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Editorial Results (free)

1. LeMoyne-Owen Change Latest for Memphis Higher Ed -

Andrea Miller is the latest of three new higher education leaders in Memphis in just more than a year.

2. LeMoyne-Owen Taps New President -

Andrea Miller is the new president of LeMoyne-Owen College and will be the first woman to lead the Memphis institution.

3. LeMoyne-Owen College Taps New President -

Andrea Miller is the new president of LeMoyne-Owen College and will be the first woman to lead the Memphis institution.

4. ULI Fairgrounds Panel Has Busy Schedule -

A team of eight out-of-town planning experts has a busy week ahead as it wades into the simmering local debate about plans to recast the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

And the first hard copy of something the Urban Land Institute-assembled group is likely to get are the comments from four town hall meetings held in different parts of Memphis over two evenings last week.

5. Memphis Gets Greenlight to Relocate Police -

Now it’s all about closing the deal.

With no debate or discussion, the Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, May 19, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s proposal to buy the 13-story Donnelley J. Hill state office building at 170 N. Main St., just a stone’s throw from City Hall.

6. Lipscomb-Area Jewelers Dazzle Both Sides of Granny White -

When the blonde left-fielder skidded across the outfield grass attempting in vain to catch a tricky hit, she likely didn’t know she was “visiting” – belly down – a well-fertilized, close-cropped living memorial to the man who spread love of Lipscomb from his jewelry store a couple hundred yards away.

7. At Long Last -

It’s taken the city of Memphis 10 years to reel in Bass Pro Shops at The Pyramid, and business owners in the nearby Pinch District hope it will be a catalytic force they’ve been waiting for.

8. Pyramid Promises -

It took about 25 years for an elevator ride to reach the top of The Pyramid.

That’s how long several generations of political leaders – three county mayors and three Memphis mayors as well as a changing group of city council members over seven elections – have been seeking a Pyramid with a ride to the apex.

9. Midtown Momentum -

Kroger Co., buoyed by the Crosstown Concourse development and increased investment in Midtown as a whole, has purchased properties associated with the long-dormant Washington Bottoms project at Poplar Avenue and Cleveland Street.

10. Council Remains Critical of City Plans for State Office Building -

The city of Memphis’ information technology department recently signed a new lease for office space at Pembroke Square Downtown.

The city inked the 20,595-square-foot lease as the administration of Mayor A C Wharton Jr. is trying to win council approval to buy the Donnelley J. Hill state office building for $1.5 million.

11. City Hall Budget Season Begins -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton takes an operating budget proposal of more than $622 million to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, April 21.

The proposed budget will be larger than the current fiscal year’s budget, reflecting Wharton’s belief that the city has enough of its fiscal crisis behind it at this point to slowly begin reinvesting in areas such as public safety and street paving.

12. Memphis Moves Closer to Downtown Building Purchase -

The state of Tennessee may have moved out, but the city of Memphis could be moving in.

The city has a tentative deal to buy the Donnelley J. Hill state office building near City Hall for $1.5 million.

13. Heritage Trail Redevelopment Plan Resurfaces -

A long-delayed city plan to remake a large swath of Downtown’s southern end appears to be making a comeback.

Memphis Housing and Community Development director Robert Lipscomb said Tuesday that the city expects to receive good news on the Heritage Trail development plan sometime this year.

14. Universal Life Building Developers Acquire Key Public Financing -

Developers of the Universal Life Building have received approval for two key pieces of financing and a commitment from the city of Memphis to lease about half of the building.

Self-Tucker Properties LLC won approval Tuesday, April 14, for a nine-year payment-in-lieu-of-taxes agreement from the Center City Revenue Finance Corp. to renovate the building for office use. Architects Jimmie Tucker and Juan Self, principals of Self-Tucker Architects, also gained approval for $2 million in Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds for the project.

15. Foote Homes Targeted by Federal Jobs Training Grant -

With a HUD official in town last week bearing word of a $3 million job training grant for public housing residents, city leaders remained focused on what Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. calls “the big one.”

16. Tanger Outlets to Open Southaven Mall in November -

What is now a field near Interstate 55 and Church Road in Southaven, Miss., soon will become an outlet-shopping destination.

The 310,000-square-foot Tanger Factory Outlets Centers Inc. shopping center should be ready for shoppers by Nov. 19, just in time for Christmas.

17. Holding On -

The national outlook for traditional enclosed malls is bleak. No new enclosed mall has been built in the U.S. since 2006. More than 24 have closed since 2010, and an additional 60 are teetering on the edge, according to data from Green Street Advisors. Around 15 percent of malls nationwide are expected to close in the next decade.

18. Coliseum Group Weighs Previtalization -

The group that wants to see the city renovate and reopen the Mid-South Coliseum is exploring something similar to the “previtalization” events of last year at the Tennessee Brewery.

“We’re not the only ones who want to do a previtalizing event in the Coliseum,” said Marvin Stockwell, of the Coliseum Coalition, on the WKNO TV program Behind The Headlines. “If an investor comes forward, great. If it doesn’t, we’ve given it a proper send off. You want to at least give citizens a chance to be in that space.”

19. Restless Winter -

For most of its 103-year life as city property, the Mid-South Fairgrounds has been a place where Memphians remember why they came there in the past, as local leaders have periodically pushed to remake its landscape and in turn create more memories going forward.

20. Southbrook Project Resurfaces Again -

The owners of Southbrook Mall got $1.5 million in improvements from City Hall this week. But it wasn’t the $1.5 million the owners of the Whitehaven mall wanted in 2012, when the city contemplated giving them that sum to fix the roof and make repairs to the mall’s heating and air conditioning system.

21. Sweetie Pie’s Approached as Possible Mall Tenant -

Sweetie Pie’s, the St. Louis soul food institution in a standoff with its Beale Street landlord, has been approached by the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. as a tenant for one of two malls the administration wants to convert to “town centers.”

22. Economic Development Secrets Hard to Keep -

The most difficult secrets to keep at City Hall are those dealing with economic development – the clandestine discussions between city and business leaders and companies considering moving to or expanding in Memphis.

23. City Requests Fairgrounds Review by ULI Experts -

The upcoming review of the Fairgrounds redevelopment concept by a group of Urban Land Institute experts will move quickly and could be a political wild card.

The city’s request last week for a review by Urban Land Institute’s Advisory Services goes to a part of the planning and land use nonprofit that has been specializing in such political hot potatoes since 1948.

24. City Wants Urban Land Institute to Review of Fairgrounds -

City Housing and Community Development Director Robert Lipscomb wants the Urban Land Institute to “review, evaluate and issue recommendations” on the Wharton administration’s Fairgrounds redevelopment plan after leading a set of public hearings and discussions that would take place over a five-day period.

25. Sweetie Pie’s Could be Tenant at Raleigh Springs Mall -

Sweetie Pie’s, the St. Louis soul food institution in a standoff with its Beale Street landlord, has been approached by the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. as a tenant for one of two malls the administration wants to convert to “town centers.”

26. Raleigh Springs Mall Tests Town Center Concept -

The idea that a declining shopping mall can be redeveloped and reinvigorated as a “town center” with local government offices as a catalyst for private developers appears to be on its way to a meeting with reality.

27. Sweetie Pie’s Approached as Mall Tenant -

Sweetie Pie’s, the St. Louis soul food institution in a standoff with its Beale Street landlord, has been approached by the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. as a tenant for one of two malls the administration wants to convert to “town centers.”

28. Alternative Ending -

The city of Memphis secured $6.7 million in federal funding last week to improve and rehab public housing.

Meanwhile, the city’s application for a much larger federal grant to demolish the city’s last large public housing development was making the rounds at the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development.

29. Wharton Calls for Outside Fairgrounds Review -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. told the Memphis Rotary Club Tuesday, Feb. 10, that the ambitious recasting of the Mid-South Fairgrounds – a project that is solely a City Hall creation at this point -- is going to get a second look from outside consultants.

30. Wharton Not Giving Up on Fairgrounds Plan -

Nashville is a more turbulent place than usual these days, especially Capitol Hill. So Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and his administration probably won’t tempt the turbulence there by taking their plan for a Tourism Development Zone to finance a Mid-South Fairgrounds renovation to the Tennessee Building Commission later this month.

31. Wharton Administration Willing to Explore Coliseum Renovation -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. is willing to explore a renovation of the Mid-South Coliseum, but he doesn’t want to delay getting state approval for a Tourism Development Zone to finance an amateur sports tournament complex at the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

32. Commissioners Watching What’s Next for Fairgrounds Plan -

It’s not on the Monday, Jan. 26, agenda of the Shelby County Commission, but commissioners are watching the political dominoes that are lining up en route to some kind of move by the city of Memphis toward a Fairgrounds Tourism Development Zone.

33. Council Approves Schools Deal, Appoints Boyd -

Two weeks after they ignored a proposed $43.1 million settlement of the six-year old schools funding legal standoff, Memphis City Council members Tuesday, Jan. 20, approved a $41.8 million settlement with Shelby County Schools.

34. Strings Come With Fairgrounds Zone -

Shelby County Commissioners could take up an endorsement Monday, Jan. 12, of the city’s proposed Tourism Development Zone for redevelopment of the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

But at this point, the backing has a lot of strings attached. And those strings involve two issues related to local schools funding.

35. A Tale of Two Projects -

At 7.7 miles, it takes about 12 minutes to make the drive between the Mid-South Fairgrounds and Graceland.

However, the political fortunes of each couldn’t be more different.

A financing plan for a long-delayed expansion of the Graceland campus to develop all 120 acres owned by Elvis Presley Enterprises and amassed since the mid-1990s cleared the Shelby County Commission this week and the Memphis City Council a week before.

36. Graceland Plan Clears Main Local Hurdles -

Elvis Presley Enterprises attempted to secure private financing of its plan for a 450-room resort hotel and a remake of its plaza area, but those attempts failed, said Graceland’s bond counsel, because it is difficult for borrowers to get conventional financing for a hotel project.

37. Commission Approves Graceland Plan, Delays Fairgrounds TDZ -

Shelby County Commissioners approved the Graceland economic impact plan Monday, Dec. 8, the last local hurdle for a plan that includes the construction of a 450-room hotel and a later phase transforming the Graceland Plaza area across Elvis Presley Boulevard from the Graceland mansion.

38. Wharton Says Southbrook Mall Qualifies for Federal Bonds -

The proposed renovation of Southbrook Mall is lurching back to life after months off the political radar screen.

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. announced Thursday, Nov. 20, that a renovation of the mall could be financed with up to $2.1 million in federal bonds through the Memphis Green Communities Program.

39. Wharton Says Southbrook Mall Qualifies For Federal Bonds -

The proposed renovation of Southbrook Mall lurched back to life Thursday, Nov. 20, after months off the political radar screen.

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. announced Thursday a renovation of the mall could be financed with up to $2.1 million in federal bonds through the Memphis Green Communities Program.

40. Stepherson Named Chair-Elect of Grocers Association -

Randy Stepherson has been named 2014-2015 chairman-elect of the Tennessee Grocers & Convenience Store Association board of directors. Stepherson is president of Stepherson Inc., the family- and employee-owned parent company of Superlo Foods, which has five Memphis-area locations, and Stepherson’s.

41. City Mulls Plan to Buy Former State Building -

It would be cheaper and more efficient for the city of Memphis to lease and then buy the vacant Donnelley J. Hill state office building across Main Street from Memphis City Hall than to continue leasing multiple properties spread across town, consultants and city officials told City Council members Tuesday.

42. Council Hears Tentative Plans for Office Building -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration would move the Memphis Police Department, information technology services and six city agencies renting offices on Union Avenue Extended into the Donnelley J. Hill office building if the city goes through with a plan to swap the office building with state government in exchange for parking spaces in the Peabody Place garage.

43. City Council Hears Tentative Plans for Office Building -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration would move the Memphis Police Department, information technology services and six city agencies renting offices on Union Avenue Extended into the Donnelley J. Hill office building if the city goes through with a plan to swap the office building with state government in exchange for parking spaces in the Peabody Place garage.

44. Southbrook Mall Concept Goes to Public Hearings -

As city Housing and Community Development Director Robert Lipscomb began talking in the gym of the Whitehaven Community Center last week, he could see the Pepper Tree Apartments on the other side of Graceland Drive.

45. Out With the Old -

A small group of people gathered last week in the front room of a new Southwest Memphis housing development for senior citizens.

The scene marked the ending of one era in public housing and the start of another as the doors opened to the newest facility in the nearly 20-year makeover of public housing.

46. Raleigh Springs Mall Owners Question City’s Plans -

The owners of the Raleigh Springs Mall had been talking with Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration until late last year about the city’s desire to see a revitalized mall possibly with city government offices.

47. Southbrook Mall Plans Simmer -

If the city is going to spend money on a renovation of the Southbrook Mall in Whitehaven, it should be part of a larger plan for Whitehaven and tie in to the aerotropolis concept.

That’s what city Housing and Community Development Director Robert Lipscomb said Tuesday, April 15, as he outlined a $6.5 million plan for turning the mall into a “town center” that includes some city government offices and private retail.

48. Wharton Outlines $596 Million Budget Plan -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. warned Tuesday, April 15, that “half measures” in converting city employees to a defined contributions benefits plan would not restore the city’s financial health and resolve an unfunded pension liability of hundreds of millions of dollars.

49. Tour Shows Work Progressing in Pyramid -

The opening date for Bass Pro Shops at The Pyramid is still tentative.

But it appears to now be in December depending on who you talked with this week as the outdoors retailer offered a look inside The Pyramid.

50. Three Town Center Concepts Take Shape -

The city of Memphis would move government offices into two shopping malls and the Soulsville Town Center under tentative “conceptual” plans Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. took Tuesday, Feb. 18, to the Memphis City Council.

51. Council Tours Pyramid, Weighs City Offices In Two Malls -

Memphis City Council members heard Tuesday, Feb. 18, that the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. wants to move some city government offices into the Soulsville Town Center in South Memphis and is weighing whether to renovate or tear down and build anew on the site of the Southbrook Mall in Whitehaven.

52. City Delays Fairgrounds Zone Application Vote -

The city of Memphis won’t be going to the Tennessee Building Commission in Nashville this week for approval of a Tourism Development Zone for the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

The administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. decided to delay the proposal last week as it reviewed the fairgrounds renovation financing plan with Memphis City Council members.

53. Heritage Trail Financing Plans Change -

The city of Memphis is making changes in its plans to finance two housing developments that are part of the broader Heritage Trail plan for redevelopment of the area south of FedExForum and into South Memphis.

54. City, County Differ on Fairgrounds Zone -

The city of Memphis and Shelby County governments have a difference of opinion about tax revenue and education funding.

It is over where the sales tax revenue would go within a tourism development zone the city wants to use to finance the redevelopment of the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

55. Billingsley Is Newest County Commissioner As "Tax Dead" Program Advances -

Former Germantown alderman Mark Billingsley is the newest Shelby County Commissioner.

On the second ballot Monday, Jan. 13, commissioners appointed Billingsley to fill the vacancy created by the resignation this month of Wyatt Bunker, who became mayor of Lakeland last year.

56. Plans in Works for Dormant Midtown Project -

City officials are working on plans to kick-start the dormant Washington Bottoms project at Poplar Avenue and Cleveland Street in Midtown.

Memphis Housing and Community Development director Robert Lipscomb confirmed that he is working on the effort but said he was not yet able to release detailed information on the project.

57. Debt and Liability -

There is rarely a good answer to the question “How much?” in politics.

With issues including the unfunded pension liability, overall debt, and revenue estimates and their validity, City Hall’s overall money problem begins but hardly ends with the question. It won’t be that simple.

58. Council Opens Unfunded Liability Plan Talks With Questions -

Memphis City Council members again rejected Tuesday, Dec. 17, an increase in the city’s monthly solid waste fee and affirmed a 2.1 percent hike in the Memphis Light Gas and Water Division water rate hike.

59. Bad Blood -

December was already going to be a busy month at City Hall for the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

He would be bringing a plan to provide $15 million in city financing for the $180 million Crosstown revitalization project and rolling out its fix to address the Tennessee Comptroller’s vocal concerns about the city’s unfunded pension liability.

60. Pay Raises, Germantown Schools Deal Top Commission Agenda -

Shelby County Commissioners won’t be voting on anything having to do with the proposed sale of AutoZone Park when they meet Monday, Dec. 16.

The resolution involving their piece of the original terms of financing for the ballpark in 1998 was pulled from the agenda of the last meeting of 2013 at the request of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. last week.

61. Crosstown Effort Shines as Development Example -

Construction documents for the $180 million revitalization of the Crosstown building were scheduled to be finished Friday, Dec. 6, with the project moving toward closing and construction in the next months.

62. Council’s Ire at Wharton Timing Grows -

It is a political constant in life at City Hall for Memphis City Council members to complain that they get critical information much too late in the decision-making process and then are pressured by the mayor to make a decision then and there.

63. Crosstown Funding Mix of Local, State and Federal -

The $15 million in funding Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration put together as the last piece of financing for the Sears Crosstown building redevelopment is not just a combination of state and federal grant money.

64. Football Part of Planning at LeMoyne-Owen -

The new $13.5 million four-story residence hall at LeMoyne-Owen College that formally opened Friday, Oct. 18, is the latest symbol of growth on the campus of the city’s only historically black college since 2006.

65. ‘Handle With Care’ -

Once the settlement of a lawsuit over control of Beale Street is complete, the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. plans on issuing requests for firms to manage and develop the thriving entertainment district.

66. Basar Looks to 2014 County Commission Election -

It may be the first time that a Shelby County Commissioner has given public notice of a barbecue.

Commissioner Steve Basar has held four at his house in the year that he’s been on the elected body. And he told political supporters at a fundraiser last week that he has “sunshined” all of them, a shorthand term to describe the public notice required by Tennessee’s open meetings law – or Sunshine Law – for any deliberative gathering of two or more commissioners.

67. County Leaders Blast Fairgrounds Tourism Development Zone Financing Plan -

Shelby County government leaders say a city plan to use incremental sales tax revenue within a tourism development zone to revitalize the Fairgrounds will take the share of that revenue that goes to Shelby County Schools.

68. Lipscomb: Fairgrounds Retail to be ‘Market Driven’ -

Robert Lipscomb, director of the city of Memphis’ Division of Housing & Community Development, says the retail to be part of the city’s Fairgrounds overhaul will not be in competition with businesses in the nearby Cooper-Young Historic District or Overton Square.

69. City Explores Crucial Crosstown Funding -

City officials are exploring multiple options for financing $15 million in infrastructure improvements at the Sears Crosstown site, key funding that could make or break the ambitious $175 million project.

70. Tax Zone Would Fund Fairgrounds Remake -

A 3-square-mile Tourism Development Zone would finance a $233 million renovation of the Mid-South Fairgrounds sought by the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

The city sent its 88-page application Sept. 13 to Tennessee Finance Commissioner Larry B. Martin. The application seeks state permission to use incremental sales tax revenue estimated at close to $12 million a year starting in 2016 to pay off the bonds to finance a project whose price tag is just below the $250 million FedExForum.

71. Memphis Considers Options for Raleigh Springs Mall -

The city of Memphis is considering acquiring the Raleigh Springs Mall site as part of a civic-driven effort to revive the former retail hub.

“We’re going to explore every option we have, but yes, that is certainly an option,” said City Council member Bill Morrison, whose district includes the area.

72. Adams Property Would Unite Police Functions -

The stars could be aligning for the Memphis Police Department to finally move out of the Shelby County Criminal Justice Center in Downtown.

Cost estimates for the department to renovate the old police headquarters on Adams Avenue have dropped and financing sources that could lighten the city’s cost burden are being explored, two important steps that could finally prompt a move.

73. Multiple Reasons Forced Trail to Lose Funding -

Bureaucratic snafus, a lack of city funds and the transformation of The Pyramid into a Bass Pro Shops store led the city to lose a $316,680 federal grant for a riverfront bike and pedestrian system.

74. Multiple Reasons Forced Trail to Lose Funding -

Bureaucratic snafus, a lack of city funds and the transformation of The Pyramid into a Bass Pro Shops store led the city to lose a $316,680 federal grant for a riverfront bike and pedestrian system.

75. City Council Again Tackles Budget, Tax Rate -

Some Memphis City Council members say they are prepared for a long day Tuesday, June 18, at City Hall as they continue down the arduous path to a tax rate and budget for the coming fiscal year.

“Let’s just be ready to spend the night,” said council member Harold Collins last week. He commented as council-mediated discussions between the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and municipal union leaders on possible cuts in employee benefits got nowhere quickly and ended after less than an hour.

76. City Budget Reset Stalls for Council -

Memphis City Council members looking for a five-year budget plan of some kind last week were told by city Chief Financial Officer Robert Lipscomb that most of the ideas hadn’t been properly vetted yet.

77. Wharton Pitches Options But No Recommendations On Budget Reset -

Memphis City Council members were looking Thursday, May 30, for a new budget plan to get City Hall on new financial footing after a state comptroller’s office report critical of city financial practices.

78. Civic Leader Says City Has ‘Right Stuff’ -

A little less than two years ago, Dr. Robert Ross was up for a standard performance review from the board of the foundation he leads.

79. Aerotropolis Pitch to Council Receives Mixed Reaction -

After years of very general talk about the aerotropolis concept, Memphis City Council members are ready for leaders of the effort to bring it in for a landing in specific terms that work with plans in smaller areas of the district around Memphis International Airport.

80. Crosstown Project Has $15 Million City "Ask" -

Leaders of the Crosstown Development Project are asking the city of Memphis for $15 million toward a $175 million project.

Memphis City Council members got a look Tuesday, March 19, at the “ask” as well as the finances and goals of the project centered on the old 1.5 million square foot Sears Crosstown building.

81. Pilot Program Helps Seniors Maintain Independence -

The MetLife Foundation and Partners for Livable Communities recently selected the Plough Foundation and Memphis to participate in the City Leaders Institute on Aging in Place, a national pilot project striving to help people aged 65 years and older to live independently in their homes.

82. Tax Zone Would Benefit Fairgrounds -

The Tourism Development Zone that Memphis officials will seek in Nashville over the next three months would generate tax revenue from Cooper-Young, the Midtown Union Avenue corridor and Overton Square for the redevelopment of the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

83. City Council Approves Fairgrounds TDZ Request -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, Feb. 19, plans for a tourism development zone to capture sales tax revenue in a large area for a renovation of the Fairgrounds property at first.

The boundaries of the zone go to the state for approval and city Community and Housing Development division director Robert Lipscomb said such a proposal could be at the state building commission in Nashville in April.

84. Reardon Cautions Downtowners About Heritage Trail -

The University of Memphis professor spearheading the opposition of demolishing the city’s last remaining public housing project in the Vance Avenue neighborhood says that while the Heritage Trail Community Redevelopment Plan appears to be on “indefinite hold,” it is not dead, and Downtowners should beware.

85. Complex Agenda -

In the first year of his first full four-year term of office as Memphis mayor, A C Wharton Jr. put his political weight behind shifting priorities at City Hall.

In that year, he attempted to broaden the police department’s anti-crime strategy beyond the Blue CRUSH brand of hot spot crime crackdowns. He moved further in his long-held quest to redefine violence – particularly gun violence – as a public health issue. And Wharton continued to meld private funding with an advancing of public funding from different pockets to move capital construction projects inside and outside of the Downtown core area in a stubborn post-recession environment.

86. Heritage Trail Complexity a Concern -

As 2012 comes to an end, the most ambitious plan from City Hall for the revitalization of an inner-city area in 15 years of such projects has hit a critical stage.

The idea of a tax increment financing zone for a large swath of the area south of FedExForum as well as the Downtown area itself into South Memphis is being examined closely by Shelby County Commissioners before they commit county property tax revenues with the “Heritage Trail” zone.

87. Council to Review $12 Million Stadium ADA Plan -

Memphis City Council members get their first look Tuesday, Dec. 18, at the plan to pay for improvements at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium to settle the city’s negotiations with the U.S. Justice Department over making the stadium comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

88. Agency to Weigh Plan for Heritage Trails in Early 2013 -

The group that will determine whether there is a tax increment financing zone for the city’s Heritage Trails redevelopment plan should begin considering the specifics of the development plan itself starting in mid-January.

89. Opponents of School Closings Raise Concerns -

The first of three of the most politically challenging decisions the countywide school board has to make about the consolidation of public schools probably won’t happen this week.

Instead of taking a first preliminary vote Thursday, Nov. 29, to close 21 schools by the August merger date, Memphis City Schools superintendent Kriner Cash is asking the board to start a set of “impact studies” and schedule public hearings for closing five elementary schools.

90. Reardon Speaks Out Against City’s Approach to Housing -

The University of Memphis professor leading the resistance to a still-forming plan to demolish the city’s last large public housing project says the city’s approach to transforming public housing since the late 1990s hasn’t worked.

91. Soul Map -

The Soulsville arrows beneath the Bellevue Boulevard railroad overpasses near Walker Avenue point north and south. It is the first indication that you are in an area where several possibilities can coexist.

92. LeMoyne-Owen Announces 'Unprecedented' Gift -

Officials of LeMoyne-Owen College will announce Friday, Oct. 18, a new gift to the city’s only historically black college from a revocable trust fund of a 1940 alumni of the school.

Wylodine Taylor Patton of San Francisco established the trust fund in 2001 and granted LeMoyne-Owen College 75 percent of her estate. She died in 2009 and the college received a $500,000 gift from the trust. Since then the estate has sold several properties Patton owned in the San Francisco area.

93. Vance Plan Could Move to Land Use Control Board -

Memphis City Council members recommended Tuesday, Oct. 16, sending a plan to the Land Use Control Board that calls for the revitalization of the Vance Avenue area and leaves the Foote Homes public housing development intact.

94. Foreclosures Continue Rise in Third Quarter -

At a public gathering at Calvary Episcopal Church last week, the city’s Housing and Community Development director Robert Lipscomb lamented the pervasiveness of poverty in Memphis.

95. Council Approves Non Discrimination Ordinance, Adds Resolution -

Memphis City Council members approved on third and final reading an ordinance Tuesday, Oct. 16, that forbids the city from discriminating in hiring, firing or promotion based on sexual orientation or gender identity.

96. City Council to Vote on Discrimination Ordinance -

With a legal opinion from City Attorney Herman Morris in hand, Memphis City Council members on Tuesday, Oct. 16, again take up an ordinance that would ban the city from discriminating in hiring and promotions based on sexual orientation.

97. Council to Vote on Cleaborn Homes -

With a vote Tuesday, Oct. 2, the Memphis City Council will change the name of the old Cleaborn Homes public housing development to Cleaborn Pointe at Heritage Landing and the name of the larger south Downtown-into-South Memphis Triangle Noir plan to Heritage Trails.

98. Difference of Opinion -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration and a group of neighborhood leaders in the Vance Avenue area agree on highlighting the significant history of the area south of FedExForum.

Some kind of trail linking up more than a dozen sights is a feature both groups are planning for the area.

99. Vance Collaborative to Unveil Plan -

When the Vance Avenue Collaborative unveils its five-year, six-project plan Thursday, Sept. 13, for revitalizing the area south of FedExForum there will be some differences from what Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration has been thinking.

100. Funding Approved for Felon Program -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration is retooling the city’s “Second Chance” program for felons just released from prison to become a joint city-county program with funding from the state.