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Editorial Results (free)

1. First Tennessee Reopens Orange Mound Branch -

At the end of this week, First Tennessee Bank is hosting a grand reopening of its updated Orange Mound branch, at 2284 Lamar Ave.

2. First Tennessee Reopens Orange Mound Branch -

At the end of this week, First Tennessee Bank is hosting a grand reopening of its updated Orange Mound branch, at 2284 Lamar Ave.

3. Real Deal -

They were tossing around numbers, trying to guess the win total for the 2015 University of Memphis football season.

In the not-too-distant past, the two Highland Hundred members and longtime season-ticket holders might have been able to add their guesses together and still come up short of the six victories needed for their favorite team to be bowl-eligible.

4. Handful Of Music Festivals Set For August -

In March, one of James Sposto’s friends posted to his Facebook page a thought about being a musician in Memphis.

Daniel McKee, a bassist who’s done turns in a few different bands, lamented that he’s never had a chance to play at the Levitt Shell. Sposto, a digital media entrepreneur in Memphis, used that as a catalyst to start preparing for something he’d already had been thinking about making happen – putting on a show that celebrates and supports the local Memphis music he’s a fan of.

5. Baby Budget -

About $245,000. That’s the estimated cost for raising one child from birth through age 18.

And that figure surprised young women who attended a recent workshop funded by a grant from GiVE 365, the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis’ dollar-a-day philanthropy program.

6. Congress Passes 3-Month Highway, Transit Aid Patch -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress sent President Barack Obama a three-month bill to keep highway and transit money flowing to states on Thursday, one day before the deadline for a cutoff of funds.

7. Family Room -

Family homelessness may be an extraordinarily difficult problem to solve, but in Sister Maureen Griner’s experience many homeless families are just regular folks.

“Ordinary families with ordinary problems,” she said.

8. Make a Mess -

If you eat a plate of ribs at Charlie Vergos’ Rendezvous, you’re likely to walk away with messy fingers. You’re also likely to get messy at a new business in Overton Square, where sisters Anna Vergos Blair and Katherine Vergos Riederer have opened their kid-friendly creativity zone The Art Project.

9. Ikea Seeks $16 Million Permit For First Memphis Store -

Future Ikea Store
On 42 Acres In Cordova
Permit Cost: $16 million

Application Date: July 2015
Owner/Tenant: Ikea
Details: Ikea is moving forward with its massive retail store in Cordova.

10. All-Male Nanny Service Eyeing Middle Tennessee -

Mary Poppins he’s not. No flying umbrellas, no Oscar-winning musical numbers.

But as a caregiver, Jon Ericksen would rank himself right up there with any nanny in the business.

“Two nieces grew up in the house with me, I have worked with kids a lot in all my jobs, so I knew this was something that I would be very interested in,” says Ericksen, one of the men working for MyManny, a Tennessee-based, all-male nanny agency.

11. Martin, Wilson Travel Parallel Paths to Success -

Pitmaster Pat Martin of Martin’s Bar-B-Que Joint and Chef Tandy Wilson of City House didn’t know one another in early 2007. Yet they’d soon have more than a few things in common.

12. Seeds of Nutrition in South Memphis -

Second in a series of profiles on the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis’ GiVE 365 grantees.

The community garden/urban farming concept literally took root years ago. Knowledge Quest founder and director Marlon Foster remembers well the 25-by-25-foot plot at the Fowler Homes housing project back in 1999. It was a humble beginning planted with a few seeds and a lot of faith and hope.

13. Keeping the Beat -

Jody Stephens may best be known as a rock 'n' roll timekeeper, the guy whose drum kit kept the beat and provided the rhythmic foundation for the pioneering power pop group Big Star.

14. Different Strokes -

Five years ago, Jim Napolitano left Hillwood Country Club in Nashville to become general manager at Chickasaw Country Club. The economy was still wheezing and Chickasaw, which received its charter in 1922 – or two years after the 19th Amendment gave women the right to vote – was trapped in a time warp.

15. Overbey Has No Regrets for Sponsoring Insure Tennessee -

Republican Sen. Doug Overbey took the road less traveled this year when he sponsored Insure Tennessee at the request of Gov. Bill Haslam.

Despite the legislation’s failure in special and regular sessions, he has no regrets and looks forward to continuing the fight in 2016 for a market-based plan to obtain roughly $1 billion annually through the Affordable Care Act to provide coverage to some 280,000 Tennesseans who are caught in a gap between TennCare and the federal plan.

16. A Door of Their Own -

Maybe during the four-plus years that Jackie Hinton was living on the streets of Memphis, you drove past her as she was walking to a shelter for a meal or a bed and a shower.

17. The Soul of Memphis -

What if there was one place that could give a meaningful identity to a new generation of Memphians, preserve the sacred story of Memphis’ social and musical history and communicate the city’s soul to the rest of the world?

18. Opry Has Become Big Part of CMA Fest -

The relationship between the Grand Ole Opry – the 90-year-old radio program and down home variety show – and CMA Music Fest is a pretty simple formula.

“A win for CMA Music Fest is a win for the Opry,” says Pete Fisher, vice president and general manager of the nation’s longest continuously running radio program.

19. Making the Connection -

Archie Willis III had just earned his master’s degree in business at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill when he returned to Memphis in 1981 to help his father, A.W. Willis Jr., redevelop the Adler Hotel Annex.

20. State Employment Policies Not Great for Recruiting -

If job security is your goal, working for the state might not be such a good idea.

Gov. Bill Haslam’s administration offered a voluntary buyout recently to more than 2,000 state employees, a proposal workers had known about since February.

21. Ramsey: No Medicaid Expansion Until 2017 -

The Tennessee legislative session ended in late April, giving itself a little more than two and a-half months to handle the state’s business. That’s plenty of time, according to Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey.

22. Harold Ford Sr. Returns to Memphis Funeral Business With New Concept -

In his years as a political force in Memphis, Harold Ford Sr. was known for his attention to detail.

The former Congressman would brush past campaign workers and climb a ladder to level a campaign banner or change the layout of “the Ford ballot,” sought by everyone from presidential candidates to court clerks.

23. Study Finds 3-1 Shortfall of Women in STEM Careers -

Women in the United States have made great strides in education and entry in the workplace over the past 50 years, yet they continue to be underrepresented in science, technology, engineering and math, referred to collectively as STEM disciplines.

24. Convincing Girls, Women to Pursue Science and Math Careers -

Claudia Rawn is used to talking about science, so when asked to speak about women in the STEM disciplines, she was a bit out of her comfort zone.

The speaking invitation came from organizers with the University of Tennessee’s inaugural Women in STEM Research Symposium, held in April.

25. Cannabis Oil Bill Could Lead to More ‘Evil Weed’ Wins -

Logan and Stacie Mathes were on "pins and needles" as they waited for Gov. Bill Haslam to sign legislation into law allowing cannabis oil to be used to treat seizures and similar medical problems in Tennessee.

26. 1 in 4 US Renters Must Use Half Their Pay for Housing Costs -

WASHINGTON (AP) – More than one in four U.S. renters have to use at least half their family income to pay for housing and utilities.

That's the finding of an analysis of Census data by Enterprise Community Partners, a nonprofit that helps finance affordable housing. The number of such households has jumped 26 percent to 11.25 million since 2007.

27. Will Tennessee Republicans Ever Be Truly Happy? -

Why aren’t Tennessee Republicans happier?

With the GOP so dominate in the Tennessee General Assembly and losses so rare – on the Hill or in elections – the party’s lawmakers should be jubilant with this year’s session. But it’s never enough.

28. New State Chair Wants All-GOP Legislature -

With more than six years of experience in the House of Representatives, Knoxville Republican Ryan Haynes is leaving the post to take on a new job: Tennessee Republican Party chairman.

29. Nashville Sounds Owner, Players Marvel at New Park -

Ten days before the Nashville Sounds’ scheduled home opener at their palatial new digs, First Tennessee Park in Germantown was still very much a work in progress.

Frank Ward, owner of the Class AAA Pacific League team, was strutting around like a proud father, all but ready to pass out cigars to an expectant media as workmen painted, pounded and pushed to make everything ready in preparation for opening of the 10,000-seat facility.

30. Sounds Like a Hit for Neighbors -

For months, sounds of construction surrounded the Nashville Sounds’ sparkling new First Tennessee Park in Germantown.

The constant thump-thump-thump of pounding jackhammers competed with the irritating, high-pitched beeps of vehicles backing up. Ka-ching! Cranes lifted steel beams into place, keeping time with a syncopated thrumming of never-ending drilling. Ka-ching!

31. Tennessee School Voucher Bill Approaching Key Committee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A state school voucher proposal that failed in the last two Tennessee General Assembly sessions is gaining support as it approaches a key committee in the final days of this year's legislative session.

32. Major Changes -

Aside from Christmas bells for its annual red kettle campaign, The Salvation Army historically has had a “quiet presence” in Memphis, according to Ellen Westbook, director of community relations and development.

33. Dogwoods & Elvis -

Dogwood Arts Festival President Janet Testerman’s family lore with Knoxville’s spring celebration goes back to the days of Elvis when he was a showstopper at the event. Her mother, also named Janet, had the once-in-a-lifetime chance to meet the King.

34. Tennessee House Bogs Down Over Making Bible Official Book -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A small-town Republican's proposal to make the Bible the official book of Tennessee ran into opposition from top members of his own party as the House delayed a scheduled vote on the measure Tuesday.

35. Events -

Sales and Marketing Society of the Mid-South will meet Wednesday, April 15, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Chickasaw Country Club, 3395 Galloway Ave. Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell will present “State of the County – Selling Shelby County.” Cost for nonmembers is $35. Visit sms-midsouth.org.

36. Wharton's Way -

City elections in Memphis begin unadorned.

Yard signs don’t bloom until mid- to late summer, when the strategic use of television ads and the much higher cycle of radio advertising kick in.

37. Legislators Not Moved by Hymns, Reason -

The words of “We Shall Overcome” and “Wade in the Water” resonate through the halls as Insure Tennessee supporters descend on the Legislative Plaza for a key vote on the plan to provide coverage to 280,000 working Tennesseans.

38. Midtown Mudbugs -

In the 20th year of a Midtown tradition, Overton Square is stronger than ever.

Bayou Bar & Grill is still the reigning host of the Overton Square Crawfish Festival, but for the first time local businesses are invited to participate by setting booths outside of their establishments and selling their unique fare during the event, to be held Saturday, April 11, from noon to 6 p.m.

39. ‘Teach a Man to Fish’ -

After getting his degree in social work, Don Leyrer, 62, spent the first half of his career in the field, including housing abused children, before moving on to law enforcement as a probation officer.

40. St. Jude Adds Chair of Radiation Oncology -

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital has a new chair for its Department of Radiation Oncology, a key position at a time when the hospital has increasingly taken steps to bolster its radiation therapy programs.

41. Tanger Outlets to Open Southaven Mall in November -

What is now a field near Interstate 55 and Church Road in Southaven, Miss., soon will become an outlet-shopping destination.

The 310,000-square-foot Tanger Factory Outlets Centers Inc. shopping center should be ready for shoppers by Nov. 19, just in time for Christmas.

42. Battle of the Band(width) -

Joyce Coltrin’s business is wandering in Bradley County’s technological wilderness. And it’s likely to remain there – because of legal threats – until the General Assembly changes state law.

43. House Majority Leader Believes Tennessee Voucher Plan Has a Shot -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A top state House lawmaker says he believes a proposal to create a school voucher program in Tennessee may pass this year after failing in the past two legislative sessions.

44. Insure Tennessee Fails to Win Sound Bite Test -

Fresh off a resounding November re-election victory, Gov. Bill Haslam ran smack dab into the reality of Tennessee politics: The Republican Party abhors anything connected to President Barack Obama.

45. Resolution Calls for End to Federal ‘Imposition’ -

Saying the feds are guilty of intruding in local schools, state Sen. Bill Ketron is seeking passage of a resolution designed to end what he calls overreach by the U.S. Department of Education.

“We don’t need the federal government telling us how to do it,” Ketron, R-Murfreesboro, said during a recent meeting with teachers in the Rutherford Education Association.

46. Insure Tennessee: Failure by Politics and Procedure -

The momentum that killed the Insure Tennessee proposal and ended the special session of the Tennessee legislature Wednesday, Feb. 4, was fueled by ideological opposition to the Affordable Care Act and President Barack Obama.

47. Haslam's Insure Tennessee Health Plan Fails in Legislature -

Gov. Bill Haslam's proposal to extend health coverage to 280,000 low-income Tennesseans has failed during a special legislative session.

The Senate Health Committee defeated the Republican governor's Insure Tennessee plan Wednesday on a 7-4 vote.

48. Student Debt, Rising Rents Take Bite Out of Real Estate Market -

Hefty student loans are a major stumbling block for young Americans as they try to buy their first home, a National Association of Realtors’ annual survey shows.

In spite of an improved job market and low interest rates in 2014, the number of first-time homebuyers dipped to 33 percent, down 5 percent from the previous year and the lowest since the National Association of Realtors began tracking the rate in 1981.

49. Drowning in Student Loan Debt -

Three-and-a-half years after graduating from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Yasameen Hoffman is still trying to land the kind of full-time job that will help her start paying off her student loan.

50. Renting Out Homes for Super Bowl Can Bring Big Bucks -

PHOENIX (AP) – Hundreds of people gather every year to hobnob with A-list celebrities at a charity bash thrown in the Super Bowl's host city. But instead of heading to a trendy nightclub or swanky restaurant, organizers this year are throwing the party inside a private home.

51. Cohen Calls Tennessee Promise ‘A Fraud’ -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen of Memphis calls the Tennessee Promise last dollar scholarship program for community college and state technical centers “a fraud.”

52. Women’s Foundation Announces 29 Grants -

The Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis has selected 29 recipients to receive grant funding for its 2014-2015 funding year, with allocations totaling $510,000.

Each year, the foundation invites organizations whose projects or continuing programs fall within its mission, vision and one or more of five areas of focus (economic and financial literacy, entrepreneurship, job readiness/career development, leadership development and non-traditional job training) to apply for funding.

53. Plans for UT/West Institute for Cancer Research Unveiled -

With an initial $2.5 million donation from the Plough Foundation, the West Cancer Center formally announced Thursday, Jan. 15, the creation of the nonprofit University of Tennessee/West Institute for Cancer Research at the center’s Germantown location on Wolf River Boulevard.

54. GOP Leader Says Tennessee Lawmakers Will Approve VW Incentives -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A top Republican in the Tennessee General Assembly expects his colleagues to approve the state share of a $300 million incentive package for Volkswagen despite misgivings over a "secret deal" for the United Auto Workers union at the German automaker's plant in Chattanooga.

55. Women’s Foundation Announces 29 Grants -

The Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis has selected 29 recipients to receive grant funding for its 2014-2015 funding year, with allocations totaling $510,000.

Each year, the foundation invites organizations whose projects or programs fall within its mission, vision and one or more of five areas of focus (economic and financial literacy, entrepreneurship, job readiness/career development, leadership development and non-traditional job training) to apply for funding.

56. OK, It’s a Great House! Can We Please See It? -

In Nashville real estate circles, it is difficult to say goodbye to 2014. We loved that 2014 and she was wonderful.

Missing her already, we hope she returns in 2015. But for the current trend to continue, Nashville is going to need some inventory.

57. Blair Durham Embraces Firm Strategy, Planning No Changes -

Don’t look for change up on the 17th floor of Parkway Towers, where Blair Durham is determined to keep his pop’s legacy thriving long into the future.

While his dad, founder of Bart Durham Injury Law, does sometimes mull changing the name of his firm to simply “Durham Injury Law” to allow for Blair to become the face of the firm – “I‘m 80, or at least I will be in March. I’m only going to live five more years, maybe, so it’s time to get Blair and his name out there,” says the elder Durham – the son says “no way.”

58. Rental Showdown -

Tiffany H., 43, has found the perfect way to make money. It’s close to home, easy-to-manage and gives her the flexibility she needs as a busy mom shuttling two children back and forth to two different schools each day.

59. Key Decisions on Drones Likely From Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration is on the verge of proposing long-awaited rules for commercial drone operations in U.S. skies, but key decisions on how much access to grant drones are likely to come from Congress next year.

60. Nashvillians Offer Resolutions and Hopes for the New Year -

About 45 percent of Americans make New Year’s resolutions – or so says the Journal of Clinical Psychology. And one of the best ways to ensure they stick? Make them public.

So, we asked a few Nashvillians in various fields – some of whom we spoke with earlier in the year – to share their resolutions, goals or intentions for both their personal lives or businesses as well as hopes they have for the city.

61. State Fines Charity Over Misleading Solicitations -

The Tennessee agency that oversees charity fundraising is levying a $45,000 fine against a Georgia-based group for misleading practices.

According to the Secretary of State’s office, NSPIRE Outreach has falsely represented that it works with other organizations with which it has no affiliation.

62. Nailor’s Persistence Leads to Commutation -

In April, Larry Nailor will walk out of the Memphis Federal Correctional Institution and away from the life sentence he got in Memphis federal court in the mid-1990s for having 50 grams of crack cocaine.

63. Brewing Opportunity -

When Memphians like Jimmy Lewis are leaving established careers to remake themselves as coffee roasters, it’s one sign that coffee culture in Memphis is abundant with opportunity and steadily coming into its own.

64. Obama Promotes Trade, Tax Fix, Innovation -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama on Thursday declared himself "much more optimistic" than he was last year about completing a major trade deal with Pacific Rim countries.

At the same time, the president acknowledged to executives on his advisory export council that a tough sales job will be necessary on a commerce issue certain to put him at odds with fellow Democrats during the last two years of his presidency.

65. Harwell Defeats Tea-Party Challenge for Speaker -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – House Speaker Beth Harwell decisively defeated a tea-party challenge from Rep. Rick Womick on Wednesday to win the Republican nomination for another term in charge of the lower chamber of the Tennessee General Assembly.

66. Ramsey an Important, Unfamiliar Pioneer -

In this season of thankfulness, Knoxvillians should pay homage to Francis Alexander Ramsey, but many people are probably not familiar with his name.

67. Recruiting Wars -

Memphis Grizzlies point guard Mike Conley is in his eighth year in the NBA. But he’s just 27 years old and his 10-year class reunion at Lawrence North High School in Indianapolis is still an event in the future.

68. Just for Pun -

SUFFERING FOOLISH. Just when you think your cold is getting better, it snot. If you think that’s bad, I’m just getting started.

As I write this, Thanksgiving weekend is winding down and my cold, a gift from my grandchildren, is just getting warmed up. Nora’s gone to church, the dogs have fled to another room, I’m out of Kleenex, and the last sneezing exhibition numbered 18. Not feeling much like writing a column, I opened my email and saw these from my friend, Gene:

69. Deck the Halls -

It was early Tuesday, a little more than 48 hours before Overton Square was set to throw a major holiday celebration complete with a tree-lighting ceremony, school choirs and dozens of participating tenants.

70. Mid-South Grows in Popularity for Retirees -

Florida or bust?

Not necessarily, not anymore.

Retirees coming from the Midwest and Northeast are realizing they have other options, and increasingly they are acting on them. Several Mid-South states have developed formal recruitment programs with the hope of luring out-of-state retirees – new money, in economic development parlance.

71. ’Tis the Season -

After the recession struck, desperate retailers competing for a shrinking amount of shopping dollars and market share began tinkering with time-tested holiday marketing strategies.

Good prices, great values, unique offerings and convenience no longer were enough to boost retail sales.

72. Ginkgos and Band-Aids – and Thanks -

LOOK FOR THE WONDER. REPEAT. I write about it every year. This year, just last week, it happened again.

Right outside my window is a ginkgo tree, and another on the other side of the house. Every fall they engage in an ancient mating dance, a spectacular competition for attention. So exhausting is the effort, it doesn’t last long. So intense is the result, it’s explosive. And then it’s gone, leaving only a memory.

73. Giving Tuesday -

Thanksgiving. Black Friday. Cyber Monday. What’s next? Giving Tuesday. That’s right. This December 2, the Tuesday after Thanksgiving, is a new global holiday, and it’s all about philanthropy.

74. Patients Before Profit -

When Hillary Clinton visited St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital 20 years ago to dedicate the then new patient care center, she was the first lady.

Clinton – the former first lady, U.S. senator and secretary of state – was back at St. Jude on Thursday, Nov. 20, to attend the dedication of the hospital’s Marlo Thomas Center for Global Education and Collaboration.

75. Resilience Gives Us Ability to Endure -

It was the night of the Cub Scout Blue and Gold Banquet. The contest that year at the dinner was cake decorating, the theme was sports. Each Den, as those small groups of Scouts are called, was required to decorate a cake for the contest with no outside help.

76. The ‘Meh’ Generation -

ALL THIS IS GETTING OLD. Mitch McConnell is 117. Across the aisle, Harry Reid is 132, same age as Nancy Pelosi over in the House, and John Boehner is 98.

The last time any of them had an original idea, they had to call it in on a rotary phone. The way they get somewhere, or fail to, is as antiquated as our infrastructure, as much in danger of collapse as our bridges.

77. New Lawmakers Trace Likely Abortion Legislation -

The two newest state legislators from Shelby County say they hope to find ways to work across party lines and even with the Shelby County Commission and the Memphis City Council.

“We may not be in the majority, but there is a lot we can do,” said incoming state Sen. Sara Kyle, who will be one of five Democrats in the 33-member Senate when next year’s legislative session in Nashville begins.

78. Corker Hits Fellow Republicans Over Immigration -

COLUMBIA, Tenn. (AP) — Republican U.S. Sen. Bob Corker on Thursday criticized members of his own party for launching political attacks against those trying to overhaul immigration laws.

79. TVA ‘Robo Houses’ a Success, On the Market -

For the past five years, several residents of the Campbell Creek subdivision have had the quietest neighbors they could have ever wanted. Now they’re going to have to adjust to having people instead.

80. Analysts: How GOP Congress Could Boost US Economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Voters made clear Tuesday that they're worried about the economy, despite steady job gains, a robust stock market and faster economic growth this year.

So what can – and should – the now-dominant Republicans in Congress and President Barack Obama do together to benefit more Americans?

81. Process Outlined to Review State Academic Standards -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Gov. Bill Haslam on Wednesday laid out a process for a public review of the state's K-12 academic standards in English and math amid continuing discussion about Common Core.

82. McManus Joins Patrick Accounting -

Michelle McManus, a Memphis native and certified public accountant, has joined Patrick Accounting and Tax Services PLLC as manager. In her new role, McManus will supervise and review the monthly accounting process for a section of clients. She will also prepare and review tax returns and work closely with clients, assisting them with ongoing tax planning.

83. Obama and the Midterms: What's At Stake? -

WASHINGTON (AP) – For President Barack Obama, the stark reality of the looming midterm elections is that the best outcome for his party gets him nothing but two more years of the status quo.

84. Downtown Knoxville Tourism Finally Finds its Stride -

When Kim Trent moved to Knoxville in 1990, she could stand along Gay Street on a Sunday and be the only soul in sight. Today, she’s a face in the crowd.

85. How Much Longer Till Titans Fans Simply Stay Home? -

Just for a moment, I’m going to let you in on something that not a lot of people know about.

I’m actually a Titans season ticketholder.

Of course, I don’t get to use the seats myself, since I’m working in the pressbox, but my wife and son like to go to the games on occasion to root for the home team and enjoy some football.

86. Room for Growth -

Sardor and Gulam Umarov are used to fighting battles with seemingly long odds.

Between 2005 and 2009, the brothers waged a high-profile human rights campaign against the authoritarian government in their native Uzbekistan for the release of their father, Sanjar Umarov, a Germantown businessman thrown into prison for opposing the regime.

87. MATA President Vows New Standards for Trolleys -

The new president and general manager of the Memphis Area Transit Authority said Friday, Sept. 26, that he hopes to have some trolley cars up and running again by the end of the year.

But Ron Garrison also said the transit authority will be overhauling training and repair standards as well as trolleys in the wake of a report from the American Public Transportation Association that found MATA lacking in both areas.

88. Inferno Celebrates 15 Years, Charitable Milestone -

Anniversaries are a time of reflecting on past successes, and the Memphis-based advertising, marketing, design and PR firm inferno is at just such a moment. Except the 15-year anniversary it’s now celebrating is as much about where it’s going as where it’s been.

89. Road to Better Mass Transit -

Picking a new transit chief is critical for a city in transition.

Next year, Nashville residents will elect a new mayor and turn over its large Metro Council.

Davidson County also expects some 200,000 new residents over the next 20 years, and much of the success of future development will depend on the ease of navigating around Nashville – already the nation’s second-worst area for sprawl, according to Smart Growth America.

90. New Chief Justice Echoes Haslam Mantra on Review -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – First, the state Supreme Court hired Gov. Bill Haslam's top legal adviser as Tennessee's next attorney general. Now the high court's new chief justice is also adopting the Republican governor's rhetoric.

91. Hilton Donates $7,500 to Hope House -

Memphis-based Hilton Worldwide has donated $7,500 to Hope House as a part of the company’s ongoing community relations efforts.

Opened in 1995, Hope House focuses on improving the quality of life for area families affected by HIV and AIDS. It serves almost 50 children and 150 adults through programs such as childcare, counseling, education, medical support and parent support groups.

92. Coverage Gap Leaves Rural Tennessee Hospitals on Life Support -

Four rural hospitals have closed and dozens are at risk of shuttering: That’s the fallout, some say, from Gov. Bill Haslam’s decision not to join the Affordable Care Act in 2013 and tap into millions in promised federal funds for Tennessee’s financially-strapped health care institutions.

93. Will More Rentals Slow Rising Home Prices? -

Hardly a day goes by that a residential real estate broker is not asked: “When will it end?”

Elliot Eisenberg, Ph.D., authors Elliot Eisenberg’s Brief Blog and sends it daily to subscribers. Here’s what he had to say on the subject in his August 25 edition:

94. Middle Tennessee State’s Goal: Students Graduating on Time -

Tennessee’s higher education funding formula is based largely on retaining students, and Middle Tennessee State University plans to stay focused on student support in 2014.

The university initiated the “Quest for Student Success” in October 2013 in an effort to keep students on track and boost its 52 percent graduation rate to 62 percent by 2020.

95. Reshaping a City, One Lot at a Time -

John G. Brittle Jr. doesn’t have an office. He has a war room. The space, crowded with maps, charts, books, piles of paper and marked-up spreadsheets, is ground zero for InfillNashville, the 10-person team of site selection specialists that Brittle leads at Village Real Estate Services.

96. Events -

Church Health Center Wellness and Bring It Food Hub will hold a Bring It, Cook It, Take It cooking class Thursday, Aug. 14, at 5:30 p.m. at 1115 Union Ave. The class will include cooking demonstrations using fresh produce, plus tastings and recipes. Cost is $5 and includes a bag of produce. Visit churchhealthcenter.org.

97. Roast of the Town -

If you catch Jimmy Lewis these days and get him talking about coffee roasting, chances are he might never stop.

98. Lawsuit Over Nineteenth Century Club Dropped -

The Union Avenue building that once housed the Nineteenth Century Club could soon meet the wrecking ball.

A plaintiff seeking to stop the planned demolition of the once-stately mansion has dropped the appeal of a lawsuit challenging the legality of the sale of the property, removing a major obstacle to its proposed redevelopment.

99. Lawsuit Over Nineteenth Century Club Dropped -

The Union Avenue building that once housed the Nineteenth Century Club could soon meet the wrecking ball.

A plaintiff seeking to stop the planned demolition of the once-stately mansion has dropped the appeal of a lawsuit challenging the legality of the sale of the property, removing a major obstacle to its proposed redevelopment.

100. Lawsuit Over Sale of Nineteenth Century Club Dropped -

The Union Avenue building that once housed the Nineteenth Century Club could soon meet the wrecking ball.

Plaintiffs seeking to stop the planned demolition of the once-stately mansion have dropped their appeal of a lawsuit challenging the legality of the sale of the property, removing a major obstacle to the property's proposed redevelopment.