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Editorial Results (free)

1. Haslam Cites Mixed Signals on Gas Tax Hike For Roads -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam two weeks ago kicked off his statewide tour in Memphis, pushing for a better method of funding state road projects.

Some in the audience of business and civic leaders at the Greater Memphis Chamber had talked with Haslam and Tennessee transportation commissioner John Schroer before about the state’s fuel tax and had urged state officials to raise the tax. And some wanted to talk about it again Aug. 5 as Haslam emphasized the state’s $6 billion backlog of transportation projects.

2. House, Senate Speakers at Odds Over Gas Tax Increase in 2016 -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — While Gov. Bill Haslam is traveling the state to discuss transportation funding needs facing Tennessee, top legislative Republicans are at odds over whether to consider a gas tax hike in 2016.

3. Raise Gas Tax or Borrow? How to Fund Road Projects -

Tennessee has an $8 billion backlog of transportation projects and not enough funds to pay for them, largely because the state gas tax, which funds those projects, hasn’t been increased in 26 years.

4. Ramsey Clear in Push to Politicize Supreme Court -

Republican Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey has a penchant for igniting flames of partisanship, and the retirement of Tennessee Supreme Court Justice Gary Wade is no exception.

5. 10 Named to Panel to Review Tennessee K-12 Education Standards -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam and the speakers of the House and Senate have appointed the 10 members of a committee established to review K-12 education standards in Tennessee.

6. Questions Abound Amid Tennessee Supreme Court Vacancy -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – When Gary Wade was appointed to the state Supreme Court in 2006, the self-described "mountain boy from the Smokies" planned to serve the eight-year term and retire from his distinguished judicial career.

7. With No Real Rival, Tennessee Republicans Attack Their Own -

Republicans are sitting in Tennessee’s political catbird seat, but that doesn’t keep them from flying off in different directions.

Elected political leaders of the same stripe found themselves at odds this year over the Bible as a state book, Common Core education standards and Insure Tennessee, Republican Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to catch 280,000 people in a medical coverage gap.

8. Tennessee’s ‘Fighting 26’ Democrats Work to Stay Relevant -

Sometimes Tennessee Democrats must feel like a tree that falls in the forest: Does anyone hear them?

When Democratic legislative leaders called for a special session this summer on Insure Tennessee, Gov. Bill Haslam’s market-based plan to use federal dollars to catch 280,000 working people in a health care coverage gap, they found themselves alone.

9. Special Action on Same-Sex Nuptials a Waste of Time -

With Republican lawmakers scrambling for a response to the U.S. Supreme Court’s gay-marriage ruling, Tennesseans on both sides of the issue say they are seeking "equality."

Immediately after the court’s decision on Obergefell v. Hodges, Democratic U.S. Rep. Jim Cooper of Nashville said, "Love and equality won. I’m glad the Supreme Court ruled on the right side of history."

10. Southern Heritage Defined Differently Across Tennessee -

Tennessee’s loyalty was divided in the Civil War, and 150 years later, little is changed as the debate over Confederate symbols arises in the wake of the racist-fueled South Carolina church massacre.

11. Capitol Commission to Review Which Historical Figures Should Be Honored -

Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey and House Speaker Beth Harwell are encouraging the Tennessee Capitol Commission to evaluate the characteristics of Tennesseans honored in the Capitol Complex.

12. Garrett, Himes Named Co-Legal Directors of State Legislature -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Tennessee General Assembly has named two new directors of legal affairs following the retirement of attorney Joe Barnes.

13. Ramsey: No Medicaid Expansion Until 2017 -

The Tennessee legislative session ended in late April, giving itself a little more than two and a-half months to handle the state’s business. That’s plenty of time, according to Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey.

14. Ramsey Uses ‘System’ to Reshape State’s Political Landscape -

Senate Speaker and Lieutenant Gov. Ron Ramsey laughs at the notion he’s changed since being elected to the Legislature 23 years ago, that he’s lost touch with the common man or become “arrogant” as lieutenant governor of Tennessee.

15. Panel Approves Plans to Move Tennessee Legislative Offices -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The State Building Commission has approved the first step to make an overhauled building next to the state Capitol the new home of the Tennessee General Assembly.

16. Legislative Speakers Disavow 'Mandate' for Tennessee Security Group -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A private group called the Tennessee Task Force on National and Homeland Security is marketing itself with an official-looking logo and a claimed "mandate" from state lawmakers. But legislative leaders say the group has no official endorsement from the General Assembly.

17. Norris Says TennCare Review ‘Essential’ -

The majority leader of the Tennessee State Senate says the legislature is not done with a proposed expansion of Medicaid.

But Republican Sen. Mark Norris of Collierville is quick to add that the expansion proposed by Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam should be part of a larger re-examination of the existing TennCare program.

18. Will Tennessee Republicans Ever Be Truly Happy? -

Why aren’t Tennessee Republicans happier?

With the GOP so dominate in the Tennessee General Assembly and losses so rare – on the Hill or in elections – the party’s lawmakers should be jubilant with this year’s session. But it’s never enough.

19. Roundup: Defeat of Insure Tennessee Proposal Set Tone in 2015 Session -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The defeat of Gov. Bill Haslam's proposal to extend health coverage to 280,000 low-income Tennesseans set the tone for the 2015 session of the state Legislature.

20. Tennessee General Assembly Adjourns for the Year -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Tennessee General Assembly adjourned for the year on Wednesday following an often contentious session highlighted by the passage of legislation that would allow handgun-carry permit holders to be armed in any state park, and the failed attempt to make the Bible the official state book.

21. Biblical Lessons Lost in Lack of Health Care Debate -

Tennessee’s legislators spent hours this session arguing over guns and whether to pass a law making the Bible the state book of Tennessee.

In fact, the Bible bill took two days of debate in the House, where it passed, and thorough discussion in the Senate, before it died – at least until next year.

22. An ‘Epiphany’ for Legislators on In-State Tuition -

Tina Sharma grew up in Tennessee, graduated from Martin Luther King High School in Nashville and enrolled at Belmont University. She calls the Volunteer State home.

23. Tennessee House Votes to Name Bible as Official Book -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Tennessee state House ignored serious constitutional concerns – and the wishes of Republican leaders in Statehouse – in voting to make the holy Bible the official state book.

24. Attorney General Election Proposal Passes Tennessee Senate -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A proposed constitutional amendment calling for the popular election of Tennessee's attorney general overwhelmingly passed the Senate on Tuesday despite arguments that the current system doesn't need to be changed.

25. Tennessee House Bogs Down Over Making Bible Official Book -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A small-town Republican's proposal to make the Bible the official book of Tennessee ran into opposition from top members of his own party as the House delayed a scheduled vote on the measure Tuesday.

26. Bill Would Make Bible Official State Book of Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Despite concerns that giving the holy Bible the same status as a salamander is a little tawdry and could be unconstitutional, Tennessee lawmakers are forging ahead with plans to make it the official state book – something at least two other states have failed to do.

27. State Senate Votes to Allow Handguns at Tennessee Capitol -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – People with handgun carry permits would be able to carry their weapons on the grounds of the state Capitol under a provision inserted into a guns-in-parks proposal that overwhelmingly passed the Senate on Wednesday.

28. Anti-Abortion Legislation Finds Little Resistance -

Buoyed by passage of Amendment 1 last fall, legislation restricting abortions is starting to roll – with relative ease – through the General Assembly.

Rep. Susan Lynn, R-Mt. Juliet, and Rep. Matthew Hill, R-Jonesborough, began the push recently with measures backed by Gov. Bill Haslam, House Speaker Beth Harwell, Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey and the Republican ranks. Their bills couldn’t even draw enough resistance to require a roll-call vote.

29. Haslam Undaunted By Difficult Prospects for Insure Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam said Thursday that he is willing to risk a second defeat of his Insure Tennessee proposal to highlight the need for improving health standards in the state.

30. Haslam Encouraged By Insure Tenn. Revival; Ramsey Skeptical -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam said Tuesday that he's pleased to see his Insure Tennessee proposal revived in the Legislature, but the top Republican in the Senate called it unlikely that the measure will reach an up-or-down vote by the full chamber.

31. 7 Tennessee School Systems Sue the State Over Funding -

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) – Hamilton County and six Chattanooga-area school systems filed a lawsuit Tuesday against the state saying local schools are not being funded as required by law.

32. Legislation Keeps Tennessee Academic Standards -

Tennessee Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey says an agreement has been reached on legislation that would keep the state’s current academic standards intact.

33. Secret 'Pre-Meetings' Become Commonplace in Tennessee House -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee House committees are increasingly gathering in cramped, tucked-away conference rooms in the legislative office complex to hold secret "pre-meetings" to discuss pending legislation. The public isn't informed or invited.

34. Tenn. Republicans Hit Each Other on 'Social Hour,' Expenses -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – House Majority Leader Gerald McCormick drew hoots and hollers of agreement from his colleagues when he suggested that members of the Senate had met during recent winter storms in the interest of padding their expense accounts.

35. Battle of the Band(width) -

Joyce Coltrin’s business is wandering in Bradley County’s technological wilderness. And it’s likely to remain there – because of legal threats – until the General Assembly changes state law.

36. Eliminating Hall Income Tax Raises New Problems -

Republican lawmakers are lining up legislation to reduce or phase out Tennessee’s Hall income tax on investments, even though Gov. Bill Haslam is concerned about losing revenue amid the state’s economic ups and downs.

37. Tennessee Public Television Stations Airing Legislative Show -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee public television stations are airing a new show about the happenings in the state Legislature.

The first of four 30-minute episodes of the "Tennessee Capitol Report" began airing Sunday morning, March 1, on public TV stations in Memphis, Nashville, Knoxville, Chattanooga, Lexington-Jackson and Cookeville. The next episodes are scheduled to air on March 29, April 26 and May 31.

38. Tennessee GOP Leader Questions Incentives for Unionized GM Plant -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – State Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey said last week that it may have been "a mistake" for Tennessee to subsidize the development of the General Motors plant outside Nashville because it has a United Auto Workers union contract.

39. Bid to Block Health Exchange in Tennessee Seen as 'Overkill' -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Some Republican lawmakers still reveling in the recent defeat of a proposal to expand Medicaid to 280,000 low-income Tennesseans are now setting their sights on 230,000 people enrolled through the federal health insurance exchange.

40. Kelsey’s New Private School Voucher Plan Looks More Like Haslam’s -

Momentum is building this session for voucher legislation that would allow state dollars to follow students from struggling public schools to private and religious institutions.

But it is hardly etched in stone.

41. Haslam Wary of Gas Tax Hike -

Despite low gas prices, a backlog on road projects and prevailing winds for fuel-tax reform, Gov. Bill Haslam is pulling back from a gas-tax increase this session.

After floating the possibility of raising the tax in December, the Republican governor appears to be changing course, in part because of his loss in a Senate committee on Insure Tennessee, the Medicaid expansion alternative that failed to make debate in the full House or Senate.

42. Insure Tennessee Fails to Win Sound Bite Test -

Fresh off a resounding November re-election victory, Gov. Bill Haslam ran smack dab into the reality of Tennessee politics: The Republican Party abhors anything connected to President Barack Obama.

43. Fresh Off Medicaid Loss, Haslam Pivots to Common Core Fight -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Fresh off his failed effort to persuade fellow Republicans in the Legislature that he wasn't peddling "Obamacare," Gov. Bill Haslam is pivoting to another tough fight over what he describes as the ruined brand of Common Core education standards.

44. 6 of 7 Who Killed Insure Tennessee are on State Health Plan -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Six of the seven Republican senators who voted to kill Gov. Bill Haslam's proposal to extend health coverage to 280,000 low-income Tennesseans are enrolled in the state government health plan.

45. Haslam's Insure Tennessee Health Plan Fails in Legislature -

Gov. Bill Haslam's proposal to extend health coverage to 280,000 low-income Tennesseans has failed during a special legislative session.

The Senate Health Committee defeated the Republican governor's Insure Tennessee plan Wednesday on a 7-4 vote.

46. Both Sides Dig In for Insure Tennessee Special Session -

Battle lines have been drawn for a Feb. 2 special session of the state Legislature to determine the fate of Gov. Bill Haslam’s Insure Tennessee proposal, which would use federal funds to catch some 280,000 working people falling through a health insurance coverage gap.

47. Both Sides Dig In For Insure Tennessee Special Session -

Battle lines have been drawn for a Feb. 2 special session of the state Legislature to determine the fate of Gov. Bill Haslam’s Insure Tennessee proposal, which would use federal funds to catch some 200,000 working people falling through a health insurance coverage gap.

48. House, Senate at Odds Over Who Goes First on Medicaid Plan -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican leaders in the state House and Senate are at odds about who should go first on taking up Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's proposal to extend health coverage to more than 200,000 low-income Tennesseans.

49. Fellow Republicans Reluctant About Haslam's Health Proposal -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam's plan to offer health coverage to more than 200,000 low-income Tennesseans is getting a tepid response from fellow Republicans in the Legislature – so much so, that he has yet to find a Senate sponsor for his proposal.

50. Tenn. Lawmakers Convene 109th General Assembly -

Tennessee lawmakers have convened the 109th General Assembly amid abortion rights protests inside the state Capitol.

Republican Rep. Beth Harwell of Nashville and Sen. Ron Ramsey of Blountville were re-elected as speakers of the House and Senate, while about 60 protesters outside shouted into a bullhorn, banged drums and chanted.

51. Haslam Eager to Defend Insure Tennessee Plan -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam hopes that when the special session of the Tennessee Legislature begins Feb. 2 the ceremony of the start of a legislative session as well as his second inaugural will have passed.

52. Tennessee’s Health Problem -

For years, the concept of “wellness” or “preventive health” measures has been the “eat your vegetables” mantra of a growing national discussion on health care that has focused primarily on the cost of such care and who should pay for it or try to control it.

53. Tenn. General Assembly Launches Website Redesign -

A redesigned website for the Tennessee General Assembly features upgrades to bill tracking and video streaming functions.

Republican Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey says the redesign is meant to make state government "more open, more transparent and customer-friendly."

54. Gas Tax Increase Gaining Momentum in Tennessee -

Momentum is mounting for a possible proposal to raise the state's gas tax for the first time in 25 years.

Gov. Bill Haslam told The Tennessean he thinks a legislative proposal on the issue is close and could be introduced in the next General Assembly, which convenes in January.

55. Tenn. General Assembly Launches Website Redesign -

A redesigned website for the Tennessee General Assembly features upgrades to bill tracking and video streaming functions.

Republican Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey says the redesign is meant to make state government “more open, more transparent and customer-friendly.”

56. Tennessee Joins Multistate Lawsuit Over Immigration -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee is joining a multistate lawsuit seeking to halt President Barack Obama's executive action on immigration, state Attorney General Herbert Slatery announced Monday.

57. Gas Tax Increase Gaining Momentum in Tennessee -

Momentum is mounting for a possible proposal to raise the state’s gas tax for the first time in 25 years.

Gov. Bill Haslam told The Tennessean he thinks a legislative proposal on the issue is close and could be introduced in the next General Assembly, which convenes in January.

58. Ramsey: Medicaid Expansion ‘Sellable’ in Tennessee -

Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey says that if fellow Republican Gov. Bill Haslam succeeds in his negotiations with President Barack Obama’s administration on a special Tennessee deal for Medicaid expansion, the result could be “sellable” to skeptical state lawmakers.

59. Harwell Defeats Tea-Party Challenge for Speaker -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – House Speaker Beth Harwell decisively defeated a tea-party challenge from Rep. Rick Womick on Wednesday to win the Republican nomination for another term in charge of the lower chamber of the Tennessee General Assembly.

60. Online App for Tennessee Lawmakers Wins Award -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — An online application for Tennessee lawmakers has won an award from the National Conference of State Legislatures.

The group awarded the state Legislature the Legislative Staff Achievement Award for the new "Dashboard" for state senators and representatives.

61. Judicial Retention Travels Complex Path -

The 2014 election year is proving to be a long one for those interested in the judicial races on the ballot.

Voters in Shelby County decided the local judicial races and participated in the August statewide retention races for appellate court positions, including three on the Tennessee Supreme Court.

62. Haslam Keeps Door Open to Pre-K; Ramsey Skeptical -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – While Gov. Bill Haslam is keeping the door open to an expansion of the public pre-kindergarten program in Tennessee, any such move would remain a tough sell among some fellow Republicans in the Legislature.

63. New Chief Justice Echoes Haslam Mantra on Review -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – First, the state Supreme Court hired Gov. Bill Haslam's top legal adviser as Tennessee's next attorney general. Now the high court's new chief justice is also adopting the Republican governor's rhetoric.

64. Sen. Summerville Charged With Public Intoxication -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Outgoing state Sen. Jim Summerville, whose behavior has often drawn the ire of his Republican colleagues, has been charged with public intoxication.

65. Coverage Gap Leaves Rural Tennessee Hospitals on Life Support -

Four rural hospitals have closed and dozens are at risk of shuttering: That’s the fallout, some say, from Gov. Bill Haslam’s decision not to join the Affordable Care Act in 2013 and tap into millions in promised federal funds for Tennessee’s financially-strapped health care institutions.

66. Haslam, Legislative Speakers Call Education Summit -

Republican Gov. Bill Haslam, House Speaker Beth Harwell and Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey are convening a summit in Nashville to discuss education changes in Tennessee.

67. Haslam, Legislative Speakers Call Education Summit -

Republican Gov. Bill Haslam, House Speaker Beth Harwell and Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey are convening a summit in Nashville to discuss education changes in Tennessee.

68. The Q Party -

CRISIS AVERTED. It’s all a matter of perspective.

At the height of the 1962 Cuban missile crisis, a friend’s father was in Corinth, Miss., on business. He was outside the courthouse having a cigarette and waiting for an appointment when he overheard a conversation between two old men on a bench.

69. Tennessee Attorney General Bob Cooper to Seek Another Term -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Tennessee Attorney General Bob Cooper announced Monday he will seek another eight-year term after three Democrats were retained on the Supreme Court.

70. Supreme Court Retention Clash Likely to Continue -

Both sides declared victory when the three Tennessee Supreme Court justices were retained by voters in the Thursday, Aug. 7, statewide judicial elections.

The votes to retain or replace Chief Justice Gary Wade and Justices Sharon Lee and Cornelia Clark ended with all three being retained for an eight-year term.

71. Cohen Prevails, Incumbents Dominate -

Democratic U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen held off Thursday, Aug. 7, the most serious electoral challenge he’s faced since winning the Congressional seat in 2006, in the form of attorney Ricky E. Wilkins.

72. Cohen, Luttrell, Weirich, Harris Take Early Vote -

Democratic U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen has taken the early vote over challenger Ricky Wilkins in the hard fought Democratic Congressional primary on Thursday’s Shelby County election ballot.

73. Supreme Court Justices Rally in Court Square -

The three Tennessee Supreme Court justices on the Thursday, Aug. 4, ballot spent the day before the election campaigning in Memphis for retention.

Chief Justice Gary Wade and Justices Cornelia Clark and Sharon Lee are countering a well-financed campaign by Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey and others, urging voters to vote against retaining the three justices.

74. Tennessee Supreme Court Races See Spending Spike -

NASHVILLE (AP) – An influx of campaign spending on three Tennessee Supreme Court seats has transformed what is traditionally a sleepy affair into a hard-fought campaign that has raised questions about the role of partisan politics in the judiciary.

75. Ask a Lawyer -

JUDGED BY LAWYERS. Q: What do you when you have a lawyer buried up to the neck in sand?

A: Not enough sand.

Lawyers can’t catch a break.

Q: What the difference between a lawyer and a catfish?

76. Supreme Court Justices Make Campaign Push -

Among the candidates going door to door in Memphis this summer looking for votes was a Tennessee Supreme Court justice.

Sharon Lee, one of three justices seeking re-election in the yes-no retention races on the August ballot, campaigned Saturday, July 19, in Hickory Hill.

77. Early Vote Expands as Campaigns Enter New Phase -

There is a unique and persistent part of the political process that gnaws at candidates, separating them from the voters they court and sometimes stalk. You might call it the day of the ballot.

In the weeks leading up to the start of early voting, they get hit up constantly by those putting out endorsement ballots to be distributed during early voting and on election day, most often by paid poll workers. Candidates must pay to be on a ballot, which those organizing the ballots say is necessary to cover printing and distribution costs.

78. Justices Stump in Memphis as Early Voting Begins -

Early voting in Shelby County opened Friday, July 18, with that most political of omens – rain.

The three Tennessee Supreme Court justices on the ballot statewide were at the Burch, Porter & Johnson law firm a few blocks from the Shelby County Election Commission early voting site Downtown.

79. 3 Democratic Supreme Court Justices Launch TV Ad -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The three Supreme Court justices facing retention elections next month have launched a television ad to stress their dedication to the federal and state constitutions.

80. Tennessee Bar Poll Calls for Judge Retention -

A first-ever poll of Tennessee Bar Association members shows those the majority of those polled recommend the retention of three of the state’s Supreme Court justices on the Aug. 7 statewide ballot.

81. Tennessee Bar Poll Calls for Judge Retention -

A first-ever poll of Tennessee Bar Association members shows those the majority of those polled recommend the retention of three of the state’s Supreme Court justices on the Aug. 7 statewide ballot.

82. Judicial Campaigns Get Testy With Endorsements -

Some of the reticence about political combat that defines local nonpartisan judicial elections is beginning to wear thin with a little more than a month until the start of early voting for the Aug. 7 elections.

83. Group Supporting Incumbent Justices Raises $600,000 -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A group supporting the retention of three incumbent Tennessee Supreme Court justices says it has raised $600,000.

The campaign called Keep Tennessee Courts Fair is supporting Justices Connie Clark, Sharon Lee and Gary Wade, who face yes-no votes on the ballot in August.

84. Tennessee Bar Polls on Supreme Court Races -

The Tennessee Bar Association is conducting a first-ever poll of its members on the August retention races for three Tennessee Supreme Court positions.

The polling by secret ballot began Tuesday, May 27, and continues through June 9, with results to be released in mid-June.

85. Lawyers Fight Effort to Oust Justices -

Lawyers are fighting back against an effort by conservatives to oust three sitting justices on the state’s highest court.

Republican Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey of Blountville has been circulating a document that takes aim at Supreme Court Justices Cornelia Clark, Gary Wade and Sharon Lee. All three were appointed by former Gov. Phil Bredesen, a Democrat, and all three are up for election on Aug. 7.

86. Lawyers Fight Effort to Oust Justices -

Lawyers are fighting back against an effort by conservatives to oust three sitting justices on the state's highest court.

Republican Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey of Blountville has been circulating a document that takes aim at Supreme Court Justices Cornelia Clark, Gary Wade and Sharon Lee. All three were appointed by former Gov. Phil Bredesen, a Democrat, and all three are up for election on Aug. 7.

87. Tennessee Bar Polls Members on Supreme Court Races -

The Tennessee Bar Association is conducting a first-ever poll of its members on the August retention races for three Tennessee Supreme Court positions.

The polling by secret ballot began Tuesday, May 27, and continues through June 9, with results to be released in mid-June.

88. Some Expect Costly, Divisive Justice Campaign -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Tennessee could be facing the costliest state Supreme Court election in its history now that conservatives have targeted three sitting justices on the state's highest court.

89. Haslam Vows ‘Full Effort’ for Re-Election -

As Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam seeks re-election, he has some challengers in the statewide August Republican primary and he’ll face a Democratic opponent in the November general election.

But Haslam’s path to re-election in 2014 should be an easy one. He is heavily favored as the incumbent with no Democratic contender who is backed by the state Democratic Party establishment.

90. Senator Appears to Make Light of Holocaust Remark -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A Tennessee state senator who compared the federal health care law to the forced transportation of Jews to concentration camps during the Holocaust appeared to make light of the firestorm about his comments this week in a blog post on Tuesday.

91. August’s ‘Big Ballot’ Awaits County’s Voters -

With the unofficial results in the Shelby County primary elections in, get ready for the “big ballot.”

The candidates who won the Democratic and Republican primaries in Tuesday’s elections advance to the August ballot where they will join a much larger group of candidates and races that once every eight years produce the largest ballot of any election cycle in Shelby County politics.

92. 108th General Assembly Adjourns for Year -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — State lawmakers concluded a session Thursday in which they approved measures to allow folks to buy wine in grocery stores, fight methamphetamine production and give high school graduates free tuition at community colleges.

93. 108th General Assembly Adjourns for the Year -

NASHVILLE (AP) – State lawmakers concluded a session Thursday in which they approved measures to allow folks to buy wine in grocery stores, fight methamphetamine production and give high school graduates free tuition at community colleges.

94. Ramsey: Pay Raises, Higher Ed Funding Face Cuts -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey says worse-than-expected revenue collections could force Tennessee to cancel planned pay raises for state employees and reduce planned investments in higher education.

95. Haslam Signs Supermarket Wine Bill Into Law -

NASHVILLE (AP) – After years of legislative debate, Republican Gov. Bill Haslam on Thursday signed a law to allow supermarket wine sales in Tennessee.

Haslam was joined by the measure's sponsors, as well as the Senate and House speakers, who helped the passage of the legislation by bringing different parties to the table to discuss it.

96. Bill to Block Nashville Amp Project Worries Haslam -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam on Tuesday raised concerns about efforts by fellow Republicans in the state Legislature to block a dedicated bus lane project through Nashville.

The governor told reporters after a speech to the Nashville Chamber of Commerce that although he has not formed an opinion about whether the project – called the Amp – is a good idea, he's worried about the possible precedent of legislative committees deciding over individual transportation projects in the state.

97. Senate Passes Medicaid Legislative Approval Bill -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A proposal that requires Gov. Bill Haslam to secure legislative approval for any potential deal to expand Medicaid in Tennessee has passed the Senate even though the Republican governor has already said he would consult with lawmakers.

98. Supermarket Wine Sales Bill Headed to Governor -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Legislation that would let voters decide whether their cities or counties allow wine to be sold in supermarkets and convenience stores has been sent to the governor, who is expected to sign the measure into law.

99. Tennessee House Passes Supermarket Wine Sales Bill -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A years-long effort to allow wine to be sold outside of Tennessee liquor stores easily cleared what was expected to be its toughest hurdle on Thursday when the state House overwhelmingly approved the measure.

100. Senate Defeats Proposal to Elect Attorney General -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The Senate on Wednesday defeated an effort to change the Tennessee constitution to require the popular election of the attorney general.

The measure sponsored by Republican Sen. Mae Beavers of Mt. Juliet received 15 votes in favor and 14 votes against. Proposals need at least 17 votes – a majority of the 33-member chamber – to pass.