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Editorial Results (free)

1. Longtime Tennessee Civil Rights Lawyer Dies at 86 -

NASHVILLE (AP) – George Barrett, a longtime Tennessee civil rights lawyer known for handling a case that ultimately desegregated the state's public colleges and universities, has died. He was 86.

2. Finding Life Influencers -

Coaches such as Alabama’s Nick Saban get paid millions to lead and win championships, so it’s only natural that Saban would say something like this:

“We are not interested in the possibilities of defeat; they do not exist.”

3. Yellen: Job Market Makes Fed Hesitant on Rate Hike -

JACKSON HOLE, Wyoming (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Friday that the Great Recession complicated the Fed's ability to assess the U.S. job market and made it harder to determine when to adjust interest rates.

4. Bull Market -

From his office on the 21st floor of the Raymond James tower Downtown, John C. Carson Jr. has a sweeping view of the Mississippi River as it rolls by the Bluff City.

5. Class is In -

For Collierville Schools superintendent John Aitken, the demerger of public schools in Shelby County didn’t become “real” until teachers reported the week before the Aug. 4 first day of classes.

6. Mumford Teacher Cheating Scandal Takes High Toll -

Federal prosecutors tallied the toll this week in the largest teacher exam cheating scandal ever pursued by authorities in the Western District of Tennessee.

The occasion was the announcement Tuesday, Aug. 19, by U.S Attorney Ed Stanton of diversion agreements with four more teachers in the two-decade long scandal and a June guilty plea and sentencing of former Hillcrest High School and Byhalia High School basketball coach James O. Sales of Memphis.

7. Reshaping a City, One Lot at a Time -

John G. Brittle Jr. doesn’t have an office. He has a war room. The space, crowded with maps, charts, books, piles of paper and marked-up spreadsheets, is ground zero for InfillNashville, the 10-person team of site selection specialists that Brittle leads at Village Real Estate Services.

8. Hit Factory -

The massive trees and the shade they make are the only thing left on the northwest corner of Danny Thomas Boulevard and Chelsea Avenue from the days when American Studios turned out 120 hit records from 1965 to 1972.

9. Cohen Prevails, Incumbents Dominate -

Democratic U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen held off Thursday, Aug. 7, the most serious electoral challenge he’s faced since winning the Congressional seat in 2006, in the form of attorney Ricky E. Wilkins.

10. Cohen, Luttrell, Weirich, Harris Take Early Vote -

Democratic U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen has taken the early vote over challenger Ricky Wilkins in the hard fought Democratic Congressional primary on Thursday’s Shelby County election ballot.

11. Pera: Development, Re-Signing Gasol Keys to Success -

Grizzlies controlling owner Robert Pera introduced new additions to the team’s front office during a press conference Friday, Aug. 1, at FedExForum, and took questions from reporters. But mainly he delivered the message that the franchise’s path to contending for a championship will come through player development and not free agency.

12. Multiple Choice -

It could have been an election about the local criminal justice system. The set of once-every-eight-years judicial races was the perfect frame for competitive races for district attorney general and juvenile court judge as the main events.

13. Congress Races to Finish VA, Highway Bills -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress ran full-tilt into election-year gridlock over immigration Thursday and headed toward a five-week summer break with no agreement in sight on legislation to cope with the influx of young immigrants flocking illegally to the United States.

14. Council Aims to Strengthen Local Medical Device Firms -

Shelby County medical device manufacturers are known for their innovation. But it took about three years of meetings before officially forming the Greater Memphis Medical Device Council this July.

“The industry was not used to coming together and sitting down,” said Bartlett Area Chamber of Commerce president John Threadgill. “They’re competitors. And to get competitors in the same room to talk about their issues, there’s some reluctance. But the fact is, they’re all having the same issues. The cat’s out of the bag.”

15. Globetrotting Stephens Eyes Eventual Return to NBA -

North Texas told D.J. Stephens no, said they no longer had a basketball scholarship for him. Remember that?

The only reason Stephens wound up at the University of Memphis was that a new young coach named Josh Pastner needed bodies to fill out the roster after John Calipari left for Kentucky and took everything but the nets off the rims at the Finch Center.

16. Early Vote Expands as Campaigns Enter New Phase -

There is a unique and persistent part of the political process that gnaws at candidates, separating them from the voters they court and sometimes stalk. You might call it the day of the ballot.

In the weeks leading up to the start of early voting, they get hit up constantly by those putting out endorsement ballots to be distributed during early voting and on election day, most often by paid poll workers. Candidates must pay to be on a ballot, which those organizing the ballots say is necessary to cover printing and distribution costs.

17. Mr. B’s Cross-Examination -

Several years ago, a Mr. B. testified as an expert witness in a plane crash case. The lawyer cross-examining him worked awfully hard. And provided some entertainment along the way. The issue was whether the pilot should have been warned of bad weather seen earlier by six FAA employees.

18. Changing Landscape -

It’s been confusing from a distance.

The formal groundbreaking for Shelby Farms Park’s $70 million “Heart of the Park” improvements, including an expansion of Patriot Lake, came the same week last month the Memphis City Council voted to delay for one year the city’s portion of funding for the Shelby Farms Parkway.

19. For the Red, White & Blue -

Let’s start this column with holiday quiz:

1. Who immortalized Paul Revere’s “midnight ride” and how?
2. Which body of water did Washington and his men cross on Christmas 1776?
3. According to legend, who sewed the first American flag?
4. Who wrote “The Star Spangled Banner”?
5. Which European countries fought for the colonies and which did not?
6. What was thrown into Boston Harbor in 1773 and why?
7. Who was the primary author of the Declaration of Independence?
8. Which state whose name starts with V was not one of the original 13 colonies?
9. How did John Adams explain to Abigail the colonies’ defeat at Long Island?
10. What was the approximate population of the 13 colonies on July 4, 1776?

20. Grizzlies Hope Stokes Develops Into Next Z-Bo -

It’s unlikely that Jarnell Stokes was the only Memphis high school basketball player sitting in the upper reaches of FedExForum cheering on the Grizzlies and warming up to that new power forward that we all know as Z-Bo.

21. Beale Street Eastern Border Marks Changes -

For much of the renovated Beale Street Entertainment District’s 30-year history, George Miller was a figure in exile just on the other side of the district’s formal eastern border of Fourth Street.

22. Ex-Senator Baker Remembered for Crossing the Aisle -

HUNTSVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Former Senate Majority Leader Howard H. Baker Jr. was remembered Tuesday for his ability to bridge political divides in Washington while also establishing the Republican Party as a statewide force in Tennessee.

23. Supreme Court: Religious Rights Trump Birth Control Rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A sharply divided Supreme Court ruled Monday that some companies with religious objections can avoid the contraceptives requirement in President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, the first time the high court has declared that businesses can hold religious views under federal law.

24. Grizzlies Cite Analytics in Adams Pick -

On draft night, as the questions from reporters all implied the Grizzlies maybe had reached in taking UCLA shooting guard Jordan Adams at No. 22, interim general manager Chris Wallace went right to the A-word.

25. What’s in a Name? -

Let’s consider our own Memphis Grizzlies. The team kept a nickname that migrated from Vancouver because fans here have embraced it. In fact, you or someone in your family probably owns a cap or a shirt bearing the team nickname or the likeness of a grizzly bear.

26. Raymond James Recommits to Downtown -

Raymond James is extending its commitment to Downtown Memphis, where the investment firm will remain a key part of the city’s skyline for at least another decade.

The firm has reached a deal with Parkway Properties to extend its lease on the Raymond James Tower at 50 N. Front St. until March of 2024.

27. Grizzlies Hope Upheaval Leads to Draft Unity -

MEMPHIS (AP) – The Memphis Grizzlies hope the recent tumultuous turnover in their front office translates into a solid, unified draft Thursday night.

For now, the team only has to concentrate on one pick – the 22nd overall – and the opportunity to add selections.

28. Ni Hao, Y'all: US Hinterlands Woo Chinese Firms -

PINE HILL, Ala. (AP) – Burdened with Alabama's highest unemployment rate, long abandoned by textile mills and furniture plants, Wilcox County desperately needs jobs.

They're coming, and from a most unlikely place: Henan Province, China, 7,600 miles away.

29. Congress Probes How IRS Emails Could Go Missing -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Internal Revenue Service commissioner said Friday the agency will not share with Congress additional details about its lost emails related to the ongoing tea party investigation until its own review is finished because he said Republicans are releasing inaccurate, interim information.

30. Busby Joins Howell Marketing as Social Media Manager -

Lisa Busby has joined Howell Marketing Strategies LLC as a social media manager, handling the social media marketing for several accounts. Busby’s background includes experience in the business, media and nonprofit sectors – including past roles as a radio news reporter and writer, and as a print editor in the national headquarters for the Fraternal Order of Police.

31. Cash Reflects on ‘Long Way Home’ -

As Graceland marks the anniversary of the death of Elvis Presley in August, another important artist from Sun Records will be remembered in Dyess, Ark.

The opening of Johnny Cash’s childhood home in Dyess as a museum is Aug. 16.

32. Wilkins Targets Cohen as ‘Career Politician’ -

Ricky Wilkins told a packed campaign headquarters in Poplar Plaza on a busy campaign weekend that U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen is waging a dirty campaign while complaining that Wilkins is doing the same.

33. Recorded History -

It’s one of the most well-known bits of lore associated with Memphis, that of a 19-year-old singer who, in July 1954, walked into a recording studio and belted his raucous version of the blues song “That’s All Right (Mama)” into Sam Phillips’ microphone.

34. Baseball Gives Rebels Realistic Championship Shot -

OXFORD, Miss. – With breakthrough success comes the luxury of laughter, and the breathing room that allows Ole Miss baseball coach Mike Bianco to say that reaching the College World Series took longer than he imagined.

35. Many Seek New Homes Near Cities But are Priced Out -

WASHINGTON (AP) – City living has been a blessing for Tim Nelson.

The Phoenix lawyer moved downtown a few months ago into a new $389,000 home with a warehouse-style floor plan, a Jacuzzi tub and kitchen counters made of Caesarstone quartz. His favorite coffee spot is three blocks away. When the Arizona Diamondbacks play on Friday nights, he can watch postgame fireworks from his deck.

36. Congress, FBI Moving on Veterans Affairs Health Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) – As Congress moves to help thousands of military veterans enduring long wait times for VA medical care, the FBI said it has opened a criminal investigation into the Department of Veterans Affairs.

37. Knoxville Democrats Stump for Memphis Votes -

Four years ago at about this time, Shelby County voters were seeing a lot of the four contenders for the Republican Party’s nomination for governor.

This election year, Shelby County voters are seeing a lot of the top two contenders for the Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate.

38. US Employers Add 217,000 Jobs; Rate Stays at 6.3 Percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. employers added 217,000 jobs in May, a substantial gain for a fourth straight month, fueling hopes that the economy will accelerate after a grim start to the year.

39. Teeing Off -

Everyone was in a good mood. Not just normally affable Grizzlies players Mike Conley and Mike Miller, but former Grizzlies coach Lionel Hollins and Pro Football Hall-of-Famer Jim Brown, a couple of hard-nosed throwback types.

40. Reaching People -

The crowds that each week turn out for Thursdays Squared, the new entertainment event in Overton Square’s Tower Courtyard, are a testament to interest in the square and to its resurgence as an entertainment hotspot.

41. Elon Musk Unveils Spacecraft to Ferry Astronauts -

HAWTHORNE, Calif. (AP) – A company that has flown unmanned capsules to the Space Station unveiled a spacecraft designed to ferry up to seven astronauts to low-Earth orbit that SpaceX founder Elon Musk says will lower the cost of going to space.

42. Career Banker to Take Over Veterans Department -

WASHINGTON (AP) – After less than four months at the Veterans Affairs Department, Sloan D. Gibson suddenly finds himself in charge of fixing the problems that led to the resignation of Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki.

43. Joerger Claims ‘Shared Vision’ With Pera -

Dave Joerger said he and Grizzlies controlling owner Robert Pera had a “shared vision” for what the franchise can accomplish going forward and that in their recent “heart-to-heart” conversation they never discussed whether Pera was close to firing Joerger early into his first season as the team’s head coach.

44. MATA President Calls for Expanded Service -

The interim leader of the Memphis Area Transit Authority wants the city’s bus line to get more involved in “transportation management associations.”

MATA’s interim president and general manager, Tom Fox, describes the associations as “groups of employers banding together to provide some kind of services to supplement what MATA can provide.”

45. More Departures From Haslam-Owned Truck-Stop Chain -

NASHVILLE (AP) – With a year-long federal fraud investigation looming over it, the huge truck-stop chain owned by the family of the Cleveland Browns owner and Tennessee's governor is doing some housecleaning at its highest levels.

46. Supreme Court Revives 'Raging Bull' Lawsuit -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court ruled Monday that a copyright lawsuit over the 1980 Oscar-winning movie "Raging Bull" can go forward, a decision that could open Hollywood studios to more claims from people seeking a share of profits from classic films, TV shows and other creative works.

47. Being Social Entrepreneurs -

There is a lot of talk these days about social entrepreneurs and social ventures but not a lot of clarity around what this really means.

It seems the term is just a new spin on not-for-profits, a new label for startup organizations that focus on social issues. However, there is a big difference – social ventures can be for-profit or nonprofit in their structure.

48. IronHorse Makes New Hire, Launches Mutual Fund -

Memphis-based investment firm IronHorse Capital Management has hired a managing director for national sales, a new hire that comes at the same time as the firm has launched its first mutual fund product.

49. Trenary Named Greater Memphis Chamber President -

A veteran of the local business and economic development scene will guide the Greater Memphis Chamber as it seeks to execute an ambitious economic and community growth plan.

Phil Trenary, the former president and CEO of Pinnacle Airlines, has been selected as the chamber’s new president and CEO.

50. Malone to Challenge Luttrell In August Mayoral Showdown -

Former Shelby County Commissioner Deidre Malone will challenge incumbent Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell in the August county general election after winning the Tuesday, May 6, Democratic mayoral primary.

51. Data Breaches: A New Source of Worry for CEOs -

NEW YORK (AP) – Add hackers to the long list of things that give CEOs insomnia.

Target's chief executive, Gregg Steinhafel, is the first boss of a major corporation to lose his job over a theft of customer data. His exit from the helm of the nation's second-largest retailer on Monday shows that –in addition to guiding company strategy and keeping Wall Street happy with ever-growing profits– today's chief executives are being held responsible for lapses in computer security.

52. This week in Memphis history: May 2-May 8 -

1950: Among the new privilege licenses listed in The Daily News was one for Martin Stadium, 476 Crump Blvd. The ballpark was the home of the Negro League Memphis Red Sox, named for the owner of the team. The new privilege license was filed three years after Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in major league baseball, although racial segregation off the field remained a fact of life for many years following Robinson’s integration of baseball.

53. White House Calls for More Privacy Laws -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The White House is asking Congress to pass new privacy laws that would add more safeguards for Americans' data and provide more protections for emails sought in the course of a law enforcement investigation.

54. GOP Blocks Democrats' Minimum Wage Try in Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Senate Republicans derailed a Democratic drive Wednesday to raise the federal minimum wage, blocking a cornerstone of President Barack Obama's economic plans and ensuring the issue will be a major feature of this fall's congressional elections.

55. AP Survey: China's Lending Bubble a Global Threat -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Just as the global economy has all but recovered from debt-fueled crises in the United States and Europe, economists have a new worry: China. They see a lending bubble there that threatens global growth unless Beijing defuses it.

56. Court Refuses to Rehear Case on Tenn. Judges -

A special state Supreme Court panel has refused to rehear a case that challenged the constitutionality of the way Tennessee selects its judges.

John Jay Hooker, a former Democratic candidate for governor who has long been a foe of the way Tennessee picks its judges, asked the court to rehear the case after it ruled against him last month.

57. Building It for the Long Haul -

Minus the cornfield backdrop, the owners of big-box gyms know that if they build it, the line from “Field of Dreams” will hold up and people will come. They most definitely will come.

Unfortunately, the average gym-goer is something of a dream-chaser, too, imagining she will be losing weight like it is merely an extra layer of unwanted clothing or believing he will undergo a Herculean-style transformation in 30 days.

58. New Redbirds GM has Deep Cardinals Connections -

The huge ring that Craig Unger wears on his finger just doesn’t tell the story of the St. Louis Cardinals’ 2011 World Series triumph, although that’s the story Unger is in the business of trying to help replicate.

59. Court Refuses to Rehear Case on Judges -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A special state Supreme Court panel has refused to rehear a case that challenged the constitutionality of the way Tennessee selects its judges.

John Jay Hooker, a former Democratic candidate for governor who has long been a foe of the way Tennessee picks its judges, asked the court to rehear the case after it ruled against him last month.

60. Mo’s Bows Founder to Appear on ‘Shark Tank’ -

Memphis entrepreneur and Mo’s Bows founder Moziah Bridges will appear on the hit ABC show “Shark Tank” this Friday, April 25, and it’s a pretty good bet he’ll be dressed to the nines as he displays his typical pluck and sense of style to a panel of investors that includes Mark Cuban.

61. Wearing it Proudly -

Businesses in Memphis increasingly seem to be getting the essence of their brands down to a T.

Said another way, if it involves something enough Memphians care about – the Memphis Grizzlies, civic efforts like the Tennessee Brewery Untapped project or even just slices of Memphis nostalgia, to name a few examples – the T-shirt printing will likely soon commence, if it hasn’t already.

62. Fed Survey: Growth Picks Up Across Most of US -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A Federal Reserve survey shows economic growth picking up across most of the United States over the past two months as bitter winter weather subsided.

Ten of the Fed's 12 regions reported an increase in economic activity, according to the Beige Book survey released Wednesday. In most places, the Fed described the improvement as "modest or moderate." Only Cleveland and St. Louis reported slower growth.

63. Congress is Giving States the Transportation Blues -

DAYTON, Ohio (AP) – On the road in a tour bus this week, the U.S. transportation secretary is spreading some bad news: the government's Highway Trust Fund is nearly broke. If allowed to run dry, that could set back or shut down projects across the country, force widespread layoffs of construction workers and delay needed repairs and improvements.

64. I Choose Memphis: Ragan Washburn -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Ragan Washburn

Job Title and Company: Manager of Community Engagement and Events at Duncan-Williams Inc.

65. Collierville Explores New School Options -

The Collierville Schools system is about to start the process of finding a site for a new high school and determining how much it would cost.

The Collierville school board voted unanimously Tuesday, April 8, to have the school system’s staff begin developing a request for the qualifications of an architect and planners to come up with plans for the school and select a site.

66. Senate Nears Passage of Jobless-Benefits Bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Capping a three-month struggle, the Senate closed in Monday on passage of election-year legislation to restore jobless benefits for the long-term unemployed that expired late last year.

67. Haslam Free Tuition Plan Garners Praise, Concern -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam's signature proposal this year, a program that would cover a full ride at two-year colleges for any high school graduate, appears on track to pass as lawmakers enter the waning days of the legislative session. The details, however – including how to pay for this perk in the years to come – remain scattered.

68. Redbirds, AutoZone Park Sales Finalized -

The city of Memphis, the St. Louis Cardinals and the Memphis Redbirds Baseball Foundation have completed the ownership transactions of the Redbirds and AutoZone Park.

Per the agreement, the Cardinals have acquired the Redbirds (their Triple-A farm club), while the city of Memphis has acquired AutoZone Park. The city will lease the ballpark to the Redbirds through a long-term agreement. Included is a substantial, multiseason capital investment in the ballpark.

69. Cardinals Expect ‘Good Things’ to Happen Again -

At grantland.com, the writer said the St. Louis Cardinals have even more depth than last year’s team, but then he went on to pick the Los Angeles Dodgers to win the World Series.

70. Deadline Brings High Interest for Health Insurance -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) – A blizzard, jammed phone lines and unreliable websites failed to stop throngs of procrastinating Americans from trying to sign up for health coverage by the midnight Monday deadline for President Barack Obama's signature domestic policy initiative.

71. Redbirds, AutoZone Park Sales Finalized -

The city of Memphis, the St. Louis Cardinals and the Memphis Redbirds Baseball Foundation have completed the ownership transactions of the Redbirds and AutoZone Park.

Per the agreement, the Cardinals have acquired the Redbirds (their Triple-A farm club), while the city of Memphis has acquired AutoZone Park. The city will lease the ballpark to the Redbirds through a long-term agreement. Included is a substantial, multiseason capital investment in the ballpark.

72. Harrah’s Tunica Casino Will Close in June -

Harrah’s Tunica casino will close June 2, according to an announcement Wednesday, March 26, by Caesars Entertainment, the parent company of Harrah’s

The casino at 13615 Old Highway 61 North in Tunica includes a hotel.

73. Cards, Redbirds Could Be Dodging Rain -

The old baseball maxim that sometimes you win, sometimes you lose, and sometimes it rains is hanging heavy in the air for the Friday night, March 28, exhibition game at AutoZone Park between the Memphis Redbirds and the St. Louis Cardinals.

74. Harrah's Tunica to Close in June -

Harrah’s Tunica casino will close June 2, according to an announcement Wednesday, March 26, by Caesars Entertainment, the parent company of Harrah’s

The casino at 13615 Old Highway 61 North in Tunica includes a hotel.

75. High Court Seems Divided Over Birth Control Rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court seemed divided Tuesday over whether employers' religious beliefs can free them from a part of the new health care law that requires that they provide coverage of birth control for employees at no extra charge.

76. Low-Wage Jobs Unexpectedly a Way of Life for Many -

WASHINGTON (AP) – For years, many Americans followed a simple career path: Land an entry-level job. Accept a modest wage. Gain skills. Leave eventually for a better-paying job.

The workers benefited, and so did lower-wage retailers such as Wal-Mart: When its staffers left for better-paying jobs, they could spend more at its stores. And the U.S. economy gained, too, because more consumer spending fueled growth.

77. Spring Break Cleanup -

In perfect spring break weather, college students from around the country gathered on McKellar Lake as Daft Punk and Pharrell tunes pumped out of a boat-mounted sound system.

And since March 1, that spring break crowd has been filling a trash barge with what is expected to be 150,000 pounds of concrete, plastic bottles, discarded dolls, other toys and tires by the time the effort concludes on March 20.

78. Obama 2015 Budget Focuses on Boosting Economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama sent Congress a $3.9 trillion budget Tuesday that would funnel money into road building, education and other economy-bolstering programs, handing Democrats a playbook for their election-year themes of creating jobs and narrowing the income gap between rich and poor.

79. Goldsworthy: Germantown, Collierville Discuss Schools Contract -

Germantown Mayor Sharon Goldsworthy says Germantown and Collierville schools leaders are discussing a contract to allow Collierville students to continue attending the Germantown district’s Houston High in the new academic year.

80. High Colorado -

“Friends around the campfire, and everybody’s high.” I cannot but think that John Denver was a prophet after all.

In January, Colorado’s long-running “grass”-roots campaign took another step, as retail marijuana shops started opening. This surely has solidified the movement begun by a 2012 statewide initiative. Fifty-five percent of voters approved a constitutional amendment that reads, in pertinent part,

81. Roland ReElected At Filing Deadline, Two Countywide Races Set For August -

One of the six Shelby County Commission incumbents seeking re-election this year was effectively elected to a new four-year term in a new district with the noon Thursday, Feb. 20, filing deadline for candidates in the May county primaries.

82. WhatsApp: A $19 Billion Bet for Facebook -

NEW YORK (AP) – Facebook is placing a $19 billion bet on reaching its next billion mobile users with the acquisition of WhatsApp, a popular messaging service that lets people send texts, photos and videos on their smartphones.

83. White House: Stimulus Bill Was Good for Economy -

RANCHO MIRAGE, Calif. (AP) — The costly $787 billion spending bill that President Barack Obama signed into law soon after taking office boosted the economy and helped avoid another Great Depression, the White House said in a status report on Monday's fifth anniversary of the law's enactment.

84. Few Eligible Patients Can Get Weight Loss Surgery -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Like 78 million other Americans, MaryJane Harrison is obese.

And like many critically overweight Americans, Harrison cannot afford to have weight loss surgery because her health insurance doesn't cover it. The financial burden makes it nearly impossible for her to follow the advice of three physicians who have prescribed the stomach-shrinking procedure for Harrison, who is four-feet, 10 inches and weighs 265 pounds.

85. ‘Zeroing’ In -

Ron Ritchhart came to Memphis for a two-day symposium on Harvard’s Project Zero education research with a message about student-achievement testing he suggested U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan should hear.

86. Harris Questions Ford’s Guns-in-Parks Vote -

Memphis City Council member Lee Harris started raising funds and gauging support for a challenge of state Sen. Ophelia Ford last week by bringing up Ford’s vote earlier in the week in favor of the bill allowing guns to be carried in parks regardless of whether a local government bans the practice.

87. Report: City Should Stay on at Beale -

The city of Memphis should maintain ownership of its properties on Beale Street and create an autonomous board or hire a new development and management company to guide its future, according to a detailed report on the iconic street.

88. Negatives Aside, AOL CEO Posts Positive Results -

NEW YORK (AP) – You've got gaffes.

AOL chief executive Tim Armstrong isn't one to mince words. Over the weekend, he apologized for insensitive comments and backtracked from an unpopular plan to pay matching 401(k) retirement contributions in a lump sum at the end of the year. Armstrong had previously defended the proposal by citing the high cost care for two "distressed babies" born to employee families.

89. Commission Sets Up in Temporary Space -

Shelby County Commissioners will serve out the remaining seven months of their current four-year term of office by staying upstairs at the county administration building in their committee room.

The Monday, Feb. 10, commission meeting was the first in the expanded committee room as the ground floor chambers where the commission normally holds its twice-monthly voting meetings is renovated.

90. Aging in Style -

A few weeks ago, Jill Stepherson fell in a Walgreens parking lot. Given that she is 90 years old, one or more broken bones could have been an unfortunate, but hardly unusual, outcome.

But Stepherson walked away with only bruises.

91. Health Care Law Will Mean Fewer People On the Job -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Several million American workers will reduce their hours on the job or leave the workforce entirely because of incentives built into President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, the Congressional Budget Office said Tuesday.

92. Hunter Fan’s Casablanca Brand Emphasizes Design -

James C. Hunter’s first ceiling fan, which he invented in Syracuse, N.Y., in 1886, was water-driven.

Sometime after that, Hunter moved the company to Memphis and in 1896 changed its name to Hunter Fan & Motor Co.

93. Events -

The University of Memphis will host its Black History Month opening ceremony and presentation of the Authur S. Holmon Lifetime Achievement Award to Dr. James L. Netters Friday, Jan. 31, at 7 p.m. in the Michael D. Rose Theatre, 470 University St. Visit memphis.edu for a schedule of other Black History Month activities.

94. Destination: Memphis -

On a slow Sunday afternoon Downtown with the Broncos and Chargers NFL playoff game on a bar TV screen, a trio of 20-somethings – two men and one woman – watched the game, speculated about whether the Grizzlies were playing a few blocks away and quizzed one another about their plans for the future.

95. Library Foundation Honors Longtime Board Members -

Memphis philanthropist Honey Scheidt likes to describe the library as “the most democratic institution we have.”

That feeling informs her longstanding service on the board of the Memphis Library Foundation, the organization created in 1994 to organize and raise funds for what’s now known as the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library.

96. State of the Union: Of Pledges, Pleas and Setbacks -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Here's a little secret about the State of the Union address that President Barack Obama will deliver next week: He'll give Congress a long list of requests but few likely will be approved. That's just the reality of a politically divided government.

97. Tennessee Democrats Struggle With New, Old Factions -

Tennessee Democratic Party Chairman Roy Herron realizes the party faithful in Memphis see some challenges in keeping the faith these days.

98. Obama Tightens Reins on Surveillance Programs -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Tightening the reins on the nation's sweeping surveillance operations, President Barack Obama on Friday ordered new limits on the way intelligence officials access phone records from hundreds of millions of Americans – and moved toward eventually stripping the massive data collection from the government's hands.

99. Merger Expands CS3’s Customer Base -

Mike Gross, president of long-time contracting company Sibley Solutions LLC, was approaching retirement age and the future of his small business’ loyal employees and customers began to weigh heavily on his mind.

100. Court Could Limit President's Recess Appointments -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Just back from their own long break, Supreme Court justices set out Monday to resolve a politically charged fight over when the Senate's absence gives the president the power to make temporary appointments to high-level positions without senators' approval.