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Editorial Results (free)

1. Real Deal -

They were tossing around numbers, trying to guess the win total for the 2015 University of Memphis football season.

In the not-too-distant past, the two Highland Hundred members and longtime season-ticket holders might have been able to add their guesses together and still come up short of the six victories needed for their favorite team to be bowl-eligible.

2. Digital Diaspora -

The ubiquitous connectivity that permeates today's workplace is having a profound effect on company cultures, most notably in the digitally-fueled diaspora unfolding in which employees can work from just about anywhere.

3. Beware of Potential Buyers at Your Door -

It’s a little early for Halloween, but that’s not stopping adults dressed as real estate professionals from knocking on doors and looking for handouts.

But these little ghouls aren’t asking for candy. They’re looking for a big payday – as opposed to a Payday – and to take advantage of potential sellers in this robust market.

4. Memphis in May Faces Decisions in Offseason -

The stages in Tom Lee Park are down. Any leftover picnic blankets are long gone. The barriers at each end of Riverside Drive have given way to the return of traffic.

5. Want to Get Into Knoxville-Area Showbiz? Here’s How -

“Chasing the fun” keeps Jaime Hemsley, founder and owner of Gage Models and Talent Agency, in high gear to find her clients opportunities in the entertainment business.

“There’s lots of different ways to get involved in the industry,” she says, adding that her clients work both locally and nationally. Her agency recently booked a client with a TV reality dating show. Gage is headquartered in Knoxville but has clients throughout the southeast and works with agencies in New York and Los Angeles.

6. Gulch Approaching 50 Percent Buildout -

Nashville’s storied Gulch, originally the home of the downtown railway terminal, is approaching another milestone in its long history.

Revitalization of the area began in the early 2000s, and The Gulch Improvement District was formed in 2006. Since that time, developers have found great success in luring in upscale residential, commercial and mixed-use tenants.

7. Plane Talk -

It was 2012 and Tom Jones was growing increasingly frustrated.

The root of Jones’ discontent was the high fares Delta Air Lines was extracting from Mid-Southerners at Memphis International Airport.

8. Boosting Overtime: Obama Calls for Broader Coverage -

WASHINGTON (AP) – They're called managers, and they sometimes work grueling schedules at fast food chains and retail stores. But with no overtime eligibility, their pay may be lower per hour than many workers they supervise.

9. Memphis Finance Gurus Retrace City’s Fiscal Path -

Mayors come and go at City Hall and what was a priority for one administration can change with the next. But one constant is finance.

It defines a city’s overall health, no matter who is in office, and thus its ability to borrow money to fund those priorities and then pay off that debt.

10. Garibaldi's Temptations Club Celebrates its 1980s Run -

Mike Garibaldi is known for his Memphis restaurant chain, Garibaldi's Pizza.

At the original Garibaldi’s, near the University of Memphis, is a picture on the wall of a smiling waitress in her 50s.

11. Stones’ Nashville Connections Go Way Back -

While Brad Paisley lives what he calls “a bucket list item” by singing while playing his guitar in typically showy fashion as the opening act for The Rolling Stones, the most important guitarist in rock ‘n’ roll history and a man idolized by Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood will be sitting in his house on Blueberry Hill in the hills of northern Davidson County.

12. Stones Rock Music City -

Pleased to meet you, hope you guessed our name. Well, hell, Mick, if it’s puzzling you, it’s Nashville. Music City USA.

We’re the national media’s flavor of the day – the “It city,” which has gone from being a secondary concert market – remember The Beatles played Memphis, not Nashville – to one of the country’s prime touring destinations.

13. Panel Alters Wharton’s Plan for Memphis Fairgrounds -

The Mid-South Coliseum becomes a pavilion with a grove next to a multi-purpose sports center. A 10-acre water park fronts on Central Avenue where a high school gym now stands.

A second north-south Tiger Lane intersects with the current east-west version.

14. Panel Alters Wharton’s Plan for Memphis Fairgrounds -

The Mid-South Coliseum becomes a pavilion with a grove next to a multi-purpose sports center. A 10-acre water park fronts on Central Avenue where a high school gym now stands.

A second north-south Tiger Lane intersects with the current east-west version.

15. MAA Outgrowing Its East Memphis Headquarters -

MAA has tapped Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors to explore its long-term corporate office needs.

The apartment-focused real estate investment trust says internal growth and the 2013 acquisition of Colonial Properties Trust means space at its East Memphis headquarters is getting tight.

16. AP Analysis: More 'Phony Numbers' in Reports as Stocks Rise -

NEW YORK (AP) – Those record profits that companies are reporting may not be all they're cracked up to be.

As the stock market climbs ever higher, professional investors are warning that companies are presenting misleading versions of their results that ignore a wide variety of normal costs of running a business to make it seem like they're doing better than they really are.

17. Making the Connection -

Archie Willis III had just earned his master’s degree in business at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill when he returned to Memphis in 1981 to help his father, A.W. Willis Jr., redevelop the Adler Hotel Annex.

18. Long-Delayed Nuclear Plant in Tennessee Nears Completion -

SPRING CITY, Tenn. (AP) – Tom Wallace started working at the Watts Bar nuclear plant as a young man in 1979, hoping he could eventually become a reactor operator.

19. Trolley Bells Adjusted After Complaints -

When the Memphis Area Transit Authority decided to put shuttle buses on Main Street in April to substitute for the sidelined trolley fleet there was a problem. And the solution has since become a problem as well.

20. Riverfront Restaurant Will Open for Memphis In May -

Riverfront Bar & Grill at Beale Street Landing will remain open during the Memphis In May International Festival activities in Tom Lee Park.

21. Riverfront Bar & Grill Remains Open During Memphis in May -

Riverfront Bar & Grill at Beale Street Landing will remain open during the Memphis In May International Festival activities in Tom Lee Park.

22. Reps for West Coast Dockworkers Urge Union to OK Contract -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – A tentative contract agreement that restored the flow of international trade through West Coast seaports earlier this year took a big step closer Friday to becoming official, as representatives of the dockworkers' union overwhelmingly recommended that rank-and-file members vote to approve the deal.

23. Bike Fest Leaders Rally for Positive Change -

It is rewarding when people who seemingly have nothing in common, of being worlds apart, find common ground. And it is nothing short of inspirational when what they build on that common ground makes life better for all of us.

24. States to Test Ways to Send Food Stamp Recipients to Work -

WASHINGTON (AP) – New federal grants will help 10 states test programs to help food stamp recipients find jobs, from using career coaches to quicker training courses to mental health assistance.

25. Hard to ‘Mansplain’ Workplace Gender Issues -

“Jane felt like screaming at Dick after he manterrupted her in the staff meeting, bropropriated her idea and then spent the afternoon mansplaining it back to her.’’

That’s an actual sentence – if people are willing to use gender-specific language that’s gaining popularity to describe unwanted workplace behavior.

26. Memphis in May Unveils Music Festival Lineup -

Memphis in May International Festival has unveiled the lineup for the Beale Street Music Festival that will unfold over three days in May at Tom Lee Park. The event is expected to bring a crowd of more than 100,000.

27. Building From a New Blueprint -

When recruiting new businesses, East Tennessee economic development officials have long touted the benefits of partnering with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee.

The lab and the university both have a history of working closely with private business to develop cutting-edge manufacturing techniques, technologies and new products. That research effort recently received a major boost with President Obama’s announcement of a new manufacturing innovation hub based in the Knoxville area.

28. High Flyer -

She does not want to tell this first story, the one that could have meant there would be no more stories. There is fear in sharing the story about how two airplanes nearly collided because she never wants to say anything that might dissuade people from flying.

29. Nashville’s Most Romantic Restaurants -

Romance means something different for everyone, but most people can agree that if there is low lighting, soft music, a charming companion and something delicious to eat, you’ve already got the makings of one outstanding evening.

30. Saluting One of the Greatest -

Tom Brokaw called Mary Margret Foley one of the greatest. No, not by name, but as one of that critical mass of individuals in this country born between 1900 and 1925 whom he dubbed “The Greatest Generation” in his book by the same name.

31. Tribute to Good and Decent -

DRAWING A CROWD. The line started at one end of the big room and wound its way out into the hall.

The widow and the son and the family received the soft words about the hard loss, the sympathy, the hugs and the tears, the emotional exchanges of finality, the shared experience of a life lived and now over. A visitation, yes, but it seemed more than that quiet, somber label would suggest.

32. Events -

The Association for Women Attorneys will host its 35th annual banquet and silent auction Thursday, Jan. 29, at 5:30 p.m. at the Holiday Inn University of Memphis, 3700 Central Ave. Cost is $60 for AWA members, $70 for nonmembers and $40 for law students. RSVP to Keating Lowery at keatingl@lawrencerussell.com or 901-844-4438.

33. Fairgrounds Plan Draws Different Opinions -

The first renderings of a recast Mid-South Fairgrounds offered years ago are just one misstep early on that continues to plague the project still in search of specific private partners.

The conceptual drawings were heavy on baseball diamonds when the idea of two mayoral administrations at City Hall was and remains more soccer fields, basketball courts and a multi-purpose sports facility along with baseball diamonds.

34. Commercial Success -

If, as the saying goes, everyone gets 15 minutes of fame, Bart Durham’s has come in 15- and 30-second spurts – the length of the commercials that depict him as a lawyer everyman, ever-ready to tilt at windmills for the sake of justice for the working class.

35. Departing Postmaster General Slams Banking Duties Proposal -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Retiring Postmaster General Patrick R. Donahoe scoffed Tuesday at suggestions that the Postal Service could ease some of its chronic financial woes by branching out and offering basic banking services to its customers.

36. Rental Showdown -

Tiffany H., 43, has found the perfect way to make money. It’s close to home, easy-to-manage and gives her the flexibility she needs as a busy mom shuttling two children back and forth to two different schools each day.

37. US Companies Eager to Embrace Cuba Face Hurdles -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Cargill aims to sell more corn and soybeans. MasterCard covets another site for Americans to swipe credit cards. Marriott sees beachfront property that needs hotels.

And outside Orlando, Florida, Danny Howell just knows there would be demand for his classic Chevrolet parts.

38. NLRB Issues Rule to Speed Up Union Organizing -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The National Labor Relations Board issued a final rule on Friday aimed at modernizing and streamlining the union election process.

The new rule will shorten the time between when an election is ordered and the election is held, eliminating a previous 25-day waiting period. And it seeks to reduce litigation that can be used to stall elections. It will also require employers to furnish union organizers with email addresses and phone numbers of workers.

39. Labor Board OKs Personal Use of Company Email -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In a victory for unions, the National Labor Relations Board ruled Thursday that employees can use their company email accounts for union organizing and other workplace-related purposes, if they do it on their own time.

40. Music City Christmas -

In years past, Carl Haley has offered his Grand Avenue transportation passengers the customary Christmas lights tour packages – about the same as other tours in Nashville – with a cruise by Opryland and a trip to a few choice, heavily decorated neighborhoods.

41. Greenline Part of Larger Changes to Shelby Farms -

The visitors center at Shelby Farms Park is about to come down, the latest sign of the transformation of the park.

42. No Child Left Behind Gets Renewed Focus -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The No Child Left Behind education law could be making a political comeback.

Sen. Lamar Alexander, the Tennessee Republican who is the incoming chairman of the Senate committee overseeing education, says his top education priority is fixing the landmark Bush-era law. His goal? Get a bill signed by President Barack Obama early next year.

43. Telecom Controversy Emerges at City Hall -

During the recent repaving of Danny Thomas Boulevard Downtown, city public works crews discovered a leak in sewer lines, and the political timing lined up with a controversy at City Hall that’s been out of the public eye for the most part since the spring.

44. Spillyards Leads Community Advisors Launch -

Greg Spillyards has joined the brokerage team at Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors to launch the firm’s Community Advisors service line.

Community Advisors is focused on the Memphis city core, with a goal to provide real estate advisory services to assist in the revitalization of the city’s underserved areas with passion, creativity and entrepreneurship, and with service to those already living and leading in their neighborhoods.

45. Obama Calls for Tougher Internet Regulation -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama on Monday embraced a radical change in how the government treats Internet service, coming down on the side of consumer activists who fear slower download speeds and higher costs but angering Republicans and the nation's cable giants who say the plan would kill jobs.

46. Pyramid’s Past Life Almost Vanished -

On the north side of The Pyramid, you can still see signs of what once was, in a way that makes 20 years seem like centuries ago.

The logo for the city’s old Wonders series of exhibitions is the most noticeable indicator of the past life of a structure long ago stripped of the seating bowl that made it an arena.

47. Hook, Line & Sinker -

In May, when the first guests at Big Cypress Lodge inside The Pyramid open the French doors in their rooms, they’ll be able to walk onto a patio overlooking the sprawling interior of the Bass Pro Shops store and attraction, including a re-creation of Delta cypress swamp and 600,000 gallons of water features.

48. Out-of-Patience Investors Sell Off Amazon -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon has long acted like an ideal customer on its own website: a freewheeling big spender with no worries about balancing a checkbook. Investors confident in founder and CEO Jeff Bezos' invest-and-expand strategy flooded into the stock as the company revolutionized shopping, upended the book industry and took on the cloud — even though its vast range of initiatives ate up all the company's profits.

49. Winless SMU on Tap for 3-3 Tigers -

They aren’t No. 18 East Carolina and they aren’t winless SMU. Halfway through the 2014 season, the Tigers are in the middle. The University of Memphis is 3-3 overall, 1-1 in the American Athletic Conference and in a large pack of teams whose seasons could yet reach lofty heights … or tumble down to the lowly place everyone knows too well.

50. Mississippi Hospitals, Clinic Receiving Updates on Ebola -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — State health officials say Mississippi hospitals will be capable of handling any Ebola cases that may arise.

State Epidemiologist Dr. Thomas Dobbs said some hospitals are updating procedures based on information provided by the state Department of Health and the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

51. NHL Bringing 2016 All-Star Game to Nashville -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Timing had been the only question about Nashville hosting the NHL All-Star game, and the league finally has the answer.

Music City will be hosting the league's showcase event in 2016 on Jan. 30-31 at Bridgestone Arena – home to the Nashville Predators.

52. Zuckerberg, Wife Donate $25 Million to CDC for Ebola -

NEW YORK (AP) – Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan, are donating $25 million to the CDC Foundation to help address the Ebola epidemic.

53. Trolley Report First Challenge for MATA Leader -

For the new president and general manager of the Memphis Area Transit Authority, last week’s report on the authority’s grounded trolley system was an introduction to one part of the long-term challenges facing the agency that is public transportation in Memphis.

54. Senators: Widen Medicaid Program for Frail Seniors -

WASHINGTON (AP) – More than a dozen U.S. senators from both parties are calling on the Obama administration to broaden a Medicaid program for the nation's frailest seniors, calling it a proven alternative to pricier nursing home care as states seek to limit long-term medical costs.

55. Prices at the Pump Head Below $3 in Much of US -

NEW YORK (AP) – The price of a gallon of gasoline may soon start with a "2'' across much the country.

Gasoline prices typically decline in autumn, and this year they are being pulled even lower by falling global oil prices. By the end of the year, up to 30 states could have an average gasoline price of less than $3 a gallon.

56. RiverFit Brings Activity to Tom Lee Park -

Riverfront Development Corp. President Benny Lendermon, while advocating for the creation of Beale Street Landing, once referred to Tom Lee Park as one of the worst parks in the country.

57. Wade: College Football Returns With Passion -

First off, I don’t believe everything that Alabama wide receiver Amari Cooper says.

“Coach Lane Kiffin is a great coach and a great person to be around,” Cooper said of the Crimson Tide’s new offensive coordinator. “Coach is a likable guy.”

58. Graceland Manager Maps Global Outposts -

The recession and changes over the last nine years in the companies owning 85 percent of Elvis Presley Enterprises played a role in delaying plans for the expansion of Graceland into a 120-acre campus in Whitehaven.

59. Author Support Key to Booksellers’ Success -

Building relationships with customers and forming partnerships with other organizations is a key ingredient to keeping Union Ave Books vibrant in the Knoxville community.

Flossie McNabb, who owns the store with her daughter, Bunnie Presswood, caters to both writers and readers in choosing events and activities. And she is open to offering new opportunities for her customers, including a book club for Southern Literature that will start later this month.

60. Fresh Market Debuts Midtown Store -

For a while now Central Gardens resident Tom Clifton has been driving to East Memphis to get his groceries.

61. Memphis in May to Honor Poland in 2015 -

The Memphis in May International Festival will honor Poland during the 2015 month-long festival.

Festival organizers announced the honored country Tuesday, Aug. 12, at the organization’s annual meeting at the Memphis Botanic Garden.

62. Tennessee Supreme Court Races See Spending Spike -

NASHVILLE (AP) – An influx of campaign spending on three Tennessee Supreme Court seats has transformed what is traditionally a sleepy affair into a hard-fought campaign that has raised questions about the role of partisan politics in the judiciary.

63. Partial Trolley Service On Road to Restoration -

The Memphis Area Transit Authority has identified five trolleys that it is repairing and could have back in limited service in three to six months, probably on the Main Street line.

“We’ve identified the five trolleys that we believe are in the best condition to focus on them and go in and do a complete reinspection and begin repair work on those five trolleys with the intent of getting at least limited service in place within three to six months,” said MATA interim president and general manager Tom Fox. “We do believe that we are still on schedule to meet that window of time.”

64. Grizzlies Plan ‘Pop-Up Park’ for Tom Lee Park -

The Memphis Grizzlies would like to activate Tom Lee Park while generating a community-wide discussion about the highest and best use of green spaces.

65. Partial Trolley Service on Road to Restoration -

The Memphis Area Transit Authority has identified five trolleys that it is repairing and could have back in limited service in three to six months, probably on the Main Street line.

“We’ve identified the five trolleys that we believe are in the best condition to focus on them and go in and do a complete reinspection and begin repair work on those five trolleys with the intent of getting at least limited service in place within three to six months,” said MATA interim president and general manager Tom Fox. “We do believe that we are still on schedule to meet that window of time.”

66. Partial Trolley Service Could Be on Road to Restoration -

The Memphis Area Transit Authority has identified five trolleys that it is repairing and could have back in limited service in three to six months, probably on the Main Street line.

“We’ve identified the five trolleys that we believe are in the best condition to focus on them and go in and do a complete reinspection and begin repair work on those five trolleys with the intent of getting at least limited service in place within three to six months,” said MATA interim president and general manager Tom Fox. “We do believe that we are still on schedule to meet that window of time.”

67. Shouldering the Load -

Ole Miss quarterback Bo Wallace enters his senior season with a chance to make history, a chance for his name to have the kind of staying power that would have Rebels fans tossing the name “Bo” around The Grove for generations, the way they do with names like Archie and Eli.

68. Downtown Stakeholders Talk Office Space, Riverfront -

Office space is moving east in Memphis for now.

But the head of the Downtown Memphis Commission says that doesn’t appear to be a long-term trend.

“I don’t disagree that that’s happened. I disagree that that will continue to happen over the next 20 or 30 years,” Downtown Memphis Commission president Paul Morris said on the WKNO-TV program “Behind the Headlines.” “If you look at it from the longer-term perspective across America, more and more offices are returning to downtown areas.”

69. Locally Grown Foods Look to Bigger Business -

PHILADELPHIA (AP) – Once a niche business, locally grown foods aren't just for farmers markets anymore.

A growing network of companies and organizations is delivering food directly from local farms to major institutions like Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in downtown Philadelphia, eliminating scores of middlemen from farm to fork. Along the way, they're increasing profits and recognition for smaller farms and bringing consumers healthier, fresher foods.

70. Former US Senator Howard Baker Jr. Dies -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Former Sen. Howard H. Baker Jr., a moderate Republican known as the politician who inquired what President Richard Nixon knew during the 1973 Senate Watergate hearings, has died. He was 88.

71. Military Considers Shopping Perk for Most Veterans -

The U.S. military is looking into allowing all of the nation's veterans who served honorably to shop online at exchanges that sell discounted, name-brand goods – a perk that is currently available only to a small minority.

72. Trolley Hiatus Comes at Critical Time for MATA -

The decision by the Memphis Area Transit Authority to temporarily stop all trolley service comes at a time of broader change for the city’s mass transit system.

The Main Street Trolley line that opened in the early 1990s and brought trolleys back in service for the first time in decades is getting its first comprehensive maintenance since the opening 22 years ago.

73. Merck to Pay $3.85 Billion for Hepatitis C Drug Developer -

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) – Merck & Co. will spend about $3.85 billion for Idenix Pharmaceuticals Inc., a small company developing hepatitis C medicines that, together with Merck's experimental drugs, could produce lucrative combo therapies that quickly cure most patients with the blood-borne virus afflicting tens of millions.

74. Commission Approves Budgets and Dueling Tax Rates Without PreK Amendment -

Shelby County Commissioners signed off Monday, June 2, on a $1.1 billion consolidated operating budget for all of Shelby County government as well as a $75 million capital budget, both for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

75. Riverside Drive Begins Pedestrian, Bike Trial -

With Saturday’s rain closing the Sunset Symphony, the Memphis in May International Festival ended its month-long stay in Tom Lee Park.

76. Riverside Drive Begins Pedestrian, Bike Lane Trial -

With Saturday’s rain closing the Sunset Symphony, the Memphis in May International Festival ended its month-long stay in Tom Lee Park.

77. MATA President Calls for Expanded Service -

The interim leader of the Memphis Area Transit Authority wants the city’s bus line to get more involved in “transportation management associations.”

MATA’s interim president and general manager, Tom Fox, describes the associations as “groups of employers banding together to provide some kind of services to supplement what MATA can provide.”

78. Gas Prices Have Familiar Look as Summer Nears -

NEW YORK (AP) – The price of gasoline looks familiar this Memorial Day. For the third year in a row, the national average will be within a penny or two of $3.64 per gallon.

Stability wasn't always the norm. Between 2003 and 2008 average retail gasoline prices more than doubled, reaching an all-time high of $4.11 per gallon in 2008. Prices then collapsed as the U.S. plunged into recession. But after a two-year run-up between 2009 and 2011, the price of gasoline has remained in a range of roughly $3.25 to $3.75 per gallon.

79. More Departures From Haslam-Owned Truck-Stop Chain -

NASHVILLE (AP) – With a year-long federal fraud investigation looming over it, the huge truck-stop chain owned by the family of the Cleveland Browns owner and Tennessee's governor is doing some housecleaning at its highest levels.

80. AP Sources: Wolves Get Permission to Talk to Joerger -

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) – With the Memphis Grizzlies front office in turmoil, the Minnesota Timberwolves are considering trying to lure coach Dave Joerger away to coach the team in his home state.

81. Economic Experts Offer Analysis, Forecast -

A report from Fitch Ratings May 14 declared that going forward the U.S. economy will have to grow without the help it has enjoyed in recent years from things such as low interest rates and government spending.

82. The Market Whisperer -

When economic analysis gets reduced to a binary choice between opposites like bullish or bearish, up or down, strong or weak, the complexity that helps explain the way things are gets lost in a thicket of sound byte-ready oversimplification.

83. Malone to Challenge Luttrell In August Mayoral Showdown -

Former Shelby County Commissioner Deidre Malone will challenge incumbent Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell in the August county general election after winning the Tuesday, May 6, Democratic mayoral primary.

84. Bayer to Buy Merck Consumer Business for $14.2 Billion -

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) – Germany's Bayer plans to buy U.S.-based Merck & Co.'s consumer health business, creating a combined medicine cabinet of household names from Bayer's aspirin to Merck's Claritin allergy pills.

85. GOP Blocks Democrats' Minimum Wage Try in Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Senate Republicans derailed a Democratic drive Wednesday to raise the federal minimum wage, blocking a cornerstone of President Barack Obama's economic plans and ensuring the issue will be a major feature of this fall's congressional elections.

86. Council Opens Budget Hearings With Cuts -

Memphis City Council members opened budget hearings Tuesday, April 29, with no frills presentations from city division directors and leaders of agencies funded by the city.

And with a majority of the 13-member council present for the opening day of the hearings, council members recommended $12 million in cuts from various departments, divisions and agencies by the lunch break in the all-day session and put the money toward the city’s annual required contribution for pension liability.

87. Crossroads -

After starting work as a butcher when he was just a teenager, Ron Manis began his career as a truck driver in 1979.

“I started when I was 16 years old, learning how to cut meat and, after being in that building 10 hours a day every day, I thought I wanted to do something outside and I’ve been driving a truck ever since,” Manis said. “Every time I saw one going down the road I thought to myself that I’d like to do that one day to see what it was like, seeing places I’ve never seen before, meeting interesting people.”

88. US Proposes Pay-for-Priority Internet Standards -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – The Federal Communications Commission is set to propose new Internet rules that would allow Internet service providers to charge content companies for faster delivery of their services over the so-called "last mile" connection to people's homes.

89. Armstrong Relocation Owner Shares ‘Only in America’ Story -

When Tom Watson was a child, his father and uncle bought what was then known as Armstrong Transfer and Storage Co.

90. Fundraising Help for Orchestra Continues -

The Kickstarter campaign to raise at least $25,000 for the financially struggling Memphis Symphony Orchestra has beaten its goal, pulling in a little more than $28,500.

That’s one example among many of how, once the orchestra’s dire straits became known earlier this year, supporters have been lining up to come to the rescue. And more chances for the public to help are still to come.

91. Health Law Concerns for Cancer Centers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Cancer patients relieved that they can get insurance coverage because of the new health care law may be disappointed to learn that some the nation's best cancer hospitals are off-limits.

92. Tennessee Brewery Plan Unveiled -

Memphis businessman Taylor Berger is part of a team preparing to take short-term ownership of the Tennessee Brewery Downtown, with plans to bring a variety of community-focused uses to the site from roughly the last weekend in April through the last weekend in May.

93. Norris Finds Legislative Leadership Has its Price -

Many people who like problem solving usually tackle a tough crossword, or maybe Sudoku.

Collierville’s Mark Norris opted for politics.

94. Feds File Suit Against For-Profit College Chain -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau filed suit Wednesday against a large, for-profit college chain alleging that it pushed students into high-cost private student loans knowing they would likely end in default.

95. Agriculture Census Shows Boom in Farm Sales -

WASHINGTON (AP) – American agriculture has experienced a boom, with market values of crops, livestock and total agricultural products reaching record highs even as the amount of U.S. farmland declined, according to a new government survey.

96. Criminal Justice Issues Likely to Dominate Races -

Expect to hear a lot between now and August about how the local criminal justice system does or does not work.

With Thursday’s filing deadline for candidates in the May 6 county primaries, two races for offices that are part of the system advanced to the August ballot.

97. Roland ReElected At Filing Deadline, Two Countywide Races Set For August -

One of the six Shelby County Commission incumbents seeking re-election this year was effectively elected to a new four-year term in a new district with the noon Thursday, Feb. 20, filing deadline for candidates in the May county primaries.

98. Tour Shows Work Progressing in Pyramid -

The opening date for Bass Pro Shops at The Pyramid is still tentative.

But it appears to now be in December depending on who you talked with this week as the outdoors retailer offered a look inside The Pyramid.

99. House Takes Step Toward Ban on In-Flight Calls -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Allowing airline passengers to make cellphone calls in-flight is asking for trouble, lawmakers said Tuesday as a House panel approved a bill to ban such calls.

The bill – passed without opposition by the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee – requires the Department of Transportation to issue regulations prohibiting such calls. The department has already said it is considering creating such a ban as part of its consumer protection role.

100. Insurance Through Work? Health Law Affects You Too -

The health care overhaul's reach stretches far beyond the millions of uninsured Americans it is expected to help. It also could touch everything from the drug choices to doctor bills of people who have insurance through work.