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Editorial Results (free)

1. May County Primary Results Certified -

The closest race in the May Shelby County primary elections turned into a tale of the tape Wednesday, May 21, as the Shelby County Election Commission certified the results of that and all of the other races on the ballot.

2. Methodist University Hospital Names Liebman New CEO -

Jeff Liebman has joined Methodist University Hospital as chief executive officer. In his new role, Liebman said, he will ensure the hospital continues to be a community resource providing the highest possible quality of care to the community while following the guidelines of the Methodist LeBonheur mission.

3. Election Commission Hopeful for School Board Ruling -

John Ryder, an attorney for the Shelby County Election Commission, capped a week of cryptic court filings in the case by quoting a line from “Macbeth” as he made the Election Commission’s point that Judge Samuel “Hardy” Mays should rule soon.

4. Election Commission Urges School Board Ruling -

The Shelby County Election Commission isn’t taking a stand on the Shelby County Commission’s plan to convert the Shelby County Schools board to a nine-member body.

But the commission will file a brief urging U.S. District Judge Samuel “Hardy” Mays to rule soon on the plan.

5. May County Primary Ballot Set -

The ballot for the May Shelby County primary elections was completed Wednesday, March 5, as the Shelby County Election Commission disqualified a County Commission candidate whose attorney argued that she intended to but never did live in the district she hoped to represent.

6. Election Commission Hears Ballot Challenges -

Shelby County Election Commissioners could complete the ballot for the May Shelby County primary elections Wednesday, March 5, by deciding on challenges to the residency of three candidates in the Democratic primaries.

7. Election Commission Urges School Board Ruling -

The Shelby County Election Commission isn’t taking a stand on the Shelby County Commission’s plan to convert the Shelby County Schools board to a nine-member body.

But the commission will file a brief urging U.S. District Judge Samuel “Hardy” Mays to rule soon on the plan.

8. Election Commission Approves All But Three Names For May Primaries -

Shelby County Election Commissioners certified all but three names Thursday, Feb. 27, for the May county primary ballot and will meet March 5 to consider challenges to the residency of candidates Edith Ann Moore, M. Latroy Williams and E. Jefferson Jones.

9. Contested Judicial Elections Spark Debate -

Memphis attorneys John Ryder and Gary Smith both think it is a bad idea to have contested elections for state appeals court judges.

10. Basar Looks to 2014 County Commission Election -

It may be the first time that a Shelby County Commissioner has given public notice of a barbecue.

Commissioner Steve Basar has held four at his house in the year that he’s been on the elected body. And he told political supporters at a fundraiser last week that he has “sunshined” all of them, a shorthand term to describe the public notice required by Tennessee’s open meetings law – or Sunshine Law – for any deliberative gathering of two or more commissioners.

11. Three-Month Period Sees Spate of County Elections -

Some of the early voting periods and election days will overlap in the set of 11 elections – special and regularly scheduled – in Shelby County this year.

Those elections would take place in less than a three-month period.

12. Armstrong Hears Whalum-Woods Election Dispute -

On his way this week to hearing and later deciding the case of a disputed election for a countywide school board seat, Chancellor Kenny Armstrong got a feel for the complexities voters faced in the 2012 election and beyond.

13. Mays Ponders Changes in Merger Terms -

U.S. District Judge Samuel “Hardy” Mays is considering whether he should change the terms of the 2011 consent decree that so far has governed the path to consolidation of Shelby County’s two public school systems.

14. Schools Merger Saga Faces Busy Day -

Countywide school board members will discuss and vote Tuesday, April 30, on starting the process of closing 11 more schools, one agenda item during what promises to be a busy day in the schools consolidation saga.

15. Special Elections Take Shape in Suburbs -

It looks like 2013 will be an election year in the six suburban towns and cities in Shelby County.

But Memphis may not join the forming set of special elections until very late in the year if at all, according to one estimate by the Shelby County Election Commission.

16. Hopson Eliminates All But One Executive Director's Position -

The still forming central office of the consolidated school sytem will include only one executive director -- the executive director of safety and security.

Interim schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson has reposted central office positions following his decision last week to eliminate all of one of the executive director positions from the city and county school systems in the front office of the new school system to come.

17. Ryder Up to Challenge as Counsel for RNC -

John Ryder of Harris Shelton Hanover Walsh PLLC was recently appointed general counsel of the Republican National Committee.

18. Memphis Attorney Ryder Named Republican National Committee Counsel -

Memphis attorney and veteran Republican National Committeeman John Ryder is the new general counsel to the Republican National Committee.

19. Memphis Attorney Named Republican National Committee Counsel -

Memphis attorney and veteran Republican National Committeeman John Ryder is the new general counsel to the Republican National Committee.

20. Election Certified Amid Continued Complaints -

Shelby County Election Commissioners certified the results Monday, Nov. 26, of the Nov. 6 election.

But they offered different verdicts on how the election was conducted.

“Overall we had a good election,” said commissioner Dee Nollner.

21. Election Commission Certifies Nov. 6 Vote Results -

Shelby County Election Commissioners certified the results Monday, Nov. 26, of the Nov. 6 election.

The certification sets in motion the swearing-in of members of the six suburban municipal school boards. And the boards, one for each of the suburban towns and cities in Shelby County, are expected to move quickly on a process for selecting superintendents for each school system by the end of the year.

22. ‘Behind the Headlines’ Explores Fixes for County’s Election Woes -

Some early voters in Shelby County are snapping pictures of their completed ballots with their phones to verify their votes. Other voters are delaying their trip to the polls because they anticipate problems in the opening days of the voting period that ends Nov. 1.

23. Dispute Arises Over School Board Race -

The Shelby County Election Commission has identified 837 disputed votes in the Aug. 2 election for the District 4 countywide school board seat.

The information disclosed last week as part of a legal challenge of the results in the district race prompted a delay of a trial in the case before Chancellor Kenny Armstrong until some time after the Nov. 6 elections.

24. Ramsey Aide Recommended for GOP Convention Role -

NASHVILLE (AP) – State Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey's top aide has been recommended for an official role at next week's Republican National Convention.

25. Despite Ruling Schools Case Far From Over -

The day after U.S. District Court Judge Hardy Mays ruled the suburban municipal schools referendums will go ahead as planned, most of the 20 attorneys in his courtroom for the ruling were back before him.

26. Grisham Joins Growing Jackson Lewis Office -

When Greg Grisham joined the Memphis office of workplace law firm Jackson Lewis LLP as a partner a few weeks ago, it marked the fourth new attorney arrival in the firm’s Memphis office since December.

27. Muni School District Votes on Hold -

At week’s end, the move to municipal school districts had slowed for a possible pit stop in Shelby County Chancery Court.

And efforts in the Tennessee Legislature to check a possible legal challenge of the state law that allows the suburban school districts specifically in Shelby County encountered some vocal non-Memphis resistance in the House Education Subcommittee.

28. Election Commission Says No To Municipal Schools Referenda -

The Shelby County Election Commission says requests to put referenda on the ballot May 10 to create municipal school districts are “procedurally defective.”

The unanimous voice vote by the commission Wednesday, March 21, sets the stage for a possible legal challenge of the decision by suburban leaders in Chancery Court.

29. School Board Petitions Held Up by District Squabble -

After they went after each other in a big way last week, Shelby County Commission members had a private attorney-client meeting with their attorneys in the federal schools consolidation lawsuit of 2011.

30. Wacky Rules Complicate Race for GOP Delegates -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Look out for some wacky results in the race for delegates in the Republican presidential primaries and caucuses. There might even be a state or two where the second-place candidate gets the most delegates, starting with Tuesday's caucuses in Iowa.

31. Jeter Joins Accounting Firm Cannon Wright Blount -

Andrew Jeter has joined Cannon Wright Blount as director of assurance and accounting services.

32. Tenn. GOP Panel Rejects Call for Closed Primaries -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The executive committee of the state Republican Party on Saturday voted down a proposal to require party registration to vote in Tennessee primaries.

The policy panel rejected the proposal sponsored by committee member Mark Winslow, a former executive director of the state GOP, on a voice vote.

33. GOP Panel to Weigh Tenn. Party Registration Plan -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The executive committee of the state Republican Party is expected to consider a proposal Saturday to require party registration to vote in Tennessee primaries.

Committee member Mark Winslow, a former executive director of the state party, said the proposal already has the support of 12 of the committee's 66 members.

34. Shelby County Court Filings See Sharp Dropoff From Q2 -

Court filings in Circuit, Chancery and Probate Courts for the third quarter of 2010 were relatively unchanged from the same quarter of 2009 and down significantly from the second quarter of this year

35. Goldin Dismisses Election Challenge Suit -

Shelby County Election Commission chairman Bill Giannini said he learned some things from the Chancery Court lawsuit challenging the results of the Aug. 5 election.

36. Beale Street Chaos -

Four months after Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. announced the city was settling a Chancery Court fight over control of Beale Street with Performa Entertainment Real Estate Inc., Performa is in control of the daily business of the entertainment district.

37. Added Protection -

Shelby County Commissioners wade into the continuing controversy over the Aug. 5 election results Monday with a resolution to change the standards for protection of whistle-blowers.

The County Commission meeting at the Vasco Smith County Administration Building, 160 N. Main St., begins at 1:30 p.m. An agenda is on page 10.

38. Ground Zero on Beale Closes -

Ground Zero Blues Club on Beale Street has closed and faces an uncertain future.

The club is apparently the victim of a civil court battle over past due rent and ownership of the recently opened club in the building on the northeast corner of Beale and Hernando that was once Pat O’Brien’s.

39. Challengers Move Closer to Election Hearing -

All sides in the legal dispute over the Aug. 5 election results will meet with Chancellor Arnold Goldin Friday to begin wading through a series of motions and ultimately a hearing on the dispute.

Ten candidates who lost in the Aug. 5 county general elections filed two lawsuits – one before the election results were certified and the other after they were certified. Both are before Goldin and are likely to be combined, a decision that is up to Goldin.

40. County Commission Settles in for Partisan Tenure -

The new Shelby County Commission will settle down a bit as more time passes. But the 13-member body with six new members will probably remain more partisan than its predecessors of the last four years.

41. County Commission Off To Partisan, Lively Start -

Shelby County Commissioners found plenty to debate during their first meeting as a body since six new commissioners took office Sept. 1.

Monday’s session saw the election of Democrat Sidney Chism as the chairman of the 13 member body for the next year.

42. GOP Urged Not to Overreach on Redistricting Plans -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Republicans were cautioned not to overreach on redistricting plans should they gain more solid control of the state Legislature in this year’s elections.

Memphis attorney John Ryder, chairman of the Republican National Committee’s redistricting committee, said Tuesday that straying from a fair redistricting plan could have both political and legal consequences.

43. Election Results Saga Not Over Yet -

The Aug. 5 election results are certified. But the events of the coming week will determine whether that’s the final word on who won and who lost.

With the results approved by the Shelby County Election Commission, the local Democratic Party and several Democratic candidates who lost must decide if they want to go back to Chancery Court. They have five days to make a decision to file.

44. Charter Commission Dissolves, Awaits Election Day -

The Metro Charter Commission goes out of business Wednesday.

Copies of the 49-page consolidation charter drafted by the group were delivered Tuesday as required by state law to the proper government clerks of Memphis, Shelby County and the six suburban municipalities.

45. Last-Minute Legal Opinion Changes Big Charter Provision -

The Metro Charter Commission has approved a consolidation charter for voters on the Nov. 2 ballot, but the last day of work on the charter was anything but ceremonial. A last-minute legal opinion caused a rewrite of a major provision.

46. Last-Minute Legal Opinion Affects Big Provision of Proposed Charter -

The Metro Charter Commission has approved a consolidation charter for voters on the Nov. 2 ballot, but the last day of work on the charter was anything but ceremonial. A last-minute legal opinion caused a rewrite of a major provision.

47. Controversy Remains Around City, Performa Settlement -

Memphis City Council members critical of the Beale Street court settlement say the Wharton administration was too generous after the city publicly alleged Performa Entertainment founder John Elkington owed the city millions of dollars.

48. Performa Files Bankruptcy After Settlement -

The same day a settlement was announced between the city of Memphis and Performa Entertainment, Performa filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy reorganization, according to The Daily News Online (www.memphisdailynews.com).

49. City and Performa Settle Beale Street Lawsuit -

The city of Memphis and Performa, the company that developed and manages Beale Street, have reached an out of court settlement of an 11 year old lawsuit over the cash flow from the entertainment district.

The settlement’s bottom line is a long talked about exit for Performa and the company's CEO John Elkington, the developer and manager of the district since in opened in October 1983.

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. announced the settlement Monday afternoon, the day before the matter is scheduled to go to trial before Special Chancellor Don Harris.

There was still no settlement as of late Monday afternoon with Beale Street Development Corporation, the third party in the lawsuit and the middleman between the city, which owns Beale Street, and Performa, which runs and developed Beale Street under a 52 year contract starting in 1982.

Performa is no longer the manager-developer of the district once its settlement with the city is signed which is expected to happen this week.

Elkington told The Daily News he is preparing for a 90 day wrap up of Performa's involvement. "If it takes 30 days -- fine," he added.

Wharton told reporters no money will be exchanged between Performa and the city of Memphis as part of the settlement.

But $420,000 in legal bills Elkington has from the dispute will be paid by the Beale Street Merchants Association in the form of rent credits the city will give to businesses on the street, according to Elkington.

Performa will also get any commissions due under the contract for collecting rent from the businesses on the street and common area maintenance (CAM) fees. 

The day to day finances of the street are already being handled by attorney John Ryder, a receiver appointed by Harris last year.

Wharton will appoint a group this week to advise his administration on ideas for future management of the district. Wharton said there would be “no limits” on the ideas and that the goal is a “business model that can be sustained.”

That could include a new management firm. Elkington had talked about letting business owners renting on the street buy their properties. Wharton said he was hesitant to be specific about options the group might present.

That included talks between the city and The Cordish Companies of Baltimore about a plan to run the district during Willie Herenton’s tenure as mayor. The effort was referred to in emails Performa’s attorneys got from the city during the discovery process of the lawsuit.

Whatever future direction the city might chart for the district, leases the businesses have would remain in effect until they expire or unless there is a willingness on all sides to talk new terms.

Because of the leases any new plan for managing the district is unlikely to have an immediate effect on the street as tourists and Memphians experience it on a daily and nightly basis.

The district is 98 percent leased with 38 businesses and offices by Elkington's count.

"No one can say it's not successful as I leave," he told The Daily News. "We've done the best we could. We got it done."

Wharton said the city owes Elkington "a debt of gratitude" despite the hard feelings on both sides from the last years of the legal dispute.

"Pioneers always get bloodied," Wharton said of Elkington.

...

50. Charter Commission to Examine Metro Mayoral Powers -

The Metro Charter Commission will take a second look at a civil service system for a proposed consolidated government Thursday.

The group drafting a proposed consolidation charter for the November ballot will also discuss what powers a metro mayor should have.

51. Rum Boogie At Heart of Beale’s Growth, Future -

The oldest bar and restaurant on Beale Street marks its 25th anniversary in June with more of the same – live music.

The stage at Rum Boogie Café has featured live music seven nights a week since it opened on the northwestern corner of Third and Beale streets in 1985.

52. Beale Street Settlement Preferable, Wharton Says -

For the third time in a year a Memphis mayor has said settling the legal dispute over Beale Street’s cash flow is a priority.

But there are still signs the dispute won’t be settled easily.

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. told the Memphis Rotary Club last week that he wants the Shelby County Chancery Court lawsuit settled this year.

53. Is 9th District Really Black? Maybe, Expert Says -  

One of the most hotly contested issues of the Democratic congressional primary race between Willie Herenton and Steve Cohen may be why the district lines are drawn the way they are.

The 9th Congressional District has been predominantly in Memphis for decades. In recent years it has grown to take in small parts of the suburbs. The lines could change again after the 2010 Census, when the Tennessee Legislature begins its usual reapportioning process.

Herenton and his supporters have repeatedly said the district’s borders were drawn to enhance the possibility of black representation in a congressional delegation that’s all white.

“I want you ... to help us to retrieve for our children what we lost in representation,” Herenton told a predominantly black crowd of 300 people Saturday at an East Memphis campaign rally.

To make the point even plainer, Herenton quoted radio talk show host and political blogger Thaddeus Matthews.

“Think about that. White folks, y’all got all 11. We just want one,” Herenton said to cheers from the crowd.

The legal concept and practice of drawing districts that reflect a majority black population, however, is not that simple. It’s rooted in the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Section II of the act requires that, in certain circumstances, districts be drawn to “give effect to the political preferences of the minority population.”

“This is actually a fairly technical area and it’s been the subject of a lot of litigation over the years, trying to interpret how Section II applies,” said attorney John Ryder.

Ryder is a Republican National Committeeman and chairman of the RNC’s redistricting committee. He is also the most experienced attorney locally of either party in the law and political effect of drawing district boundaries.

The clearest guideline for the creation of such a district is the 1986 Gingles case from North Carolina, which established three criteria or preconditions to create such a district:

  • The minority population must be compact and contiguous.
  • The minority population usually votes as a bloc.
  • The white population usually votes as a bloc in such a way as to defeat the minority population’s candidate of choice.

Tennessee meets the first condition, Ryder said.

“The problem with the second two … conditions is that it’s hard to argue that the white majority votes in such a way as to defeat the preferred candidate of the minority population’s choice when we’ve elected Barack Obama as president,” he said, adding the 2006 U.S. Senate race in Tennessee in which Harold Ford Jr. got 49 percent of the vote in a statewide race won by Bob Corker.

“You just don’t see the kind of racial bloc voting that existed in 1965 when the Voting Rights Act was originally passed,” Ryder said.

The first black political leader to claim what is now the 9th District seat did so in the 1974 midterm congressional elections, in a district drawn with no overt racial considerations.

Harold Ford Sr. was a Democratic state representative at the time, seeking to unseat Dan Kuykendall, the white Republican congressman from Memphis in what was then the 8th Congressional District.

After the 1970 census, the majority Democrat Tennessee Legislature redrew congressional district lines to cede to Republicans seats in the majority GOP eastern end of the state, Ryder said. They also moved to create more Democratic districts in West Tennessee by splitting the Republicans outside Memphis between the 8th and 7th districts.

“As a result in 1972, those seats elected Republicans,” Ryder said. “They got a little too clever and overreached. What was then the 8th district was drawn to be a Democrat district, not necessarily a black district.”

Ford upset Kuykendall in the year of Watergate, when Republican incumbents were imperiled by the scandal and the tarnished presidency of Richard Nixon. Kuykendall also underestimated Ford, who held the seat for 22 years. His son, Harold Ford Jr., continued for another 10 years.

By then, black voters were considered the majority of registered voters in Memphis. The official numbers from the Shelby County Election Commission by themselves are less conclusive.

Voter registration statistics as of Jan. 31 show there are 412,433 voters in the city of Memphis. Of that number, 183,443 are black and 96,686 are white. Another 132,304 are listed as “other,” meaning they are of another racial group or did not indicate their race on voter registration forms.

The 2000 U.S Census puts the city’s population at 670,902 with 61.4 percent black and 34.4 percent white. Of the total population counted, 27.9 percent were younger than 18.

Ryder said the central question that was already present when Cohen was elected in 2006 and re-elected in 2008 is who is the preferred candidate of the black population.

“Steve Cohen has obviously been successful in obtaining votes from the black population. I think he can make a legitimate claim to be the preferred candidate of choice,” Ryder added. “What it means is the Voting Rights Act certainly led to the creation of a majority black district, and that means that the black population in the 9th District has the opportunity to elect its preferred candidate of choice. In our political system, all players are free to compete to become that preferred candidate.”

Herenton and those putting together his campaign strategy point out that Cohen won the Democratic primary the first time in a large field with numerous black contenders. In 2008, Nikki Tinker returned from that pack for a second try in a smaller field of four challengers. Cohen won easily and Tinker later expressed regret over a controversial campaign strategy that stressed race.

The message to black voters from Herenton’s camp is a tacit admission that Cohen was elected with black votes.

“It’s the only place in Tennessee that you can elect somebody that looks like you,” Shelby County Commissioner Sidney Chism said at Saturday’s rally. “We’ve got to clean up what we messed up. … You should want the same, and if you don’t, something’s wrong.”

...

54. Consolidation Task Forces Begin Work -

The Metro Charter Commission will begin a series of task force meetings this week on the various issues a proposed consolidation charter should address.

The task forces, which are smaller groups of commissioners working with citizens not on the commission, will submit ideas to the full body for its consideration.

55. Harris Shelton Attorneys Honored in SuperLawyers -

Five attorneys from Harris Shelton Hanover Walsh PLLC have been selected for inclusion in the 2009 edition of Mid-South SuperLawyers, and four attorneys have been named Rising Stars.

56. Charter Commission Prepares for Nine-Month Mission -

The 15 members of the Metro Charter Commission will need some time to get organized before they wade into the details of what a consolidated local government should look like.

The group met for the first time Tuesday in the “historic courtroom” of the Shelby County Courthouse, a third-floor courtroom restored to its original early 20th-century appearance including a rubber-tiled floor.

57. Three Memphis Firms Honored In 2010 Best Lawyers -

Three Memphis law firms have attorneys who have been honored in the 2010 edition of The Best Lawyers in America.

Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart PC had four attorneys from its Memphis office honored: Donna K. Fisher, Thomas L. Henderson, Charles V. Holmes and Frederick J. Lewis were named to the list as top lawyers in labor and employment law. All four previously have been recognized by Best Lawyers.

58. Why the Struggle to Control Beale Street Continues -

Eight blocks lie between the Shelby County Courthouse and Beale Street.

The courthouse’s seated representations of wisdom, justice, liberty and authority look southward toward the entertainment district. Sometimes, if the wind is blowing in the right direction, you can hear the band in Handy Park from the courthouse steps.

59. Receiver Tapped To Oversee Beale Street Saga -

The new receiver for the Beale Street Entertainment District will oversee an entity with shifting alliances, more than two sides to every story and thousands of pages of records involving hundreds of thousands of dollars.

60. Ryder Is Beale Street Receiver -  

Attorney John Ryder has been appointed receiver for the Beale Street entertainment district.

Special Chancellor Don Harris appointed Ryder at the end of a day long hearing Wednesday on multiple motions in a lawsuit in which the city of Memphis is seeking access to records from Performa Entertainment, the manager of the district. The city is performing a forensic audit. In two other Beale Street lawsuits, Performa and the Beale Street Merchants Association claim the audit is a front to wrest control of the district from Performa.

The appointment of the receiver was moved by John Candy, attorney for the Beale Street Development Corporation, another party in the lawsuit and the middleman between the city of Memphis, which owns the district, and Performa, which manages the district.

Performa will continue to manage the street, but Ryder will pay the company its monthly 10.5 percent management fee as well as other percentages that are part of its contract. He will also make payroll for Performa employees working in the district. Harris specified that Performa employees in other cities or on other properties could not be paid with the rent collected from tenants.Performa will not be reimbursed for any prior expenses until they are reviewed by the court through the receiver. Any expenses effective with the court order appointing Ryder will be paid by Ryder. There will be no additional fees which is one of numerous issues in dispute in the lawsuit.

“Several months ago, I said I was dedicated to full discovery,” Harris, of Franklin, Tennessee said just before setting the terms for the receivership. Months later, not all of the documents had been turned over according to attorney for the city and the BSDC – a point Performa disputes.

“This is one of the things that concerns me most,” Harris said. “I have an obligation to protect not only the parties in the case, but the taxpayers of Memphis.”

Revenue beyond fees and expenses is supposed to go to the city through the BSDC.

Earlier in the hearing, Harris also granted a motion to bar Performa from paying its attorneys in the case with money earned through the contract it has with the BSDC to manage the district. The motion specifically bars Performa from expensing the legal fees against the gross rental income it gets from the district’s tenant.

“We do not intend to hobble the defense,” said Michael Fletcher, an attorney for the city. “We just do not believe we should finance the defense.”

Performa CEO John Elkington conferred with his attorney, Richard Carter, after Harris set out the terms for the receivership. Elkington attempted to address the court, but was denied by Harris.

“He’s had an opportunity,” Harris said. “He’s drug it out.”

Later, Elkington told The Daily News he welcomed the appointment of Ryder.

“We’re happy,” he said. “It will add some sanity to this situation. All we’ve done is made (Beale Street) a very successful place.”

Read more in Friday’s edition of The Daily News.

...

61. Receiver Appointed For Beale Street District -

Attorney John Ryder has been appointed receiver for the Beale Street entertainment district.

Special Chancellor Don Harris appointed Ryder at the end of a day long hearing on multiple motions in a lawsuit in which the city of Memphis is seeking access to records from Performa Entertainment, the manager of the district. The city is performing a forensic audit. In two other Beale Street lawsuits, Performa and the Beale Street Merchants Association claim the audit is a front to wrest control of the district from Performa.

62. Influence 1 Foundation Names Hartsfield COO -

Felicia Hartsfield has been named chief operating officer of Influence 1 Foundation.

Hartsfield will oversee the continued stability and growth of the foundation’s fiscal, strategic, organizational and operational functions. Her duties also will include building and maintaining relationships with community leaders, as well as creating collaborations, which will enhance the foundation’s strategic model.

63. Events -

The Engineers’ Club of Memphis Inc. will hold its weekly meeting and lunch today at 11:30 a.m. at the Holiday Inn–University of Memphis, 3700 Central Ave. Leighann Gipson, biologist for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Memphis District, will present “The Lower Mississippi River Resource Assessment.” Cost is $14. No reservations are required.

64. Events -

Amodeo Chiropractic Clinic will hold a vendor fair Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 161 U.S. 72 East in Collierville. Refreshments will be served and door prizes awarded. For more information, call 853-8270.

65. Events -

The Memphis Regional Chamber will hold its annual chairman’s luncheon today from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the Grand Ballroom of The Peabody hotel, 149 Union Ave. Tom Schmitt, chairman of the Memphis Regional Chamber and president and CEO of FedEx Global Supply Chain, will be the keynote speaker. Special features will include speaker University of Memphis basketball coach John Calipari, a tribute to Isaac Hayes and live musical performances. Cost is $125 for members and $150 for prospective members. For reservations, contact Tunga Lee at 543-3571 or tlee@memphischamber.com.

66. UT Medical Group Names Martin VP of Corporate Compliance -

Linda Martin has joined UT Medical Group Inc. as vice president of corporate compliance.

67. Towne Center Tenant Files Bankruptcy -

As the economy tightened and credit dried up over the past several weeks, a South Memphis grocery store owner who is planning to open a new location in the mixed-use Towne Center at Soulsville hit a rough patch.

68. Rock Star vs. Maverick -

Newsweek magazine senior editor and columnist Jonathan Alter came to Memphis in November 2006 to plug his new book on the presidency of Franklin D. Roosevelt, “The Defining Moment: FDR’s Hundred Days and the Triumph of Hope.”

69. Early Voting Numbers 'Relatively' Robust -

Early voter turnout in Shelby County spiked in the final days of the voting period.

As a result, election officials expected the turnout in advance of Tuesday's Tennessee presidential primaries to be around 20,000 to 25,000 of the more than 611,000 registered voters in Shelby County. That would be twice as many as the 11,313 early voters in the 2004 primaries.

70. Delaware Plan Could Reorder Presidential Primary Race -

Memphis attorney John Ryder saw lots of rain during a trip to Maui earlier this month. Despite the rainy weather in Hawaii, Ryder told legislative and political leaders from several Western states that he sees clear skies ahead for a reordering of the presidential primary process starting in 2012.

71. Frey Named Alpha Eta Society National President -

Dr. William R. Frey recently was selected as the national president of the Alpha Eta Society, the largest scholastic honor for allied health professionals. The organization has more than 60 chapters throughout the U.S.

72. Herman Morris Campaign Receives Prominent Backing -

The first major endorsement in Memphis' mayoral race by a former or current area mayor is the product of a relationship that stretches back to the 1980s.

At the time, Shelby County's then-mayor Bill Morris had found himself interacting frequently with the chairman of an ad hoc commission that was recommending the county establish a home rule charter. Under that new form of government, the county would have the power to adopt its own ordinances without approval from the state legislature.

73. Play It Again, Uncle Sam -

A high-profile visitor next week will bring further proof that several economic trend lines are threatening to choke off lush opportunities that otherwise might blossom for some Memphians.

Former North Carolina Sen. John Edwards, who's in the running for the 2008 Democratic presidential nomination, will take a break from his main campaign beginning Sunday for a 12-city road trip. His "Road to One America Tour" attempts to focus more attention on Americans living in poverty.

74. Back in the Ring -

This morning, Memphis mayor Willie Herenton, accompanied by supporters, is expected to stride up to the glass window in the office of the Shelby County Election Commission and do something he's long promised.

75. Morris Field Director Seizes Opportunity With Clinton Camp -

For years, she'd courted local votes for candidates running for everything from the Shelby County Commission to Memphis mayor to the U.S. House of Representatives. Then, opportunity knocked - loudly.

76. Romney Leads the Pack With Local Campaign Contributions -

Memphis-area supporters of Mitt Romney, the deep-pocketed Republican businessman from Massachusetts sometimes described as that state's "CEO Governor," write the biggest checks.

Local campaign contributors attracted to Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., are more numerous. Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani has a small coterie of Memphis campaign donors who nonetheless dig deep into their wallets for him.

77. Presidential Hopeful McCain to Speak In Memphis -

When Republican presidential candidate John McCain addresses the Economic Club of Memphis next week, he'll bring to Memphis a campaign that already boasts several connections to the city.

For one thing, McCain - the Arizona senator who's one of a handful of contenders for the GOP's 2008 nomination - has enjoyed a long friendship with FedEx founder and CEO Frederick W. Smith. McCain's presidential exploratory committee was co-chaired by none other than Smith, a Vietnam veteran like McCain.

78. Herman Morris 'Going to the Mattresses' In Mayoral Race -

Anyone who has seen "The Godfather" probably knows what it means when a person is said to be "going to the mattresses."

The phrase is a throwback to the era of organized crime, when one crime family went to war against another and, for the duration of the conflict, stayed tucked away in sparsely furnished hideouts. Mattresses were spread out on the floor so they could sleep.

79. Ryder Puts Years of Know-How Into Bankruptcy and Commercial Litigation -

Attorney John L. Ryder is a member of the well-known Memphis law firm of Harris Shelton Hanover Walsh PLLC. The firm formed in 2000 as the result of a merger between two longtime Memphis law firms: Harris, Shelton, Dunlap, Cobb & Ryder PLLC and Hanover, Walsh, Jalenak & Blair PLLC.

80. 'Too Close to Call' -

Like a pair of prize fighters, the two men battling to become Tennessee's next U.S. senator have landed and taken their blows mainly by deploying campaign ads that now are being talked about around the world.

81. Gerard Appointed Administrator at Methodist Cancer Center -

Dr. Dava F. Gerard has been appointed administrator for the Methodist Healthcare Cancer Center. She previously was the founding vice president and chief operating officer of the Nevada Cancer Institute in Las Vegas.

82. Big Names, High Stakes: Political wheels spin faster in Ford/Corker race -

It was 2002, and the now-infamous political ad that ran during the midterm elections that year targeted incumbent senator Max Cleland.

A voiceover rebuked Cleland, D-Georgia, and his image was shown along with photos of Osama bin Laden and Saddam Hussein. The photos generated cries of protest because Cleland is a decorated military veteran who lost three limbs in Vietnam.

83. Peabody Hotel Does Booming Trade -

This weekend, The Peabody Hotel is hosting a star-studded political conference the Memphis Convention and Visitors Bureau expects will have a nearly $1 million economic impact on the city.

But something much more significant is expected to come out of the grand old party the South's Grand Hotel is hosting through Sunday for a crowd of Republican celebrities.

84. Marketing Agency Hires New Art Director -

Lyle Wardlaw has joined full-service advertising, marketing, design and public relations firm inferno as art director. Prior to that she spent three years providing design support for clients at Imre Communications and Babcock Advertising in the Washington, D.C., area. She graduated from Millsaps College in 1996 with a double major in studio art and elementary education, and has completed advertising and graphics programs from Memphis College of Art and Southwest Community College. In her position as art director, Wardlaw will serve clients and help with new creative projects.

85. Memphis Film Industry Grows as Economic Force -

If Linn Sitler could write a sequel to the blockbuster growth of the film industry in Memphis, it might sound like this.

Director Craig Brewer, whose film "Hustle & Flow" got its red-carpet premiere in Memphis last week, would return to the Bluff City to shoot his next picture, "Black Snake Moan." He would be undaunted by the lure of film-friendly states like Georgia and Louisiana, even though they offer a slew of tax credits to movie production companies that Tennessee doesn't.

86. Archived Article: Newsmakers - Flintco Companies Names New Senior Vice President

Flintco Names New Senior Vice President

Kevin Moyes was appointed senior vice president of The Flintco Cos. Inc. Moyes has worked with Flintco for 18 years. He earned a bachelors degree from Ok...

87. Archived Article: Events - The Shelby County Sheriffs Office is taking applications for a citizen academy to be offered later this month

The Shelby County Sheriffs Office is taking applications for a citizens academy to be offered later this month. Attendees will participa...

88. Archived Article: Events - The Society for Human Resources Management holds a meeting from 11:30 a

The Society for Human Resources Management meets from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. today at the Racquet Club of Memphis, 5111 Sanderlin Ave. Guest speaker Linda Carter, FedEx Express...

89. Archived Article: Newsmakers - (ephotos of both) Dr

Campbell Clinic Doctors Named to State Board Dr. Robert Miller and Dr. William C. Warner Jr., both of Campbell Clinic, were named to the board of the Tennessee Orthopaedic Society at the groups recent annual meeting. Miller w...

90. Archived Article: Events - The Association of Fundraising Professionals holds a luncheon from 11:30

The Association of Fundraising Professionals hosts a luncheon from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. today in the Thomas Center East Lounge at Christian Brothers University. Speakers are...

91. Archived Article: Law Focus - Consolidation whats past is prologue Consolidation whats past is prologue JOHN L. RYDER Special to The Daily News Consolidation is an idea whose time has come and gone. The word "consolidation" has a nice ring to it. It conjures up an imag...

92. Archived Article: Memos - John R John R. Borden was named chief operating officer for Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare-Jackson Hospital. Borden had the same position until 1998, when he was named administrator of Methodist Healthcare-McNairy Hospital in Selmer, Tenn. He will ...

93. Archived Article: Calendar - Calendar of events: June 5 11 Calendar of events: March 26-April 1 March 26 The Federalist Society Memphis Lawyers Chapter is hosting a book signing with University of Mississippi School of Law professor Ronald J. Rychlak. He will discuss his latest...

94. Archived Article: Comm Briefs - Crossroads, 25 Carroll Cloar drawings that have not been exhibited before will be displayed in the Christian Brothers Univer "Crossroads," 25 Carroll Cloar drawings that have not been exhibited before will be displayed in the Christian Bro...

95. Archived Article: Memos - David C David C. Bradford joined Askew Hargraves Harcourt & Associates Inc. as a mechanical project engineer. He holds bachelors and masters degrees from Mississippi State University. Christopher M. Kolehmainen has joined Archer/Malmo as chief f...

96. Archived Article: Law Briefs - Seven attorneys from the Memphis-based law firm Harris, Shelton, Dunlap, Cobb & Ryder were included in the ninth edition of T Seven attorneys from the Memphis-based law firm Harris, Shelton, Dunlap, Cobb & Ryder were included in the ninth ed...

97. Archived Article: Memos - Flynn Named Vice President of Ruth Ann Marshall has been appointed North American Region president for MasterCard International. Marshall formerly was executive vice president at Concord EFS Inc. Stephen J. Flynn has been named vice president of res...

98. Archived Article: Calendar - April 12 April 12 Shelby County Republican Women will meet at 10:45 a.m. at the Adams Mark Hotel. The speaker will be John Ryder, a National Republican Committee member for Tennessee. For more information, call 756-5808. The Quality Center will spon...

99. Archived Article: Calendar - April 6 April 6 Buckeye Toastmasters will meet at 7:15 p.m. at Germantown United Methodist Church, 2331 S. Germantown Road. For more information, call Gloria Morrow at 753-8604. Consumer Credit Counseling Service will offer a free seminar on re-esta...

100. Archived Article: Calendar - March 30 March 30 Buckeye Toastmasters will meet at 7:15 p.m. at Germantown United Methodist Church, 2331 S. Germantown Road. For more information, call 753-8604. April 9 The Quality Center will offer an ISO 9000 implementation overview. The cost is...