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Editorial Results (free)

1. ’Tis the Season -

After the recession struck, desperate retailers competing for a shrinking amount of shopping dollars and market share began tinkering with time-tested holiday marketing strategies.

Good prices, great values, unique offerings and convenience no longer were enough to boost retail sales.

2. More at Moore -

The large old trees on its campus and the large paned windows of its brick buildings indicate the William R. Moore College of Technology has been around for a while.

It was the idea of William R. Moore, a dry goods wholesaler, who left a $500,000 endowment to fund the institution following his death in 1909.

3. Moore Tech Awakens -

The large old trees on its campus and the paned windows of its brick buildings indicate the William R. Moore College of Technology has been around for a while.

It was the idea of William R. Moore, a dry goods wholesaler, who left a $500,000 endowment to fund the institution following his death in 1909.

4. Handling the Stress of Thanksgiving Air Travel -

Do you plan on traveling over the Thanksgiving holiday? You’re not alone, as Airlines for America has projected 24.6 million passengers will travel globally on U.S. airlines during the 12-day Thanksgiving travel period.

5. The ‘Meh’ Generation -

ALL THIS IS GETTING OLD. Mitch McConnell is 117. Across the aisle, Harry Reid is 132, same age as Nancy Pelosi over in the House, and John Boehner is 98.

The last time any of them had an original idea, they had to call it in on a rotary phone. The way they get somewhere, or fail to, is as antiquated as our infrastructure, as much in danger of collapse as our bridges.

6. Watching Kobe’s Empty-the-Clip Tour -

For those first few minutes, Kobe Bryant was toying with us. He passed the ball and he passed up shots – open and otherwise.

The crowd last Tuesday night at FedExForum seemed unnerved by this. Let’s face it, whether you come wearing a white No. 50 Zach Randolph jersey or a purple and gold No. 24 Lakers jersey, you come to see Kobe be true to his DNA.

7. Obama Calls for Tougher Internet Regulation -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama on Monday embraced a radical change in how the government treats Internet service, coming down on the side of consumer activists who fear slower download speeds and higher costs but angering Republicans and the nation's cable giants who say the plan would kill jobs.

8. Palazzolo Prepares to Lead Germantown -

Germantown Mayor-elect Mike Palazzolo was surprised that the mayor’s race became as hard-fought as it was.

But after beating former city division director George Brogdon last week, Palazzolo prepares to take the oath of office Dec. 15, assemble his administration and start work on a new economic development plan.

9. Justices to Hear Challenge to Health Law Subsidies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court agreed Friday to hear a new challenge to President Barack Obama's health care law.

The justices said they will decide whether the law authorizes subsidies that help millions of low- and middle-income people afford their health insurance premiums.

10. Sixth Circuit Upholds Gay Marriage Ban -

The Sixth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Thursday, Nov. 6, that bans on gay marriage in Tennessee as well as Kentucky, Michigan and Ohio are constitutional.

The long-awaited ruling, the latest in a series from the nation’s set of federal appeals courts, sets the stage for the U.S. Supreme Court to decide the now conflicting rulings among the appeals courts.

11. $400 Million in Road Projects Delayed in Tennessee -

The uncertainty of federal funding has led Tennessee's highway director to delay road projects worth $400 million.

The Tennessean reports 12 construction projects and 21 right-of-way acquisitions were supposed to be complete by Sept. 30, 2015; now they will have to wait until fiscal year 2016.

12. $400 Million in Road Projects Delayed in Tennessee -

The uncertainty of federal funding has led Tennessee’s highway director to delay road projects worth $400 million.

The Tennessean reports 12 construction projects and 21 right-of-way acquisitions were supposed to be complete by Sept. 30, 2015; now they will have to wait until fiscal year 2016.

13. Grizzlies Brass Has Challenge In Analyzing Player Minutes -

It took but a single game for one of the Memphis Grizzlies’ main dilemmas to present itself. Namely, what’s a coach to do when his starters are playing well and the bench is giving him almost nothing?

14. Health Overhaul's Subsidies at Supreme Court -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Supreme Court justices have their first chance this week to decide whether they have the appetite for another major fight over President Barack Obama's health care law.

15. How Well Did the Fed's Stimulus Work? -

NEW YORK (AP) – Soaring inflation. A collapsing dollar. Bubbles in financial markets that would soon pop. One presidential candidate even suggested that the Federal Reserve chairman should be roughed up.

16. GOP Governors Don't See 'Obamacare' Going Away -

WASHINGTON (AP) — While Republicans in Congress shout, "Repeal Obamacare," GOP governors in many states have quietly accepted the law's major Medicaid expansion. Even if their party wins control of the Senate in the upcoming elections, they just don't see the law going away.

17. Recruiter’s Career Twist -

Ask Janet Miller about her remarkable career at the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce and she’ll likely attribute it to good timing or pass credit onto others.

18. Long-Term Success -

Insurance products by definition tend to be long-term oriented, providing value over an extended period of time. No surprise, then, that Memphis insurance agency Lipscomb & Pitts, which opened its doors with one employee in 1954, all of a sudden finds itself celebrating 60 years in business.

19. Garrison Charts New Course for MATA -

The new president of the Memphis Area Transit Authority wants more collaboration with groups that have ideas about where the city’s bus system can gain passengers while keeping those riders who depend on the bus system.

20. Days Creek Flood Work Permit Still Pending -

A state permit for the city of Memphis to widen and deepen Days Creek in Whitehaven is still pending with officials at the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation.

And the state officials have a lot of questions about the work the city wants to do in the wake of Sept. 11 flooding in the area near the Mississippi state line, said city Public Works Director Dwan Gilliom.

21. NBA Extends Television Deals With ESPN and TNT -

NEW YORK (AP) – The NBA and its television partners couldn't wait to extend their contracts.

The league renewed its deals with ESPN and TNT even though two seasons remain on the old ones. With potential competition from Fox looming, both networks were willing to pay generously to secure the rights long term.

22. Government Website for Doc Payments Not Up to Snuff -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Another year, another headache for the Obama administration over a health care website.

This one is called "Open Payments." The goal was to allow consumers to find out if their doctors are getting drug company freebies, travel or other financial benefits that could create ethical conflicts. But since the site launched Tuesday, complaints have been piling up.

23. Everyone Wants Locker to Succeed, But Can He? -

Perhaps the best thing that Jake Locker has going for him right now is Coach Ken Whisenhunt’s profession of faith.

There is no question that virtually everyone at St. Thomas Sports Park is pulling for Locker to make good in his final chance to be the Titans long-term answer at quarterback.

24. Jones’ Wide Net Gathers Old Friends, Top Prospects -

Butch Jones was sitting in the office of Knoxville’s South-Doyle High School athletic director and football coach Clark Duncan during a visit to see recruit Jocquez Bruce last winter.

25. Old School, New Day -

Vasco Smith remembers working the polls at Fairview Junior High School in the 1960s as a child. His job was simple – to hand out campaign literature and not stray within the 100-foot limit by law between poll workers and the polling place in the gymnasium.

26. Brighter Economy Driving Up Holiday Hiring Plans -

NEW YORK (AP) – UPS will hire up to 95,000. Kohl's plans to take on 67,000 and FedEx 50,000. Wal-Mart will add 60,000.

One after the other, a flurry of major U.S. retail and transportation companies announced sharp increases this week in the number of temporary workers they plan to hire for the holiday season. Collectively, such hiring could reach its highest point this year for stores since 1999, when the economy was roaring and the Great Recession was still eight years away.

27. Unintended Consequences: ER Visits Increase -

Hospital officials have been pushing for the state to expand Medicaid health care coverage for thousands of Tennessee’s poorest citizens, despite two significant and related concerns:

Expansion will lead to increased visits to the most expensive place in America for routine health care, the emergency room.

28. Bloodworth: Greenways Increasing Residential Values -

The Memphis region’s existing 50 miles of greenways, paths and trails are responsible for some increase in property values, particularly residential property, says Rusty Bloodworth, vice president of Boyle Investment Co. and past chairman of the Urban Land Institute’s Memphis chapter.

29. High-Flying Vols Can’t Overlook Arkansas State -

KNOXVILLE – You had to be hiding under a rock not to hear the buzz this week about the University of Tennessee’s football team.

One person not reveling in the Vols’ 38-7 season opening victory over Utah State on Sunday night was UT coach Butch Jones.

30. Music City Food + Wine More Than Another Festival -

A wallop of good food and music can leave a mark. It’s why a year later, I can still conjure that trickle of butter on my chin from a bite of Chef John Besh’s crab and caviar toast at the inaugural Music City Food + Wine festival.

31. Legal Obligation -

The package arrived at the FedEx facility in Spokane, Wash., in early July, and as it moved along the parcel delivery system a conveyor belt malfunctioned and damaged the shipping box.

A FedEx employee inspecting the damaged package discovered what was believed to be illegal prescription pills in the container and the company contacted law enforcement, including the Spokane Police Department and the local Drug Enforcement Administration office.

32. Some Fear Auto Industry Returning to Bad Habits -

DETROIT (AP) – Big discounts. Six- or seven-year loans, in some cases to buyers who would have been turned down in the past.

As the auto industry strives to sustain its post-recession comeback, car companies are resorting to tactics that some experts warn will lead to trouble down the road.

33. Longtime Tennessee Civil Rights Lawyer Dies at 86 -

NASHVILLE (AP) – George Barrett, a longtime Tennessee civil rights lawyer known for handling a case that ultimately desegregated the state's public colleges and universities, has died. He was 86.

34. Finding Life Influencers -

Coaches such as Alabama’s Nick Saban get paid millions to lead and win championships, so it’s only natural that Saban would say something like this:

“We are not interested in the possibilities of defeat; they do not exist.”

35. Yellen: Job Market Makes Fed Hesitant on Rate Hike -

JACKSON HOLE, Wyoming (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Friday that the Great Recession complicated the Fed's ability to assess the U.S. job market and made it harder to determine when to adjust interest rates.

36. Bull Market -

From his office on the 21st floor of the Raymond James tower Downtown, John C. Carson Jr. has a sweeping view of the Mississippi River as it rolls by the Bluff City.

37. Class is In -

For Collierville Schools superintendent John Aitken, the demerger of public schools in Shelby County didn’t become “real” until teachers reported the week before the Aug. 4 first day of classes.

38. Mumford Teacher Cheating Scandal Takes High Toll -

Federal prosecutors tallied the toll this week in the largest teacher exam cheating scandal ever pursued by authorities in the Western District of Tennessee.

The occasion was the announcement Tuesday, Aug. 19, by U.S Attorney Ed Stanton of diversion agreements with four more teachers in the two-decade long scandal and a June guilty plea and sentencing of former Hillcrest High School and Byhalia High School basketball coach James O. Sales of Memphis.

39. Reshaping a City, One Lot at a Time -

John G. Brittle Jr. doesn’t have an office. He has a war room. The space, crowded with maps, charts, books, piles of paper and marked-up spreadsheets, is ground zero for InfillNashville, the 10-person team of site selection specialists that Brittle leads at Village Real Estate Services.

40. Hit Factory -

The massive trees and the shade they make are the only thing left on the northwest corner of Danny Thomas Boulevard and Chelsea Avenue from the days when American Studios turned out 120 hit records from 1965 to 1972.

41. Cohen Prevails, Incumbents Dominate -

Democratic U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen held off Thursday, Aug. 7, the most serious electoral challenge he’s faced since winning the Congressional seat in 2006, in the form of attorney Ricky E. Wilkins.

42. Cohen, Luttrell, Weirich, Harris Take Early Vote -

Democratic U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen has taken the early vote over challenger Ricky Wilkins in the hard fought Democratic Congressional primary on Thursday’s Shelby County election ballot.

43. Pera: Development, Re-Signing Gasol Keys to Success -

Grizzlies controlling owner Robert Pera introduced new additions to the team’s front office during a press conference Friday, Aug. 1, at FedExForum, and took questions from reporters. But mainly he delivered the message that the franchise’s path to contending for a championship will come through player development and not free agency.

44. Multiple Choice -

It could have been an election about the local criminal justice system. The set of once-every-eight-years judicial races was the perfect frame for competitive races for district attorney general and juvenile court judge as the main events.

45. Congress Races to Finish VA, Highway Bills -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress ran full-tilt into election-year gridlock over immigration Thursday and headed toward a five-week summer break with no agreement in sight on legislation to cope with the influx of young immigrants flocking illegally to the United States.

46. Council Aims to Strengthen Local Medical Device Firms -

Shelby County medical device manufacturers are known for their innovation. But it took about three years of meetings before officially forming the Greater Memphis Medical Device Council this July.

“The industry was not used to coming together and sitting down,” said Bartlett Area Chamber of Commerce president John Threadgill. “They’re competitors. And to get competitors in the same room to talk about their issues, there’s some reluctance. But the fact is, they’re all having the same issues. The cat’s out of the bag.”

47. Globetrotting Stephens Eyes Eventual Return to NBA -

North Texas told D.J. Stephens no, said they no longer had a basketball scholarship for him. Remember that?

The only reason Stephens wound up at the University of Memphis was that a new young coach named Josh Pastner needed bodies to fill out the roster after John Calipari left for Kentucky and took everything but the nets off the rims at the Finch Center.

48. Early Vote Expands as Campaigns Enter New Phase -

There is a unique and persistent part of the political process that gnaws at candidates, separating them from the voters they court and sometimes stalk. You might call it the day of the ballot.

In the weeks leading up to the start of early voting, they get hit up constantly by those putting out endorsement ballots to be distributed during early voting and on election day, most often by paid poll workers. Candidates must pay to be on a ballot, which those organizing the ballots say is necessary to cover printing and distribution costs.

49. Mr. B’s Cross-Examination -

Several years ago, a Mr. B. testified as an expert witness in a plane crash case. The lawyer cross-examining him worked awfully hard. And provided some entertainment along the way. The issue was whether the pilot should have been warned of bad weather seen earlier by six FAA employees.

50. Changing Landscape -

It’s been confusing from a distance.

The formal groundbreaking for Shelby Farms Park’s $70 million “Heart of the Park” improvements, including an expansion of Patriot Lake, came the same week last month the Memphis City Council voted to delay for one year the city’s portion of funding for the Shelby Farms Parkway.

51. For the Red, White & Blue -

Let’s start this column with holiday quiz:

1. Who immortalized Paul Revere’s “midnight ride” and how?
2. Which body of water did Washington and his men cross on Christmas 1776?
3. According to legend, who sewed the first American flag?
4. Who wrote “The Star Spangled Banner”?
5. Which European countries fought for the colonies and which did not?
6. What was thrown into Boston Harbor in 1773 and why?
7. Who was the primary author of the Declaration of Independence?
8. Which state whose name starts with V was not one of the original 13 colonies?
9. How did John Adams explain to Abigail the colonies’ defeat at Long Island?
10. What was the approximate population of the 13 colonies on July 4, 1776?

52. Grizzlies Hope Stokes Develops Into Next Z-Bo -

It’s unlikely that Jarnell Stokes was the only Memphis high school basketball player sitting in the upper reaches of FedExForum cheering on the Grizzlies and warming up to that new power forward that we all know as Z-Bo.

53. Beale Street Eastern Border Marks Changes -

For much of the renovated Beale Street Entertainment District’s 30-year history, George Miller was a figure in exile just on the other side of the district’s formal eastern border of Fourth Street.

54. Ex-Senator Baker Remembered for Crossing the Aisle -

HUNTSVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Former Senate Majority Leader Howard H. Baker Jr. was remembered Tuesday for his ability to bridge political divides in Washington while also establishing the Republican Party as a statewide force in Tennessee.

55. Supreme Court: Religious Rights Trump Birth Control Rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A sharply divided Supreme Court ruled Monday that some companies with religious objections can avoid the contraceptives requirement in President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, the first time the high court has declared that businesses can hold religious views under federal law.

56. Grizzlies Cite Analytics in Adams Pick -

On draft night, as the questions from reporters all implied the Grizzlies maybe had reached in taking UCLA shooting guard Jordan Adams at No. 22, interim general manager Chris Wallace went right to the A-word.

57. What’s in a Name? -

Let’s consider our own Memphis Grizzlies. The team kept a nickname that migrated from Vancouver because fans here have embraced it. In fact, you or someone in your family probably owns a cap or a shirt bearing the team nickname or the likeness of a grizzly bear.

58. Raymond James Recommits to Downtown -

Raymond James is extending its commitment to Downtown Memphis, where the investment firm will remain a key part of the city’s skyline for at least another decade.

The firm has reached a deal with Parkway Properties to extend its lease on the Raymond James Tower at 50 N. Front St. until March of 2024.

59. Grizzlies Hope Upheaval Leads to Draft Unity -

MEMPHIS (AP) – The Memphis Grizzlies hope the recent tumultuous turnover in their front office translates into a solid, unified draft Thursday night.

For now, the team only has to concentrate on one pick – the 22nd overall – and the opportunity to add selections.

60. Ni Hao, Y'all: US Hinterlands Woo Chinese Firms -

PINE HILL, Ala. (AP) – Burdened with Alabama's highest unemployment rate, long abandoned by textile mills and furniture plants, Wilcox County desperately needs jobs.

They're coming, and from a most unlikely place: Henan Province, China, 7,600 miles away.

61. Congress Probes How IRS Emails Could Go Missing -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Internal Revenue Service commissioner said Friday the agency will not share with Congress additional details about its lost emails related to the ongoing tea party investigation until its own review is finished because he said Republicans are releasing inaccurate, interim information.

62. Busby Joins Howell Marketing as Social Media Manager -

Lisa Busby has joined Howell Marketing Strategies LLC as a social media manager, handling the social media marketing for several accounts. Busby’s background includes experience in the business, media and nonprofit sectors – including past roles as a radio news reporter and writer, and as a print editor in the national headquarters for the Fraternal Order of Police.

63. Cash Reflects on ‘Long Way Home’ -

As Graceland marks the anniversary of the death of Elvis Presley in August, another important artist from Sun Records will be remembered in Dyess, Ark.

The opening of Johnny Cash’s childhood home in Dyess as a museum is Aug. 16.

64. Wilkins Targets Cohen as ‘Career Politician’ -

Ricky Wilkins told a packed campaign headquarters in Poplar Plaza on a busy campaign weekend that U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen is waging a dirty campaign while complaining that Wilkins is doing the same.

65. Recorded History -

It’s one of the most well-known bits of lore associated with Memphis, that of a 19-year-old singer who, in July 1954, walked into a recording studio and belted his raucous version of the blues song “That’s All Right (Mama)” into Sam Phillips’ microphone.

66. Baseball Gives Rebels Realistic Championship Shot -

OXFORD, Miss. – With breakthrough success comes the luxury of laughter, and the breathing room that allows Ole Miss baseball coach Mike Bianco to say that reaching the College World Series took longer than he imagined.

67. Many Seek New Homes Near Cities But are Priced Out -

WASHINGTON (AP) – City living has been a blessing for Tim Nelson.

The Phoenix lawyer moved downtown a few months ago into a new $389,000 home with a warehouse-style floor plan, a Jacuzzi tub and kitchen counters made of Caesarstone quartz. His favorite coffee spot is three blocks away. When the Arizona Diamondbacks play on Friday nights, he can watch postgame fireworks from his deck.

68. Congress, FBI Moving on Veterans Affairs Health Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) – As Congress moves to help thousands of military veterans enduring long wait times for VA medical care, the FBI said it has opened a criminal investigation into the Department of Veterans Affairs.

69. Knoxville Democrats Stump for Memphis Votes -

Four years ago at about this time, Shelby County voters were seeing a lot of the four contenders for the Republican Party’s nomination for governor.

This election year, Shelby County voters are seeing a lot of the top two contenders for the Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate.

70. US Employers Add 217,000 Jobs; Rate Stays at 6.3 Percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. employers added 217,000 jobs in May, a substantial gain for a fourth straight month, fueling hopes that the economy will accelerate after a grim start to the year.

71. Teeing Off -

Everyone was in a good mood. Not just normally affable Grizzlies players Mike Conley and Mike Miller, but former Grizzlies coach Lionel Hollins and Pro Football Hall-of-Famer Jim Brown, a couple of hard-nosed throwback types.

72. Reaching People -

The crowds that each week turn out for Thursdays Squared, the new entertainment event in Overton Square’s Tower Courtyard, are a testament to interest in the square and to its resurgence as an entertainment hotspot.

73. Elon Musk Unveils Spacecraft to Ferry Astronauts -

HAWTHORNE, Calif. (AP) – A company that has flown unmanned capsules to the Space Station unveiled a spacecraft designed to ferry up to seven astronauts to low-Earth orbit that SpaceX founder Elon Musk says will lower the cost of going to space.

74. Career Banker to Take Over Veterans Department -

WASHINGTON (AP) – After less than four months at the Veterans Affairs Department, Sloan D. Gibson suddenly finds himself in charge of fixing the problems that led to the resignation of Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki.

75. Joerger Claims ‘Shared Vision’ With Pera -

Dave Joerger said he and Grizzlies controlling owner Robert Pera had a “shared vision” for what the franchise can accomplish going forward and that in their recent “heart-to-heart” conversation they never discussed whether Pera was close to firing Joerger early into his first season as the team’s head coach.

76. MATA President Calls for Expanded Service -

The interim leader of the Memphis Area Transit Authority wants the city’s bus line to get more involved in “transportation management associations.”

MATA’s interim president and general manager, Tom Fox, describes the associations as “groups of employers banding together to provide some kind of services to supplement what MATA can provide.”

77. More Departures From Haslam-Owned Truck-Stop Chain -

NASHVILLE (AP) – With a year-long federal fraud investigation looming over it, the huge truck-stop chain owned by the family of the Cleveland Browns owner and Tennessee's governor is doing some housecleaning at its highest levels.

78. Supreme Court Revives 'Raging Bull' Lawsuit -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court ruled Monday that a copyright lawsuit over the 1980 Oscar-winning movie "Raging Bull" can go forward, a decision that could open Hollywood studios to more claims from people seeking a share of profits from classic films, TV shows and other creative works.

79. Being Social Entrepreneurs -

There is a lot of talk these days about social entrepreneurs and social ventures but not a lot of clarity around what this really means.

It seems the term is just a new spin on not-for-profits, a new label for startup organizations that focus on social issues. However, there is a big difference – social ventures can be for-profit or nonprofit in their structure.

80. IronHorse Makes New Hire, Launches Mutual Fund -

Memphis-based investment firm IronHorse Capital Management has hired a managing director for national sales, a new hire that comes at the same time as the firm has launched its first mutual fund product.

81. Trenary Named Greater Memphis Chamber President -

A veteran of the local business and economic development scene will guide the Greater Memphis Chamber as it seeks to execute an ambitious economic and community growth plan.

Phil Trenary, the former president and CEO of Pinnacle Airlines, has been selected as the chamber’s new president and CEO.

82. Malone to Challenge Luttrell In August Mayoral Showdown -

Former Shelby County Commissioner Deidre Malone will challenge incumbent Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell in the August county general election after winning the Tuesday, May 6, Democratic mayoral primary.

83. Data Breaches: A New Source of Worry for CEOs -

NEW YORK (AP) – Add hackers to the long list of things that give CEOs insomnia.

Target's chief executive, Gregg Steinhafel, is the first boss of a major corporation to lose his job over a theft of customer data. His exit from the helm of the nation's second-largest retailer on Monday shows that –in addition to guiding company strategy and keeping Wall Street happy with ever-growing profits– today's chief executives are being held responsible for lapses in computer security.

84. This week in Memphis history: May 2-May 8 -

1950: Among the new privilege licenses listed in The Daily News was one for Martin Stadium, 476 Crump Blvd. The ballpark was the home of the Negro League Memphis Red Sox, named for the owner of the team. The new privilege license was filed three years after Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in major league baseball, although racial segregation off the field remained a fact of life for many years following Robinson’s integration of baseball.

85. White House Calls for More Privacy Laws -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The White House is asking Congress to pass new privacy laws that would add more safeguards for Americans' data and provide more protections for emails sought in the course of a law enforcement investigation.

86. GOP Blocks Democrats' Minimum Wage Try in Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Senate Republicans derailed a Democratic drive Wednesday to raise the federal minimum wage, blocking a cornerstone of President Barack Obama's economic plans and ensuring the issue will be a major feature of this fall's congressional elections.

87. AP Survey: China's Lending Bubble a Global Threat -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Just as the global economy has all but recovered from debt-fueled crises in the United States and Europe, economists have a new worry: China. They see a lending bubble there that threatens global growth unless Beijing defuses it.

88. Court Refuses to Rehear Case on Tenn. Judges -

A special state Supreme Court panel has refused to rehear a case that challenged the constitutionality of the way Tennessee selects its judges.

John Jay Hooker, a former Democratic candidate for governor who has long been a foe of the way Tennessee picks its judges, asked the court to rehear the case after it ruled against him last month.

89. Building It for the Long Haul -

Minus the cornfield backdrop, the owners of big-box gyms know that if they build it, the line from “Field of Dreams” will hold up and people will come. They most definitely will come.

Unfortunately, the average gym-goer is something of a dream-chaser, too, imagining she will be losing weight like it is merely an extra layer of unwanted clothing or believing he will undergo a Herculean-style transformation in 30 days.

90. New Redbirds GM has Deep Cardinals Connections -

The huge ring that Craig Unger wears on his finger just doesn’t tell the story of the St. Louis Cardinals’ 2011 World Series triumph, although that’s the story Unger is in the business of trying to help replicate.

91. Court Refuses to Rehear Case on Judges -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A special state Supreme Court panel has refused to rehear a case that challenged the constitutionality of the way Tennessee selects its judges.

John Jay Hooker, a former Democratic candidate for governor who has long been a foe of the way Tennessee picks its judges, asked the court to rehear the case after it ruled against him last month.

92. Mo’s Bows Founder to Appear on ‘Shark Tank’ -

Memphis entrepreneur and Mo’s Bows founder Moziah Bridges will appear on the hit ABC show “Shark Tank” this Friday, April 25, and it’s a pretty good bet he’ll be dressed to the nines as he displays his typical pluck and sense of style to a panel of investors that includes Mark Cuban.

93. Wearing it Proudly -

Businesses in Memphis increasingly seem to be getting the essence of their brands down to a T.

Said another way, if it involves something enough Memphians care about – the Memphis Grizzlies, civic efforts like the Tennessee Brewery Untapped project or even just slices of Memphis nostalgia, to name a few examples – the T-shirt printing will likely soon commence, if it hasn’t already.

94. Fed Survey: Growth Picks Up Across Most of US -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A Federal Reserve survey shows economic growth picking up across most of the United States over the past two months as bitter winter weather subsided.

Ten of the Fed's 12 regions reported an increase in economic activity, according to the Beige Book survey released Wednesday. In most places, the Fed described the improvement as "modest or moderate." Only Cleveland and St. Louis reported slower growth.

95. Congress is Giving States the Transportation Blues -

DAYTON, Ohio (AP) – On the road in a tour bus this week, the U.S. transportation secretary is spreading some bad news: the government's Highway Trust Fund is nearly broke. If allowed to run dry, that could set back or shut down projects across the country, force widespread layoffs of construction workers and delay needed repairs and improvements.

96. I Choose Memphis: Ragan Washburn -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Ragan Washburn

Job Title and Company: Manager of Community Engagement and Events at Duncan-Williams Inc.

97. Collierville Explores New School Options -

The Collierville Schools system is about to start the process of finding a site for a new high school and determining how much it would cost.

The Collierville school board voted unanimously Tuesday, April 8, to have the school system’s staff begin developing a request for the qualifications of an architect and planners to come up with plans for the school and select a site.

98. Senate Nears Passage of Jobless-Benefits Bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Capping a three-month struggle, the Senate closed in Monday on passage of election-year legislation to restore jobless benefits for the long-term unemployed that expired late last year.

99. Haslam Free Tuition Plan Garners Praise, Concern -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam's signature proposal this year, a program that would cover a full ride at two-year colleges for any high school graduate, appears on track to pass as lawmakers enter the waning days of the legislative session. The details, however – including how to pay for this perk in the years to come – remain scattered.

100. Redbirds, AutoZone Park Sales Finalized -

The city of Memphis, the St. Louis Cardinals and the Memphis Redbirds Baseball Foundation have completed the ownership transactions of the Redbirds and AutoZone Park.

Per the agreement, the Cardinals have acquired the Redbirds (their Triple-A farm club), while the city of Memphis has acquired AutoZone Park. The city will lease the ballpark to the Redbirds through a long-term agreement. Included is a substantial, multiseason capital investment in the ballpark.