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Editorial Results (free)

1. After the Campaign -

The 2014 election year began in January with dissent from the floor.

At the end of the Shelby County Democratic Party’s annual Kennedy Day fundraiser in January, former Memphis City Council member and state Rep. Carol Chumney, who was not among the speakers, challenged the party establishment from her table to do more to support women running for office.

2. Cohen, Luttrell, Weirich, Harris Take Early Vote -

Democratic U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen has taken the early vote over challenger Ricky Wilkins in the hard fought Democratic Congressional primary on Thursday’s Shelby County election ballot.

3. Juvenile Court Reform Moves to Child Welfare Cases -

For the last two years, much of the attention in Juvenile Court reforms has been on delinquent children who come to the court for their actions.

But this fall, the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges will begin an examination of its child welfare program – the reason that most children come to the court.

4. Juvenile Court Judge Race Remains Hard-Fought -

The candidates are counting down the days to the July 18 start of early voting in advance of the Aug. 7 election day.

With one more weekend of campaigning until early voting dictates a shift in tactics, the sizeable cast of the longest ballot of any Shelby County election cycle is searching at events for crowds comprised of mostly voters rather than other candidates and their campaign workers.

5. Checkered Progress on Disabled Care Despite Ruling -

Brent Kaderli has a wheelchair-accessible van waiting in the driveway, a hospital bed in a spare bedroom and an electric lift that's left unused. If the 30-year-old quadriplegic had his way, he'd be living here, in his father's house, with help from aides. Instead, he is in an institution, hoping each day for a place that feels more like a home.

6. Brooks: Assault Charge Being Used by ‘Detractors’ -

The same day that she announced she was quitting her job at Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare, Shelby County Commissioner Henri Brooks’ mug shot on an assault charge wound up on the top row of the front page of “Just Busted.”

7. Arrests Mark Turbulent Season for Democrats -

At week’s end, Shelby County Commissioner Henri Brooks and Shelby County Democratic Party Chairman Bryan Carson had been arrested within 24 hours of each other on separate charges.

8. Michael Meets Resistance in Juvenile Court Campaign -

Dan Michael has worked for the last two Juvenile Court judges and hopes to succeed the latest, Curtis Person Jr., with the August election results.

9. Brown’s Complex Contempt Case Moves Forward -

Former Criminal Court Judge Joe Brown’s actions in Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court in March will live on in court past the May county primaries and into the campaign season as Brown prepares to challenge incumbent District Attorney General Amy Weirich in the August general election.

10. Brown Contempt Hearing Scheduled for Friday -

Former Criminal Court Judge Joe Brown’s March contempt citation in Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court is set to be heard by a special Criminal Court judge Friday, May 2.

11. Brown Contempt Hearing Scheduled for Friday -

Former Criminal Court Judge Joe Brown’s March contempt citation in Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court is set to be heard by a special Criminal Court judge Friday, May 2.

12. Filing Frenzy -

Until Tuesday, no one was running for the District 7 seat on the Shelby County Schools board. No one had pulled a qualifying petition from the Shelby County Election Commission until just two days before the filing deadline for candidates on the August election ballot.

13. Brown’s Contempt Hearing Reflects Political Skirmish -

Joe Brown’s bid to unseat District Attorney General Amy Weirich in the 2014 elections probably wasn’t supposed to begin this way – in a courtroom dispute with Juvenile Court that has nothing to do with Weirich.

14. Brown Contempt Jailing Maps Political Challenge -

The arrest of the Democratic nominee for Shelby County district attorney general Monday, March 24, is the best indication yet of the tumult within the local Democratic Party as it attempts to win countywide offices four years after losing every race to Republicans.

15. DA Candidate Brown Jailed For Contempt in Juvenile Court -

Former Shelby County Criminal Court Judge Joe Brown, who is the Democratic nominee for District Attorney General in the August county general elections, was arrested and jailed Monday, March 24, for being in contempt of court.

16. Sugarmon Opens Campaign for Juvenile Court Judge -

City Court Judge Tarik Sugarmon told supporters Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court is “administratively top-heavy” and too expensive to operate as it currently is.

“We are going to make a change to a 50-year continuum of Juvenile Court,” Sugarmon told supporters at the Shelby County Election Commission last week as he filed his qualifying petition to run in the August election for Juvenile Court judge. “We’re going to reverse this trend. We are going to change this court.”

17. Criminal Justice Issues Likely to Dominate Races -

Expect to hear a lot between now and August about how the local criminal justice system does or does not work.

With Thursday’s filing deadline for candidates in the May 6 county primaries, two races for offices that are part of the system advanced to the August ballot.

18. Election Filing Pace Quickens as Deadline Nears -

The May 6 Shelby County primary races began to move toward their final form Monday, Feb. 17, just ahead of the noon Thursday filing deadline for candidates.

Shelby County Commissioner Steve Mulroy brought the Democratic primary race for county mayor to four as he filed his qualifying petition Monday afternoon.

19. Michael Opens Campaign for Juvenile Court -

Chief Juvenile Court Magistrate Dan Michael says he is prepared if his opposition in the race for Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court judge tries to make an issue of reforms underway at the court.

20. Dueling Election Databases Make Tracking Difficult -

If ever the political axiom of needing a scorecard to keep up with the players applied to an election cycle, it would be the set of three elections in 2014 across Shelby County.

The middle election of the three – the August ballot of county general elections and state and federal primary elections – is expected to be one of the longest in the county’s political history, if not the longest.

21. Wilkins Pulls Petition to Challenge Cohen -

Attorney Ricky E. Wilkins has pulled a qualifying petition to run in the August Democratic primary for the 9th Congressional District.

Wilkins would be challenging U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen in the primary, something Wilkins began considering last year.

22. Wilkins Pulls Petition to Challenge Cohen -

Attorney Ricky E. Wilkins has pulled a qualifying petition to run in the August Democratic primary for the 9th Congressional District.

Wilkins would be challenging U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen in the primary, something Wilkins began considering last year.

23. Judicial Candidates Move to August Ballot -

In the first week to pick up petitions for the August judicial elections in Shelby County, judicial candidates have accounted for most of the activity at the Shelby County Election Commission.

Juvenile Court Chief Magistrate Dan Michael has pulled a petition to run for Juvenile Court judge in the nonpartisan race. Michael has been campaigning for several months in his bid to succeed outgoing Judge Curtis Person Jr.

24. Weirich Opens Re-Election Campaign -

There were lots of judges on hand as Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich opened her re-election campaign Sunday, Nov. 10.

25. Memphis Police, School System Rift Not First One -

It took three weeks into the unified school system’s first school year for Memphis Police to get a memo that they were to respond to calls at Shelby County Schools within the city of Memphis.

The information bulletin from Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong went out to all officers Thursday, Aug. 22, the same day that a 5-year-old kindergarten student at Westside Elementary School walked into the Frayser school with a gun in his backpack and the gun went off in the backpack.

26. Northside School for Detained Juveniles Opens -

The charter school that opened for class Thursday, Aug. 15, in North Memphis is unique for several reasons.

A total of 130 children, all of them in the custody of Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court, are assigned to Thurgood Marshall High School of Career Development. Of that number, 86 had registered on the first day of classes at the school within a school at Northside High School.

27. School Board To Consider Reversing Course On Humes -

Countywide school board members meeting in special session Tuesday, March 19, will consider a recommendation to change or alter plans for an optional school for the musical arts at Humes Middle School and instead turn the school over to the state-led Achievement School District.

28. Fink Joins Diamond Cos. as Senior Vice President -

Justin Fink has joined Diamond Cos., an International truck dealership holding company, as senior vice president, truck sales. In the new role, Fink oversees new and used truck sales, and helps develop programs and processes to grow customer relationships, sales and profits.

29. Due Process -

One at a time. That is the most noticeable change so far at Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court as a result of a landmark settlement in November with the U.S. Justice Department. The children before the court come before the court magistrates one at a time. No more groups of juvenile defendants waiting for their case to come up as other cases are being heard.

30. Juvenile Court Reform Details Emerging -

Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court Chief Administrative Officer Larry Scroggs describes the court as being “sort of at the end of the beginning” in a review process by the U.S. Justice Department.

31. APNewsBreak: Tennessee's Meningitis has Likely Peaked -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Tennessee's chief medical officer says the rate of new infections from a deadly fungal meningitis outbreak appears to be declining in the state where it was first discovered.

32. Herenton’s Hands to be ‘All Over’ Charter School Project -

A memorandum of understanding is still to come. And there are the details of curriculum not to mention funding and a budget.

But former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton will open the first of what he plans to be several charter schools in August, probably at Northside High School, for children in grades 6-12 who are in Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court custody.

33. Herenton Charter School for Juvenile Court To Open 2013 -

Memphis City Schools leaders and former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton announced Wednesday, Sept. 12, the opening of a new charter school for children in Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court custody.

34. Suburban School Board Races Almost Set -

Races on the Nov. 6 ballot for six sets of suburban school boards took shape Thursday, Aug. 16, at the noon filing deadline for candidate qualifying petitions.

The candidates that made the deadline have another week to withdraw from the races if they wish.

35. ‘Value Proposition’ -

This is the first in a two-part series looking at the state of the local travel agency industry.

On display in the hallways of A & I Travel Service Inc. at 5124 Poplar Ave., is a series of vintage, black-and-white agency photographs from one of the company’s first offices, which was located in Downtown Memphis.

36. Time for Court To Get it Right -

You have probably heard the phrase “going forward” used a lot. And the temptation is great to use it again in the case of the recent report on Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court by the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Justice Department.

37. Big Changes Lie Ahead for Local Juvenile Court -

In the run-up to this month’s U.S. Justice Department report on Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court, the most animated discussions between the attorneys from the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division and those at Juvenile Court were about state law.

38. DOJ: ‘Fundamental Misunderstanding’ Exists In Local Juvenile Court -

The U.S. Justice Department report critical of Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court released last week is the fourth since May 2007 on court operations.

It is also the fourth to note the need for change in the court that has only had two judges since the merger of the city and county juvenile courts in the 1960s.

39. Discrimination Found in Juvenile Court -

The U.S. Justice Department said Thursday, April 26, that juvenile offenders in Shelby County are denied due process rights and that black children are treated differently and more harshly than white children by the Juvenile Court of Memphis and Shelby County, including the process used to transfer children who are to be tried as adults.

40. Juvenile Court Discrimination Found In Scathing DOJ Report -

The U.S. Justice Department said Thursday, April 26, that juvenile offenders in Shelby County are denied due process rights and that black children are treated differently and more harshly than white children by the Juvenile Court of Memphis and Shelby County, including the process used to transfer children who are to be tried as adults.

41. Carpenter Reflects on Five-Year Run -

As Memphis voters prepare to bring to an end another city campaign season, Shelby County Commissioner Mike Carpenter just ended a five-year run on the Shelby County Commission.

42. Commission Readies to Replace Carpenter -

After the Shelby County Commission fills seven positions on the new countywide school board next week, it will then consider a vacancy in its own ranks.

The departure of commissioner Mike Carpenter at the end of this month dovetails with the seating of the countywide school board that will replace the separate Memphis City Schools and Shelby County Schools boards on Oct. 1.

43. Metamorphoses Targets Memphis’ At-Risk Boys -

When the national news media early this year zeroed in on reports of high rates of pregnancy among Memphis’ adolescent girls and the programs being implemented to address the issue, many Memphians asked, “So, what about the boys?”

44. Review: ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’ -

If art is about risk-taking, the joint production of Michael Ching’s opera a capella “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” by Opera Memphis, Playhouse on the Square and Delta Capella/RIVA risks about as much as one show possible can.

45. 'Finding a Home' -

Animal Planet viewers know Shelly Bookwalter as the spunky, red-headed star of “Last Chance Highway,” the network’s reality series chronicling her efforts to rescue stray dogs from death row at high-kill shelters for a second chance at life in ‘forever homes’ in the Northeast.

46. South Main Etsy Event Showcases Local Artists -

The recession-era culture has seen many consumers shunning big-box retailers and mass-produced goods in favor of independently-owned shops and more sustainable products.

The 3/50 Project, a popular ‘buy local” viral campaign launched in March 2009, warns consumers that only $43 of every $100 they spend with national retailers stays in their local community. As for online shopping, the return is zero.

47. New Policy Set for Police Handling of Juveniles -

Memphis Police got new written orders last week that gives them broader discretion in dealing with juveniles.

The policy put in writing by Police Director Larry Godwin and announced this week by Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. comes after several years of discussion and concern about the number of juvenile offenders who are sent to detention.

48. Towns’ MED Job Proves You Can Go Home Again -

Tish Towns has just finished her first year at one of the most challenging jobs in the city – spearheading the effort to secure funding for The Regional Medical Center at Memphis.

It is a mission that brought her back home after 28 years.

49. Huckabee Backs Boozman in Arkansas Senate Race -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Former Gov. Mike Huckabee is backing Republican John Boozman's bid to unseat Democratic Sen. Blanche Lincoln this fall.

50. Commission Races Hinge on Public Issues -

Two issues figure in to the 11 competitive races for the Shelby County Commission – the future of the Regional Medical Center and local government consolidation.

Any push card for a credible candidate includes either something about how to save The MED or the candidate’s opposition to consolidation – or both.

51. Candidates Battle it Out in Democratic Primary -

Before voters get to the slimmer, trimmer Aug. 5 race for Shelby County mayor, some of them must decide the three-candidate Democratic primary on the May 4 ballot.

As political races go, this one has enough drama to make it interesting.

52. Court Attorney Coupé Earns Juvenile Law Certification -

Thomas W. Coupé, a staff attorney at the Juvenile Court of Memphis and Shelby County, has been certified as a juvenile law and child welfare specialist by the Tennessee Commission on Continuing Legal Education and Specialization. He is one of only 10 attorneys statewide certified in this specialty by the Tennessee Commission.

53. Commission to Appeal Second Juvenile Court Judgeship -

The battle over more than one Juvenile Court judge is on its way to the Tennessee Supreme Court.

Shelby County Commissioners voted this week to appeal an earlier ruling by the Tennessee Appeals Court to the high court. The Supreme Court could choose to hear the case or deny the request for an appeal, which would leave the appeals court ruling in place.

54. Wrangling Expected Before Juvenile Court Ruling’s Appeal -  

The loser was expected to appeal.

But the Shelby County Commission will have a debate at the very least and possibly a close vote before any appeal of this week’s Tennessee Court of Appeals ruling on a second Juvenile Court judge’s position is approved.

A three-judge panel of the appeals court ruled this week that the Shelby County Commission cannot fill a second Juvenile Court judge’s position.

The ruling not only reverses a Chancery Court ruling and plans by a majority on the Commission, it also holds that part of a private act by the Tennessee Legislature is unconstitutional. Passed in 1967, the law provided for a second judge’s position.

The commission was not unanimous when it voted to create the position but did not fill it.

The move in early 2007 by the commission prompted Juvenile Court Judge Curtis Person Jr. to file the lawsuit the appeals court ruled on this week.

“It’s always been very clear, to me anyway, that this power could never be delegated by the Legislature,” Person, a former state legislator, told The Daily News.

“A court without a judge is an anomaly,” he added, quoting from the court ruling. “It was something that I felt I had to do to protect the court and to determine the future of the court. Therefore it had to be dealt with. It’s a huge constitutional issue.”

Hot air ahead

Person noted it is the second ruling of its kind from an appeals court panel on the issue in the past year. The previous lawsuit involved a city court created in the city of Jellico, Tenn.

“This opinion is much longer and has a lot more detail in it … about why it can’t be done,” Person said.

Commissioner Deidre Malone, who led the charge for the second judge’s position, said Monday she was disappointed by the decision. But she also said she would ask the commission to appeal the ruling to the Tennessee Supreme Court.

“My recommendation is going to be that we appeal,” Malone said. “My hope is that we kick it up to the state Supreme Court.”

The possibility of an appeal came as no surprise to Person.

“Certainly they have that right,” he told The Daily News.

Commission Chairwoman Joyce Avery was opposed to the second judgeship and praised the court’s decision.

“I think the court ruled in a correct manner. I always felt that Judge Person was elected as judge and he should remain as judge without two judges,” Avery said.

The differing opinions that remain are an indication that more debate is ahead before the commission decides on an appeal.

“There will be a lot of debate,” Avery said at the end of a nearly four-hour meeting with a relatively short agenda that did not include word of the ruling. “As you’ve seen today, commissioners like to talk.”

Catch-22

In 1967, Person supported passage of the private act in his role as a state legislator. The legislation unified what had been separate juvenile courts in Memphis and Shelby County.

The commission’s action and the appeals court ruling focused on a part of the private act known as “Section 20.”

The section created a second division of the unified Juvenile Court and authorized the County Commission to appoint a judge to that division.

The legislation also included a clause that said if Section 20 was ever declared unconstitutional, the rest of the legislation would stand on its own.

“We have concluded, however, that the General Assembly did not create or establish a court because it did not provide for the judgeship,” read the appeals court opinion written by Judge Patricia J. Cottrell. “While the General Assembly may have begun the process of establishing a court, it did not complete it. Because we find that Division 2 was not created in 1967, and, in fact, has not existed since that time, we find this argument by the commission inapplicable.”

Appeals court Judges Frank G. Clement and Richard H. Dinkins agreed for a unanimous opinion.

Chaotic times

Malone proposed the second judge’s position following Person’s election in the 2006 county elections. Avery and other critics argued the drive to create another position was a response by those who backed Veronica Coleman-Davis, who lost to Person in the election.

Malone and proponents argued a second and even third or fourth judgeship would not cost the county any more money and could replace a system of Juvenile Court referees who work under the Juvenile Court judge. The system of referees was put in place during the 40-year-plus tenure of the late Kenneth Turner, who did not have a law degree.

Person also served as a referee during Turner’s tenure as Juvenile Court judge.

He argued more than one judge controlling the direction of the court would create “chaos” and insisted the system of referees works well.

Critics of the current system pointed to other criminal and civil courts that operate efficiently with multiple divisions and one judge who serves as the administrative judge, usually on a rotating basis.

But Person points to a footnote in this week’s ruling that he said demonstrates the unique nature of Juvenile Court.

“Judges have duties regarding administrative aspects of the courts,” the footnote reads. “In order for a judge to perform these ministerial duties, it is necessary to know whether the Juvenile Court is composed of one or two divisions.”

Oops, their bad

Commissioner Steve Mulroy, a law professor at the Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law at the University of Memphis, said the opinion was a “strained reading of the 1967 act’s text.”

“We should have the Tennessee Supreme Court decide this matter once and for all,” he said.

Person’s suit also alleged a violation of the state open meetings law following the first vote in late 2006, just weeks after Person won an eight-year term as Juvenile Court judge.

Malone acknowledged some private discussion with other commissioners prior to the first vote.

Weeks later, she moved to rescind the action and take a second vote. The resolution was approved again.

The appeals court ruling held the second attempt was all the remedy that was needed to the violation of the state law.

“Where … the governmental body acts quickly and decisively to correct any mistake in its procedure, the primary goal of the Open Meetings Act has been accomplished,” said the ruling. “We do not believe that the Legislature intended to hinder such correction of error, but rather to encourage it.”

...

55. Appeals Court Sides With Person in Juvenile Court Lawsuit -  

The Tennessee Appeals Court ruled Monday that the Shelby County Commission cannot fill a second Juvenile Court judge’s position.

The ruling not only reverses a Chancery Court ruling and plans by the Commission. It also holds that a private act by the Tennessee legislature passed in 1967 which provided for a second judge’s position is unconstitutional.

The commission was not unanimous when it voted to create the position but did not fill it.

The move in early 2007 by the commission prompted Juvenile Court Judge Curtis Person Jr. to file the lawsuit that the appeals court ruled on this week.

Commissioner Deidre Malone, who led the charge for the second judge’s position, said Monday she was disappointed by the decision. But she also said she would ask the commission to appeal the ruling to the Tennessee Supreme Court.

“My recommendation is going to be that we appeal,” Malone told The Daily News. “My hope is that we kick it up to the state supreme court.”

Commission chairwoman Joyce Avery was opposed to the second judgeship and praised the court’s decision.

“I think the court ruled in a correct manner. I always felt that Judge Person was elected as judge and he should remain as judge without two judges.”

The differing opinions that remain are an indication that more debate is ahead before the commission decides on an appeal.

“There will be a lot of debate,” Avery said at the end of a nearly four hour meeting with a relatively short agenda that did not include word of the ruling. “As you’ve seen today, commissioners like to talk.”

Malone proposed the second judge’s position following Person’s election in the 2006 county elections. Avery and other critics argued the drive to create another position was a response by those who backed Veronica Coleman-Davis, who lost to Person in the election.

Malone and proponents argued a second and even third or fourth judgeship would not cost the county any more money and could replace a system of Juvenile Court referees who work under the Juvenile Court Judge. The system of referees was put in place during the 40 year plus tenure of the late Kenneth Turner who did not have a law degree.

Person also served as a referee during Turner’s tenure as Juvenile Court Judge.

He argued more than one judge controlling the direction of the court would create “chaos” and insisted the system of referees worked well.

Critics of the current system pointed to other criminal and civil courts that operate efficiently with multiple divisions and one judge who serves as the administrative judge, usually on a rotating basis.

Person voted for passage of the private act in his role as a state legislator before becoming a referee. The legislation unified what had been separate Juvenile Courts in Memphis and Shelby County.

The commission’s action and the appeals court ruling focused on a part of the private act known as “section 20.”

The section created a second division of the unified Juvenile Court and authorized the County Commission to appoint a judge to that division.

“We have concluded, however, that the General Assembly did not create or establish a court because it did not provide for the judgeship,” the appeals court ruled in an opinion written by Judge Patricia J. Cottrell. “While the General Assembly may have begun the process of establishing a court, it did not complete it. Because we find that division 2 was not created in 1967, and, in fact, has not existed since that time, we find this argument by the Commission inapplicable.”

Appeals court judges Frank G. Clement and Richard H. Dinkins agreed for a unanimous opinion.

The ruling noted that both sides in the lawsuit agreed that the Tennessee Constitution bars the legislature from delegating its authority to establish and create “inferior” courts including Juvenile Courts. Citing an 1879 Tennessee Supreme Court ruling, Cottrell wrote that the definition of a court includes “a judge or chancellor performing the judicial functions.” The court also ruled in 1916, “The presence of a judge or judges is necessary as an essential element of a court.”

...

56. UPDATE: Appeals Court Rules No Second Juvenile Court Judge -

The Tennessee Appeals Court ruled today that the Shelby County Commission cannot fill a second Juvenile Court judge’s position.

The ruling not only reverses a Chancery Court ruling and plans by the Commission. It also holds that a private act by the Tennessee legislature passed in 1967 which provided for a second judge’s position is unconstitutional.

57. Stanley’s Rise – and Fall -

Paul Stanley is a political result of the conservative backlash that with the 1994 mid-term elections gave the GOP majorities in the U.S. House and Senate for the first time since Dwight Eisenhower was president.

58. Why the Struggle to Control Beale Street Continues -

Eight blocks lie between the Shelby County Courthouse and Beale Street.

The courthouse’s seated representations of wisdom, justice, liberty and authority look southward toward the entertainment district. Sometimes, if the wind is blowing in the right direction, you can hear the band in Handy Park from the courthouse steps.

59. Fox to Help Raise Scholarship Money -

Actress Vivica A. Fox will be in town this weekend to celebrate her 44th birthday and help a local nonprofit organization raise money for it scholarship fund. The fund will present $1,000 scholarships to teenagers from four Memphis-area high schools for college admission and expenses.

60. Walker Advocates for Litigants In Juvenile Court Position -

David Walker is the supervising attorney for the Juvenile Court of Memphis and Shelby County’s Advocate for Non-Custodial Parents Program, a free service that helps litigants with various juvenile-related matters.

61. TBA Honors Judge Person For Efforts to Aid Litigants -

Shelby County Juvenile Court Judge Curtis Person will be recognized Saturday by the Tennessee Bar Association’s Juvenile and Children’s Law Section. The recognition is for his creation of a special position at the court that offers free legal advice about juvenile court-related matters to people unable to afford an attorney.

62. Family Court Plan Spotlights Pilot Debate -

A family court task force set up by the Shelby County Board of Commissioners completed its work this week with a set of recommendations that call for more of a connection between the courts that deal with families in crisis and social services agencies. The report goes to the commission for further consideration.

63. Second Juvenile Court Judge Position Hinges on Appeal -

There won't be any move by the Shelby County Commission to fill a second Juvenile Court judge's position until the issue is decided by an appeals court.

Chancellor Kenny Armstrong refused to lift a stay of such an appointment Monday afternoon. As that was happening, commissioners, at their bi-monthly session, were opening a new front in the political discussion about changes to the court.

64. Juvenile Judge Stay Should Be Lifted, Commission Votes -

Shelby County Commissioners voted Wednesday to seek to lift a stay of a Chancery Court ruling that would allow them to appoint a second Juvenile Court judge.

The commission's attorney in the matter, Leo Bearman, is expected to file the motion with Chancellor Kenny Armstrong soon, said Commissioner Deidre Malone.

65. Commissioners Weigh Options For Juvenile Court -

Shelby County Commissioners meet today to debate the next move in the legal fight over a second Juvenile Court judge's position.

Some commissioners want to ask Chancellor Kenny Armstrong to lift a stay of his May ruling that the commission can create the second position and fill it until a special election is held in 2008. Armstrong sided with the commission in a lawsuit filed by Juvenile Court Judge Curtis Person Jr. But he stayed the ruling pending an appeal.

66. Chinese Parents Regain Final Custody of Anna Mae He -

MEMPHIS (AP) - A Chinese couple regained custody of their 8-year-old daughter Monday after a seven-year fight to get her back from what was supposed to be temporary foster care.

Judge Curtis Person of Memphis Juvenile Court signed an order returning legal custody of Anna Mae He to parents Shaoqiang “Jack” and Qin Luo “Casey” He, Chinese citizens who came to the United States so Shaoqiang He could attend college.

67. Help for Dark Moments Of Divorce Offered at Lecture -

The trials and tribulations that go on inside divorce courts have inspired a bounty of movies, books, country songs and numerous other works of fiction.

Sadly, however, the truth about divorce is that even the prospect of severing ties with a spouse can leave divorcing couples with plenty of questions about their financial future and, if children are involved, their future as parents.

68. New Juvenile Court Study Comes With Criticism and Praise -

A second study of Juvenile Court operations reaches many of the same conclusions as a study by Shelby County Commissioners.

But the study by the National Center For State Courts (NCSC) comes with more conciliatory language than the commissioners offered in what has become a political as well as policy issue.

69. Juvenile Court Recommendations Call for Overhaul -

The possibility of a second Juvenile Court judge for Shelby County is an issue other judges in other courts will decide.

The high-profile change is but the most basic of several recommended by a County Commission committee. The ad hoc committee has been reviewing court operations since September, when many of its members and Juvenile Court Judge Curtis Person took office. Its discussion has been just as spirited as the public back-and-forth with Person.

70. Juvenile Court JudgeTops Commission Agenda -      Shelby County Commission members will discuss a lawsuit over the possibility of hiring a second judge for the Juvenile Court of Memphis and Shelby County.
     The commission meeting will beg

71. Second Juvenile Court JudgeCloser to Reality -      A second judge may soon preside at Juvenile Court.
     Chancellor Kenny W. Armstrong ruled last week that the Shelby County Board of Commissioners can move ahead with creating a second judg

72. Anna Mae He Act Making Way Through General Assembly -

The Anna Mae He Act was approved Wednesday by the Tennessee House Children and Family Affairs Committee and now is moving through the Senate.

The current House bill aims to address cases such as the Anna Mae He case by more clearly defining terms such as "willfully failed to support" and "willfully failed to visit." Those terms were at the core of findings by both the Tennessee Supreme Court in January and that of Robert L. Childers, judge in Division 9 of the Circuit Court of Tennessee for the 30th Judicial District, in his initial finding in May 2004.

73. Juvenile Court DisputeMoves to State Legislature -      Single parents trying to collect monetary support from absentee parents almost found themselves walking a much thinner tightrope as they try to force unwilling parents to support their children.
   &n

74. Brighton Students Punished For MySpace Page Spoofing Teacher -

There's a reason that Internet sensation MySpace.com is so popular that Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. spent almost $600 million in 2005 to buy it. The site reportedly signs up about 230,000 new users a day.

75. New Law Augments Legal Representation For Low-Income Tennesseans -

For many people, solving legal problems might be as simple as consulting an attorney. But for the more than 1 million Tennesseans who live in poverty, finding legal assistance is not that easy.

That's where legal aid programs come in, and the Tennessee Alliance for Legal Services (TALS) is leading the pack.

76. State Senator Plans to Run for Juvenile Court Position -

After nearly 40 years in office, State Sen. Curtis S. Person Jr., R-Memphis, is making plans to retire from the Tennessee Senate in November.

But while other 71-year-olds might opt for leisure time at this point in life, Person would prefer a gavel to a fishing pole. The senator is making a bid for Shelby County Juvenile Court judge, the position from which his friend Judge Kenneth Turner will retire this year.

77. Archived Article: Law Focus - Gun laws

Enough is enough, says united area leadership

By MARY DANDO

The Daily News

The rising number of children killed in crossfire has brought the community together in an effort to stop violent crime and get illegal guns and those re...

78. Archived Article: Law Focus - Child custody New legislation to boost custodial protection By MARY DANDO The Daily News Legislation tightening loopholes in custodial protection of children born out of wedlock is currently moving through the states General Assembly. The Child Cust...

79. Archived Article: Calendar - Oct

Calendar for Oct. 8-Oct. 14

Oct. 8
The International Association of Administrative Professionals monthly meeting is 6 p.m. at the Holiday Inn-East. The speaker is Charlotte Doyle, IAAP Tennessee division adviser and immediate past Ten...

80. Archived Article: Calendar - Oct

Oct. 1

Minority Enterprise Development Week, Oct. 1 through Oct. 5, brings together minority business owners, buyers and procurement representatives from corporate America, federal, state and local governments. In keeping with this years t...

81. Archived Article: Ccdc (lead) - CCDC rejects Poly Esters application CCDC rejects nightclub loan application By SUE PEASE The Daily News After an apparent mix-up over the Center City Development Corp.s policy, the CCDCs board of directors Wednesday rejected a development applicati...

82. Archived Article: Law Focus - She who pays the clinic gets the abortion Language of abortion amendment draws Kyles ire By MARY DANDO The Daily News State legislators might be heading for a heated debate as to who pays for abortions in Tennessee. Sen. David Fowler (R-Signal Mount...

83. Archived Article: Market Briefs - The International Association of Administrative Professionals will meet at 6 p The International Association of Administrative Professionals will meet at 6 p.m. Feb. 12 at the Holiday Inn-Memphis East. The program will be "A Salute to Students,...

84. Archived Article: Assisi (lead) - By Stacey Wiedower Assisi Foundation honored for giving The Assisi Foundation of Memphis will be honored this week by the Tennessee Medical Association for its outstanding contributions to public health in Memphis. The organization is one of three r...

85. Archived Article: Real Focus - After-the-Fact Referral Fees   Legislation before the state General Assembly would limit when referral fees can be requested from real estate agents By Doug Collins Special to The Daily News Imagine you are a salesperson who has spent many hour...

86. Archived Article: Law Focus - By SUZANNE THOMPSON Defer and relieve Two new laws will make more income available to senior citizens living on fixed incomes By SUZANNE THOMPSON The Daily News Proposed changes in Tennessee tax law could provide financial help for senior citizens l...

87. Archived Article: Back-state - State appoints commission State appoints commission on juvenile justice reform A 17-member panel has been named to rewrite state laws for juvenile offenders, Gov. Don Sundquist announced last week. The commission will focus on the current problems t...

88. Archived Article: Standout - By SUZANNE THOMPSON Maximizing misery Curtis D. Wall fell to the depths, but a spiritual program has helped him come out on top By SUZANNE THOMPSON The Daily News Although Curtis D. Wall has a masters degree in psychology from Middle Tennessee State...

89. Archived Article: Real Briefs - Mid-America Apartment Communities Inc Mid-America Apartment Communities Inc. announced it will merge with Flournoy Development Co., a Columbus, Ga.-based developer, builder, owner and manager of apartment communities in a transaction valued at about...

90. Archived Article: Court Records Chg - By CAMILLE H Law says counties canít profit from online access By CAMILLE H. GAMBLE The Daily News Gov. Don Sundquist signed into legislation this month a bill that will require all county offices who offer records via computer to only charge...

91. Archived Article: County Online Chg - By CAMILLE H State bill should define cost for remote access to county records By CAMILLE H. GAMBLE The Daily News The Tennessee Association of Realtors is supporting a bill in the state legislature that would require county governments providing co...

92. Archived Article: Law Focus.st - The cooperation of two General Sessions civil judges with court officials had led to pending legislation that, when passed, will create a new domestic violence court in Shelby County. Consolidating courts Legislation would streamline domestic violen...

93. Archived Article: Workers Comp Jts - 4/12 jts subcontr. comp Bill to require workers comp for subcontractors By JAMES SNYDER The Daily News A state Senate bill introduced last month would require all construction subcontractors to carry workers compensation insurance. Under the current...