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VOL. 127 | NO. 92 | Thursday, May 10, 2012




Eckstein Finds Room to Grow at Martin Tate

By Andy Meek

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Adam Eckstein had been clerking for two years with Tennessee Supreme Court Justice Janice Holder and was interviewing with various law firms, including several in Memphis that seemed like places where he could see himself working.

ECKSTEIN

But Eckstein, who has a background as both a journalist and a lawyer, said his interview with Martin, Tate, Morrow & Marston PC was “a real standout.”

“Every attorney was just thrilled to be associated with this firm and seemed genuinely excited to approach the work,” said Eckstein, who recently joined the firm as an associate. “It seemed like there were interesting issues coming out of every office and just a great location to work in, a place to grow into a better practitioner and have a chance to really try the cases that are not routine and that are fascinating in multiple aspects.”

Eckstein joined Martin Tate’s litigation section last year. He graduated from Christian Brothers High School in 1998 – and still had a few twists and turns to go in his life and career before settling into his role as a lawyer.

After graduating cum laude from Washington University in St. Louis, for example, he spent three years in Washington, D.C., as a writer and editor focused on the pharmaceuticals industry.

“I’ve sort of been letting my experiences guide where my next step is going to be,” he said.

After graduating high school, he felt writing was a strength he’d developed that could be parlayed into a career.

But one thing always leads to another, and the content he produced and focused on regarding pharmaceuticals, regulations, the FDA and more led him to “see where lawyers could accomplish a lot in their day to day activity.”

Eckstein went on to attend the University of Cincinnati College of Law, where he served as executive editor for the University of Cincinnati Law Review. He got his law degree in 2008 and accepted a position clerking for Holder in his hometown of Memphis.

He’s licensed to practice law in Tennessee, and he uses the broad term of commercial litigation to describe the practice areas he focuses on at Martin Tate.

The firm was founded more than 100 years ago. It boasts attorneys who are members of everything from the American College of Trial Lawyers, the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel, American College of Real Estate Lawyers, Best Lawyers in America and Mid-South Super Lawyers.

“One of the reasons I wanted to come here, I think my practice area will expand from just commercial litigation to property issues, trust litigation, hopefully some commercial transactions, things like that,” Eckstein said. “I’d like to be one of those attorneys who can wear many hats and not just focus only on one field.”

Eckstein said the best career advice he’s ever gotten is what he’s already long tried to live by – don’t be afraid to step outside your comfort zone once in a while. Especially since the future direction your career takes could result from those moments of exploration.

“The best advice I got, and it’s from someone at Martin Tate, was always be available to try something new,” Eckstein said. “I do my best to never say no to an opportunity. I don’t want to just take the things I’m comfortable with. I’m trying to push my boundaries. And that personal growth is really encouraged at Martin Tate.”

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RECORD TOTALS DAY WEEK YEAR
PROPERTY SALES 78 215 4,981
MORTGAGES 96 322 6,548
FORECLOSURE NOTICES 0 25 1,504
BUILDING PERMITS 223 541 11,800
BANKRUPTCIES 84 203 5,162
BUSINESS LICENSES 19 65 2,001
UTILITY CONNECTIONS 124 351 6,815
MARRIAGE LICENSES 21 65 1,406

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