Spring Creek Ranch Addition Tops Shelby County Commission Agenda

By Bill Dries

Shelby County Commissioners consider an events center for Spring Creek Ranch golf course Monday, Aug. 5, as well as a mixed-use commercial site at Austin Peay Highway and Millington-Arlington Road by First Citizens National Bank.

The two land use cases are part of what is a relatively light agenda for the commission, which meets at 1:30 p.m. at the Vasco Smith County Administration Building, 160 N. Main St.

The Daily News will provide live tweets at www.twitter.com/tdnpols during the meeting.

The addition to Spring Creek by Trail Partners LLC would include a two-building events center with a culinary school and a microbrewery. The amendment also includes residential detached lots with an average size of 7,200 feet as well as cabins and a day spa with a pool.

The property is on the east side of Collierville-Arlington Road, north of Raleigh LaGrange Road.

ROBB MEYER

“I didn’t design the golf course to host events, so we had to turn a lot of people away,” Robb Meyer, the general manager of Spring Creek, told The Daily News last month, as he announced the plans.

The golf course was founded by Meyer’s father, ophthalmologist David Meyer, and the family regained control of it in 2010 after they sold half ownership in it the year before to Stanford Financial.

The financial firm was out after its founder, R. Allen Stanford, was jailed and convicted of fraud in a Ponzi scheme with a national reach.

Meanwhile, the commercial mixed-use development of what is now vacant land at Austin Peay and Millington-Arlington would permit offices, retail sales and restaurants.

The development by First Citizens National Bank of Munford would front Austin Peay and Donnel Road, two arteries that the state plans to widen in the future.

Also on the commission agenda is accepting a $150,000 state grant for the new fiscal year for a criminal-justice case-management program. The state money specifically pays for two case managers in an effort to reduce recidivism by offering offenders mental health and substance abuse treatment when needed.

Back on the commission’s agenda is a new set of seismic provisions for the existing building code. Both the commission and the Memphis City Council voted earlier this year to delay implementation of the provisions until the new calendar year.

The amended section of the code would take effect Oct. 1 under the ordinance, which is before the commission Monday for the first of three readings.

And in a bit of budget housekeeping from the prior fiscal year, the commission will vote on a resolution to carry over $23,744 in federal grant funding for the Operation Safe Community anti-crime coalition effort. The money that flowed from the federal government through the University of Memphis to Operation Safe Community is part of a U.S. Justice Department grant of $140,789.