» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'Walter Evans' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:7611
Editorial:94
West Tennessee:8
Middle Tennessee:47
East Tennessee:25
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Walter Nominated to TVA Board -

The Tennessee Valley Authority board would include two Memphians with the appointment of Ron Walter to the board.

2. Juvenile Court Judge Race Remains Hard-Fought -

The candidates are counting down the days to the July 18 start of early voting in advance of the Aug. 7 election day.

With one more weekend of campaigning until early voting dictates a shift in tactics, the sizeable cast of the longest ballot of any Shelby County election cycle is searching at events for crowds comprised of mostly voters rather than other candidates and their campaign workers.

3. Southwind Annexation Ruling Hinges on Timing -

The city of Memphis can collect property tax revenues from two parts of Southwind whose annexation was stopped in 2013 just days before the areas were to become part of the city.

That is the effect of a ruling Wednesday, July 2, from the Tennessee Appeals Court reversing the

4. State Appeals Court Greenlights Southwind Annexation -

The Tennessee Appeals Court ruled Wednesday, July 2, that the city of Memphis can move ahead with plans to annex Southwind because a recently enacted moratorium on annexation by the state legislature does not apply to the earlier annexation decision.

5. Memphis Bar Judicial Poll Released -

The Memphis Bar Association poll of attorneys on the judicial races on the Aug. 7 ballot shows 16 percent to as high as 38 percent of the attorneys participating have no opinion in many of the judicial races.

6. Brooks’ Residency Hearing Delayed in Chancery Court -

A Shelby County Chancery Court hearing on the residency lawsuit filed by County Commissioner Henri Brooks against the commission was delayed Monday, June 30, before Chancellor Walter Evans.

7. Brooks' Residency Hearing Delayed in Chancery Court -

A Shelby County Chancery Court hearing on the residency lawsuit filed by County Commissioner Henri Brooks against the commission was delayed Monday, June 30, before Chancellor Walter Evans.

8. Armstrong Appointed to Appeals Court -

Shelby County Chancellor Kenny Armstrong has been appointed to the Tennessee Court of Appeals by Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam.

9. Armstrong Appointed to Appeals Court -

Shelby County Chancellor Kenny Armstrong has been appointed to the Tennessee Court of Appeals by Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam.

10. Harris Files Ford Challenge at Deadline -

Memphis City Council member Lee Harris is challenging Democratic state Sen. Ophelia Ford in the August primary for District 29, the Senate seat held by a member of the Ford family since 1975.

11. Wells Joins Evans Petree as Associate -

Julie Wells has joined Evans Petree PC as an associate in the East Memphis office, focusing her practice in health care law and general business matters. She previously worked at Baptist Medical Group, where she played an integral role in physician practice acquisitions and contractual-related matters.

12. Fields Begin to Gel for May and August Ballots -

With two weeks to the filing deadline for candidates in the May Shelby County primary elections and two months to the deadline for those in the August state and federal primaries and county nonpartisan elections, the fields have solidified enough that some political players are weighing their prospects for a late entry before the filing deadlines.

13. Dueling Election Databases Make Tracking Difficult -

If ever the political axiom of needing a scorecard to keep up with the players applied to an election cycle, it would be the set of three elections in 2014 across Shelby County.

The middle election of the three – the August ballot of county general elections and state and federal primary elections – is expected to be one of the longest in the county’s political history, if not the longest.

14. Nineteenth Century Club Bond Posted -

Plaintiffs seeking to stop planned demolition of the Union Avenue mansion once home to the Nineteenth Century Club haven’t cinched a deal with the property’s new owner, but they have closed on a court appeal that could take years to play out.

15. Nineteenth Century Club Case Bond Posted -

Plaintiffs in the Chancery Court Case seeking to stop planned demolition of the Union Avenue mansion that had been home to the Nineteenth Century Club posted an additional $50,000 bond Thursday, Oct. 31, as they appeal a Chancery Court decision.

16. Nineteenth Century Club Case Bond Posted -

Plaintiffs in the Chancery Court Case seeking to stop planned demolition of the Union Avenue mansion that had been home to the Nineteenth Century Club posted an additional $50,000 bond Thursday, Oct. 31, as they appeal a Chancery Court decision permitting the demolition of the mansion to make way for a retail shopping center.

17. Nineteenth Century Club Case Bond Posted -

Plaintiffs in the Chancery Court Case seeking to stop planned demolition of the Union Avenue mansion that had been home to the Nineteenth Century Club posted an additional $50,000 bond Thursday, Oct. 31, as they appeal a Chancery Court decision permitting the demolition of the mansion to make way for a retail shopping center.

18. Nineteenth Century Club Case Bond Posted -

Plaintiffs in the Chancery Court Case seeking to stop planned demolition of the Union Avenue mansion that had been home to the Nineteenth Century Club posted an additional $50,000 bond Thursday, Oct. 31, as they appeal a Chancery Court decision permitting the demolition of the mansion to make way for a retail shopping center.

19. Nineteenth Century Club Case Shifts to Fundraising -

Opponents of the still-pending demolition of the Midtown mansion known as the Nineteenth Century Club are in the fundraising mode.

They have until Nov. 1 at 10 a.m. to raise $50,000, the additional court bond Shelby County Chancellor Walter Evans ordered Wednesday, Oct. 16, to stay demolition as his September ruling that demolition can proceed is appealed.

20. Another Deadline Issued in Nineteenth Century Club Case -

The court case over the future of the Midtown mansion known as the Nineteenth Century Club has been issued another deadline.

The plaintiffs in the Chancery Court case, which is now on appeal, have until Nov. 1 at 10 a.m. to raise an additional $50,000 in a court bond if they hope to stay demolition pending appeal.

21. Nineteenth Century Club Remains in Limbo -

The deal to prevent the demolition of the Nineteenth Century Club building in Midtown is still tentative. But it has more time from Chancellor Walter Evans for the prospective new owners to put up $40,000 in earnest money.

22. Nineteenth Century Club Demolition Appealed -

The planned demolition of the Nineteenth Century Club building on Union Avenue has been halted by an appeal of a Chancery Court decision upholding the sale of the historic property.

Preservationists and former club members filed an appeal Friday, Sept. 20, challenging Chancellor Walter Evans’ ruling to uphold the sale of the property.

23. Nineteenth Century Club Demolition Appealed -

The planned demolition of the Nineteenth Century Club building on Union Avenue has been halted by an appeal of a Chancery Court decision upholding the sale of the historic property.

Preservationists and former club members filed an appeal Friday, Sept. 20, challenging Chancellor Walter Evans’ ruling to uphold the sale of the property. While Evans upheld the sale, he left in place until Sept. 20 a temporary injunction that prevented demolition of the building and froze the cash involved in the sale in order to give plaintiffs in the civil case time to appeal.

24. Nineteenth Century Club Prepares to Fade Away -

No matter what happens to the old mansion that has been home to the Nineteenth Century Club for most of the 20th century and all 13 years of the 21st century, the club itself is about to go out of existence.

25. Evans Upholds Nineteenth Century Club Sale, Demolition -

Chancellor Walter Evans upheld the sale of the Nineteenth Century Club building on Union Avenue by the club to a private company and denied a request to permanently stop any demolition of the historic building.

26. Court Case Shows Time’s Effect on Nineteenth Century Club -

There was a time when the outgoing president of the Nineteenth Century Club got a silver tea service at the end of her tenure.

That time lasted into the mid-1990s, when the custom became too expensive for a philanthropic organization whose membership had dwindled.

27. Nineteenth Century Club Hearing Continues -

Testimony continued for a third day Wednesday, Aug. 28, in the Shelby County Chancery Court hearing on the sale of the Nineteenth Century Club building.

At issue in the case before Chancellor Walter Evans is whether the sale to Union Group LLC was valid. Plaintiffs, some of whom are members of the nonprofit organization, are contesting it.

28. Attorney General Reopens Nineteenth Century Club Review -

The state attorney general has reopened a review of the sale of the Nineteenth Century Club property on Union Avenue just as efforts by current and former club members to challenge the sale face a critical Monday fundraising deadline.

29. Memphis Demolition Moratorium Delayed -

A plan by some on the Memphis City Council to declare a four-month moratorium on all demolitions of Memphis properties on the National Register of Historic Places was put off this week after questions about the legality of the moratorium.

30. Judge Stops Nineteenth Century Club Work -

A Shelby County Chancery Court Judge has issued a temporary restraining order prohibiting the owners of the historic Nineteenth Century Club building on Union Avenue from doing any work on the property for 10 days.

31. Troubled Beale Nightspot Changes Hands -

It’s been almost four months since Club Crave, the Beale Street nightspot with a history of violence under several names, was closed as a public nuisance under state law.

As the legal question of whether the building at 380 Beale St. is off limits for any future nightclub leases works its way through Shelby County General Sessions Environmental Court, the ownership of the club has changed in the last four months.

32. Jackson’s Suspension, Lawsuit Point Out State Law Paradox -

After he was indicted last month by the Shelby County grand jury on four counts of official misconduct, General Sessions Court Clerk Otis Jackson said voters put him in office and only they could take him out of office.

33. Jackson Sues Judges Over Suspension -

General Sessions Court Clerk Otis Jackson is suing the General Sessions Court Judges who suspended him from office earlier this week.

34. Court Limits Banks’ Immunity -

A recent ruling from the Tennessee Court of Appeals has limited the immunity banks in the state once had when it comes to liability for withdrawals of money under powers of attorney.

The July 26 ruling comes in the Memphis case of the estate of Robert Stokes West, which sued Regions Bank in 2008 over the issue.

35. Malco Loses Franchise Tax Court Battle -

Malco Theaters Inc. lost an important court battle over state franchise taxes last week at the state appeals court level.

36. Cooper Files Lawsuit Related to Cordova Restaurant -

The strip club owner who opened – then abruptly closed – a restaurant in Cordova, which he’s insisted he’s not turning into a strip club, has filed a lawsuit related to his application for a compensated dance permit for the business.

37. Cooper Files Lawsuit Related to Cordova Restaurant -

The strip club owner who opened – then abruptly closed – a restaurant in Cordova, which he’s insisted he’s not turning into a strip club, has filed a lawsuit related to his application for a compensated dance permit for the business.

38. IBERIABANK Files $2.5 Million Permit -

4894 Poplar Ave.
Memphis, TN 38117
Permit Amount: $2.5 million

Project Cost: Applied January 2011
Completion: Fall 2011
Owner: IBERIABANK
Tenant: IBERIABANK
Contractor: Webb Building Corp.
Architect: Chrestia Staub Pierce Inc.

39. CVS/Pharmacy Buys Former Union Ave. United Methodist Land -

CVS 4992 TN LLC, an affiliate of Woonsocket, R.I.-based CVS/pharmacy drug store chain, has officially bought Union Avenue United Methodist Church property at 2117 Union Ave., at the southwest corner of Union Avenue and South Cooper Street. CVS paid $2.3 million to St. Luke’s United Methodist Church, formerly known as Union Avenue United Methodist Church Inc.

40. School Election to be Held in 45 to 60 Days -

The lawsuit is over and the election is on in the fast-moving, ever-changing schools standoff.

A day after a citizens group filed suit seeking a court order to put the Memphis City Schools (MCS) system charter surrender on the ballot, all sides in the lawsuit agreed there would be a referendum election sometime in March.

41. March Charter Surrender Referendum Agreement Made -

There will be a citywide referendum on a Memphis City Schools system charter surrender sometime no later than March 14 under terms of a consent order entered Thursday morning in Shelby County Chancery Court.

42. Evans Denies CVS, Church Injunction -

Chancellor Walter Evans denied a motion Thursday that would have stopped work on Union Avenue United Methodist Church as the site of a new CVS drug store.

43. Evans Denies CVS, Church Injunction -

Chancellor Walter Evans denied a motion Thursday that would have stopped work on Union Avenue United Methodist Church as the site of a new CVS drug store.

44. Higgins Takes Long Road to the Bench -

Gina Higgins thought 2006 was the year she would run for judge in the once-every-eight-year races known by politicians as the “big ballot.”

45. Challengers Move Closer to Election Hearing -

All sides in the legal dispute over the Aug. 5 election results will meet with Chancellor Arnold Goldin Friday to begin wading through a series of motions and ultimately a hearing on the dispute.

Ten candidates who lost in the Aug. 5 county general elections filed two lawsuits – one before the election results were certified and the other after they were certified. Both are before Goldin and are likely to be combined, a decision that is up to Goldin.

46. Election Challenge Lawsuits Back In Court Friday -

Both sides in the two lawsuits over the Aug. 5 election results are due in Chancery Court Friday for a scheduling conference.

Both cases have been assigned to Chancellor Arnold Goldin after Chancellors Walter Evans and Kenny Armstrong recused themselves.

47. Losing Candidates File Suit Over Election Results -

Before the polls closed Aug. 5, a clearly dismayed Shelby County Election Commission chairman Bill Giannini talked about the inevitability of some aspect of holding an election going wrong.

48. Election Results Saga Not Over Yet -

The Aug. 5 election results are certified. But the events of the coming week will determine whether that’s the final word on who won and who lost.

With the results approved by the Shelby County Election Commission, the local Democratic Party and several Democratic candidates who lost must decide if they want to go back to Chancery Court. They have five days to make a decision to file.

49. Memphians Share Legal Expertise with Thai Delegation -

Chancellor Arnold Goldin began a talk last week to a group in the courtroom of U.S. District Judge Bernice Donald with a joke.

50. Candidates Wait on Certified Results Before Legal Challenge -

Before there can be a challenge of the Aug. 5 election results, there has to be a set of certified election results.

That’s the bottom line of a possible legal challenge of the recent county general election results that materialized this week.

51. West Memphis Mojo Rises -

On the night of the worst civic tragedy in West Memphis’ history, blues stood up and did its thing.

The “Blues Trail to Chicago” concert was briefly canceled before officials decided to go with the show in honor of the two second-generation law enforcement officers who were shot and killed earlier Thursday.

52. Matthews Sues After Radio Ouster -

Thaddeus Matthews’ departure Friday as host of a 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. talk show at KWAM-AM 990 came with something frequently associated with the hot-button radio personality: fireworks.

The host of “Express Yourself” has filed a $500,000 lawsuit in Shelby County Chancery Court alleging KWAM president and general manager George Bryant breached Matthews’ contract with the station when he gave Matthews the boot.

53. City Gives Second Thought to Lee Settlement -

Shortly before Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton retired in July, the city paid more than $426,000 to settle a lawsuit with the former head of the city-owned utility company.

But the city now wants to recover some or all of the money awarded to Joseph Lee, the former president and CEO of Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division.

54. One Week Later: Historic Mayoral Era Turns to New Beginnings -

Just more than a week ago, Methodist minister Frank McRae opened a gathering at City Hall that was Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton’s farewell.

McRae talked about what he termed the “passing parade of politicians.”

55. City Attorney Standoff Changes Little With Court Ruling -

Chancellor Walter Evans has ruled Memphis Mayor Myron Lowery did nothing wrong in his move to fire City Attorney Elbert Jefferson.

But at the end of a hearing that took up most of Wednesday afternoon, Evans also ruled that Lowery needs a majority vote from the City Council to replace Jefferson with former U.S. Attorney Veronica Coleman-Davis in the city post.

56. UPDATE: Evans Rules Lowery Needs Majority Council Vote To Oust Jefferson -

Chancellor Walter Evans has ruled Memphis Mayor Myron Lowery did nothing wrong in his move to fire City Attorney Elbert Jefferson.

But at the end of a hearing that took up most of Wednesday afternoon, Evans also ruled that Lowery needs a majority vote from the City Council to replace Jefferson with former U.S. Attorney Veronica Coleman-Davis in the city post.

57. City Attorney Dispute Moves Into Chancery Court Today -

A turbulent turn of office at City Hall moves into a courtroom two blocks away this afternoon.

Memphis Mayor Myron Lowery delayed a City Council vote Tuesday on Veronica Coleman Davis as his nominee to be city attorney.

58. UPDATE: Council Vote On City Attorney Delayed -

Memphis Mayor Myron Lowery today delayed a City Council vote on Veronica Coleman Davis as his nominee to be city attorney.

Lowery told council members he wanted the delay to let a Chancery Court hearing tomorrow resolve any legal issues.

59. New Mayor Lowery Braces for First Council Battle -

Memphis Mayor Pro Tempore Myron Lowery goes to the City Council today with a new nominee for city attorney, former U.S. Attorney Veronica Coleman Davis, and lots of questions from some of his former council colleagues about his dismissal Friday of the old city attorney.

60. UPDATE: Lowery Appoints Coleman-Davis Deputy City Attorney -  

Memphis Mayor Myron Lowery has appointed his choice to be city attorney to be deputy city attorney until the City Council can act on her nomination.

The naming of Veronica Coleman-Davis to the number two spot is the latest twist in a controvery that began minutes after Lowery took the oath of office Friday and fired City Attorney Elbert Jefferson.

Jefferson then filed suit in Chancery Court against Lowery contesting Lowery's decision to fire him. Chancellor Walter Evans issued a preliminary injunction preventing Jefferson's dismissal at least until a hearing before Evans Wednesday afternoon.

On the Drake & Zeke Show on radio station 98.1 The Max, Lowery said until the council acts, Coleman-Davis, a former U.S. Attorney, will be deputy director. Her appointment to that position is immediate and does not require council approval.

Meanwhile, Jefferson's attorney, Ricky E. Wilkins, told The Daily News her confirmation Tuesday as City Attorney would have to come after a council vote to back Jefferson's firing.

"We will ask the court to continue to keep that injunction in place throughout the tenure of Myron Lowery as mayor pro tempore," Wilkins said. "If Myron is able to get the necessary votes to terminate Mr. Jefferson and to get the votes to replace him with a substitute city attorney ... then that's what the process calls for and I think Mr. Jefferson understands that. But Myron Lowery cannot ignore and violate the city charter to satisfy his own political means."

Jefferson was at City Hall over the weekend, escorted by City Council attorney Allan Wade, according to Lowery.

After taking the oath of office Friday afternoon from U.S. District Court Judge Hardy Mays, Lowery told reporters he had offered Jefferson a severance and a chance to resign the appointed post. Jefferson refused which apparently surprised Lowery since Jefferson had tendered his resignation to outgoing Mayor Willie Herenton earlier in the month and Herenton refused to accept it.

Lowery met with Jefferson in a City Hall stairwell after the swearing in ceremony. Lowery emerged without Jefferson and told reporters he had fired the attorney. Several sources said later that Jefferson was escorted from the building and his parking pass and other identification taken as he was walked to his car and out of City Hall.

Wilkins termed the forcible exit a "low blow" and a "fairly drastic action."

“The legal department has almost been a black hole for dollars,” Lowery said Friday, minutes after the stairwell meeting. “I think that we spend too much money on attorney fees. I think that our city attorney has allowed this to happen without adequate controls on this. And I’m looking for stronger controls in the city attorney’s office.”

“If the mayor pro tempore doesn’t have the power, who does?” Lowery said. “Of course I do.”

Power play

In addition to Coleman-Davis, Lowery will also take the nomination of former council member Jack Sammons as his Chief Administrative Officer to the council Tuesday.

Herenton CAO Keith McGee had retired effective July 4. But when Herenton moved back his resignation date to July 30, McGee extended his stay on a voluntary basis. McGee is working with Lowery on a transitional basis. Lowery said he had hoped Jefferson would work under the same arrangement.

“He wanted to keep the title and the salary that comes with it. So I had to make a decision,” Lowery said. “I wish he had accepted it. … He’s forced me to take this action.”

Lowery said he wants Coleman Davis to examine past city legal bills and expenses.

“I have heard that several individuals have been hired … in the legal department to fill vacancies who were scheduled to start work Monday. I just found this out,” Lowery told reporters. “I want to make sure that we don’t have cronies of our former legal division director who have been hired.”

Those appointments will be examined.

“I don’t want any friends of the division director receiving dollars or any backroom deals outside the scope of the City Council. You know what I’m talking about,” he told reporters. “That is not going to occur under my administration.”

‘Hard work and enthusiasm’

As Lowery moved into the seventh floor mayor’s office Friday at City Hall, council member Harold Collins moved into the council chairman’s office on the fifth floor as part of the transition in power following Herenton’s resignation. Collins indicated his displeasure with the firing of Jefferson and said he wants Lowery and Jefferson to be at Tuesday's council committee sessions to tell their sides of the story.

“It’s a new day at City Hall,” Lowery told a crowd in the Hall of Mayors the day after Herenton’s farewell address in the same hall. Lowery’s guests at the ceremony were Herenton, former Mayor Dick Hackett and J.O. Patterson Jr., the city’s first African-American mayor who served in the top post for 20 days after the resignation of Mayor Wyeth Chandler in 1982. Patterson was City Council chairman at the time. Like Lowery, Patterson also ran in the special election that followed and lost to Hackett, who lost to Herenton nine years later by 142 votes.

“With new life, new individuals, comes hope and promise,” Lowery said. “As mayor, I will promote a moral philosophy of customer service – customer-driven government. … I’m here also to say that I’m going to promote ethical leadership in government.”

One priority will be a new crime fighting strategy, although Lowery was quick to say he likes the direction the police department and those efforts have taken under current Police Director Larry Godwin. The other immediate priority is a more aggressive city cleanup campaign.

Lowery didn’t refer to Herenton directly in any of his comments, but the contrasts were apparent.

“We will be energetic in city government – more productive There’s a phrase, ‘We need to be workhorses, not showhorses.’” Lowery said. “You will not get a lot of catchy phrases from me. But you will get a lot of hard work and enthusiasm.”

The remark came the day after Herenton’s farewell address and press conference in which Herenton repeatedly invoked what looks to be the campaign slogan “Keep It Real” in his bid for the Democratic congressional nomination in 2010.

“As everyone knows, we’ve lost many people during the past several years. I’m going to say come home to Memphis,” Lowery said.

The remark is in contrast to one of Herenton’s most cited quotes from his 18-year tenure. When asked about citizens moving out of Memphis for the suburbs, Herenton responded by saying he had no problem with that and adding “goodbye.”

...

61. Commercial Real Estate Still Dropping, Stanton Says -

Janice Stanton, managing director of investment research for Cushman & Wakefield in New York, discussed the global financial crisis and how it has impacted commercial real estate at Wednesday’s Commercial Property Forecast Summit, at the Germantown Performing Arts Centre and sponsored by the Memphis Area Association of Realtors Commercial Council.

62. BlueHippo to Set Aside $1M in Tennessee -

BlueHippo, a company that markets computers nationwide to people with poor credit, was ordered Wednesday to set aside $1 million to cover potential claims from unhappy Tennessee residents.

The Tennessee attorney general’s office is suing BlueHippo, accusing the company of misleading customers with confusing advertising claims and financial arrangements.

63. Middle Eastern Visitors Get Look At Memphis Law System -

Saud y Al Sanea has seen temptation in the form of an iPod. It's not the iPod itself. The temptation is the card needed to upload music from iTunes to fill the iPod.

It can take two weeks to get one of the cards in Kuwait City where he is a public prosecutor at Kuwait's Ministry of Justice. But you can buy a knock-off version on the streets and some stores of Kuwait City much sooner.

64. GMAC Dismissed From Hyneman-Bud Davis Cadillac Suit -

GMAC Financial Services Corp., the auto loan company sued late last year along with Bud Davis Cadillac Inc. by wealthy Memphis real estate developer Rusty Hyneman, has been dismissed as a defendant in the case.

65. Coin Toss Sparks Complaint Against Judge -

A coin toss was performed during a recent hearing in Shelby County Chancery Court that was intended to solve a logistical dispute in a high-profile case brought late last year by real estate developer Rusty Hyneman.

66. Kwanzaa Tussle Neutralized in Court -

It began as a routine announcement at the end of the last Shelby County Board of Commissioners meeting of 2007.

County Commissioner Henri Brooks announced her annual Kwanzaa program would be held the day after Christmas in the County Commission chambers. There was some concern immediately. Commission Chairman David Lillard thought workers would be installing a new document management and voting system in the chambers - work involving some major disruptions, including drilling holes in the floor.

67. Great Kwanzaa Caper Ends in Court -

The great Shelby County Building Kwanzaa controversy ended Wednesday at the Shelby County Courthouse with a ruling by Chancellor Walter Evans that County Commissioner Henri Brooks could hold a Kwanzaa program in the commission chambers.

68. Great Kwanzaa Caper Ends in Court - The great Shelby County Building Kwanzaa controversy ended earlier today at the Shelby County Courthouse with a ruling by Chancellor Walter Evans that County Commissioner Henri Brooks could hold a Kwanzaa program in the commission chambers.

69. Edmund Ford Files SuitAgainst His Landlord -      Former Memphis City Council member Edmund Ford on Monday filed a lawsuit in Shelby County Chancery Court against the landlord of his mortuary business at 3390 Elvis Presley Blvd., according to The Daily News Online, www.

70. Sills Appointed To AANS Bulletin Advisory Board -

Dr. Allen K. Sills Jr., medical director of the Neuroscience Institute at Methodist University Hospital, associate professor at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and neurosurgeon at Semmes-Murphey Neurologic & Spine Institute, has been appointed to the American Association of Neurological Surgeons' (AANS) Bulletin advisory board. Sills will contribute articles to the AANS' quarterly publication, "The Bulletin."

71. Open Trustee Position Causes Speculation in Bankruptcy Circles -

Two new judges recently have donned black robes and begun hearing bankruptcy cases in West Tennessee, though one important position in the local bankruptcy establishment remains to be filled.

It's the Chapter 13 trustee job that was vacated in June when George Emerson Jr. left the post to fill one of those two spots on the bankruptcy court bench.

72. Bankruptcy Changes to Hit at Tough Time -

The waiting room on the sixth floor of 200 Jefferson Ave., known among bankruptcy attorneys as the "bus stop," can be a chaotic place. There, rows of debtors wait to speak with their lawyers and meet with the Bankruptcy Court's trustees - a process that has grown so exponentially over the years that a new bankruptcy judge will be named soon to help with the caseload.

73. Archived Article: Lead - 2004 Courts

Local Courts See Declines in Case Filings

Circuit, Chancery Courts see drop, but Probate filings rise

LANCE ALLAN

The Daily News

Representatives of several local courts were busy in 2004, but they were given somewhat of a ...

74. Archived Article: Law Focus - Chancellor vacancy leaves big shoes to fit

Chancellor court vacancy leaves big gap to fill

By MARY DANDO

The Daily News

The sudden death of Chancellor Floyd Peete Jr. created not only a sense of loss among the staff of Shelby County Chan...

75. Archived Article: Calendar - Calendar of events Jan

Calendar of events June 24-June 30

June 24

Mississippi Museum of Art, 201 E. Pascagoula St. in Jackson, Miss., presents Passionate Observer: Eudora Welty among Artists of the Thirties, featuring photographs by Mississ...

76. Archived Article: Calendar - Calendar of events Jan Calendar of events: June 17-June 23 June 17 Memphis Investors Group will hold its monthly meeting from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Holiday Inn Select, Adams Lecture Hall, 2490 Mount Moriah Road. MIG is a private, non-profit, educa...

77. Archived Article: Calendar - Calendar of events Jan Calendar of events: June 10-June 16 June 10 The Memphis Bar Association presents "Designated Topics in Bankruptcy," from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at 200 Jefferson Ave., sixth floor. Bankruptcy court Chief Judge David...

78. Archived Article: Calendar - Calendar of events Jan Calendar of events: June 3-June 9 June 6 The giant Friends of the Library Book Sale returns to the Mid-South Fairgrounds June 6-9 in the Charles Brakefield Youth Building. Thousands of books, videos, records, sheet music and b...

79. Archived Article: Calendar - Calendar of events Jan Calendar of events: May 20-26 May 21 The Memphis Bar Association Masters of the Law Series continues with a seminar at the Peabody, 149 Union Ave. Shelby County Public Defender and county mayoral candidate A C Wharton is the s...

80. Archived Article: Calendar - Calendar of events Jan Calendar of events: May 13-19 May 13 Network of Memphis, an organization of progressive, professional and entrepreneurial women, meets the second Monday of the month at Napa Cafe in Sanderlin Centre at 5:30 p.m. The May meetin...

81. Archived Article: Calendar - Calendar of events Jan Calendar of events: May 6-10 May 7 Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women, 6225 Humphreys Blvd., offers free community seminars in the hospitals education classroom as part of the Dr. Sam P. Patterson Library Seminar Series, whic...

82. Archived Article: Calendar - Calendar of events Jan Calendar of events: April 29-May 5 April 29 The Mid-South Disc Jockey Association meeting begins at 7 p.m. at Fox Ridge Pizza, 5950 Knight Arnold Road. All DJs and Karaoke Jocks are invited. For information, call 368-6782. Mem...

83. Archived Article: Calendar - Calendar of events Jan Calendar of events: April 22-April 28 April 22 Mississippi Museum of Art, 201 E. Pascagoula St. in Jackson, Miss., presents Ms. Booths Garden: Photographs by Jack Kotz, a collection of photographs by Santa Fe-based photographe...

84. Archived Article: Calendar - Calendar of events Jan Calendar of events: April 15-April 21 April 15 Mississippi Museum of Art, 201 E. Pascagoula St. in Jackson, Miss., presents Ms. Booths Garden: Photographs by Jack Kotz, a collection of photographs by Santa Fe-based photographe...

85. Archived Article: Calendar - Calendar of events Jan Calendar of events April 8-April 14 April 8 The Shelby County Republican Women's Club invited 19 Republican County Commission candidates for districts 1, 3, 4 and 5 to speak at the club's meeting. The program begins at 11 a.m....

86. Archived Article: Calendar - Calendar of events Jan Calendar of events April 1-April 7 April 1 Consumer Credit Counseling Service hosts a free workshop on building a budget from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at CCCS main office, 2430 Poplar Ave. Call 323-4909, Ext. 1313. Mississippi Muse...

87. Archived Article: Calendar - Calendar of events Jan Calendar of events March 25-March 31 March 25 Mississippi Museum of Art, 201 E. Pascagoula St. in Jackson, Miss., presents Ms. Booths Garden: Photographs by Jack Kotz, a collection of photographs by Santa Fe-based photographer...

88. Archived Article: Benchmark - Tennessee Supreme Court Tennessee Supreme Court passes on Grizzlies appeal The state Supreme Court declined to get involved Tuesday in the fight over public funding for a $250 million NBA arena for the Memphis Grizzlies. The arena arguments go next ...

89. Archived Article: Comm Briefs - A public meeting is scheduled from 8:30 a A public meeting is scheduled from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday at the Plaza Club in the Toyota Center, next to AutoZone Park, to discuss the application for the Round III Empowerment Zone program and the ...

90. Archived Article: Law Focus - No Taxes NBA still steaming ahead No Taxes NBA steaming ahead to stop arena deal By MARY DANDO The Daily News Attorney Duncan Ragsdale is no quitter. The man spearheading the No Taxes NBA campaign sees what some might regard as a setback as the spur...

91. Archived Article: Attorney Graph - Attorney Attorney Judgments Amount ------------------------------------------------ ----------- -------------------------- Gordon & Feldbaum 226 $220,174.79 Baer Baer & Baer 220 $348,622.30 Mccullough Law Firm ...

92. Archived Article: Gov't (lawsuit) - A hearing set in Chancery Judge D Hearing set for Jan. 6 on property lawsuit By KATHLEEN BURT The Daily News A hearing set in Chancery Judge D.J. Allisandratos courtroom Jan. 6 could wrap up a lawsuit several Cordova residents have filed against the...

93. Archived Article: Gibbons Oath - Notes Gibbons swearing in New DA sworn in, already lobbying for funds for office By GABRIELLE C.L. SONGE The Daily News It was a solemn event and a roast District Attorney General Bill Gibbons swearing in ceremony at the criminal justice center Frid...

94. Archived Article: Back Hobnob - Public gets chance to meet Public can mingle with politicians at Hobnob 96 Attendees to the Memphis Chamber of Commerces nonpartisan political event "HobnobPolitics in the Park" will be able to mix and mingle in an informal atmosphere with...