

The weekend after the announcement, Peck in his Sunday column once again lectured about the hard economic times.

From the start, Peck’s quest was to garner favorable attention within the city and in journalism circles across the country by winning awards. At first, he touted every award the paper won, which, for writing and reporting, were usually the monthly Scripps awards from the home office in Cincinnati.

But he later reversed that and said the paper should note only awards of national stature. Photographers regularly won those, but reporters didn’t.

When some reporters complained their work was always excluded from consideration, Peck directed that reporters submit on a monthly basis any work they wanted to be considered for award entries.

Those suggestions were then forwarded to the very editors who had been excluding their work in the first place and who remained in control of contest entries.

Like other newspapers, the CA’s approach to awards is sometimes to deem a story to be eligible for an award, possibly before the first interview is done or the first word is written.

But a contest entry had to have the right byline as well – the right reporter doing a story for a contest was usually not the one covering the beat from which the story arose.

Pamela Perkins, who left the paper voluntary in the November 2008 round of layoffs, along with music writer Bill Ellis, who left in 2005, won a national award in 2004 from the Missouri School of Journalism at the University of Missouri for their continuing coverage of the return of Stax Records and the surrounding Soulsville neighborhood in South Memphis. Their writing won first place in the arts and entertainment category of the Missouri Lifestyle Journalism Awards.

There was no companywide e-mail congratulating them as there had been for awards in the monthly Scripps competition.

Stephen Price’s work as one of several reporters working on the deadly shooting of a child on Rosamond Avenue in 2002 caught the attention of Florida’s Poynter Institute, a leading journalism think tank. Other reporters deemed more worthy were praised the next day in the inevitable self-congratulatory e-mail in which management separated those it favored from those it didn’t.

Price had blended into the neighborhood crowd as police cleared reporters from the area, came back with the story no one else had and wrote it on deadline.

The Poynter Institute carries a lot of weight in Peck’s newspaper philosophy. Several times, he’s used Poynter fellows to mediate discussions with community leaders about the newspaper’s policies. But when Price’s account of the shooting aftermath in the Rosamond neighborhood was reprinted in Poynter’s annual anthology of the nation’s best journalism of the past year, CA management once again did not acknowledge the accolade.

Curious ideas

As the 2004 presidential season began, Peck revealed an important part of his views on political coverage to an editors’ forum in Washington. It was the same night as the Iowa caucuses.

The remarks to the American Press Institute gathering didn’t get much publicity, even after they showed up on an industry blog. It took a few more months. He never said anything about it to anyone who worked at the CA.

Peck said having reporters cover campaign events was a waste of time and resources. Instead, he said citizen journalists should cover the events – those who were already going to attend the rallies anyway.

“We have to get over the notion that we have to do it all ourselves,” he told Chad Capellman of API as he talked of having editors find volunteers to write summaries of what was said. “It’s not doing the democracy any good to send out a reporter to write down a regurgitation of what a candidate is saying in a staged event.”

Peck also said newspapers should compete with comedy shows such as “The Daily Show” and “Saturday Night Live” as a source of political information. Also, Peck called for focus groups of readers to determine what issues should be discussed.

“Don’t let the candidates drive coverage of the three issues they want to ride to get elected,” he told the API group.

Being the newspaper’s political reporter had been a difficult posting for some time, even before Peck arrived in Memphis. Bernsen had a checkered history of political coverage that turned into a deep distrust and contempt for politics when he became the head of Metro.

Each election season he would dutifully call those assigned to political coverage to his office and haul out a set of his own news clippings, which he said illustrated the kind of reporting he wanted. Under no circumstances, he insisted, would the candidates be setting the agenda for the newspaper’s coverage.

Such tension is normal in the planning of most media coverage of politics. It’s a game candidates, their representatives and the reporters who cover them play constantly.

Bernsen’s decision was not to play the game at all. He did not want coverage of campaign events and rallies. And the end of an election meant the end of political coverage. Any attempt a candidate made to establish or give voice to an issue was uniformly rejected even if it obviously hit a nerve with voters. To him, the whole process was rigged and the newspaper’s view was the only valid one.

There was supposed to be a wall between the reporting that was allowed on the political process and the endorsements of candidates that the CA editorial board made. Most candidates interested in the newspaper’s endorsement never believed there was a wall. If there was, they reasoned, editors not on the board would still find a way to limit or tilt coverage of those who weren’t endorsed.

Prism of perception

The CA began 2009 with a curious 15-part series that recapped the public life of Mayor Willie Herenton.

Herenton has had problems with the newspaper throughout that public life. And similarly, the newspaper’s leadership has had problems seeing straight when the subject was Willie Herenton.

The paper’s until then consistent political coverage was missing in action when Herenton launched a surprisingly strong-willed bid for mayor in 1991. Editorially, the newspaper had strong reservations about the People’s Convention that Herenton took by storm, clearing the first political obstacle in what became a historic campaign.

His willingness to participate in the convention, whose goal was to come up with a consensus black challenger to incumbent Dick Hackett, put off those in the newspaper’s front office. It translated to next to no coverage of a campaign effort that was on the streets every day, while Hackett pursued the local equivalent of a rose garden strategy of speaking to small groups at select backyard parties.

When Herenton won, the ambivalence turned into hostility.

Herenton had a good relationship with several reporters who had covered his tenure as city schools superintendent – even through the sexual harassment lawsuit that came near the end of his tenure there and just before his entry into the 1991 mayor’s race. (The harassment case stemmed from a relationship Herenton had with a teacher.)

Those reporters had to walk a fine line. A favorable comment by Herenton in public that got back to editors could mean that reporter would be perceived as biased toward Herenton. The problem many reporters had with walking the tightrope was editors increasingly viewed a reporter’s duty to the paper as a requirement to shank their sources in print to show where their loyalties lay.

The editors were convinced a 2005 recall petition mounted by radio talk show host and blogger Thaddeus Matthews would succeed. They considered it a foregone conclusion that Matthews would gather more than enough signatures on the petitions and do it well before the deadline to file with the Shelby County Election Commission.

The newspaper’s planned coverage moved past the recall drive itself. The editors ordered up a piece on who was likely to run in the recall election that followed. They approached at least two reporters with the task before the effort flagged just enough for the piece to become an article on who might run for city mayor in 2007.

The fact that politicos across the city were still waiting to see if the 2006 county elections would offer any opportunities didn’t cross their minds. Calls to those politicos were met with widespread laughter and wonderment at the eccentric methods afoot at the CA. The petition drive failed and Matthews backed Herenton’s 2007 bid for re-election.

Distance learning

By this past February, CA management signed off on a content-sharing agreement with fellow Scripps paper The Knoxville News Sentinel, as well as The Tennesseean newspaper in Nashville and the Chattanooga Times Free Press.

The Feb. 5 agreement was already in effect by the time an internal memo from News Sentinel management surfaced in early March in Editor & Publisher.

The CA and the Knoxville newspaper had used such a strategy for years in covering politics. The result was that the CA continued to do without any local political coverage beyond biographical pieces introducing candidates.

Statewide races for governor and the U.S. Senate were covered from Knoxville or by the CA’s Nashville bureau chief, Richard Locker, or in some cases by Bartholomew Sullivan, a former CA reporter who now works for the Scripps News Service’s Washington bureau. That meant candidates for statewide office coming to Memphis were usually covered before they got to the city or after they left.

The agreement was most visible during the 2006 U.S. Senate race between Republican Bob Corker of Chattanooga and Democrat Harold Ford Jr. of Memphis. One of the campaign’s crucial events was a showdown between the two at Memphis International Airport.

Corker had called a press conference there. Ford crashed the event ahead of time and the two faced off in the airport parking lot – a few inches from each other with television cameras and microphones surrounding them.

There was no CA reporter in the press pack. Sullivan covered what became known as the “parking lot debate” from the D.C. bureau.

...

58. Calipari Tapped to Rally Real Estate Community -

For many local sports fans, the lasting image of 2008 was the University of Memphis men’s basketball team suffering a heartbreaking loss to Kansas in the national championship game.

For many local Realtors, the lasting image of 2008 was the housing market suffering a continued slump.

59. Medtronic Q2 Profit Sinks On Hefty Legal Charge -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Medtronic Inc., the world’s largest medical device maker, reported Tuesday that legal expenses and declining foreign exchange rates weighed down its fiscal 2009 second-quarter profit.

60. MAAR Elects Board of Directors -

The Memphis Area Association of Realtors elected six real estate professionals to its 2009-2010 board of directors at last week’s annual meeting.

The new directors are Landis Foy of Crye-Leike Inc.; Steve Guinn of Highwoods Properties; R. Darnell Tate of ERA Legacy Realty; Michael Green of John Green & Co. Realtors; Betsy Kelly of Hobson Co. Realtors; and Randy Jefferson of Hobson Co. Realtors.

61. Donald to Receive ABA Achievement Award -

The American Bar Association Tort Trial & Insurance Practice Section will honor U.S. District Court Judge Bernice B. Donald of Memphis with the inaugural Liberty Achievement Award.

The award raises awareness of the importance of diversifying the legal profession by honoring lawyers and judges who actively promote diversity within their legal communities.

62. 2007's Top RealtorsHonored by MAAR -      The Memphis Area Association of Realtors recently handed out awards at its annual gala, including one to John Linthicum of Crye-Leike Inc., who was named 2007 Realtor of the Year. Randy Jefferson of The Hobson Co. Realto

63. California-Based Investor Bullish On Memphis Multifamily -

It didn't take long for California-based Better Buildings & Apartments LLC to make its second investment in Memphis' multifamily market.

Fewer than three months after the company's first acquisition, The Birches Townhouses in Whitehaven, Better Buildings & Apartments (BBA) president Bill Sparano bought another apartment complex here, beefing up his local portfolio and further entrenching himself in the city he and his company plan to call home as early as the spring.

64. Medtronic Second Quarter Earnings Dip 2 Percent -

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) - Medical device maker Medtronic Inc. said Monday that its second-quarter profits dipped 2 percent after it recalled wires for connecting its defibrillator to patients' hearts.

65. California Investor Sees Memphis As 'Long-Haul' Market -

Thanks to his company's recent purchase of The Birches Townhouses in Whitehaven for $3.6 million, Bill Sparano can be counted among the out-of-town investors who are bullish on Memphis real estate.

66. MAAR ElectsBoard of Directors -      Members of the Memphis Area Association of Realtors (MAAR) elected five directors to the organization's board at last week's annual meeting.
     The new directors are Bill Maury of Hobson Co

67. Tinker Works To Out-Fundraise Cohen For His Congressional Seat -

In last Friday's edition of The Washington Post, columnist Mary Ann Akers introduced her readers to Memphis congressman Steve Cohen, summing up her interviewee as a "fun-loving hipster in an aging man's body."

68. When Pigs Fly - All The Way to Australia -

Australia is about to experience a taste of Memphis when Charles Vergos' Rendezvous restaurant caters the Fourth of July party at the U.S. Embassy in Canberra, Australia.

More than 1,500 people will attend the event, including some of the more prominent politicians, CEOs, athletes and celebrities in Australia.

69. Parkway Picks Commercial Alliance -

Memphis-based Commercial Alliance Management LLC has been tapped to handle all new leases for a Downtown office portfolio that includes the Morgan Keegan Tower, Falls Building and Toyota Center.

Those buildings are owned by Jackson, Miss.-based Parkway Properties Inc., a real estate investment trust (REIT) that had contracted last fall with Trammell Crow Co. to lease the properties.

70. Wal-Mart Gains More Ground In Greater Memphis -

In Memphis, answers to the question "What hath Wal-Mart wrought?" are about as numerous as the amount of shelves the world's largest retailer keeps stocked with its famously deep-discounted merchandise.

71. Wolfchase Neighbor Up for Grabs? Shopping Center across from mall scoped by NY real estate trust -

Judging by the interest of a New York-based real estate investment trust, ownership of one of the most expensive pieces of property in Shelby County soon could be changing hands.

New Plan Excel Realty Trust is in the early stages of acquiring The Commons, a 33-acre shopping center across from Wolfchase Galleria that includes such tenants as Old Navy, Home Depot and Toys 'R' Us.

72. Storm Water Fund Floods City's Maintenance Coffers -

Five months into the city's new Storm Water Enterprise Fund, the new fees are bringing in about $1 million each month, said Jerry Collins, director of public works for Memphis.

The fees became effective May 1, and show up as an extra charge on the Memphis Light, Gas & Water Division bills of both residential and commercial property owners. The fees collected through the storm water fund will pay for $140 million worth of improvements to the storm water drainage system in Memphis.

73. Archived Article: Real - Bill Morris Extension Means More Collierville Commercial

Commercial Developers Eye Bill Morris Extension

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When the extension of state Highway 385 through Collierville to state Highway 57 is completed later this ...

74. Archived Article: Digest - Regions Announces Sale

Hyneman Purchases

565 Acres in Arlington

John N. Hyneman has purchased 473.83 acres in Arlington from Alaco-Malkin LP for $1.1 million. The property is located near Galloway Levee Road, formerly Old Brownsville Road. ...

75. Archived Article: Lead - Outlook Positive for Commercial Market

Outlook Positive for Commercial Market

Retail growth spurs real estate market heading into 2005

LANCE ALLAN

The Daily News

Following several years of post-9/11 uncertainty, the commercial real es...

76. Archived Article: Lead - Winchester Road Office Growing

Winchester Grows as Office Corridor

Germantown leaders push for high-tech development

LANCE ALLAN

The Daily News

Southeast Shelby County has been growing by leaps and bounds in recent years, and not just...

77. Archived Article: Real - Major Outdoor Retailer Coming to Hacks Cross Area

Winchester Corridor Continues to Expand

LANCE ALLAN

The Daily News

A national outdoors retailer is preparing to enter the Memphis market, choosing a thriving stretch of Winchester Road fo...

78. Archived Article: Fayette Iii (lead) - Fayette 3 Office Growth

Better Access to Boost Fayettes Potential

Highway 385 extension could lead to office development

LANCE ALLAN

The Daily News

Good transportation routes bring development and growth to a community, especially whe...

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Discount Retailer Debuts in Hickory Hill

World Discount Club owners plan to expand nationwide

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The Daily News

After years marked by vacancies, the Hickory Ridge Commons shopping center is mak...

80. Archived Article: Annex (lead) - Annexation Affects More Than Residents

Rising Taxes Hit Commercial Properties

Landlords adjust to annexation-driven tax increases

LANCE ALLAN

The Daily News

When an unincorporated area of Shelby County is annexed by the city of Memphi...

81. Archived Article: Real Recap - 2144 Madison Ave

Atlanta Firm Refinances French Quarter Suites

2144 Madison Ave.

Memphis, TN 38104

Cost: $4 million

Borrower: Lodgian Memphis Property Owner LLC

Lender: Merrill Lynch Mortgage Lending Inc.

Trustee: Midsouth Title...

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As Hickory Hill Evolves, Retailers Adapt

Stores shift focus to local, not regional, shoppers

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The Daily News

It wasnt so long ago that Metro Memphis had two major retail centers, each anchored by a sparkling ne...

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Winchester: Not Another Germantown Parkway

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The Daily News

Germantown Parkway, once a road without any reason for stoplights, now has too many to count, due in large part to commercial development that has taken place in ...

84. Archived Article: Coll Retail (lead) - Lead

Collierville Experiences Retail Boom

Open-air mall brings new development south of Poplar

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The Daily News

When Cousins Properties Inc. and Jim Wilson & Associates Inc. purchased 135 acres of land for the much-talke...

85. Archived Article: Real Focus - Real

Office, Retail Markets Follow Residential Growth

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The Daily News

East is the place to be, at least as far as Metro Memphis retail and office real estate is concerned.

The suburban submarkets reflected the highest occup...

86. Archived Article: Real Focus - Real

Winchester Development Not Slowing Down

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Once an area with an insurance agency here, a doctors office there and a few neighborhoods scattered around, Winchester Road in southeastern Shelby County is nothing...

87. Archived Article: Apple (lead) - Terry Ramsey, Vice President of RidAll Pest Control

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New store marks chains 21st in Memphis market

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