» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'John Long' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:6
Shelby Public Records:196
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:112
Middle Tennessee:607
East Tennessee:233
Other:12

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Mike Shildt: From College Walk-On To Memphis Redbirds Manager -

Any professional baseball player can tell you about the stigmas he has to fight. For one guy, it might be that he doesn’t hit with enough power. And for another it might be that he doesn’t make consistent enough contact.

2. Brooks Plea Coda to Political Whirlwind -

It could have gone either way for Henri Brooks at just about this time a year ago. The Shelby County Commissioner had plans to continue a nearly 20-year political arc beyond a political track record that included seven terms in the state House and the two-term limit on the Shelby County Commission.

3. Memphis in May Unveils Music Festival Lineup -

Memphis in May International Festival has unveiled the lineup for the Beale Street Music Festival that will unfold over three days in May at Tom Lee Park. The event is expected to bring a crowd of more than 100,000.

4. New Brewery Venture Eyeing Crosstown -

When they launched a Facebook page at the end of January, the first post for which was simply the logo for the craft beer brewery they’re planning, Will Goodwin and Clark Ortkiese didn’t expect the flood of interest their concept would generate.

5. Car Built With 3-D Printer Stirs Industry -

At the recent North American International Auto Show in Detroit, innovative carmaker Local Motors offered an up close look at the future of automobile manufacturing.

In a microfactory set up on the auto show floor, Local Motors built the latest version of its Strati, a lightweight, two-seat electric car. It took about 40 hours using the latest 3-D printing technology, all while thousands of auto show visitors watched.

6. Building From a New Blueprint -

When recruiting new businesses, East Tennessee economic development officials have long touted the benefits of partnering with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee.

The lab and the university both have a history of working closely with private business to develop cutting-edge manufacturing techniques, technologies and new products. That research effort recently received a major boost with President Obama’s announcement of a new manufacturing innovation hub based in the Knoxville area.

7. Kellogg Cuts Forecast as Cereal Sales Decline -

Kellogg said Thursday that its cereal unit suffered another quarterly sales decline, and the company cut its long-term revenue forecast.

The maker of Frosted Flakes, Pop Tarts and Special K said it now expects core revenue to rise between 1 to 3 percent over the long-term, down from the previous forecast of 3 to 4 percent.

8. Jones, Vols Make Honor Roll With Recruiting Class -

KNOXVILLE – Butch Jones has done it again.

Tennessee’s football coach has created a national buzz with his 2015 recruiting class.

UT finished with the No. 4 class in the nation as rated by 247Sports and ended up ranked No. 5 by Rivals when the Feb. 4 national signing day was over.

9. Kellogg Cuts Sales Forecast As Cereal Continues Decline -

Kellogg said Thursday that its cereal unit suffered another quarterly sales decline, and the company cut its long-term revenue forecast.

The maker of Frosted Flakes, Pop Tarts and Special K said it now expects core revenue to rise between 1 to 3 percent over the long-term, down from the previous forecast of 3 to 4 percent.

10. Americans Striving to Find Their Place in a Global Sport -

He was supposed to be the next Andy Roddick, the next great American tennis player. That’s what they said about Ryan Harrison.

11. IRS Apologizes for Seizing Bank Accounts of Small Businesses -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Pressured by Congress, the IRS said Wednesday it is changing its policies and apologizing for seizing banks accounts from otherwise law-abiding business owners simply because they structured bank transactions to avoid federal reporting requirements.

12. Haslam Budget Seeks to Improve Teacher Salaries -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam says he's committed to making Tennessee the fastest-improving state in the nation in terms of teacher pay and that his budget will reflect that commitment.

13. Justin Ford: ‘We’re On The Cusp Of Change’ -

Shelby County commission chairman Justin Ford is running for Memphis Mayor in 2015.

Ford announced his intention to challenge Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. Monday, Feb. 9, joining former county commissioner James Harvey, city council member Jim Strickland, and former University of Memphis basketball player Detric Golden in the growing field.

14. Growth is Great, But Where Will Workers Live? -

For the past two years, developers, property owners and Realtors alike have been treated to what some call the best real estate market in the country. Sellers are realizing astronomical returns on their investments as they shed properties that they have been strapped with for years.

15. Greenprint Maps Plan for 25-Year Development -

Open a trail or bike lane in the Memphis area and one of the first questions will be about how it links up to other trails or greenlines or bike lanes.

The Mid-South Regional Greenprint Plan is the answer and the guide to those questions with a long-term 25-year plan that maps out a proposed regional trail system to be built in pieces over the quarter of a century scope of the plan.

16. Skyline-Changing Tower Project Planned for Beale -

The resurrected One Beale project at Riverside Drive and Beale Street has returned to a two-tower plan that will include 280 apartments, 40,000 square feet of retail and meeting space, 20,000 square feet of office space and a 300-room hotel.

17. Open In Memphis -

First-year Memphis Open tennis director Erin Mazurek no doubt could tell you more than you ever wanted to know about the Detroit Red Wings.

Mazurek spent five years working for the National Hockey League team as director of private events. So, she’s got a history there. She knows the value of winning and what the Stanley Cup means (last won by the Red Wings in 2008).

18. Pay Down That Debt by Investing in Real Estate -

My father was born (1928) and raised in Franklin, when it was a sleepy little standalone hamlet unrelated to Nashville. In the mid-90s, I met him for lunch at the Shoney’s near I-65 off of Highway 96.

19. Renting Out Homes for Super Bowl Can Bring Big Bucks -

PHOENIX (AP) – Hundreds of people gather every year to hobnob with A-list celebrities at a charity bash thrown in the Super Bowl's host city. But instead of heading to a trendy nightclub or swanky restaurant, organizers this year are throwing the party inside a private home.

20. Legendary Memphis Studio Has No. 1 Hit With ‘Uptown Funk’ -

The Mark Ronson song “Uptown Funk” featuring Bruno Mars has spent a few weeks now in the top spot on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

It’s something Memphis producer and Royal Studios owner Boo Mitchell is especially proud to see, since the chart-topping track was recorded in Memphis at his studio.

21. Justices Debate Judicial Candidates' Campaign Appeals -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court's conservative and liberal justices clashed Tuesday over campaign finance restrictions in a dispute involving candidates for elected state and local judgeships.

22. Walter Awarded AAF Silver Medal -

Ronald A. Walter, president and general manager of WREG-TV, has been chosen to receive AAF Memphis’ 2015 Silver Medal, the highest form of individual recognition given by local chapters of the American Advertising Federation. The annual award, which honors an exceptional leader for a career of outstanding accomplishment and contribution in the industry, will be presented at AAF Memphis’ luncheon Jan. 29 at 11:30 a.m. at Memphis Botanic Garden.

23. ServiceMaster Signals Desire to Strengthen Tennis Tournament -

After it was announced at a press conference at The Racquet Club of Memphis that ServiceMaster Global Holdings Inc. had entered into a three-year deal to be the presenting sponsor of the Memphis Open, the company’s chief financial officer, Alan Haughie, couldn’t help himself.

24. Council Takes Up Beale’s Next Act -

Memphis City Council members are likely to have some questions Tuesday, Jan. 20, about the still tentative settlement of the last part of the court fight for control of Beale Street.

The tentative terms of the settlement between the city of Memphis and the Beale Street Development Corp. leaked last week and include a share of revenues from the operation of the entertainment district for the BSDC that would otherwise go to the city, which owns the property between Second and Fourth streets.

25. Millennial Challenge: Do I Rent or Do I Own? -

Mike Smalling is a mortgage loan originator with F&M Mortgage and is a lifer in mortgage lending. He recently penned a book entitled “Your Mortgage Matters,” and the work provides information for those new to home buying, as well as those that have bought and sold numerous homes.

26. Despite Low Gas Prices, Gas Tax Hike Appears Unlikely -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The new Republican-controlled Congress is facing an old problem: where to find the money for highway and transit programs.

With gasoline prices at their lowest in years when the new Congress convened, there had been talk that it might be time to raise federal gas and diesel taxes, which haven't budged in more than 20 years.

27. Center of Attention -

The Pinch District, one of the city’s oldest neighborhoods and commercial centers, will receive some much-needed tender loving care in advance of Bass Pro Shops opening its massive store at The Pyramid May 1.

28. Honoring a Legacy -

The Grizzlies are in their 14th season in Memphis, and next Monday, Jan. 19, will mark the 13th Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Day.

29. Fear of Trying -

The most complicated move in ballroom dancing is often the step that gets you through the dance studio’s front door.

Television shows like, “Dancing with the Stars’’ and “So You Think You Can Dance’’ are wildly popular and have contributed to a renewed interest in the glamourous art (skill? sport?) of ballroom dancing, but those high-energy, competitive programs or a movie like “Dirty Dancing’’ can also intimidate people and keep them glued to the couch.

30. Commercial Success -

If, as the saying goes, everyone gets 15 minutes of fame, Bart Durham’s has come in 15- and 30-second spurts – the length of the commercials that depict him as a lawyer everyman, ever-ready to tilt at windmills for the sake of justice for the working class.

31. Pastner Rumors Part of 2014-15 Season Narrative -

Wading in with some quick takes on everything from Josh Pastner to Jameis Winston to Baseball Hall of Fame voting …

An acquaintance approached me this week to say that, while he couldn’t vouch for the validity of the story, someone close to him had heard from someone else close to the University of Memphis administration that a “big booster” had delivered the message that “something needs to be done about Josh Pastner.”

32. Grizzlies Move to Front in NBA Trade Rumors -

One only need look back to Monday, Jan. 5, at FedExForum to understand the business of the NBA. The New York Knicks were warming up for their game against the Grizzlies when word came down that team president Phil Jackson was done waiting for things to get better on their own.

33. AutoZone Park Unveils $6.5 Million Facelift -

AutoZone Park’s makeover is now underway. When renovations are completed they will total about $6.5 million, with the St. Louis Cardinals contributing around $2 million in addition to the $4.5 million that was part of the deal that had the Cardinals purchasing the Memphis Redbirds last year and the Cardinals leasing the ballpark from the city.

34. NCAA Contenders Include the 'Little Guys' -

Every March they become the nation's darlings.

This year, a host of stalwarts aren't waiting nearly that long to establish themselves as contenders – either for their own, non-power conferences or possibly the Final Four after another round of realignment.

35. Nashvillians Offer Resolutions and Hopes for the New Year -

About 45 percent of Americans make New Year’s resolutions – or so says the Journal of Clinical Psychology. And one of the best ways to ensure they stick? Make them public.

So, we asked a few Nashvillians in various fields – some of whom we spoke with earlier in the year – to share their resolutions, goals or intentions for both their personal lives or businesses as well as hopes they have for the city.

36. Vol Players See TaxSlayer Win as a Big Step for Program -

KNOXVILLE – Christmas break has come and gone for the University of Tennessee’s football team. Now it’s back to business.

The Vols return to campus for practice Saturday and, after a Sunday practice, fly to Jacksonville for the Jan. 2 game against Iowa in the TaxSlayer Bowl, formerly the Gator Bowl.

37. US Companies Eager to Embrace Cuba Face Hurdles -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Cargill aims to sell more corn and soybeans. MasterCard covets another site for Americans to swipe credit cards. Marriott sees beachfront property that needs hotels.

And outside Orlando, Florida, Danny Howell just knows there would be demand for his classic Chevrolet parts.

38. Election Year Marks Passing of Generations -

There were more than a few indications of the passing of political generations in Memphis this past year.

Political leaders left the scene to return to life out of office, got elected to other offices and, in some cases, passed away.

39. Knoxville Area a Magnet for Retirees -

Retired air traffic controller Sterling King moved to Knoxville when his brother needed him. Five years later, he has fallen in love with the area and everything it has to offer.

Moderate weather, without the bone-chilling Northern winters or the searing heat of Florida summers, is a big draw, along with its location in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains, says King, 58, who migrated from Dayton, Ohio, to Raleigh, North Carolina, and then to Knoxville.

40. Vols’ Barnett Faces Nation’s Best in Iowa’s Scherff -

KNOXVILLE – Derek Barnett is spending most of the Christmas holidays away from his Nashville home, and he wouldn’t have it any other way.

41. NLRB Issues Rule to Speed Up Union Organizing -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The National Labor Relations Board issued a final rule on Friday aimed at modernizing and streamlining the union election process.

The new rule will shorten the time between when an election is ordered and the election is held, eliminating a previous 25-day waiting period. And it seeks to reduce litigation that can be used to stall elections. It will also require employers to furnish union organizers with email addresses and phone numbers of workers.

42. Stars Flock to Music City’s Ernest Tubb Record Shop -

When Bob Dylan drops by, he generally goes right for “a handful” of Hank and Carter Family recordings, although on one Lower Broadway afternoon the old man from the North Country also is reported to have purchased a “Larry the Cable Guy” DVD.

43. Council to Weigh Next Moves on Beale -

A Beale Street Tourism Development Authority with a nine-member appointed board would oversee the development and management of the entertainment district under the terms of a 13-page resolution that goes to the Memphis City Council this week for discussion.

44. 321,000 Jobs Added in November, Most in Nearly 3 Years -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A burst of U.S. hiring in November – the most in nearly three years – added 321,000 jobs and provided the latest evidence that the United States is outperforming other economies throughout the developed world.

45. No Child Left Behind Gets Renewed Focus -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The No Child Left Behind education law could be making a political comeback.

Sen. Lamar Alexander, the Tennessee Republican who is the incoming chairman of the Senate committee overseeing education, says his top education priority is fixing the landmark Bush-era law. His goal? Get a bill signed by President Barack Obama early next year.

46. ’Tis the Season -

After the recession struck, desperate retailers competing for a shrinking amount of shopping dollars and market share began tinkering with time-tested holiday marketing strategies.

Good prices, great values, unique offerings and convenience no longer were enough to boost retail sales.

47. More at Moore -

The large old trees on its campus and the large paned windows of its brick buildings indicate the William R. Moore College of Technology has been around for a while.

It was the idea of William R. Moore, a dry goods wholesaler, who left a $500,000 endowment to fund the institution following his death in 1909.

48. Moore Tech Awakens -

The large old trees on its campus and the paned windows of its brick buildings indicate the William R. Moore College of Technology has been around for a while.

It was the idea of William R. Moore, a dry goods wholesaler, who left a $500,000 endowment to fund the institution following his death in 1909.

49. Handling the Stress of Thanksgiving Air Travel -

Do you plan on traveling over the Thanksgiving holiday? You’re not alone, as Airlines for America has projected 24.6 million passengers will travel globally on U.S. airlines during the 12-day Thanksgiving travel period.

50. The ‘Meh’ Generation -

ALL THIS IS GETTING OLD. Mitch McConnell is 117. Across the aisle, Harry Reid is 132, same age as Nancy Pelosi over in the House, and John Boehner is 98.

The last time any of them had an original idea, they had to call it in on a rotary phone. The way they get somewhere, or fail to, is as antiquated as our infrastructure, as much in danger of collapse as our bridges.

51. Watching Kobe’s Empty-the-Clip Tour -

For those first few minutes, Kobe Bryant was toying with us. He passed the ball and he passed up shots – open and otherwise.

The crowd last Tuesday night at FedExForum seemed unnerved by this. Let’s face it, whether you come wearing a white No. 50 Zach Randolph jersey or a purple and gold No. 24 Lakers jersey, you come to see Kobe be true to his DNA.

52. Obama Calls for Tougher Internet Regulation -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama on Monday embraced a radical change in how the government treats Internet service, coming down on the side of consumer activists who fear slower download speeds and higher costs but angering Republicans and the nation's cable giants who say the plan would kill jobs.

53. Palazzolo Prepares to Lead Germantown -

Germantown Mayor-elect Mike Palazzolo was surprised that the mayor’s race became as hard-fought as it was.

But after beating former city division director George Brogdon last week, Palazzolo prepares to take the oath of office Dec. 15, assemble his administration and start work on a new economic development plan.

54. Justices to Hear Challenge to Health Law Subsidies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court agreed Friday to hear a new challenge to President Barack Obama's health care law.

The justices said they will decide whether the law authorizes subsidies that help millions of low- and middle-income people afford their health insurance premiums.

55. Sixth Circuit Upholds Gay Marriage Ban -

The Sixth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Thursday, Nov. 6, that bans on gay marriage in Tennessee as well as Kentucky, Michigan and Ohio are constitutional.

The long-awaited ruling, the latest in a series from the nation’s set of federal appeals courts, sets the stage for the U.S. Supreme Court to decide the now conflicting rulings among the appeals courts.

56. $400 Million in Road Projects Delayed in Tennessee -

The uncertainty of federal funding has led Tennessee's highway director to delay road projects worth $400 million.

The Tennessean reports 12 construction projects and 21 right-of-way acquisitions were supposed to be complete by Sept. 30, 2015; now they will have to wait until fiscal year 2016.

57. $400 Million in Road Projects Delayed in Tennessee -

The uncertainty of federal funding has led Tennessee’s highway director to delay road projects worth $400 million.

The Tennessean reports 12 construction projects and 21 right-of-way acquisitions were supposed to be complete by Sept. 30, 2015; now they will have to wait until fiscal year 2016.

58. Grizzlies Brass Has Challenge In Analyzing Player Minutes -

It took but a single game for one of the Memphis Grizzlies’ main dilemmas to present itself. Namely, what’s a coach to do when his starters are playing well and the bench is giving him almost nothing?

59. Health Overhaul's Subsidies at Supreme Court -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Supreme Court justices have their first chance this week to decide whether they have the appetite for another major fight over President Barack Obama's health care law.

60. How Well Did the Fed's Stimulus Work? -

NEW YORK (AP) – Soaring inflation. A collapsing dollar. Bubbles in financial markets that would soon pop. One presidential candidate even suggested that the Federal Reserve chairman should be roughed up.

61. GOP Governors Don't See 'Obamacare' Going Away -

WASHINGTON (AP) — While Republicans in Congress shout, "Repeal Obamacare," GOP governors in many states have quietly accepted the law's major Medicaid expansion. Even if their party wins control of the Senate in the upcoming elections, they just don't see the law going away.

62. Recruiter’s Career Twist -

Ask Janet Miller about her remarkable career at the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce and she’ll likely attribute it to good timing or pass credit onto others.

63. Long-Term Success -

Insurance products by definition tend to be long-term oriented, providing value over an extended period of time. No surprise, then, that Memphis insurance agency Lipscomb & Pitts, which opened its doors with one employee in 1954, all of a sudden finds itself celebrating 60 years in business.

64. Garrison Charts New Course for MATA -

The new president of the Memphis Area Transit Authority wants more collaboration with groups that have ideas about where the city’s bus system can gain passengers while keeping those riders who depend on the bus system.

65. Days Creek Flood Work Permit Still Pending -

A state permit for the city of Memphis to widen and deepen Days Creek in Whitehaven is still pending with officials at the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation.

And the state officials have a lot of questions about the work the city wants to do in the wake of Sept. 11 flooding in the area near the Mississippi state line, said city Public Works Director Dwan Gilliom.

66. NBA Extends Television Deals With ESPN and TNT -

NEW YORK (AP) – The NBA and its television partners couldn't wait to extend their contracts.

The league renewed its deals with ESPN and TNT even though two seasons remain on the old ones. With potential competition from Fox looming, both networks were willing to pay generously to secure the rights long term.

67. Government Website for Doc Payments Not Up to Snuff -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Another year, another headache for the Obama administration over a health care website.

This one is called "Open Payments." The goal was to allow consumers to find out if their doctors are getting drug company freebies, travel or other financial benefits that could create ethical conflicts. But since the site launched Tuesday, complaints have been piling up.

68. Everyone Wants Locker to Succeed, But Can He? -

Perhaps the best thing that Jake Locker has going for him right now is Coach Ken Whisenhunt’s profession of faith.

There is no question that virtually everyone at St. Thomas Sports Park is pulling for Locker to make good in his final chance to be the Titans long-term answer at quarterback.

69. Jones’ Wide Net Gathers Old Friends, Top Prospects -

Butch Jones was sitting in the office of Knoxville’s South-Doyle High School athletic director and football coach Clark Duncan during a visit to see recruit Jocquez Bruce last winter.

70. Old School, New Day -

Vasco Smith remembers working the polls at Fairview Junior High School in the 1960s as a child. His job was simple – to hand out campaign literature and not stray within the 100-foot limit by law between poll workers and the polling place in the gymnasium.

71. Brighter Economy Driving Up Holiday Hiring Plans -

NEW YORK (AP) – UPS will hire up to 95,000. Kohl's plans to take on 67,000 and FedEx 50,000. Wal-Mart will add 60,000.

One after the other, a flurry of major U.S. retail and transportation companies announced sharp increases this week in the number of temporary workers they plan to hire for the holiday season. Collectively, such hiring could reach its highest point this year for stores since 1999, when the economy was roaring and the Great Recession was still eight years away.

72. Unintended Consequences: ER Visits Increase -

Hospital officials have been pushing for the state to expand Medicaid health care coverage for thousands of Tennessee’s poorest citizens, despite two significant and related concerns:

Expansion will lead to increased visits to the most expensive place in America for routine health care, the emergency room.

73. Bloodworth: Greenways Increasing Residential Values -

The Memphis region’s existing 50 miles of greenways, paths and trails are responsible for some increase in property values, particularly residential property, says Rusty Bloodworth, vice president of Boyle Investment Co. and past chairman of the Urban Land Institute’s Memphis chapter.

74. High-Flying Vols Can’t Overlook Arkansas State -

KNOXVILLE – You had to be hiding under a rock not to hear the buzz this week about the University of Tennessee’s football team.

One person not reveling in the Vols’ 38-7 season opening victory over Utah State on Sunday night was UT coach Butch Jones.

75. Music City Food + Wine More Than Another Festival -

A wallop of good food and music can leave a mark. It’s why a year later, I can still conjure that trickle of butter on my chin from a bite of Chef John Besh’s crab and caviar toast at the inaugural Music City Food + Wine festival.

76. Legal Obligation -

The package arrived at the FedEx facility in Spokane, Wash., in early July, and as it moved along the parcel delivery system a conveyor belt malfunctioned and damaged the shipping box.

A FedEx employee inspecting the damaged package discovered what was believed to be illegal prescription pills in the container and the company contacted law enforcement, including the Spokane Police Department and the local Drug Enforcement Administration office.

77. Some Fear Auto Industry Returning to Bad Habits -

DETROIT (AP) – Big discounts. Six- or seven-year loans, in some cases to buyers who would have been turned down in the past.

As the auto industry strives to sustain its post-recession comeback, car companies are resorting to tactics that some experts warn will lead to trouble down the road.

78. Longtime Tennessee Civil Rights Lawyer Dies at 86 -

NASHVILLE (AP) – George Barrett, a longtime Tennessee civil rights lawyer known for handling a case that ultimately desegregated the state's public colleges and universities, has died. He was 86.

79. Finding Life Influencers -

Coaches such as Alabama’s Nick Saban get paid millions to lead and win championships, so it’s only natural that Saban would say something like this:

“We are not interested in the possibilities of defeat; they do not exist.”

80. Yellen: Job Market Makes Fed Hesitant on Rate Hike -

JACKSON HOLE, Wyoming (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Friday that the Great Recession complicated the Fed's ability to assess the U.S. job market and made it harder to determine when to adjust interest rates.

81. Bull Market -

From his office on the 21st floor of the Raymond James tower Downtown, John C. Carson Jr. has a sweeping view of the Mississippi River as it rolls by the Bluff City.

82. Class is In -

For Collierville Schools superintendent John Aitken, the demerger of public schools in Shelby County didn’t become “real” until teachers reported the week before the Aug. 4 first day of classes.

83. Mumford Teacher Cheating Scandal Takes High Toll -

Federal prosecutors tallied the toll this week in the largest teacher exam cheating scandal ever pursued by authorities in the Western District of Tennessee.

The occasion was the announcement Tuesday, Aug. 19, by U.S Attorney Ed Stanton of diversion agreements with four more teachers in the two-decade long scandal and a June guilty plea and sentencing of former Hillcrest High School and Byhalia High School basketball coach James O. Sales of Memphis.

84. Reshaping a City, One Lot at a Time -

John G. Brittle Jr. doesn’t have an office. He has a war room. The space, crowded with maps, charts, books, piles of paper and marked-up spreadsheets, is ground zero for InfillNashville, the 10-person team of site selection specialists that Brittle leads at Village Real Estate Services.

85. Hit Factory -

The massive trees and the shade they make are the only thing left on the northwest corner of Danny Thomas Boulevard and Chelsea Avenue from the days when American Studios turned out 120 hit records from 1965 to 1972.

86. Cohen Prevails, Incumbents Dominate -

Democratic U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen held off Thursday, Aug. 7, the most serious electoral challenge he’s faced since winning the Congressional seat in 2006, in the form of attorney Ricky E. Wilkins.

87. Cohen, Luttrell, Weirich, Harris Take Early Vote -

Democratic U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen has taken the early vote over challenger Ricky Wilkins in the hard fought Democratic Congressional primary on Thursday’s Shelby County election ballot.

88. Pera: Development, Re-Signing Gasol Keys to Success -

Grizzlies controlling owner Robert Pera introduced new additions to the team’s front office during a press conference Friday, Aug. 1, at FedExForum, and took questions from reporters. But mainly he delivered the message that the franchise’s path to contending for a championship will come through player development and not free agency.

89. Multiple Choice -

It could have been an election about the local criminal justice system. The set of once-every-eight-years judicial races was the perfect frame for competitive races for district attorney general and juvenile court judge as the main events.

90. Congress Races to Finish VA, Highway Bills -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress ran full-tilt into election-year gridlock over immigration Thursday and headed toward a five-week summer break with no agreement in sight on legislation to cope with the influx of young immigrants flocking illegally to the United States.

91. Council Aims to Strengthen Local Medical Device Firms -

Shelby County medical device manufacturers are known for their innovation. But it took about three years of meetings before officially forming the Greater Memphis Medical Device Council this July.

“The industry was not used to coming together and sitting down,” said Bartlett Area Chamber of Commerce president John Threadgill. “They’re competitors. And to get competitors in the same room to talk about their issues, there’s some reluctance. But the fact is, they’re all having the same issues. The cat’s out of the bag.”

92. Globetrotting Stephens Eyes Eventual Return to NBA -

North Texas told D.J. Stephens no, said they no longer had a basketball scholarship for him. Remember that?

The only reason Stephens wound up at the University of Memphis was that a new young coach named Josh Pastner needed bodies to fill out the roster after John Calipari left for Kentucky and took everything but the nets off the rims at the Finch Center.

93. Early Vote Expands as Campaigns Enter New Phase -

There is a unique and persistent part of the political process that gnaws at candidates, separating them from the voters they court and sometimes stalk. You might call it the day of the ballot.

In the weeks leading up to the start of early voting, they get hit up constantly by those putting out endorsement ballots to be distributed during early voting and on election day, most often by paid poll workers. Candidates must pay to be on a ballot, which those organizing the ballots say is necessary to cover printing and distribution costs.

94. Mr. B’s Cross-Examination -

Several years ago, a Mr. B. testified as an expert witness in a plane crash case. The lawyer cross-examining him worked awfully hard. And provided some entertainment along the way. The issue was whether the pilot should have been warned of bad weather seen earlier by six FAA employees.

95. Changing Landscape -

It’s been confusing from a distance.

The formal groundbreaking for Shelby Farms Park’s $70 million “Heart of the Park” improvements, including an expansion of Patriot Lake, came the same week last month the Memphis City Council voted to delay for one year the city’s portion of funding for the Shelby Farms Parkway.

96. For the Red, White & Blue -

Let’s start this column with holiday quiz:

1. Who immortalized Paul Revere’s “midnight ride” and how?
2. Which body of water did Washington and his men cross on Christmas 1776?
3. According to legend, who sewed the first American flag?
4. Who wrote “The Star Spangled Banner”?
5. Which European countries fought for the colonies and which did not?
6. What was thrown into Boston Harbor in 1773 and why?
7. Who was the primary author of the Declaration of Independence?
8. Which state whose name starts with V was not one of the original 13 colonies?
9. How did John Adams explain to Abigail the colonies’ defeat at Long Island?
10. What was the approximate population of the 13 colonies on July 4, 1776?

97. Grizzlies Hope Stokes Develops Into Next Z-Bo -

It’s unlikely that Jarnell Stokes was the only Memphis high school basketball player sitting in the upper reaches of FedExForum cheering on the Grizzlies and warming up to that new power forward that we all know as Z-Bo.

98. Beale Street Eastern Border Marks Changes -

For much of the renovated Beale Street Entertainment District’s 30-year history, George Miller was a figure in exile just on the other side of the district’s formal eastern border of Fourth Street.

99. Ex-Senator Baker Remembered for Crossing the Aisle -

HUNTSVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Former Senate Majority Leader Howard H. Baker Jr. was remembered Tuesday for his ability to bridge political divides in Washington while also establishing the Republican Party as a statewide force in Tennessee.

100. Supreme Court: Religious Rights Trump Birth Control Rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A sharply divided Supreme Court ruled Monday that some companies with religious objections can avoid the contraceptives requirement in President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, the first time the high court has declared that businesses can hold religious views under federal law.