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Editorial Results (free)

1. Council Questions Five-Year Wharton Plan -

It’s usually a quick bottom line for any local government budget proposal – does it mean a property tax hike?

The $596 million operating budget submitted to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, April 15, by Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. does not include a property tax hike.

2. Wharton Outlines $596 Million Budget Plan -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. warned Tuesday, April 15, that “half measures” in converting city employees to a defined contributions benefits plan would not restore the city’s financial health and resolve an unfunded pension liability of hundreds of millions of dollars.

3. City, Schools Agree To Mediation on Funding -

The city of Memphis and Shelby County Schools have agreed to an “official mediation process with a third party mediator” to resolve the $57 million claim and judgment the school system has against the city and the $89 million counterclaim the city is pursuing against the school system for capital funding.

4. City, Schools Agree To Mediation on Funding -

The city of Memphis and Shelby County Schools have agreed to an “official mediation process with a third party mediator” to resolve the $57 million claim and judgment the school system has against the city and the $89 million counterclaim the city is pursuing against the school system for capital funding.

5. Council Displeased With Budget Ideas -

This isn’t going to be pretty. Two weeks before Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. takes a budget proposal to the Memphis City Council, council members reacted angrily to how Wharton’s administration set the stage for its definitive recommendations.

6. Council Unhappy With Budget Plans So Far -

The administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. got a rough reception at the Tuesday, April 1, Memphis City Council session as it set the stage for Wharton’s budget proposal to come in two weeks.

7. City Council Continues Pension Talks -

Memphis City Council members continue their discussions Tuesday, March 18, about the city’s unfunded pension liability as well as possible changes in city employee heath care benefits.

But there is still no action on any part of the issues on the council agenda for a vote.

8. Council Looks to Pinpoint Pension Numbers -

The Tuesday, March 4, discussion Memphis City Council members had with Tennessee Comptroller Justin Wilson, Tennessee Treasurer David Lillard and consultants from four actuarial firms centered on the city’s pension liability.

9. Council Weighs Conflicting Liability Numbers, Approves Mall Plan -

Memphis City Council members cleared much of their committee calendar Tuesday, Feb. 4, to talk for four hours about specifics of the city’s pension fund liability crisis.

The discussion with Tennessee Comptroller Justin Wilson, Tennessee Treasurer David Lillard and consultants from four actuarial firms was aimed at trying to define the specifics of the problem, see if there is agreement on some of the numbers and better explain the differences.

10. Council Weighs Conflicting L:iability Numbers, Approves Mall Plan -

Memphis City Council members cleared much of their committee calendar Tuesday, Feb. 4, to talk for four hours about specifics of the city’s pension fund liability crisis.

The discussion with Tennessee Comptroller Justin Wilson, Tennessee Treasurer David Lillard and consultants from four actuarial firms was aimed at trying to define the specifics of the problem, see if there is agreement on some of the numbers and better explain the differences.

11. City Council to Dig Into Pension Liability -

The road to a specific solution to the city’s unsustainable pension liability and employee benefits begins Tuesday, March 4, in detailed, technical and complex financial discussions at City Hall that will dominate the committee schedule of the Memphis City Council.

12. Seeking Collaboration -

The debate over which development projects should be public or public-private efforts could intensify in the coming months as the city of Memphis explores multiple redevelopment plans.

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. said if the city, which is facing strong financial headwinds, hopes to attract investment, it must sometimes help jump-start developments in areas that the private sector may otherwise be hesitant to enter.

13. Dunavant Awards Nomination Deadline Nears -

While candidates are watching the election calendar, the committee that will award the Dunavant Public Servant Awards is also watching the calendar.

There are two weeks left for citizens to nominate an elected official and/or an appointed public official for the awards named in honor of the late Probate Court Clerk Bobby Dunavant.

14. Strickland: Shorten Pension Ramp-Up -

The Memphis City Council chairman thinks the city shouldn’t take five or six years to ramp up to an annual pension fund contribution of $100 million but instead do it in two fiscal years.

“I think everyone is in uniform support of fully funding our annual contribution,” council chairman Jim Strickland said on the WKNO-TV program “Behind the Headlines.” “In fact, I don’t think we ought to take six years. I think we ought to take two years. Get it fully funded, whether its $60 million or $100 million.”

15. Council Hires Actuary Consultant -

The Memphis City Council approved hiring its own actuary firm Tuesday, Feb. 18, to review the city’s financial state, namely city government’s unfunded pension liability. The council voted to hire Segal Consulting of Atlanta to advise it as the council prepared for a March 4 committee session in which it will meet with the administration’s actuary and others on the unsustainable trajectory the pension fund is on.

16. Council Hires Actuary Consultant -

The Memphis City Council approved hiring its own actuary firm Tuesday, Feb. 18, to review the city’s financial state, namely city government’s unfunded pension liability. The council voted to hire Segal Consulting of Atlanta to advise it as the council prepared for a March 4 committee session in which it will meet with the administration’s actuary and others on the unsustainable trajectory the pension fund is on.

17. Council Tours Pyramid, Weighs City Offices In Two Malls -

Memphis City Council members heard Tuesday, Feb. 18, that the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. wants to move some city government offices into the Soulsville Town Center in South Memphis and is weighing whether to renovate or tear down and build anew on the site of the Southbrook Mall in Whitehaven.

18. Dunavant Awards Symposium Set for April 21 -

When the 11th annual Bobby Dunavant Public Service awards are given out in April, the University of Memphis will also host the awards’ second annual symposium on public service.

19. City Delays Fairgrounds Zone Application Vote -

The city of Memphis won’t be going to the Tennessee Building Commission in Nashville this week for approval of a Tourism Development Zone for the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

The administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. decided to delay the proposal last week as it reviewed the fairgrounds renovation financing plan with Memphis City Council members.

20. Police, Fire Directors Discuss Budget With Council -

Memphis City Council members got deeper Tuesday, Feb. 4, into the specifics of Memphis Police and Fire Department budget decisions.

But they didn’t get a clearer picture of what the direction forward will be as they and Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. prepare to make some hard decisions about public safety in dealing with the city’s unfunded pension liability.

21. Council Hears More on Police and Fire Budget Decisions -

Memphis City Council member got deeper Tuesday, Feb. 4, into the specifics of Memphis Police and Fire Department budget decisions.

But they didn’t get a clearer picture of what the direction forward will be as they and Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. prepare to make some hard decisions about public safety in dealing with the city’s unfunded pension liability.

22. Sen. Alexander to Keynote Dunavant Awards -

U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander will be the keynote speaker in April for the 11th annual Bobby Dunavant Public Service Awards.

Alexander, also a former Tennessee governor, U.S. Secretary of Education and president of the University of Tennessee, will speak at the April 21 luncheon at the Holiday Inn University of Memphis.

23. Council Approves Ballpark Deal, Changes Coming -

When AutoZone Park opens for another season of Redbirds baseball, you probably won’t notice anything different about the ballpark itself, though it will be owned by the city and the Redbirds will be owned by the St. Louis Cardinals.

24. Council Approves Ballpark Deal -

Memphis City Council members approved the city’s $19.5 million purchase of AutoZone Park Tuesday, Jan. 7, and another $4.5 million in improvements to the baseball park.

The deal includes the St. Louis Cardinals buying the Memphis Redbirds franchise and entering into a 17-year lease with the city of Memphis at $300,000 a year.

25. Harris to Lead Council’s Budget Committee -

Memphis City Council member Lee Harris will be chairman of the council’s budget committee for 2014.

26. Debt and Liability -

There is rarely a good answer to the question “How much?” in politics.

With issues including the unfunded pension liability, overall debt, and revenue estimates and their validity, City Hall’s overall money problem begins but hardly ends with the question. It won’t be that simple.

27. Harris to Lead City Council Budget Committee -

Memphis City Council member Lee Harris will be chairman of the council’s budget committee for 2014.

28. Strickland Suggests Redbirds Ticket Surcharge -

Memphis City Council member Jim Strickland is floating the idea of a Memphis Redbirds ticket surcharge to guarantee a more consistent flow of revenues to pay off the debt from the city’s proposed purchase of AutoZone Park.

29. Strickland Suggests Redbirds Ticket Surcharge -

Memphis City Council member Jim Strickland is floating the idea of a Memphis Redbirds ticket surcharge to guarantee a more consistent flow of revenues to pay off the debt from the city’s proposed purchase of AutoZone Park.

30. Council Rules Could Change in 2014 -

Memphis City Council members are already starting to adapt some items in a set of proposed changes in how they conduct business.

The proposal took a bit longer to formulate than originally anticipated.

31. City Council Questions Pension Plan -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. plans to ask the Memphis City Council sometime in February or March to close the city’s defined benefits pension plan to new hires and those city employees with less than 10 years of service.

32. Council Opens Unfunded Liability Plan Talks With Questions -

Memphis City Council members again rejected Tuesday, Dec. 17, an increase in the city’s monthly solid waste fee and affirmed a 2.1 percent hike in the Memphis Light Gas and Water Division water rate hike.

33. City Council to Revisit Water, Waste Fee Hikes -

Memphis City Council members will at least talk at their last meeting of the year about undoing two votes they’ve taken recently.

The Tueday, Dec. 17, council agenda includes revisiting its Nov. 19 approval of a 2.13 percent increase in Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division water rates.

34. Veterans’ Aid -

Cordell Walker wanted to join the military in the 1960s as his older friends were enlisting or being drafted for the Vietnam War.

“I really wanted to join the military but could not because I was the only son in my family and I was too young,” said Walker, who for the last 26 years has been executive director of Alpha Omega Veterans Services Inc.

35. Council Changes Ballpark Terms, Delays Approval -

Memphis City Council members received some more answers Monday, Dec. 9, to their questions about the proposal for the city to buy AutoZone Park. But some of those answers were different than the ones they got to the same questions last week.

36. Nominations Open for Dunavant Public Service Awards -

The 11th annual Bobby Dunavant Public Servant Awards in 2014 will be awarded against a backdrop of the largest election ballot in Shelby County history.

The once-every-eight-year August ballot features not only county races held every four years but judicial offices for terms of eight years, U.S. Senate primaries and primaries in the governor’s race.

37. Ballpark Deal Back on Council’s Agenda -

After getting a rough reception last week, the deal for the city of Memphis to buy AutoZone Park and the St. Louis Cardinals to buy the Memphis Redbirds baseball team returns to the Memphis City Council Monday, Dec. 9, for a vote.

38. Council Weighs Crosstown, AutoZone Park Deals -

Memphis City Council members could complete financing Tuesday, Dec. 3, of the Crosstown project. And there will be a move by some on the council to delay any decision on the proposal for the city to buy AutoZone Park.

39. Team Players -

The key players, from Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. to St. Louis Cardinals chairman and CEO Bill DeWitt Jr., grabbed the microphone at an invitation-only rally held on the club level of AutoZone Park and made their best pitches.

40. Tax Dead Dilemma -

The brick church at 299 Chelsea Ave. in North Memphis shows up in records at the Shelby County Assessor’s office as “vacant land.”

41. New Council Chairman Could Have New Rules -

The new chairman of the Memphis City Council in 2014 could be overseeing the council under a different set of ground rules.

Jim Strickland was elected chairman by his fellow City Council members Tuesday, Nov. 5, to start his one-year term in January.

42. Council Keeps Southbrook Mall Renovation Alive -

Memphis City Council members voted Tuesday, Nov. 5, to start over again in plans to find a legal use for city funds in renovating the Southbrook Mall in Whitehaven.

And the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. gave a qualified endorsement through what amounts to a new feasibility study on the mall due before the council in a month.

43. Midtown Kroger Construction to Start -

With a few amendments by the Memphis-Shelby County Board of Adjustment Wednesday, Oct. 23, the new Midtown Kroger supermarket rolled out of the planning and zoning process and into preparation for demolition of the old Belvedere apartments building and construction of the new store.

44. Beale Street Deal Would Pay Handy Park Debt -

The settlement of the last remaining item in the bankruptcy petition of Beale Street developer Performa Entertainment hasn’t gone by any of the scripts the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. has written and rewritten.

45. City Council to Vote on Bonds, Review Land Swap -

Memphis City Council members this week take up $375 million in refunding bonds and general obligation bonds, and discuss a land swap with Church of the River for access to a boardwalk on the Harahan Bridge across the Mississippi River.

46. Overton Square Garage Opens -

Visitors to Overton Square know that parking has been at a premium recently, with side streets around the entertainment district filling up as quickly as the restaurants and shops there.

Parking at Overton Square should get much easier with the opening of its 451-space parking garage at the northeast corner of Monroe Avenue and Florence Street. The city-owned garage opened this weekend, and parking is free for the rest of October.

47. Crossing Local Party Lines Becoming Hazardous -

Call it fallout from the local Democratic executive committee’s censure last month of Shelby County Commission Chairman James Harvey.

48. City Pension Crisis Meets Sanitation Overhaul -

The city’s looming pension liability crisis and the proposed solution to it intersected Tuesday, Oct. 1, with a plan to overhaul city sanitation services and, in the process, provide a pension supplement to sanitation workers.

49. Council Gives Early Approval to Solid Waste Fee -

The Memphis City Council sent a proposed lease of Handy Park on Beale Street back to committee Tuesday, Sept. 3, for more discussion about the details.

And the council approved on the first of three readings a restoration of the city’s solid waste fee to $25.05 a month. But there were conflicting explanations about which part of an overhaul of sanitation services the restoration of the fee is supposed to fund.

50. Business Leaders Back Pre-K Initiative -

The Greater Memphis Chamber and members of the business community have come out in support of a half percent hike in the city sales tax rate to fund pre-kindergarten education for more than 4,500 4-year-olds in the city.

51. Events -

The Greater Memphis Chamber will host a conversation with Bill Strickland, CEO of Manchester Bidwell Corp. and author of “Making the Impossible, Possible,” Wednesday, Aug. 21, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at The Peabody, 149 Union Ave. Strickland’s topic is “The Art of Leadership & The Business of Social Change.” Cost is $35 for members and $40 for nonmembers. Visit memphischamber.com or call 543-3571.

52. Events -

Playhouse on the Square will present a Great Wine Performances wine tasting and theater contest Tuesday, Aug. 20, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Playhouse, 66 S. Cooper St. Characters from “Les Miserables” will serve 10 French wines and tests attendees’ knowledge of the musical for prizes. Cost is $65 at the door. Visit playhouseonthesquare.org.

53. Events -

Playhouse on the Square will present a Great Wine Performances wine tasting and theater contest Tuesday, Aug. 20, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Playhouse, 66 S. Cooper St. Characters from “Les Miserables” will serve 10 French wines and tests attendees’ knowledge of the musical for prizes. Cost is $50 in advance or $65 at the door. Visit playhouseonthesquare.org.

54. Sales Tax Hike Goes to City Voters -

For months, political forces have been gathering to make the case for a half percent hike in the city sales tax rate that would fund a city administered pre-kindergarten program.

But when the Memphis City Council approved on third and final reading Tuesday, Aug. 6, of the ordinance to put it on the ballot for city voters in October, the debate revealed a significant difference of opinion.

55. Council Debates Restoring MATA Service -

A day before the board of the Memphis Area Transit Authority votes on significant cuts in bus and trolley service, the Memphis City Council will review $2.1 million in capital spending for the authority.

56. Bumper Crop -

Unless you see the signs, it is hard to tell when you have crossed the Tennessee-Mississippi state line where Fayette County, Tenn., meets Marshall County, Miss., not too far from the southern city limits of Collierville.

57. City Budget Debate Shifts to Larger Issues -

When city leaders gathered last week for the groundbreaking of renovation work on the James Lee House in Victorian Village, the talk among them was bound to turn to the city budget season’s recent end.

58. Eastward Bound -

Another Memphis park may be getting a name change just as the controversy over three Confederate-themed parks starts to move again at City Hall.

But unlike the controversy surrounding those parks, there doesn’t appear to be any disagreement about the changes for Columbus Park, a tiny patch of land at Adams Avenue and Third Street.

59. Events -

Memphis Area Legal Services, AutoZone Inc. and Bass, Berry & Sims PLC will hold the fifth annual pro bono legal clinic for Memphis-area seniors Tuesday, July 2, from 10 a.m. to noon at Orange Mound Senior Center, 2590 Park Ave. The free clinic offers seniors legal advice and helps in the preparation of wills, advanced care plans and more. Call Linda Warren Seely at 523-8822.

60. Strickland, Conrad Warn of Budget Pitfalls -

When most of the 13 people on the Memphis City Council began their service in 2008, the city’s property tax rate was $3.43 and rolling back that rate was a priority of a voting majority on the body.

61. Council to Tackle Budget Leftovers -

Meeting for a third consecutive Tuesday, Memphis City Council members take up a few budget leftovers Tuesday, July 2, but also get to some items delayed because of the unusual budget deliberations.

62. Events -

The Cooper-Young Business Association will feature Standby for Mars as part of the Red Hot Summer concert series Wednesday, July 3, from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in the gazebo at Cooper Street and Young Avenue. Cost is free. Visit cooperyoung.biz.

63. Events -

Downtown Memphis Commission, Victorian Village Inc. and the Association for the Preservation of Tennessee Antiquities will host a launch party for the James Lee House renovation Monday, July 1, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the house, 690 Adams Ave. Visit downtownmemphiscommission.com.

64. Property Tax Hike Highlights New City Budget -

Memphis City Council members raised the city property tax rate Tuesday, June 26, by 4 cents above the recertified tax rate and put the rest of a turbulent budget season to rest.

The approval of the $3.40 property tax rate and city operating and capital budgets came in a council session that ended at 12:30 a.m. Wednesday morning.

65. Council to Take Final Votes on Budget -

The most critical vote at last week’s budget-dominated Memphis City Council meeting may have been the vote to adjourn leaving final budget decisions pending.

It left a week for all sides in the ongoing budget drama at City Hall a wealth of time by political standards to build support for their respective positions.

66. City Budget Woes Affect 400 Employees -

The numbers at play so far in the Memphis City Council’s long budget season are big.

Council members tallied $24.4 million in city operating budget cuts Tuesday, June 18, in a marathon seven-hour session before an overflow crowd of angry city employees.

67. Council Approves $24.2 Million In Budget Cuts -

Memphis City Council members tallied $24.2 million in city operating budget cuts Tuesday, June 18, in a marathon seven-hour session before an overflow crowd of angry city employees.

But the council adjourned before taking a final vote on the operating budget as amended or setting a city property tax rate.

68. Strickland Pitches Budget Plan For Stable City Tax Rate -

City Council budget committee chairman Jim Strickland plans to make his case Tuesday, June 17, for a set of city budget cuts totaling $26.3 million that would keep the city property tax rate at its current rate of $3.11.

69. Next Goal for City Budget: Consensus -

For now, Memphis City Council members have more questions than consensus about which end is up on the proposed city budget for the fiscal year that is three weeks away.

Beyond the questions awaits a significant difference of opinion among council members about the general direction city finances should take with the new fiscal year and beyond.

70. Pre-Kindergarten Expansion in Funding Limbo -

The idea of a city sales tax hike to fund an expansion of pre-kindergarten classrooms in Memphis schools may have been buried this week.

It happened as the City Council fielded a proposal from Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. for a 15-cent property tax hike on top of the 25-cent increase in the tax rate as the recertified city property tax rate.

71. Budget Reset Talks Lead to Fresh Drama -

The Memphis City Hall budget drama turned from a budget reset into a political thicket Tuesday, June 4, as Memphis City Council members debated getting involved in the details of changing employee and retiree benefits.

72. Wharton Proposes 15-Cent Tax Hike, Council Delays Budget Votes -

Memphis City Council members delayed a series of seven budget and tax rate-related votes Tuesday, June 4, at the end of a busy day at City Hall.

The day featured a new tax rate proposal from Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. that includes a 15-cent city property tax hike above the recertified rate proposed by Wharton.

73. Wharton Proposes 14-Cent Tax Hike Above Recertified Rate -

The administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. is proposing a 14-cent city property tax hike on top of the 25 cents added to the current rate of $3.11 to compensate for property value lost in the 2013 property reappraisal.

74. Critical State Report Remakes City Budget -

An April report from the Tennessee Comptroller of the Treasury critical of city finances threw the budget season at City Hall into remake mode Tuesday, May 21.

The bottom line for the budget is a remediation plan that will increase the city’s long term debt, force the city to use its reserves, and take reserves below the 10 percent level considered key with bond-rating agencies.

75. Property Tax Complicates Sales Tax Considerations -

Whether it is a tax hike or a tax rate hike, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s proposed 28-cent increase in the city property tax rate has complicated the idea of a half-percent city sales tax hike to go on the ballot later this year if the property tax hike sticks.

76. Police Budget Passes Early Council Test -

The Memphis City Council’s budget committee approved the largest budget for any single city division Tuesday, May 7.

But the committee debate before the vote set the stage for what is expected to be more discussion about how much the Memphis Police Department needs to protect and serve.

77. Beyond the Numbers -

It’s that time of year again when thick budget books dominate life for those in the Memphis and Shelby County governments.

But this year’s budget season on both sides of the Civic Center Plaza is more than line items and bottom lines on paper. The deliberations that ultimately determine how much you will pay in property taxes and at what rate go beyond the plans in the books of estimates, projections and the recurring and one-time revenue sources.

78. Questions Kick Off City Budget Hearings -

Memphis City Council members opened budget committee hearings Tuesday, April 23, on the clock and with lots of questions about what seemed to some like different budget numbers from last year at this time by the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

79. Severance Pay Ups Ante in Auto Inspections Stand-Off -

Some on the Memphis City Council weren’t certain Tuesday, April 16, about going ahead with a severance package for the city employees who now work at city-run auto inspection stations.

The council entered the budget season for the new fiscal year that begins July 1 just minutes earlier with Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s budget address.

80. Wharton Proposes 28-Cent Tax Hike -

The way Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. views the city’s budget trajectory is shaped by a City Council with different fiscal ideas that have consequences the city is still paying for.

The way City Council budget Chairman Jim Strickland sees it, Wharton has proposed property tax hikes multiple times since taking office in 2009 instead of seeking to fundamentally change city government from the inside.

81. Wharton Pitches Budget With 28-Cent Property Tax Rate Hike -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. presented a $622.5 million operating budget proposal to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, April 16, that would require a property tax rate increase of 28 cents.

That would bring the city property tax rate, currently at $3.11, to $3.39.

82. Council OKs Registry for Blighted Properties -

For months, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and the Memphis City Council had delayed final votes on his proposal to require the registration of property to make it easier for the city to find the owners of blighted property.

83. Food Truck Alliance Grows With Rodeos -

In 2011, the Memphis City Council passed a food truck ordinance drafted by council members Jim Strickland and Shea Flinn, which allowed self-contained mobile food preparation vehicles to operate in the city of Memphis.

84. Golfing Options -

Al Patton doesn’t expect the real golfers until the weather gets warmer, more consistent and past the spring showers.

Since the Links at Whitehaven, the city operated golf course at 750 E. Holmes Road, reopened March 1, Patton has seen the start of a normal cycle in golfers.

85. Dunavant Symposium Examines Public Service -

Saying there should be “good government” and there must be “ethical government” is easy.

Defining what those terms mean can be difficult especially for non-elected public administrators.

A new symposium connected to the annual Bobby Dunavant Public Service Awards aims to open a discussion about the issues of public service in practice.

86. State Delays Auto Inspection Takeover -

The state of Tennessee has told the city of Memphis it will probably take two years for it to take over auto inspection duties in Shelby County.

But city funding for the auto inspection stations and employees runs out when the current fiscal year does, at the end of June.

87. Sales Tax Hike Headed to Ballot -

Memphis City Council members take final votes Tuesday, March 5, on a half-percent city sales tax hike referendum and the use of the estimated $47 million in revenue the tax hike will produce.

The council, which meets at 3:30 p.m. at City Hall, 125 N. Main St., is expected to pass the referendum and send it to voters this year.

88. Respecting Time -

For Clyde “Kit” Carson, the road to becoming Shelby County Jury commissioner began when he was 16 years old and looking for as much time driving a car as possible.

Then-Circuit Court Clerk Clint Crabtree, who attended the same church as Carson, hired him to work in his campaign. When Carson turned 18, Crabtree hired him to work in the office. He began as a runner retrieving files from the basement of the Shelby County Courthouse.

89. Strickland, Carson Given Dunavant Honors -

Memphis City Council member Jim Strickland remembers putting on his tie in front of a mirror this month after learning he won the Bobby Dunavant Public Service Award.

90. City Council Approves Fairgrounds TDZ Request -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, Feb. 19, plans for a tourism development zone to capture sales tax revenue in a large area for a renovation of the Fairgrounds property at first.

The boundaries of the zone go to the state for approval and city Community and Housing Development division director Robert Lipscomb said such a proposal could be at the state building commission in Nashville in April.

91. Strickland, Carson Named Dunavant Award Winners -

Memphis City Council member Jim Strickland and Shelby County Jury Commissioner Clyde ‘Kit’ Carson have been named the winners of the 2013 Bobby Dunavant Public Service Awards.

92. Council Votes on Sales Tax Referendum -

Memphis City Council members take the first step toward a fall referendum on a citywide half percent sales tax hike Tuesday, Feb. 4, as they vote on the first of three readings of the referendum ordinance.

93. Sales Tax Referendum Shifts to Late Summer -

A referendum on a half-percent city sales tax hike to fund a city pre-kindergarten expansion and roll back the city property tax rate by 20 cents would happen in August or September instead of May.

94. Council Preps for Late Summer Sales Tax Hike Referendum -

A referendum on a half percent city sales tax hike to fund a city pre kindergarten expansion and roll back the city property tax rate by 20 cents would happen in August or September instead of May.

95. Council to Discuss Pyramid Development -

Memphis City Council members vote Tuesday, Jan. 22, on the “Memphis Pyramid Planned Development” – the formal name for the conversion of The Pyramid to a Bass Pro Shops store with other attractions including a hotel.

96. Conrad, Flinn Pitch Cost-Saving Measures for City -

Memphis City Council member Kemp Conrad wants to explore selling city assets, including Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division, and using the proceeds to establish a trust fund for early childhood education and other “wrap around” social services.

97. Blue CRUSH Cuts Point to Larger Divide -

Crime numbers may be the most politically volatile set of statistics elected officials can debate or rely on.

The statistics mean little to someone who has been a crime victim. But they are a way of validating whether public money is being spent effectively. On the other hand, how crimes are counted always will be debated.

98. City Sales Tax Hike Proposal Resurfaces -

Two months after voters – most of them Memphians – rejected a countywide sales tax hike, there is a new proposal for a citywide sales tax hike to go on the ballot later this year in a special election.

99. City Sales Tax Hike Proposal Resurfaces -

Two months after voters – most of them Memphians -- rejected a countywide sales tax hike, there is a new proposal for a city-wide sales tax hike to go on the ballot later this year in a special election.

100. Ford Jr. Ready for Ascent to City Council Chairman -

If you didn’t know that Edmund Ford Jr. teaches mathematics, there would be clues.

He can almost sense a percentage that is wrong and he prefers not to “ballpark” numbers.

The precise numbers are part of the story of his entry into politics.