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Editorial Results (free)

1. Dot Foods Breaks Ground on Dyersburg Facility -

A windy, cold morning would not keep civic leaders, elected officials and the Dyersburg community from giving a warm welcome to Dot Foods Inc. and its senior managers on Thursday morning as they broke ground on a new home. Company leaders gathered with the Dyersburg community to place the first shovels in the ground for a $24 million distribution center in Dyersburg Industrial Park next to the Nordyne building off Highway 211. The 166,494-square-foot distribution center is scheduled for completion by September 2014 making it the company's ninth distribution center in the United States.

2. Three-Month Period Sees Spate of County Elections -

Some of the early voting periods and election days will overlap in the set of 11 elections – special and regularly scheduled – in Shelby County this year.

Those elections would take place in less than a three-month period.

3. Election Certified Amid Continued Complaints -

Shelby County Election Commissioners certified the results Monday, Nov. 26, of the Nov. 6 election.

But they offered different verdicts on how the election was conducted.

“Overall we had a good election,” said commissioner Dee Nollner.

4. Election Commission Certifies Nov. 6 Vote Results -

Shelby County Election Commissioners certified the results Monday, Nov. 26, of the Nov. 6 election.

The certification sets in motion the swearing-in of members of the six suburban municipal school boards. And the boards, one for each of the suburban towns and cities in Shelby County, are expected to move quickly on a process for selecting superintendents for each school system by the end of the year.

5. Dispute Arises Over School Board Race -

The Shelby County Election Commission has identified 837 disputed votes in the Aug. 2 election for the District 4 countywide school board seat.

The information disclosed last week as part of a legal challenge of the results in the district race prompted a delay of a trial in the case before Chancellor Kenny Armstrong until some time after the Nov. 6 elections.

6. Election Commission Admits Ballot Problems -

Challenges to the conduct of the Aug. 2 election may have reached a peak Tuesday, July 24.

The Shelby County Election Commission admitted a “limited number” of voters in some precincts got early voting ballots that included the wrong district races.

7. Prescott Leads Schools Planning Commission -

Former Memphis City Schools board member Barbara Prescott is chairman on the new schools consolidation planning commission.

8. Schools Planning Commission Begins Work -

The 21-member schools consolidation planning commission goes to work Thursday, Sept. 29, in a conference room at the city-county Office of Construction Code Enforcement in Shelby Farms.

9. A Mayor’s Race to Remember: Candidates pump up the drama as election nears -

The field is set at 25 candidates and Memphians start voting Sept. 25 in a mayor’s race that has been neither a surprise nor the expected.

But there’s no guarantee the election will settle what the post-Willie Herenton era will look like. Too many other events still have to be decided.

10. Field of 28 For Mayor Meets Filing Deadline With Enough Signatures -  

A field of 28 candidates had filed petitions with enough valid signatures to run in the Oct. 15 special election for Memphis mayor by today’s noon deadline.

Shelby County Election Commission administrator Richard Holden told The Daily News several contenders had their petitions rejected once election commission staff checked the signatures.

Each person signing must be a registered voter in the city of Memphis and list the address that is on their voter registration record.

A total of 33 petitions were filed by the noon deadline. But several candidates were disqualified for not having enough signatures. And then three were returned to the list of candidates after a second check of their petitions. Those who returned to candidate status included Memphis school board member Sharon Webb.

Those who made today's cut have until noon Sept. 10 to withdraw from the race. The field will then become final.

The candidates include: 

  • Leo Awghowhat
  • Kenneth Baroff
  • Joe Brown, Memphis City Council member
  • Randy L. Cagle
  • Charles Carpenter, attorney
  • Carol Chumney, former City Council member
  • Dewey Clark, former aide to and witness against jailed Atlanta Mayor Bill Campbell
  • James M. Clingan
  • Menelik Fombi, a candidate for Memphis City Schools Board in past elections
  • Wanda Halbert, chairwoman, City Council budget committee
  • Johnny Hatcher
  • Robert “Prince Mongo” Hodges  
  • Constance Houston
  • Dewayne Jones
  • E.C. Jones, former City Council member
  • Jerry Lawler, entertainer and former professional wrestler
  • Myron Lowery, Memphis mayor pro tem
  • Ernie Lunati
  • Harrel C. Moore  
  • Mary T. Shelby-Wright, perennial candidate for numerous offices
  • Detric W. Stigall
  • Silky Sullivan, restaurant owner and entrepreneur
  • David Vinciarelli
  • Vuong Vaughn Vo
  • Sharon Webb, Memphis school board member
  • Kenneth T. Whalum Jr., pastor of New Olivet Baptist Church and Memphis school board member
  • A C Wharton Jr., Shelby County mayor
  • John Willingham, former Shelby County commissioner

Sullivan showed up at the Election Commission in a white Rolls Royce wearing a white suit.

“When you see this white suit, you know I’m coming at you,” he told reporters as he outlined a plan to turn The Pyramid over to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital instead of the proposed lease to Bass Pro Shops.

“It’s going to be a dogfight,” Sullivan said of the mayor’s race.

When someone asked if he would still be in the race after next week’s withdrawal deadline, Sullivan said he was in “to the violent end.”

“You know you can’t win,” political blogger and radio talk show host Thaddeus Matthews said to Sullivan.

“Why not?” Sullivan replied.

Anthony Willoughby, the last candidate to file before noon, told reporters he was a Realtor-broker who played a role in the development of Banneker Estates in southwest Memphis, the subdivision developed by former Mayor Willie Herenton.

“I’m not a politician,” Willoughby said. “I’m going to run on that statement.”

Willoughby didn't have enough qualified signatures, though. So he won't be running.

Daniko Flowers, a construction worker still wearing his safety vest, showed up at five minutes before noon and checked out a petition. He returned at three minutes past noon and was not allowed to file. Flowers only had 18 signatures on the petition anyway.

...

11. Self-Appointed Watchdog Posts Campaign Contributions To Web Site -

The words of FBI special agent My Harrison at a press conference about the latest public corruption scandal in Memphis resonated with the force of a shotgun blast.

"Tap, tap, tap - you never know where we're going to be," Harrison said on Nov. 30, the day two Memphis City Council members were implicated in a bribery scandal. The multi-agency investigation that triggered the press conference, "Main Street Sweeper," is continuing, she added.

12. County Continues Preparations For Unusually Long Ballot This Fall -

Thaddeus Matthews has worn many labels in his lifetime.

As colorful a Memphian as they come, he's been known as a radio "shock jock," a repo man, a tough-talking political watchdog, convicted felon, salesman, preacher, bounty hunter and a firebrand who continues to bemuse political observers.

13. Archived Article: Memos - Julie Wittichen Gasaway has become an associate at Askew Nixon Ferguson Architects

Julie Wittichen Gasaway has become an associate at Askew Nixon Ferguson Architects. She joined the firm in 1990 and earned a bachelors degree from the University o...