» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'Steve Hill' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:16
Shelby Public Records:91
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:19
Middle Tennessee:449
East Tennessee:181
Other:5

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Walnut Hill Apartments Sells for $28 Million -

8920 Walnut Grove Road
Cordova, TN 38018
Sale Amount: $27.9 million

Sale Date: Aug. 28, 2014
Buyer: IRT Walnut Hill Apartments Owner LLC
Seller: 30 California-based limited liability companies
Details: The 324-unit Walnut Hill Apartments in Cordova has sold for $27.9 million to an entity affiliated with Philadelphia-based RAIT Financial Trust.

2. Shelby County Home Sales Down 28 Percent in August -

Shelby County home sales plummeted in August when compared to the same month last year. Realtors sold 1,235 homes in Shelby County in August, down a staggering 28 percent from 1,705 home sales in August 2013, according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, chandlerreports.com.

3. SEC’s New Quarterbacks Ready to Prove Themselves -

They are the SEC quarterbacks left behind. The quarterbacking gods, with names like Manziel, McCarron, Mettenberger and Murray – what is it about M’s? – have ascended to a higher place: playing on Sundays in the NFL.

4. Shelby County Home Sales, Prices Dip in July -

From 2008 to 2012, bank sales – or foreclosure sales – propped up what was an otherwise crumbling real estate market.

After several years of historically high bank sales, that inventory has finally thinned out and their months-long decline is impacting overall sales figures, according to several Memphis-area Realtors.

5. Chism Picnic Reflects Summer Campaign Tone -

From the stage at County Commissioner Sidney Chism’s annual political picnic Saturday, June 21, you could almost see the Aug. 7 election day.

6. County Commission to Weigh New Disparity Study -

Shelby County Commissioners consider a start Monday, June 16, toward a new disparity study as a way to changing the county’s efforts in increasing minority business participation in government contracts.

7. Grants Prove Bioworks is Delivering Good Results -

One grant is good. Two grants are better.

In 2012, Memphis Bioworks received a grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Environmental Workforce Developmental and Job Training Program (EWDJT). The $300,000 grant issued provided training for 110 persons, 65 of whom already have been placed in full-time jobs.

8. Wilkins Maps Different Challenge of Cohen -

Ricky Wilkins is promising to match U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen’s energy level and be more of a presence in the district than Cohen if he upsets the incumbent in the August Democratic primary for the 9th Congressional District.

9. Governors Erupt in Partisan Dispute at White House -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The nation's governors emerged from a meeting with President Barack Obama on Monday claiming harmony, only to immediately break into an on-camera partisan feud in front of the West Wing.

10. Banner Year for East Memphis Office Space -

The Memphis office real estate market began showing signs of life in 2013, with the market for Class A office space in the East Memphis submarket fueling the resurgence.

While the city’s overall office market numbers may not appear very strong, the city’s most desired office submarket – East Memphis around Poplar Avenue and Interstate 240 – began showing strong signs of improvement in the second half of the year.

11. Restaurant Row -

If you blink, you might miss a new restaurant opening along the Poplar Avenue corridor in East Memphis.

Over the last few months, several new restaurants have opened or are on the way around the heavily traveled Poplar corridor between Perkins Road and Kirby Parkway.

12. Kennedy’s Memphis Presence Felt 50 Years Later -

There once was a monument in a Memphis park that marked the spot where President John F. Kennedy had stood during a visit to the city in 1960 as he campaigned for the presidency.

By the marker were two distinct shoeprints that Memphians took their children to for them to stand in the slain president’s footsteps on Memphis soil.

13. Grizzlies Announce Hirings of Three Assistants -

MEMPHIS (AP) – The Memphis Grizzlies have hired Elston Turner, Duane Ticknor and Shawn Respert to join the returning Bob Thornton as assistants on new head coach Dave Joerger's staff.

14. Tricky Obstacles Ahead to Averting Shutdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Despite pressure from some liberal Democrats for a September showdown in hopes of ending huge automatic, government-shrinking spending cuts, Washington appears on track to avert what would be the first government shutdown in nearly two decades.

15. City Enticing FBI to Move Downtown -

City leaders are attempting to bring the FBI Downtown. The FBI is searching for a significant amount of office space, and local leaders, including U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Memphis, are urging the law enforcement agency to locate Downtown.

16. Internet Sales Tax Bill to Hit Roadblock in House -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A bill to require Internet shoppers to pay sales taxes for online purchases may be cruising through the Senate but it will soon hit a roadblock in the House.

"There's a lot of political difficulty getting through the fog of it looking like a tax increase," said Rep. Steve Womack, R-Ark., one of the main sponsors of the bill in the House.

17. Obama Nominates Justice Official to Top Labor Slot -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Thomas Perez, President Barack Obama's choice for Labor secretary, has used his perch as the nation's chief civil rights enforcer to crack down on voter suppression, discrimination and police brutality.

18. Events -

LightWave Solar will host a lunch & learn titled “How Solar Can Work for Your Home or Business” Friday, Dec. 14, from noon to 1 p.m. in the River Tower at South Bluffs clubhouse, 655 Riverside Drive. R.S.V.P. to Grace Robertson at grobertson@lightwavesolar.com or 615-641-4050, ext. 104.

19. Tax Consulting Firm, Daily News Host Financial Forum -

CBIZ MHM Thompson Dunavant and The Daily News are presenting a seminar in a few weeks that will take a broad look at topics including estate and gift tax issues, business and personal investments, health care reform and an update on the mergers and acquisitions market.

20. Cohen, Flinn Sparring Heats Up as Election Nears -

It’s been an election year in Shelby County dominated by something other than candidates in a local political arena where personality and name recognition usually go far.

There have been significant problems with the accuracy of the vote count, presidential campaigns only momentarily interested in the local Republican and Democratic bases and the politics of tax increases and municipal school districts.

21. Woman-Owned Engineering Firm Finds Right Design for Success -

Entrepreneurship was never in Nisha Powers’ plans.

Armed with a degree in civil engineering, Powers moved to Memphis in 1997 and followed a traditional post-college path: She sought and landed a job at one of the state’s top firms in her field. But after eight years in one small office, she was ready to explore new territory.

22. Sharp Marks Production of 3 Millionth Solar Panel -

Less than two years after its executives marked the making of the 2 millionth solar panel at the Memphis Sharp Manufacturing plant, the company on Monday, April 30, marked the production of the 3 millionth solar panel by Sharp Electronics Corp.

23. Sauvignon Blanc True To its Grapes -

Awine of purity and intensity is one that is faithful to the grapes from which it is made and that displays the character of those grapes with marked eloquence and lack of interference. Such a one is the Hall Sauvignon Blanc 2010, Napa Valley.

24. New District Plan Fizzles, Causes Strife -

The dust hasn’t completely settled on the differences Shelby County Commissioners are having with each other across party lines and on a number of other fronts.

“We’ve outed a civility gap on this commission,” commissioner Steve Mulroy said. “It’s existed for a while.”

25. Rep. DeBerry Says She’s Free of Cancer -

NASHVILLE (AP) – State Rep. Lois DeBerry of Memphis has a lot to be thankful for this holiday season – mainly being alive.

26. Cohen Among Playoff Supporters Launching Nat’l Campaign -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Proponents of a college football playoff are launching a new national campaign aimed at taking down the BCS, and Rep. Steve Cohen of Tennessee is among the supporters.

27. Tubing Maker Doubles Space in Willow Lake -

A Memphis-based tubing supplier is renewing its lease and more than doubling its space in a distressed Hickory Hill industrial park.

Jacob Tubing LP – the U.S. subsidiary of European modular tubing manufacturer Jacob Soehne – has renewed its 10-year lease for 20,232 square feet and expanded into an additional 30,000 square feet at Willow Lake Business Park, 3948 Willow Lake Blvd., in the Southeast industrial submarket.

28. Deadline Looms For Candidates In March Primaries -

There is the paperwork and there are the deadlines in politics. And then there are the campaigns that begin long before the paperwork or deadlines.

One group of candidates in the 2012 election cycle is approaching its first deadline Thursday, Dec. 8, at noon – the filing deadline for the March 6 county primaries.

29. Home Sales Up 2 Percent For October -

October home sales in Shelby County inched 2 percent higher compared to the same month a year ago, marking the fourth consecutive month with year-over-year improvement.

Shelby County registered 1,073 home sales last month, compared to 1,011 in October 2010, according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, www.chandlerreports.com.

30. Events -

Leadership Memphis and Michael Synk will present the Leadership Memphis Book Club by In-Synk, a monthly, one-hour book club focusing on business, leadership and management titles, beginning Friday, Oct. 14, from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at South of Beale, 361 S. Main St. Cost is $20 for Leadership Memphis alumni and current class members and $25 for the general public. For more information or to register, visit lmdriving.eventbrite.com.

31. White House Threatens to Veto Boehner's House Plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House threatened on Tuesday to veto emergency House legislation that aims to avert a threatened national default, a pre-emptive strike issued as Republican Speaker John Boehner labored to line up enough votes in his own party to pass the measure.

32. Next Move - To say the now-closed restaurant at 7955 Fischer Steel Road has had an unusual history is probably an understatement.

33. Advocates Push Overton-Greenline Link -

When the group of architects and planners working on a bicycle-pedestrian path connecting the Shelby Farms Greenline with Overton Park went beyond the end of the Greenline onto Tillman Street recently, they had a Memphis Police bicycle escort.

34. $800K Grant to Help Public Housing Residents -

Nearly $800,000 in federal funding is on its way to the city of Memphis to prepare public housing residents for life outside the vanishing developments.

And Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. hinted this week that much more in U.S. Housing and Urban Development funding is on the way shortly for other parts of the ongoing move in the city away from public housing.

35. FedEx Files $10.8M Permit For Demolition Work -

2781 Democrat Road
Memphis, TN 38118
Permit Amount: $10.8 million

Permit Date: Applied April 2011
Owner: FedEx
Tenant: FedEx
Contractor: Flintco Inc.

36. Tea Party Rallies to Keep GOP Cutting Spending -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The tea partyers who helped drive GOP gains in the last election rallied in the city they love to hate Thursday, urging Republican House leaders – Speaker John Boehner above all – to resist the drive toward compromise in the protracted fight over the federal budget. Even, they say, if that means Congress fails to do its most important job: pay for the government.

37. Obama Talks Jobs With Jobs, Other Tech Leaders -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama is assembling the biggest names in Silicon Valley to confer on jobs and innovation, trying to get leaders from companies like Google and Apple behind his push to keep spending on high-tech initiatives even as Republicans are out to slash the budget.

38. Conservative Radio Launches in Memphis -

Two years before the next national election and with fervor for conservative activism, Memphis-based MPS Broadcasting Monday announced the launch of WMPS “The Point” simulcast on 87.7 FM and 1210 AM.

39. Menlo Deal Tops Noteworthy Leases -

The Daily News in September launched a new weekly column called “Inked” to spotlight Memphis’ commercial leasing landscape.

Despite tough times, local commercial real estate firms were able to ink plenty of deals in the past four months. Here’s a rundown of some of the most noteworthy commercial leases since Inked’s debut:

40. Apartment Optimism -

Apartment owners and operators in the Memphis market forecast a bright 2011, boosted by a continued weak homebuying landscape and a lack of new multifamily product coming online within the market.

“2010 was certainly an improvement for the multifamily sector – both in operations and in sales – over 2009, and we expect to see more of the same next year,” said Blake Pera, senior vice president of CB Richard Ellis Memphis’ multifamily division. “Most operators experienced comfortable revenue growth throughout the year, and there is some positive momentum in continued stable occupancy and concession burn-off next year with the lack of new supply hitting the market.”

41. Memphis Stands Tall as Logistics Industry Struggles -

Although the aftermath of the recession was palpable across all industry sectors in 2010, Memphis continued to prove its status as a critical logistics and distribution center.

The year came to a close with a milestone in economic development when Swedish manufacturer Electrolux said it will build a $190 million manufacturing plant on 800 acres of land in the Frank C. Pidgeon Industrial Park in southwest Memphis.

42. Projects Seeking IDB OK Need More Time -

All of the items on the Memphis-Shelby County Industrial Development Board’s special meeting Friday were lacking one major detail: time.

The board granted U.S. Foodservice Inc. more time for the presentation of its seven-year, $14.3 million payment-in-lieu-of-taxes request for expanding a distribution warehouse it now leases a portion of at 5900 E. Holmes Road.

43. More Time Needed for Projects Seeking IDB Approval -

All of the items on the Memphis-Shelby County Industrial Development Board’s special meeting Friday were lacking one major detail: time.

The board granted U.S. Foodservice Inc. more time for the presentation of its seven-year, $14.3 million payment-in-lieu-of-taxes (PILOT) request for expanding a distribution warehouse it now leases a portion of at 5900 E. Holmes Road.

44. Down-Home Culture -

Back in 1995, Perry Welch had a wild idea.

His wife, Carrie, was in the shipping business and was about to take a business trip to San Francisco.

45. Music & Heritage Festival Set for the Weekend -

The 23rd annual Memphis Music & Heritage Festival will be held Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Main Street between Peabody Place and Barboro Alley.

This year’s festival will honor Memphis musician Jim Dickinson and feature performances by Bobby Rush, Kate Campbell, Al Kapone, Joyce Cobb, Hill Country Revue, Eddie Bond, The Homemade Jamz Blues Band, a special tribute to Dickinson featuring Sid Selvidge, Jimmy Crosthwait, Cody Dickinson and Steve Selvidge, and more.

46. Shelby County Schools Files Permit For Millington Central Renovations -

8057 Wilkinsville Road
Millington, TN 38053
Permit Amount: $3.9 Million

Project Cost: $5 million
Permit Date: Applied June 2010
Completion: July 2011
Owner: Shelby County Schools
Tenant: Millington Central High School
Contractor: Barnes & Brower Inc.
Architect: Steve Landwehr, Fleming/Associates/Architects PC

47. Changing Tide -

The foreclosure crisis took an interesting twist in the past year.

No longer was the problem relegated only to blighted communities like Frayser, Raleigh and Hickory Hill.

Although those areas were still severely afflicted by loan defaults and vacant homes, the biggest foreclosure headlines of the previous 12 months centered on some of the area’s most ambitious projects and most prominent properties.

48. Cohen Bill Elevates Aerotropolis Concept -

U.S. Rep Steve Cohen hopes his colleagues on Capitol Hill will soon become as familiar with the term “aerotropolis” as the constituents he represents in Tennessee’s 9th District.

49. Ford Name Plays Into Election Victory -

It didn’t work for Myron Lowery in last year’s special election for Memphis mayor.

But Joe Ford won the Democratic nomination for Shelby County mayor this week by running from the office.

50. Ford Wins Democratic Mayoral Primary -  

Interim County Mayor Joe Ford became the Democratic nominee for mayor in the August county general elections Tuesday night.

And the August sheriff’s race will be a contest between Democrat Randy Wade and Republican Randy Wade.

All three were among the winners in Tuesday’s low turnout county primaries.

Approximately ten percent of Shelby County’s nearly 600,000 voters cast ballots in early voting and election day polling.

Ford, who was appointed interim mayor in December, beat County Commissioner Deidre Malone and General Sessions Court Clerk Otis Jackson in the Democratic primary. He will face Republican Mark Luttrell who had only token opposition in the Republican primary from perennial contender Ernie Lunati.

Luttrell has raised more money than all three of the Democratic primary contenders combined and began running television ads in the last week runup to election day.

The final unofficial totals in the Democratic mayoral primary are:

Ford 20,360 57%

Malone 12,916 37%

Jackson 2,168 6%

The pair of primaries for Sheriff featured eight candidates, seven of whom either currently work for the sheriff’s department or are past employees. Only Reginald French, in the Democratic primary was not a former or current department official.

Wade was the 2002 Democratic nominee, losing to Luttrell who is leaving as Sheriff after serving two terms. French was the Democratic nominee in the 2006 elections.

Oldham is Luttrell’s chief deputy, the number two position in the department. He is also a former director of the Memphis Police Department.

The final unofficials totals in the Republican primary are:

Bill Oldham 13,821 48%

Dale Lane 7,981 28%

Bobby Simmons 5,886 21%

James Coleman 943 3%

In the Democratic primary:

Randy Wade 22,643 67%

Reginald French 6,777 20%

Larry Hill 2,738 8%

Bennie Cobb 1,814 5%

Voters in the primary elections decided to return six Shelby County commissioners to new four year terms with Tuesday’s results. They also elected six new commissioners. The winner of the thirteenth commission seat will be decided on the August general election ballot in a contest between district 5 Democratic incumbent Steve Mulroy and Republican challenger Dr. Rolando Toyos. The winner of the match up will determine whether the commission remains majority Democrat or goes majority Republican.

Mulroy easily defeated Jennings Bernard in Tuesday’s Democratic primary.

Republican incumbent Mike Ritz ran unopposed as did new Democratic commissioner Walter Bailey.

In the remaining ten contests, the primaries decided who gets the seats since no one ran in the opposing party’s primary.

The most hotly contested contest among the commission races was for District 4 Position 1. Outgoing Probate Court Clerk Chris Thomas beat John Pellicciotti, appointed to a commission seat last year but running for a different position in the same district. Jim Bomprezzi, the former mayor of Lakeland, was the third contender in the contest.

The final unofficial totals in the Republican primary:

Thomas 7,631 52%

Pellicciotti 4,871 33%

Bomprezzi 2,298 15%

In position 2 of the same district incumbent Republican Wyatt Bunker easily overcame two challengers with former Lakeland alderman John Wilkerson finishing second and Ron Fittes finishing third.

Millington businessman Terry Roland claimed the third position in the district that takes in all six of Shelby County’s suburban towns and cities.

Roland beat George Chism to take the seat Pellicciotti was appointed to but opted not to run for in deference to Roland.

Heidi Shafer, an aide to outgoing County Commissioner George Flinn, claimed Flinn’s District 1 Position 2 seat over Albert Maduska.in the GOP primary.

District 1 incumbent Republican Mike Carpenter easily beat businessman Joe Baier.

In the Democratic commission primaries, Melvin Burgess claimed Malone’s District 2 Position 3 seat in a field of six contenders. His closest contender was Reginald Milton. Burgess, a city school system audit manager, had run for the seat before. He brought in 54 percent of the vote.

The other hard fought Democratic commission primary saw Justin Ford, son of the interim mayor, claim his father’s District 3 Position 3 seat.

Ford beat Edith Moore, a retired IBM executive, whom the commission appointed to the seat after the elder Ford became mayor.

The final unofficial vote totals are:

Ford 7,342 66%

Moore 3,822 34%

Democratic incumbent commissioners Henri Brooks, Sidney Chism and James Harvey were all re-elected over primary challengers.

The county-wide primaries for seven clerk’s positions saw the return of former Criminal Court Clerk Minerva Johnican 16 years after Republican challenger Bill Key took her job. Johnican decisively beat Ralph White and Vernon Johnson in her first bid for office since the 1994 defeat. She will face Republican Kevin Key, the son of Bill Key in the August general election.

The final unofficial vote totals are:

Johnican 16,381 51%

White 10,170 31%

Johnson 5,954 18%

Former Juvenile Court Clerk Shep Wilbun easily won the Democratic primary with 76 percent of the vote to face Republican Joy Touliatos in August for the office being vacated by Republican Steve Stamson. Touliatos was unopposed in the primary.

Democrat Coleman Thompson is back for another go at incumbent Republican Register Tom Leatherwood.

Aside from Leatherwood, Jimmy Moore is the only other of the seven clerks seeking re-election. Moore ran unopposed in the GOP primary. He will face Democrat Ricky Dixon in August.

Trustee Regina Newman was appointed to her office following the death last year of Paul Mattila. Newman easily overcame M LaTroy Williams in Tuesday’s Democratic primary. She will face David Lenoir, who beat former Shelby County Commissioner John Willingham in the Republican contest.

The final unofficial vote totals are:

Lenoir 15,922 58%

Willingham 11,569 42%

The other six candidate field on the ballot was in the Democratic primary for Probate Court Clerk. Sondra Becton posted impressive vote totals over her rivals, bringing in 35 percent of the vote with Peggy Dobbins her closest rival. Becton, who is making her fourth bid for the office, will face Republican Paul Boyd, who ran unopposed in his primary.

The final unofficial vote totals are:

Becton 10,929 36%

Dobbins 5,366 18%

Annita Hamilton 4,848 16%

Clay Perry 3,549 12%

Danny Kail 3,120 11%

Karen Tyler 2,782 9%

The closest contest of the evening was in the Democratic primary for County Clerk. Wrestling promoter and television personality Corey Maclin won his political debut by less than 1,400 votes over Charlotte Draper and LaKeith Miller. He will face Republican Wayne Mashburn who beat Steve Moore in the companion primary.

Early voting in advance of the Aug. 5 election day begins July 16. The August ballot will also feature state and federal primary elections including the statewide primaries for governor and the primaries for all nine of the state’s Congressional districts.

...

51. Tricky Market -

Because loan defaults are a common occurrence in this difficult financial climate, last week’s news that the 306-unit Preserve at Southwind Apartments had been foreclosed could easily be chalked up to a case of “another one bites the dust.”

52. Commission District 5 Candidates Get Campaign Start -

Two contenders in the May 4 county primaries are ready to rumble.

But District 5 Shelby County Commissioner Steve Mulroy and challenger Dr. Rolando Toyos won’t meet until the August general election ballot.

53. Candidate Filing List -- The Final Version -

Shelby County Sheriff Mark Luttrell appeared on his way to the Republican nomination for Shelby County mayor at Thursday’s noon filing deadline for candidates on the May 4 primary ballot.

54. UPDATE: Mayor's Race Grows At Filing Deadline -

Shelby County Sheriff Mark Luttrell appeared on his way to the Republican nomination for Shelby County mayor at Thursday’s noon filing deadline for candidates on the May 4 primary ballot.

Luttrell faces only token opposition from perennial candidate Ernie Lunati.

Meanwhile, the Democratic primary for mayor grew to three contenders as General Sessions Court Clerk Otis Jackson filed his qualifying petition just before the deadline. He joins interim County Mayor Joe Ford and Shelby County Commissioner Deidre Malone.

Luttrell ruled out a bid for Shelby County mayor last year (2009). But when Harold Byrd decided not to run in the Democratic primary, some local GOP leaders asked Luttrell to reconsider.

The result touched off a scramble of candidates from both parties for the open sheriff’s office. But before the noon deadline, the initial field of over a dozen possible contenders was narrowed to ten – six Democrats and four Republicans.

The other surprise at the filing deadline was the return of attorney Walter Bailey to the District 2 Position 1 seat he gave up in the 2006 elections. Bailey sought re-election then to another term despite a two term limit on commissioners. Bailey lost to J.W. Gibson who decided not to seek re-election. He also lost a court fight to overturn the term limits.

Bailey was the only candidate who had filed for the seat at the Thursday deadline.

Only one incumbent county commissioner – Republican Mike Ritz -- was effectively re-elected at the deadline because he had no opposition.

All but one of the eleven contested County Commission races will be decided with the May 4 primaries. The only general election battle for the August ballot is the district 5 contest between GOP challenger Dr. Rolando Toyos and whoever wins the May Democratic primary between incumbent Steve Mulroy and Jennings Bernard.

Former County Commissioner John Willingham also returned to the ballot among a field of Republican contenders in the primary for Shelby County Trustee.

And former Criminal Court Clerk Minerva Johnican joined the Democratic primary field for her old job. Incumbent Republican Bill Key pulled petition to seek re-election but did not file at the deadline.

Here is the list of races and contenders from The Shelby County Election Commission. All candidate have until noon Feb. 25 to withdraw from the ballot if they wish.

D-Democrat

R- Republican

I- Independent

Shelby County Mayor:

Deidre Malone (D)

Joe Ford (D)

Otis Jackson (D)

Mark Luttrell (R)

Ernest Lunati (R)

Leo Awgowhat (I)

Shelby County Sheriff:

James Coleman (R)

Bobby Simmons (R)

Bill Oldham (R)

Dale Lane (R)

Larry Hill (D)

Bennie Cobb (D)

Randy Wade (D)

James Bolden (D)

Elton Hymon (D)

Reginald French (D)

County Commission Dist 1 Pos 1

Mike Ritz (R) (incumbent)

County Commission Dist 1 Pos 2

Albert Maduska (R)

Heidi Shafer (R)

County Commission Dist 1 Pos 3

Mike Carpenter (R) (incumbent)

Joe Baire (R)

County Commission Dist 2 Pos 1

Walter Bailey (D)

County Commission Dist 2 Pos 2

Henri Brooks (D) (incumbent)

David Vinciarelli (D)

County Commission Dist 2 Pos 3

Eric Dunn (D)

Norma Lester (D)

Tina Dickerson (D)

Melvin Burgess (D)

Reginald Milton (D)

Freddie Thomas (D)

County Commission Dist 3 Pos 1

James Harvey (D) (incumbent)

James Catchings (D)

County Commission Dist. 3 Pos 2

Sidney Chism (D) (incumbent)

Andrew "Rome" Withers (D)

County Commission Dist. 3 Pos 3

Edith Moore  (D) (incumbent)

Justin Ford (D)

County Commission Dist 4 Pos 1

Chris Thomas (R)

John Pellicciotti (R)

Jim Bomprezzi (R)

County Commission Dist 4 Pos 2

Wyatt Bunker (R) (incumbent)

John Wilkerson (R)

Ron Fittes (R)

County Commission Dist 4 Pos 3

Terry Roland (R)

George Chism (R)

Edgar Babian (R)

County Commission Dist 5

Steve Mulroy (D) (incumbent)

Jennings Bernard (D)

Rolando Toyos (R)

Shelby County Clerk

Charlotte Draper (D)

Corey Maclin (D)

LaKeith Miller (D)

Wayne Mashburn (R)

Steve Moore (R)

Criminal Court Clerk

Vernon Johnson (D)

Minerva Johnican (D)

Ralph White (D)

Michael Porter (R)

Kevin Key (R)

Jerry Stamson (I)

Circuit Court Clerk

Jimmy Moore (R) (incumbent)

Steven Webster (D)

Carmichael Johnson (D)

Ricky W. Dixon (D)

Juvenile Court Clerk

Joy Touliatos (R)

Charles Marshall (D)

Sylvester Bradley (D)

Shep Wilbun (D)

Julia Roberson Wiseman (I)

Probate Court Clerk

Paul Boyd (R)

Sondra Becton (D)

Danny Kail (D)

Annita Sawyer Hamilton (D)

Peggy Dobbins (D)

Clay Perry (D)

Karen Tyler (D)

Shelby County Register

Tom Leatherwood (R) (incumbent)

Coleman Thompson (D)

Lady J. Swift (D)

Carlton Orange (D)

Shelby County Trustee

Regina Newman (D) (incumbent)

M. LaTroy Williams (D)

John Willingham (R)

Jeff Jacobs (R)

David Lenoir (R)

...

55. Adversarial -

Both sides in the federal lawsuit Memphis and Shelby County have filed against Wells Fargo are beginning to strap on their armor.

The San Francisco-based financial services giant – one of the largest U.S. banks by assets – has hired Memphis attorney Jef Feibelman of Burch, Porter & Johnson PLLC.

56. Cohen Applauded by Pro-Pot Activists -

WASHINGTON (AP) - Tennessee Rep. Steve Cohen acknowledged feeling a little lonely as he addressed a crowd of self-described pot smokers just off Capitol Hill.

57. 2010 -

Is it over yet? That may be the most frequently asked question in the New Year. “It” is the worst national economic recession since the Great Depression.

Accurately reading the indicators will not be easy. Some will predict the recession is about to end, just as new indicators point to continuing economic agony for thousands of Memphians.

58. Conwood Acquisition Helps Salvage November Commercial Sales -

A single, high-dollar transaction helped salvage November’s commercial sales total, accounting for half of the dollar volume last month. Beyond that, the most noteworthy trend to arise from the most recent data was a dearth of activity as Shelby County nears the end of 2009 – the slowest year for commercial transactions in at least two decades.

59. Findings Pinpoint Lamar Corridor’s Troubles -

Anyone who has traveled along Lamar Avenue between Interstate 240 and the Mississippi state line knows how congested it can get, with a seemingly endless line of trucks driving both directions and backing up traffic.
Members of the Greater Memphis Chamber’s aerotropolis initiative now have a better idea of the corridor’s horrendous deficiencies.
Cambridge Systematics Inc., a Cambridge, Mass.-based firm that studies transportation assets and needs nationwide, late last week presented the preliminary findings of its Lamar Avenue Corridor Study to the aerotropolis initiative’s access and transportation committee.
The message is clear and not at all surprising: Lamar Avenue has a host of problems that need to be resolved if Memphis wants to continue its role as a critical link in the global supply chain.
The study, which kicked off in the summer, is addressing traffic flows and transportation needs within the Lamar Avenue corridor – the area bordered by I-240 to the north, the Mississippi state line to the south, Interstate 55 to the west and Hickory Hill to the east.
Cambridge Systematics is conducting the study in conjunction with the Memphis Metropolitan Planning Organization, the University of Memphis’ Intermodal Freight Transportation Institute and the chamber.
The Tennessee Department of Transportation assigned Cambridge Systematics to the study following a request from MPO; TDOT has an ongoing contract with Cambridge Systematics to assist local planning organizations around the state.

60. SPIN METER: ‘War and Peace’ In 209 Pages? -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Republicans are using everything short of forklifts to show Americans that Democratic health care legislation is an unwieldy mountain of paper.

They pile it high on desks, hoist it on a shoulder trussed in sturdy rope and tell people it’s longer than “War and Peace,” which it isn’t.

61. High-Dollar Deal Boosts Commercial Real Estate -

Following what has become a pattern, the local commercial real estate market in September was salvaged by one large deal that offset an otherwise dreary month.

This time it was Resource Real Estate Inc. to the rescue. The Philadelphia-based company bought the Wyndridge Apartments for $9.5 million Sept. 29 and carried the weight for Shelby County’s commercial activity during the month.

62. Greenville, S.C., Publisher Elected SNPA President -

NAPLES, Fla. (AP) - Steve Brandt, president and publisher of The Greenville (S.C.) News, was elected president of the Southern Newspaper Publishers Association during the SNPA's annual convention Monday.

63. City Mayoral Transition Yields Crowded To-Do List -  

Memphis Mayor-elect A C Wharton Jr. will be appointing a new city attorney once he takes office next week.

Elbert Jefferson, the city attorney Mayor Pro Tem Myron Lowery tried to fire just minutes after taking the oath of office on July 31, Friday sent a second resignation letter to Lowery. The two met for an hour Sunday evening at City Hall and Lowery accepted Jefferson’s resignation.

Jefferson’s attorney, Ted Hansom, and city Chief Administrative Officer Jack Sammons were also present. Jefferson turned in his key card, the keys to his city car and his laptop.

“The drama is over,” Lowery said Monday. “For my part, I wish it had never happened.”

Dramatis personae

In a resignation letter last week to Wharton, Jefferson had expressed hope that he would be hired for some position in the new administration. Over the weekend, he used the same text in the new letter but addressed it to Lowery instead. He requested the city pay his legal fees as well.

The resignation letter to Lowery made moot an ouster suit filed by Shelby County District Attorney General Bill Gibbons. Criminal Court Judge James Lammey, who was to hear the case, reset a final report to Oct. 27, citing Jefferson’s departure.

“A hearing on the issue of suspension would be an inefficient use of judicial resources, of the state of Tennessee and of the resources of the city of Memphis, and considering (Jefferson’s) current health status, would be an unnecessary tax on (Jefferson’s) well-being and a possible threat to his health,” Lammey wrote in the court order.

Jefferson was scheduled to return to City Hall from sick leave Monday. He apparently believed the new mayor would be in office by the time he returned.

An audit of city financial affairs is standard procedure in a change of administrations. Wharton is naming team members to review the offices of the city attorney, human resources and finance and administration. He was also to name members of his transition team Monday.

Time-, battle-tested

Shelby County Commissioner Mike Carpenter and Methodist Healthcare executive Cato Johnson will head the team.

The other members are:

- Herman Morris, attorney and 2007 candidate for Memphis Mayor.

- Tomeka Hart, Memphis Urban League CEO and Memphis school board member.

- Jim Strickland, attorney and Memphis City Council member.

- Rev. Dwight Montgomery, Southern Christian Leadership Conference Memphis chapter President.

- Jose Velasquez, Latino Memphis former executive director.

- Nisha Powers, Powers Hill Design Inc. President.

- Paul Morris, attorney and former chairman Center City Commission.

- Douglas Scarboro, The Leadership Academy vice president.

- Steve Reynolds, Baptist Memorial Health Care Corp. CEO.

- Diane Rudner, Plough Foundation chairman.

- Darrell Cobbins, Universal Commercial CEO.

Johnson has more experience serving on such task forces and ad hoc committees than any other leader in the city’s corporate community. Most recently, Johnson was one of two business leaders on the ad hoc committee exploring single-source local funding for education. He also served as a leader of the Mid-South Fairgrounds renovation committee and has been involved in similar capacities with every major construction project for a civic use in the past 15 years.

Carpenter’s appointment is certain to fuel speculation that he might be tapped for some role in the new administration. However, Carpenter has already been holding fundraisers in anticipation of a bid for re-election to his commission seat in the 2010 county elections.

Wharton is tentatively scheduled to take the oath of office Oct. 26.

The Shelby County Commission also meets that same day and could receive Wharton’s resignation and declare a vacancy in the county mayor’s office with a vote to appoint Wharton’s successor-to-come in November. Until that vote, County Commission Chairwoman Joyce Avery will serve as interim mayor.

“It will be a day in which I come to work at one place and leave work from another place,” Wharton told The Daily News.

But the Shelby County Election Commission will meet earlier than expected -- Thursday afternoon -- to certify the Oct. 15 election results. Once the results are certified, Wharton is free to resign as Shelby County mayor and take the oath as Memphis mayor.

Cooperative efforts

Meanwhile, Wharton has asked City Council Chairman Harold Collins to consider delaying a council vote today on the five appointees the city mayor is to make to a metro charter commission. The council set today’s vote with the intention of having whomever won the Oct. 15 special election appoint members of the panel.

“I won’t be there on the 20th. … I’m seeing if they are in a position to put it off until I’m actually over there,” Wharton told The Daily News, as he has had attorneys researching if a council vote in November would meet timelines for such an effort set out in state law.

“I believe that they may be able to meet on Nov. 3,” Wharton said.

Wharton has already named the 10 appointees to be made by the Shelby County mayor to the panel. The County Commission approved all 10 earlier this month.

While it appears he will make the other five, Wharton said he will ask the council, through Collins, to effectively pick the five nominees, whom Wharton would then send to the council as his appointees.

“I chose all 10 over here, which I had to do by law. If I could find some way around it that passed legal muster, then I would do that,” he said. “But we’ve researched it and I know of no way in which the city mayor can say … ‘I’m not going to do that.’ You can’t transfer it.”

Wharton and Lowery were to discuss the matter at a meeting Monday afternoon. Lowery told The Daily News he had received no suggested appointees from council members, but would be willing to submit names the council wants on the charter commission.

...

64. Update: Wharton Names Transition Team -  

Memphis Mayor-elect A C Wharton Jr. has named eleven more people to his transition team.

Shelby County Commissioner Mike Carpenter and Methodist Healthcare executive Cato Johnson will chair the group. The others include:

- Herman Morris, attorney, former president of Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division and 2007 Memphis mayoral candidate;

- The Rev. Dwight Montgomery, president of the Memphis chapter of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference;

- Nisha Powers, president of Powers Hill Design Inc.;

- Tomeka Hart, Memphis school board member and Memphis Urban League president and CEO;

- Darrell Cobbins, Universal Commercial President and CEO;

- Jim Strickland, attorney and Memphis City Councilmember;

- Jose Velasquez, Latino Memphis’ former executive director.

- Paul Morris, attorney and former chairman Center City Commission.

- Diane Rudner, Poplar Foundation chairman.

- Steve Reynolds, Baptist Memorial Health Care President & CEO.

- Douglas Scarboro, The Leadership Academy vice president.

In other transition developments, the Shelby County Election Commission will meet Thursday afternoon to certify the results of the Oct. 15 special mayoral election.

The meeting is earlier than Wharton had expected. Once the results are certified, Wharton can resign his post as Shelby County mayor at any point and take the oath of office at City Hall. The Shelby County Commission will then declare a vacancy in the county mayor’s office and commission chairwoman Joyce Avery will become acting mayor until the commission appoints someone to serve the year remaining in Wharton’s county term of office.

...

65. Dishmon Joins UT Medical Group -

Dr. Dwight “Dan” Dishmon has joined the Department of Medicine at UT Medical Group.
Dishmon is an interventional cardiologist and cares for adults with ischemic heart disease and peripheral arterial disease.
He earned his medical degree and completed his internal medicine residency and general cardiology fellowship training at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. He later completed additional fellowship training at Michigan State University’s Borgess Medical Center. 

66. A River Runs Through Us: Memphis’ once and future connection with the Wolf -

A cottonmouth slithers through the marsh. A wolf spider clings to a cypress tree. A white heron soars above the bottomland forest.

Paddle a canoe down the Ghost River section of the Wolf River in Fayette County and you’ll travel through multiple, distinct ecosystems teeming with wildlife. But while animal sightings convey the true spirit of the Wolf, only one creature – the elusive “river rat” – can verbalize why this river and its wetland corridor are so important.

67. Closely Watched Cordova Restaurant To Open Soon -

The Memphis-Shelby County Office of Construction Code Enforcement has issued a certificate of occupancy for an upscale restaurant developed in Cordova by a topless-nightclub businessman.

That approval granted Aug. 7 means city and county officials are satisfied the building is suitable for occupancy, said Assistant County Attorney Carter Gray. And it means Stella Marris, strip club mogul Steve Cooper’s restaurant at 7955 Fischer Steel Road, can open whenever its owner is ready.

68. Christ Community To Add Dental Clinics -

Christ Community Health Services announced Tuesday morning that it will add dental clinics at two of its health centers with $1.5 million in federal stimulus money.

Work at the Broad Avenue location could begin as early as October, while renovations at the Hickory Hill location may start in January.

69. Events -

The National Association of Women Business Owners Memphis Chapter will hold a luncheon mixer today at 11:30 a.m. at Jason’s Deli, 3473 Poplar Ave., Suite 102. Lynn V. Evans will speak on “Tips for Increasing Cash.” For reservations, e-mail nitab@memphisoriginals.com or call 413-1315.

70. MERI Names Roberts Human Resources Coordinator -

Nancy Roberts has joined the Medical Education & Research Institute (MERI) as human resources coordinator.

Roberts joins MERI after working as vice president of organization development for a large apartment real estate investment trust. In addition, Roberts has more than 15 years of HR experience, including serving in the human resources capacity for a large retail operation and a large marketing firm.

71. Stimulus Money To Return Foreclosures To Marketplace -

Part of the latest dose of federal stimulus money to arrive in Shelby County predates the Obama administration.

This week at the Frayser Community Development Corp., office, home and mortgage lenders as well as leaders of the various CDCs across the county gathered to mark the awarding of almost $27 million in federal funding. The money from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development comes from Washington through the Tennessee Housing Development Agency and other state agencies.

72. Events -

The National Association of Women Business Owners will hold a lunch mixer today from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Elzemeyer Talent Agency, 149 Monroe Ave. Attendees will each have 60 seconds to pitch their business to NAWBO Member Showcase by Tess Bear.

73. Is Twitter the News Outlet for the 21st Century? -

NEW YORK (AP) - Cassy Hayes and Jasmine Coleman were among the first fans to arrive outside the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles where Michael Jackson was brought and later pronounced dead.

74. Debate Expected Over Sex Discrimination Vote -

A proposal to ban employment discrimination in Shelby County government because of a person’s sexual orientation faces a make-or-break vote today.

The full Shelby County Commission will take up the measure for the first of three votes required before county ordinances can become law. The meeting begins at 1:30 p.m. in the Shelby County Administration Building at 160 North Main St.

75. US Congress Can Learn from Mass., Tenn. Health Plans -

Laid off from her job in Massachusetts, Danielle Marks thought immediately about losing her health insurance. How could she afford the medication and physical therapy she needed to heal after shoulder surgery?

76. Bailout Redux: Repaid Money Could Go Back to Banks -

NEW YORK (AP) - After acing their "stress tests," some big banks are rushing to raise capital and return billions in federal bailout money. But don't expect it to replenish government coffers.

77. Corker Decries Auto Industry Bailout, Other Federal Moves -

U.S. Sen. Bob Corker is not only a critic of the federal stimulus package in Washington – he’s also outspoken against the federal bailout of the auto industry, especially since Tennessee is one of the top three states for auto manufacturing.

78. Foreclosures Mellow in Q1 -

Shelby County’s usual spate of foreclosures appears to be slowing.

From every vantage point of the foreclosure process – the original foreclosure notice, the lender seizing property and the sale to a new owner – the numbers fell in the first quarter.

79. Home Sales Freefall Continues in Q1 -

Shelby County home sales continued their downward spiral during the first quarter of 2009, proof that consumer confidence has yet to be restored and that credit issues have yet to be resolved.

Just 3,078 homes were sold in the first three months of 2009, down 25 percent from 4,101 in Q1 2008, according to the latest data from real estate information company Chandler Reports, www.chandlerreports.com. The period’s total marked the lowest first quarter since Q1 2001, which saw 3,107 home sales.

80. Events -

The University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law will host a diversity outreach program for high school and college undergraduate students today at 8 a.m. in Room 136 of the Fogelman Executive Center. The all-day event will include a question-and-answer session with current law students, a panel discussion and a luncheon. There is no admission fee but registration is required. To register, call 678-2528.

81. City Council To Consider Frayser Foreclosure Woes -

Steve Lockwood, executive director of the Frayser Community Development Corp., offers a nine-digit figure when quantifying the pain of the housing slump in Frayser, the epicenter of foreclosure activity in Shelby County.

82. Cohen Expands on the World According to Cohen -

Minutes after casting votes on the floor of the House of Representatives Tuesday night, U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen made his way to a conference call during which he took the political pulse of his district.

83. Keller Williams Set to Expand in Memphis -

At a time when real estate companies everywhere are closing offices and agents are abandoning the profession, Keller Williams Realty is expanding.

84. Cohen Puts Own Spin on White House Dustup, Reflects on ‘08 -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Memphis, told the Memphis Rotary Club this week he was never asked to leave the White House. And he did find the Memphis ornament by local artist Carol DeForest on one of the White House Christmas trees before a run-in with an usher.

85. Lee To Announce Next Step In Legal Fees Flap - The Memphis City Council Tuesday affirmed its vote in Oct. to reject paying the legal fees of former Memphis Light Gas & Water Division president Joseph Lee.

The bill for Lee’s legal defense in a grand jury probe that led to his indictment as well as a hearing before the council came to $426,422. The corruption charges were later dropped by federal prosecutors.

The 7-6 vote came at the end of a day in which MLGW president Jerry Collins told council members talks between the utility and Lee’s attorney, Robert Spence, failed to reach any terms for a lesser amount.

Spence told The Daily News an announcement on a decision by Lee about pursuing the legal fees in a lawsuit against the city could be made as early as today.

The council has also given final approval Tuesday to an ordinance regulating the location of financial services, payday loan and title loan businesses.

The council vote was unanimous on third and final reading. Third and final vote before the Shelby County Commission is scheduled for Dec. 8.

The council passed an amended version that emerged as a compromise during this week’s council session.

The ordinance bans the businesses from being with 1,000 feet of each other. The compromise worked out by council member Bill Morrison, with agreement from the payday loan industry, deals with a 90 day grace period for existing businesses to apply for a waiver.

Council member Barbara Swearengen Ware argued the location of the businesses isn’t the problem. It’s the high interest rates the companies charge – up to 264 percent annually.

“We need to deal with the root of the problem,” she said. “And if we could regulate how much (of an) interest rate is charged or how much the fees are, then we would be doing a service to the community,” Ware said. “I know we mean well here, but it’s supply and demand that is driving these businesses.”

But usery rates are regulated by the state and not the city council.

Morrison said the businesses cluster in his district which covers Frayser and Raleigh. Frayser is among the areas of the city hardest hit by home foreclosures.

Council member Harold Collins, whose district includes Hickory Hill – also hit hard by home foreclosures – said there is a connection. He counted at least 20 pay day lenders along one stretch of Winchester.

“Maybe they’re not contributing to the fact that many of the people in my district are losing their homes. But they are sure out there,” he said. “There needs to be some kind of line drawn that will keep the people in Hickory Hill from losing their homes.”

Steve Lockwood, head of the Frayser Community Development Corporation, said the close proximity of the lenders allows people in desperate financial straits to get around a limit of two loans totaling $500 from a particular lender by simply going to the payday lender next door.

He termed the location limits “an opening shot across the bow.” He said his organization’s financial counselors see a connection between the lenders and foreclosures.

“I think that the neighborhoods that are really going to benefit from this are in Cordova,” Lockwood said. “If you want Cordova to look like Winchester or Frayser, don’t pass this.”

In other action, a Fairgrounds development agreement is tentatively set to have the first of three Memphis City Council votes in two weeks.

The city picked Fair Ground LLC to develop a master plan for the property that includes the Mid-South Coliseum, The Liberty Bowl and The Children’s Museum of Memphis. What is still being worked out is a contract with the terms for drawing up that master plan.

There are still several formidable obstacles to putting a development agreement in writing.

Shelby County government owns some of the Fairgrounds land including some of the land under The Liberty Bowl.

City Housing & Community Development director Robert Lipscomb told City Council members he will again pursue an agreement in which the county would sell its share in The Fairgrounds as well as The Pyramid.

The Shelby County Commission rejected such a sell-off by the county during consideration of a development agreement for The Pyramid involving Bass Pro Shops.

The commission eventually approved the development agreement after the agreement won approval from the city council.

Without a sell-off, the Fairgrounds development agreement appears on its way to the same dual track debate and voting process.

Lipscomb also told The Daily News there are conflicting legal opinions on the amount of public infrastructure financing the city would have to put up to leverage private investment.

He said the amounts vary from $75 million to $200 million. The city is seeking legal opinions on the public amount required under terms of Tourism Development Zone (TDZ) financing. If the amount is $200 million or close to it, Lipscomb said it makes the Fairgrounds renovation much harder to accomplish.

Henry Turley, one of several developer partners in Fair Ground LLC, said he considers the city’s contribution to be $75 million. Turley was instrumental in drafting the state legislation that allowed for the Tourism Development Zones.

The TDZs allow for financing of bonds through sales tax revenue generated in the designated area or zone.

Turley wants to include a big box retail store on the site and possibly a hotel according to tentative plans that are fluid on the location of those and other parts of an overall plan. The sales tax revenue from the store would go to pay off the TDZ bonds. No local government general fund revenue would be used.

...

86. Council Again Rejects Lee Legal Fees -

The Memphis City Council this evening affirmed its vote in Oct. to reject paying the legal fees of former Memphis Light Gas & Water Division president Joseph Lee.

The bill for Lee’s legal defense in a grand jury probe that led to his indictment as well as a hearing before the council came to $426,422. The corruption charges were later dropped by federal prosecutors.

The 7-6 vote came at the end of a day in which MLGW president Jerry Collins told council members talks between the utility and Lee’s attorney, Robert Spence, failed to reach any terms for a lesser amount.

Council members voting against the proposed settlement were: Bill Boyd, Kemp Conrad, Shea Flinn, Reid Hedgepeth, Myron Lowery, Bill Morrison and Jim Strickland. Those voting for it were: Joe Brown, Harold Collins, Edmund Ford Jr., Janis Fullilove, Wanda Halbert and Barbara Swearengen Ware.

Spence told The Daily News an announcement on a decision by Lee about pursuing the legal fees in a lawsuit against the city could be made as early as Tuesday.

The council has also given final approval this evening to an ordinance regulating the location of financial services, payday loan and title loan businesses.

The council vote was unanimous on third and final reading. Third and final vote before the Shelby County Commission is scheduled for Dec. 8.

The council passed an amended version that emerged as a compromise during today’s council session.

The ordinance bans the businesses from being with 1,000 feet of each other. The compromise worked out by council member Bill Morrison, with agreement from the payday loan industry, deals with a 90 day grace period for existing businesses to apply for a waiver.

Council member Barbara Swearengen Ware argued the location of the businesses isn’t the problem. It’s the high interest rates the companies charge – up to 264 percent annually.

“We need to deal with the root of the problem,” she said. “And if we could regulate how much (of an) interest rate is charged or how much the fees are, then we would be doing a service to the community,” Ware said. “I know we mean well here, but it’s supply and demand that is driving these businesses.”

But usery rates are regulated by the state and not the city council.

Morrison said the businesses cluster in his district which covers Frayser and Raleigh. Frayser is among the areas of the city hardest hit by home foreclosures.

Council member Harold Collins, whose district includes Hickory Hill – also hit hard by home foreclosures – said there is a connection. He counted at least 20 pay day lenders along one stretch of Winchester.

“Maybe they’re not contributing to the fact that many of the people in my district are losing their homes. But they are sure out there,” he said. “There needs to be some kind of line drawn that will keep the people in Hickory Hill from losing their homes.”

Steve Lockwood, head of the Frayser Community Development Corporation, said the close proximity of the lenders allows people in desperate financial straits to get around a limit of two loans totaling $500 from a particular lender by simply going to the payday lender next door.

He termed the location limits “an opening shot across the bow.” He said his organization’s financial counselors see a connection between the lenders and foreclosures.

“I think that the neighborhoods that are really going to benefit from this are in Cordova,” Lockwood said. “If you want Cordova to look like Winchester or Frayser, don’t pass this.”

In other action, a Fairgrounds development agreement is tentatively set to have the first of three Memphis City Council votes in two weeks.

The city picked Fair Ground LLC to develop a master plan for the property that includes the Mid-South Coliseum, The Liberty Bowl and The Children’s Museum of Memphis. What is still being worked out is a contract with the terms for drawing up that master plan.

There are still several formidable obstacles to putting a development agreement in writing.

Shelby County government owns some of the Fairgrounds land including some of the land under The Liberty Bowl.

City Housing & Community Development director Robert Lipscomb told City Council members he will again pursue an agreement in which the county would sell its share in The Fairgrounds as well as The Pyramid.

The Shelby County Commission rejected such a sell-off by the county during consideration of a development agreement for The Pyramid involving Bass Pro Shops.

The commission eventually approved the development agreement after the agreement won approval from the city council.

Without a sell-off, the Fairgrounds development agreement appears on its way to the same dual track debate and voting process.

Lipscomb also told The Daily News there are conflicting legal opinions on the amount of public infrastructure financing the city would have to put up to leverage private investment.

He said the amounts vary from $75 million to $200 million. The city is seeking legal opinions on the public amount required under terms of Tourism Development Zone (TDZ) financing. If the amount is $200 million or close to it, Lipscomb said it makes the Fairgrounds renovation much harder to accomplish.

Henry Turley, one of several developer partners in Fair Ground LLC, said he considers the city’s contribution to be $75 million. Turley was instrumental in drafting the state legislation that allowed for the Tourism Development Zones.

The TDZs allow for financing of bonds through sales tax revenue generated in the designated area or zone.

Turley wants to include a big box retail store on the site and possibly a hotel according to tentative plans that are fluid on the location of those and other parts of an overall plan. The sales tax revenue from the store would go to pay off the TDZ bonds. No local government general fund revenue would be used.

...

87. Fannie, Freddie Spent Millions On Lobbying -

WASHINGTON (AP) – For years, mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac tenaciously worked to nurture, and then protect, their financial empires by invoking the political sacred cow of homeownership and fielding an army of lobbyists, power brokers and political contributors.

88. Hickory Hill Stakeholders Steaming Over Property's Neglect -

Atlanta developer Keven R. Patterson made his first attempt to enter the Memphis market four years ago when he and a group of investors, Water Gardens LLC, bought the Marina Cove apartment complex on Winchester Road for $1.6 million.

89. House Lawmakers Consider $15B Mortgage Bailout Plan as Housing Troubles Continue -

WASHINGTON (AP) - Investors could sell up to $15 billion of troubled mortgages to the government under a plan key House members are discussing to bolster the U.S. housing market.

The tentative plan would allow the government to purchase up to 1 million mortgages over five years in an effort to help struggling borrowers avoid foreclosure and financial markets avoid more credit-related losses. The loans would be bought by the Federal Housing Administration, a Depression-era agency that insures loans made to borrowers with poor credit.

90. Government Gets Involved in Storm Recovery Effort -

Two days before a swarm of tornadoes descended on Memphis and the region, emergency responders in Memphis and Shelby County began making plans in case Tuesday's approaching storm spawned tornadoes.

91. Search and Recovery -

Ash Wednesday in Memphis began with a search for loss and destruction. The day after storms raked the city and the region, Memphians focused on repairing the physical damage and coming to grips with the human toll.

92. Time Matters In Desire for Change To Sunshine Law -

Too many items on the agenda and not enough meeting time. That's the bottom line rationale for a call by most on the Shelby County Board of Commissioners to change the Tennessee Open Meetings Law, also known informally as the Sunshine Law.

93. Leading the Charge: Memphian keeps watchful eye on Iraq progress -

CNN talk show host Wolf Blitzer earlier this month peppered the U.S. Army's highest-ranking non-commissioned officer with questions about the situation in Iraq. Blitzer, the host of CNN's "Late Edition," asked about everything from troop morale to the availability of munitions.

94. Vote Delayed on Chamber Funding of Interest Groups -

Members of the Shelby County Board of Commissioners had a lot to say Monday about whether nonprofit civic groups with ties to groups that endorsed or ranked candidates in recent elections should get any money from the Memphis Regional Chamber Foundation and under what terms. But they ultimately delayed a vote on the terms for up to $1 million in funding.

95. Watergrove Transaction Sets Multifamily Price Record -

With 22 acres of lakes dotted across its sprawling footprint near Tenn. 385, Watergrove Townhomes has been one of the more recognizable properties in the Hickory Hill area for the past 20 years.

Thanks to the arrival of Philadelphia-based BPG Properties Ltd., the 1,002-unit Class B complex can now add another distinction to its resume - most lucrative.

96. Smart Clings to Claim He's Broke, Represents Himself -

Forest Hill cemeteries and funeral homes owner Clayton Smart will act as his own attorney at least for the time being.

Criminal Court Judge W. Otis Higgs made the ruling Wednesday at the end of another hearing in which Smart repeatedly claimed he didn't have any money to hire an attorney.

97. Smart Represents Himself, Claims He's Broke -

Forest Hill cemeteries and funeral homes owner Clayton Smart will act as his own attorney – at least for the time being.

Criminal Court Judge W. Otis Higgs made the ruling Wednesday at the end of another hearing in which Smart repeatedly claimed he didn't have any money to hire an attorney.

98. Smart Represents Himself, Claims He's Broke -

Forest Hill cemeteries and funeral homes owner Clayton Smart will act as his own attorney – at least for the time being.

Criminal Court Judge W. Otis Higgs made the ruling Wednesday at the end of another hearing in which Smart repeatedly claimed he didn't have any money to hire an attorney.

99. Archived Article -

6125 Shelby Drive
Memphis, TN 38141
Sale Amount: $13.5 million

Sale Date: July 20, 2007

Buyer: NatTennessee GP

100. City Council Races Overflow With 83 Candidates Filing -

It's the year of the open seat on the Memphis City Council.

With seven incumbents not running for re-election and the resignation last month of an eighth, it is already the biggest turnover of council seats in the 40-year history of the mayor-council form of government.