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Editorial Results (free)

1. 8 Apply to Become Next Tennessee Attorney General -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Eight candidates have applied with the Tennessee Supreme Court for the next eight-year term as state attorney general.

Tennessee is the only state where the high court appoints the attorney general.

2. Few Clues to Tennessee Attorney General Applicants -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The deadline to apply to become Tennessee's next attorney general is Friday, but anyone still on the fence about whether to join the fray won't have the benefit of sizing up the competition first.

3. Vols: Looks Like 6-6 Season -

Pull out your 2014 schedules, UT fans.

Fall camp is done, and it’s time to get in game-week mode with the season opener against Utah State fast approaching.

So go to the little box next to each of UT’s opponents on the 2014 schedule and pick the winner.

4. Tenn. Attorney General: Parents Can't Give Kids New Last Names -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Tennessee's attorney general says married parents can't invent new last names for their children.

Attorney General Bob Cooper writes in a legal opinion that state law limits the options to the last name of either the father or the mother, or both.

5. Musical Tribute -

Jack T. Cooper was born a few years after American modernist composer Charles Ives died, but this did not the stop them from connecting – even before Cooper was born.

Cooper, 51, and an associate professor and the director of jazz and studio music at the University of Memphis, was born in Los Angeles to a mother who was a professional keyboardist and a father who was an amateur saxophone and clarinet player.

6. Tennessee Attorney General Bob Cooper to Seek Another Term -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Tennessee Attorney General Bob Cooper announced Monday he will seek another eight-year term after three Democrats were retained on the Supreme Court.

7. U.S. Senate Primaries Feature Different Realities -

The statewide primary races for U.S. Senate on the August ballot feature the longest and best-known political back story in Tennessee politics and competing realities about what it takes for Democrats to end their shutout in statewide offices.

8. Events -

Talk Shoppe will host Speed Networking: Scoring Business Leads With Fast Pitches & Race Around the Bases Wednesday, April 30, from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. at DeVry University, 6401 Poplar Ave., sixth floor. Baseball attire optional. Cost is free. Visit talkshoppe.biz.

9. Events -

B.I.G. for Memphis, a business interest group that connects Memphis Police colonels and business leaders, will meet Wednesday, April 30, at 9:45 a.m. at Phelps Security, 4932 Park Ave. Bob Nations of the Shelby County Office of Preparedness will present “Emergency Preparedness and Homeland Security in the Mid-South.” Visit phelpssecurity.com.

10. Harris Files Ford Challenge at Deadline -

Memphis City Council member Lee Harris is challenging Democratic state Sen. Ophelia Ford in the August primary for District 29, the Senate seat held by a member of the Ford family since 1975.

11. Tennessee Can Lawfully Electrocute Inmates if No Drugs -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Tennessee can lawfully use the electric chair in executions if lethal injection is stopped by the courts or because the state can't get the drugs to carry out the sentence, the state attorney general said in a legal opinion this week.

12. Senate Defeats Proposal to Elect Attorney General -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The Senate on Wednesday defeated an effort to change the Tennessee constitution to require the popular election of the attorney general.

The measure sponsored by Republican Sen. Mae Beavers of Mt. Juliet received 15 votes in favor and 14 votes against. Proposals need at least 17 votes – a majority of the 33-member chamber – to pass.

13. Full Senate to Vote on Latest Attorney General Election Proposal -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The state Senate is taking another run at changing the way Tennessee's attorney general gains office.

Under a proposed constitutional amendment advanced to a full Senate vote Tuesday, the attorney general would stand for popular election rather than being appointed by the state Supreme Court.

14. Events -

Playhouse on the Square will host a Four Seasons Cocktail Series happy hour Saturday, Dec. 21, from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Playhouse, 66 S. Cooper St. The event will include guided tours of the theater, including areas off limits to the public. Cost is free; donations benefit Memphis Youth Symphony Orchestra. Visit playhouseonthesquare.org.

15. Events -

The Orpheum Theatre will hold its Holiday Open House Friday, Dec. 20, at the theater, 203 S. Main St. Doors open at 10 a.m., and highlights include a concert on the Mighty Wurlitzer organ at noon, a screening of “Miracle on 34th Street” at 2 p.m. and a presentation by “Memphis Movie Theatres” author Vincent Astor at 4:30 p.m. Visit orpheum-memphis.com for a complete schedule.

16. Overton Square Banner Hints at Music Return -

In the place where the marquee for Lafayette’s Music Room in Overton Square was once anchored, a new banner went up last week by Loeb Properties reading “The Music Is Back.”

Covered over with a blank tarp is another sign above it also by the Overton Square developers that bears a striking resemblance to the old marquee.

17. Airline Merger Could Bring Changes to Memphis Airport -

Delta Air Lines considers itself a “low-cost carrier” that should be able to apply for the slots and gates US Airways Group Inc. and American Airlines are giving up as part of their merger settlement agreement with the U.S. Justice Department.

18. Agreement Keeps Merged Airline at 5 Tennessee Airports -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Tennessee's top five airports will continue to be served by a merged US Airways and American Airlines for the next five years under an agreement with the state.

The U.S. Justice Department on Tuesday announced it reached an agreement to allow the two entities to become the world's largest airline after agreeing to scale back its presence at Reagan National Airport in Washington and in other big cities.

19. Overton Square Momentum Connects With History -

If you think Midtown’s recent momentum, particularly in and around Overton Square, is real growth, you are right.

But it is growth in development that Overton Square developer Bob Loeb believes will bring along a denser population in the area.

20. Contested Judicial Elections Spark Debate -

Memphis attorneys John Ryder and Gary Smith both think it is a bad idea to have contested elections for state appeals court judges.

21. States Get $30 Million From Discount Club Marketer -

Tennessee is one of a group of states that has won a $30 million settlement against a marketing company the state says used confusing and deceptive business practices.

According to the state attorney general’s office, Affinion and its subsidiaries offer a variety of services, including credit monitoring, roadside assistance and discount travel.

22. Events -

Memphis Rotary Club will meet Tuesday, Aug. 27, at noon at the University Club of Memphis, 1346 Central Ave. Tennessee Attorney General Bob Cooper will speak. Cost for nonmembers is $18. RSVP to Taylor Hughes at taylor@memphisrotary.org.

23. House GOP, Democrats Clash Over Immigration -

WASHINGTON (AP) – House Republicans took a tentative step toward offering citizenship to some unauthorized immigrants Tuesday, but hit an immediate wall of resistance from the White House on down as Democrats said it wasn't enough.

24. Events -

The Project Management Institute Memphis chapter will meet Wednesday, July 10, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at DoubleTree Hotel, 5069 Sanderlin Ave. Bob Mahler, consultant for the U.S. Deparment of Homeland Security, will present “Common Sense Risk Management.” Registration, which includes dinner, begins at 5:45 p.m. Cost is $20 at the door. Visit pmimemphis.org.

25. Events -

The Booksellers at Laurelwood will host the Eating Greek Wine & Food Tasting Tuesday, July 9, at 6:30 p.m. at The Booksellers Bistro, 387 Perkins Road Extended. The meal will include traditional Greek foods paired with wines. Cost is $25; space is limited. R.S.V.P. to 374-0881.

26. Medical Supply Program Facing Delays, Scrutiny -

Less than a week before an effort to rein in billions of dollars in Medicare spending on home medical equipment is set to kick in, members of Congress and medical supply programs are pushing to delay the plan, saying some of the process has been mishandled and that the process lacks transparency.

27. Events -

The Center City Development Corp. board will meet Wednesday, June 19, at 9 a.m. in the Downtown Memphis Commission conference room, 114 N. Main St. Visit downtownmemphiscommission.com.

28. Events -

Talk Shoppe will meet Wednesday, June 19, from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. at DeVry University, 6401 Poplar Ave., sixth floor. Cost is free. Visit talkshoppe.biz.

29. Children's Services Would Charge $35,000 for Public Records -

The state agency that oversees the welfare of Tennessee children is again at financial odds with news organizations seeking more information.

The Tennessean reported the Department of Children’s Services said this week that it would charge $34,952 to produce public records of children who died or nearly died during the past 11 months after having some contact with DCS.

30. Bill Haslam Vetoes ‘Ag Gag’ Bill -

Gov. Bill Haslam on Monday vetoed a bill that would require images documenting animal abuse be turned over to law enforcement within 48 hours, saying his main concern is its constitutionality.

State Attorney General Bob Cooper last week said in a legal opinion that the measure would be “constitutionally suspect” because it could violate Fifth Amendment protections against self-incrimination and for placing burdens on news collection.

31. Tennessee Receives Portion of Drug Quality Claim -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Tennessee will receive a portion of a $500 million settlement with generic drug manufacturer Ranbaxy.

Tennessee Attorney General Bob Cooper announced Thursday that Tennessee will receive more than $5.5 million. The settlement resolved claims that Ranbaxy sold inferior drugs and made false statements about how they were made.

32. Haslam Vetoes ‘Ag Gag’ Bill -

Gov. Bill Haslam on Monday vetoed a bill that would require images documenting animal abuse be turned over to law enforcement within 48 hours, saying his main concern is its constitutionality.

State Attorney General Bob Cooper last week said in a legal opinion that the measure would be “constitutionally suspect” because it could violate Fifth Amendment protections against self-incrimination and for placing burdens on news collection.

33. Settlement With Nonprofits Could Bring $40 Million -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A long-standing legal dispute between two publicly traded healthcare companies and the receiver for two Tennessee non-profit corporations could ultimately result in $40 million going to charities in the Volunteer State.

34. Steady Groove -

This year’s Record Store Day, an international celebration held the third Saturday in April, brought casual music fans along with diehards and vinyl evangelists into music shops around the country, including Goner Records and Shangri-La Records in Memphis.

35. Senate Votes to Block Access to Gun Carry Records -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Before last year's elections, the Senate Republican Caucus obtained a copy of the entire database of handgun carry permit holders in Tennessee. On Wednesday, the GOP-controlled chamber voted to block public access to those records.

36. Shakin’ Up Beale -

The newest addition to Beale Street is a Memphis music legend. Jerry Lee Lewis, the last living member of the Sun Records’ “Million Dollar Quartet,” is lending his name and personal items to a nightspot at 310 Beale St.

37. Constitutional Concerns Raised Over Vanderbilt Police Bill -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The state's attorney general has raised constitutional concerns over an effort to strip Vanderbilt University of its police force because of a nondiscrimination policy for student groups.

38. Tennessee to Benefit From Google Settlement -

Tennessee will get an estimated $133,528 as part of an agreement reached with Google and 36 other states to revamp the online search giant’s privacy practices.

That’s according to Tennessee Attorney General Bob Cooper. The agreement stems from privacy complaints regarding Google’s collection of data from unsecured wireless networks nationwide while taking photographs for its Street View service between 2008 and March 2010.

39. Tennessee Homeowners Get Loan Relief -

Thousands of Tennessee homeowners have received more than $161 million in loan relief as part of a landmark multistate settlement with five U.S. banks over foreclosure abuses.

Tennessee Attorney General Bob Cooper’s office said on Friday that the relief went to about 4,000 homeowners in the state between March 1 and Dec. 31. The announcement came after a report was released last week by an office monitoring the settlement.

40. Events -

The Gavel Club of Memphis will meet Friday, Feb. 22, at 11:30 a.m. in the Holiday Inn University of Memphis Medallion Room, 3700 Central Ave. Ron Reid, senior agency manager of Memphis Public Library LINC, will speak. Lunch is Dutch treat. Call Bob Gray at 494-8639.

41. Events -

Poplar Pike Playhouse will present “The Wiz” Thursday, Feb. 21, through March 9 at the theater, 7653 Old Poplar Pike. Visit ppp.org for times and tickets.

42. Filling the Voids -

Last year was a banner year for adaptive reuse projects in Midtown and Downtown.

Developers announced plans for the Sears Crosstown building, Overton Square, Hotel Chisca, James Lee House and old United Warehouse in the South Main Historic Arts District. Construction began on The Pyramid, turning it into a 220,000-square-foot mega-Bass Pro Shop Outdoor World, and Memphis in May moved into its new headquarters at 56 S. Front St., a 14,600-square-foot building that’s on the National Register of Historic Places.

43. Loeb: City Should Increase Investment in Urban Core -

The relevance of Overton Square is that it’s one of many initiatives the city has in place to make Memphis a better place and a city of choice for the millennial generation.

Seventy-seven percent of those born from the early 1980s to the early 2000s want to live in the urban core and to drive less.

44. Mortgage Settlement Deadline is Friday -

The deadline to file a claim under the national mortgage settlement is Friday, Jan. 18.

Approximately 37,000 Tennessee borrowers who lost their homes to foreclosure between Jan. 1, 2008, and Dec. 31, 2011, may be eligible to receive a payment under the settlement.

45. Local Politicians Split on Fiscal Cliff Bill -

There was only one vote for the American Taxpayer Relief bill Tuesday, Jan. 1, among the nine Tennesseans who represent the state in the U.S. House of Representatives.

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Memphis, said he wasn’t happy with all of the agreement but voted for it because of the tax cuts it maintained.

46. MemShop Latest Boon for Overton Square -

A year ago, Loeb Properties Inc. was granted the green light from Memphis City Council for the funds necessary to construct a parking lot and detention pond west of Cooper Street – the last component in the more than $30 million public/private partnership to revitalize the once thriving Overton Square district.

47. Obama Carries Shelby, Cohen Over Flinn and Two Tax Hikes Defeated -

President Barack Obama carried Shelby County in unofficial Nov. 6 election returns as his Republican challenger Mitt Romney took the state’s 11 electoral votes.

Voter turnout in the most popular election cycle among Shelby County voters was 61.9 percent, about the same percentage as four years ago. But the 371,256 voters is fewer than 2008 when more than 400,000 Shelby County voters cast ballots. The percentage is about the same because there are fewer registered voters in Shelby County than there were four years ago after a purge by election officials.

48. Shelby Early Vote Shows Cohen Winning - Two Tax Questions Losing -

Early vote totals from Shelby County were released just before 10 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 6, after the vote count was delayed in part by long lines of voters waiting to vote at the 7 p.m. closing of polls.

49. Foreclosure Help Notices Being Mailed in Tennessee -

Notices are going out in the mail to an estimated 37,000 Tennessee borrowers who may be eligible for payment under a $25 billion national mortgage foreclosure settlement.

Eligible borrowers will be receiving claim forms in the mail this month and Attorney General Bob Cooper of Tennessee urged residents to complete the forms and return them by the Jan. 18 deadline.

50. Grassroots Effort -

Approaching the second anniversary of “New Face for an Old Broad” and the Historic Broad Avenue Business Association’s painting of its own bike lanes, the Binghampton district has seen activity increase exponentially on several fronts.

51. Tennessee Starting to Benefit From Foreclosure Settlement -

Tennessee homeowners have received more than $36 million in relief from March 1 through June 30 as part of a nationwide settlement reached with the country’s five big mortgage servicers.

That’s according to the office of Tennessee Attorney General Bob Cooper. The relief is in the form of loan modifications, refinances and facilitated short sales.

52. Kelsey, McManus Seek Opinion On South Cordova -

Two state legislators from Shelby County have requested a legal opinion from Tennessee Attorney General Bob Cooper on the recent annexation of South Cordova by the city of Memphis.

53. State Creates Mortgage Hotline to Help Homeowners -

The Tennessee attorney general and Tennessee Housing Development Agency have created a mortgage hotline for struggling homeowners.

The development comes after attorneys general across the country reached an agreement with the nation’s top five mortgage services that will provide an estimated $140 million in relief to Tennesseans.

54. Another Round -

The revitalization of Overton Square can perhaps be best summed up with a famous quote often attributed to Mark Twain: “History does not repeat itself, but it does rhyme.”

The history of the Midtown entertainment district dates back to late 1970, when T.G.I. Friday’s opened its first franchised location on Madison Avenue near Cooper Street following the passage of a referendum vote allowing liquor by the drink citywide a year prior.

55. Tenn. to Receive $13M in Glaxo Settlement -

Tennessee Attorney General Bob Cooper says the state will receive more than $13 million as part of a settlement agreement with GlaxoSmithKline PLC over illegal marketing and drug pricing allegations.

56. Tying it All Together -

Two of the city’s high-profile architecture firms are behind the design enhancement of one of Memphis’ most cherished spots – Overton Square.

LRK Inc. is the architect of record for both Loeb Properties Inc.’s $20 million revitalization of the Midtown theater district and also for the city’s parking garage at Monroe Avenue and Florence Street.

57. Loeb Makes Progress on Square Plan -

The blue banner that hung until recently at the curved building at Cooper Street and Madison Avenue and read “Returning in 2012” will soon ring true for Overton Square and its developer, Loeb Properties Inc.

58. Horse Slaughter Bill Stalls in Legislature -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The sponsor of a state Senate proposal that seeks to encourage the commercial slaughter of horses in Tennessee withdrew the measure Wednesday, but said he likely will revive it if a similar bill makes progress in the House.

59. Conspiracy Theory -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Tennessee joined 14 other states along with the U.S. Justice Department in suing Apple Inc. and major book publishers Wednesday, alleging a conspiracy to raise the price of electronic books they said cost consumers more than $100 million in the past two years by adding $2 to $5 to the price of each e-book.

60. All Eyes Look to Nashville in Schools Debate -

As Tennessee legislative committees in Nashville prepare to shut down for the year, there are still a few to meet this week.

And one of them on Wednesday, March 28, could be the next curve in the schools reformation saga.

61. School Board Rejects Building Transfer Rules -

Countywide school board members rejected Thursday, March 22, an agreement with county government on the possible transfer of school buildings to municipal school districts that would check possible legislation in Nashville on the same general subject.

62. Muni School District Votes on Hold -

At week’s end, the move to municipal school districts had slowed for a possible pit stop in Shelby County Chancery Court.

And efforts in the Tennessee Legislature to check a possible legal challenge of the state law that allows the suburban school districts specifically in Shelby County encountered some vocal non-Memphis resistance in the House Education Subcommittee.

63. Election Commission Says No To Municipal Schools Referenda -

The Shelby County Election Commission says requests to put referenda on the ballot May 10 to create municipal school districts are “procedurally defective.”

The unanimous voice vote by the commission Wednesday, March 21, sets the stage for a possible legal challenge of the decision by suburban leaders in Chancery Court.

64. AG's Opinion Familiar Front In Schools Discussion -

The schools consolidation saga is moving into déjà vu territory with a new legal opinion from the Tennessee attorney general on a schools ballot question and legislation affecting the process moving in Nashville.

65. Tenn. Lawmakers Join Opposition to Obama Health Care Bill -

A group of Tennessee lawmakers are joining their counterparts from around the country in registering with the U.S. Supreme Court their opposition to President Barack Obama’s signature domestic legislation, the health care reform bill.

66. Foreclosure Deal Nets State $146M -

The state of Tennessee is participating in a $25 billion settlement announced Thursday, Feb. 9, between 49 states – all but Oklahoma – over foreclosure abuses from some of the nation’s biggest lenders.

67. Foreclosure Deal Nets $146M for Tennessee -

The state of Tennessee is participating in a $25 billion settlement announced Thursday, Feb. 9, between 49 states – all but Oklahoma – over foreclosure abuses from some of the nation’s biggest lenders.

68. Loeb Tells Rotary About Overton Square Plans -

Among the first of Bob Loeb’s comments when he addressed the Memphis Rotary Club Tuesday, Jan. 10, was that when his firm finishes the redevelopment of Overton Square, the hope is to pass the Rotarian Four-Way Test.

69. Airport Authority to Benefit From GE Entity Settlement -

The Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority is among the Tennessee entities that stand to benefit from a recent settlement with a GE-affiliated entity.

Tennessee Attorney General Bob Cooper and 26 other state attorneys general have reached a $34.25 million agreement with GE Funding Capital Market Services Inc. as part of an investigation into alleged anticompetitive and fraudulent conduct in the municipal bond derivatives industry.

70. Beyond Square One -

Memphis City Council’s approval for spending $16 million to improve Midtown’s Overton Square marked a milestone for neighborhood supporters, grassroots leaders and financial stakeholders – especially Loeb Properties Inc.

71. Green Light -

It may have been a murky day in Memphis, but neighborhood stakeholders didn’t let the afternoon rain dampen their support of the Overton Square redevelopment project during the Memphis City Council’s final meeting of the year.

72. Council Passes $16M Overton Square Funding -

It may have been a murky day in Memphis, but neighborhood stakeholders didn’t let the afternoon rain dampen their support of the Overton Square redevelopment project during the Memphis City Council’s final meeting of the year.

73. Overton Square Votes Dominate Meeting -

The Memphis City Council votes Tuesday, Dec. 20, on the redevelopment of Overton Square. At its last meeting of the year, the council will vote on a planned development for the south side of Madison Avenue at Cooper Street to be redeveloped by Loeb Properties Inc. The development includes a parking garage.

74. Tenn. AG Joins Campaign About Texting and Driving -

Tennessee Attorney General Bob Cooper has joined a group of state attorneys general, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the Ad Council for a campaign to stop teenagers from texting while driving.

75. Loeb Unveils Ambitious Plan For Renewed Overton Square -

Loeb Properties Inc. hopes to capitalize on Midtown’s recent successes with a $31 million revitalization plan for Overton Square.

76. Loeb Properties Reveals Theater Arts District for Overton Square -

Loeb Properties Inc. is hoping to capitalize on Midtown’s recent successes with a $31 million revitalization plan for Overton Square.

77. Loeb Hosts Meeting about Overton Square Plans -

Loeb Properties Inc. will hold a meeting Wednesday, Oct. 12, at 6 p.m. at Playhouse on the Square, 66 S. Cooper St., presenting the latest plans for the redevelopment of Overton Square.

78. Tenn. AG Weighs In on Amazon Tax -

An association of brick-and-mortar retailers says a legal opinion from state Attorney General Bob Cooper should cancel a sales tax exemption for online merchant Amazon.com.

79. Haslam to Appoint Schools Consolidation Commission -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam said during a Memphis visit Wednesday, Aug. 31, that he should appoint his choice to a schools consolidation transition committee this week, possibly as early as Thursday.

80. Second Day of Schools Mediation Ends Early -

The second day of mediation in the schools consolidation case ended early and still with no comment from any of the parties on whether the attempts to settle the last part of the lawsuit are making progress or have made progress.

81. Mediation Effort Continues in Schools Consolidation Case -

All sides in the schools consolidation case were in Memphis federal court again Monday, Aug. 22, as an attempt continued to mediate the second set of decisions to be made in the case.

On hand for the Monday sessions was Tennessee Attorney General Bob Cooper.

82. Events -

The Rotary Club of Memphis Central will meet Friday, July 15, from 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Holiday Inn University of Memphis, 3700 Central Ave. Frank Gianotti, vice president of Tetra Tech, will speak about the planning and construction of the Memphis Greenline. Cost is $20 for nonmembers. For reservations, call Karen Shea at 683-9099.

83. To Bike or Not to Bike -

Reid Hedgepeth had heard vaguely about plans for the Shelby Farms Greenline when it began to take shape two years ago. But the City Council member didn’t quite know what to expect when the greenline began taking shape behind his home in High Point Terrace.

84. Sponsor Delays Immigration Bill to Address Cost -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The House sponsor of legislation that would allow law enforcement agents in Tennessee to question suspects about their immigration status says he's trying to make the proposal financially feasible.

85. Madison Bike Lane Debate Heats Up -

More than 60 business owners along the Midtown leg of Madison Avenue are coalescing around the idea of something other than a dedicated bicycle lane in both directions on the street.

Their idea is that bicycles and motorized traffic should continue sharing the curb lane in both directions with no new lane markings. That would keep two lanes of motorized traffic both ways.

86. Events -

The Small Business Chamber Breakfast Club will meet Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Office Suites Plus, 6000 Poplar Ave., suite 250. Cost is free to members and first-time guests and $10 for returning guests. For more information, call Melody Douglas at 261-5400.

87. Events -

The Germantown Area Chamber of Commerce will hold a general membership luncheon Thursday at 11:15 a.m. at the Germantown Country Club, 1780 Kimbrough Road. Andrew Clarksenior of News Radio 600 WREC will speak. For reservations, call 755-1200.

88. Bill to Require Photo ID From Voters Passes House -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A proposal that would require Tennessee voters to show photo identification before they can cast ballots passed the House on Thursday despite a legal opinion from the state's attorney general that the Republican-led effort would violate the Tennessee and U.S. constitutions.

89. New Solicitor General Named in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Bill Young has been named the new solicitor general for Tennessee.

Attorney General Bob Cooper said in a news release on Thursday that Young's background in both the private and government sectors makes him an exceptional fit for the job. Young previously worked in the attorney general's office for eight years and most recently served as the senior vice president and general counsel of Blue Cross Blue Shield of Tennessee.

90. Overton Square Developer Eyes Grocery Store for Site -

A premium grocery store is in the works for Overton Square with plans to preserve the entertainment district’s character and bring it back to life, Loeb Properties Inc. revealed this week.

91. Overton Square Developer Eyes Grocery Store -

A premium grocery store is in the works for Overton Square with plans to preserve the entertainment district’s character and bring it back to life, Loeb Properties Inc. revealed this week.

Before a standing room only crowd Tuesday at the office of Memphis Heritage Inc., 2282 Madison Ave., Loeb president Bob Loeb unveiled the site plan for a 53,000-square-foot grocery store, more than double the size of Schnucks’ Midtown location.

92. Broad Possibilities -

Back when Broad Avenue was the terminus of the Interstate-40/Sam Cooper Boulevard corridor, car traffic was a big problem.

93. Lighting the Fuse -

Memphis voters have 22 words to weigh as they decide what is to become of Shelby County’s two public school systems.
“Shall the administration of the Memphis City School System, a special school district, be transferred to the Shelby County Board of Education?”
The words seem inadequate to cover what a “yes” or a “no” vote means after a state law and other factors changed the terms of a vote already scheduled for March 8.
Voters for schools consolidation may be against special schools district status but for letting some of the six suburban towns and cities try to go with their own municipal school system.
Voters may be against school consolidation and against special school district status if it includes taxing authority for the county school board, albeit with tax approval required by the Tennessee Legislature.
Some voters may see it as a way of ending reforms driven by MCS superintendent Dr. Kriner Cash. Others may see it as a way of ending Shelby County Schools board chairman David Pickler’s dominance of that school system.
School consolidation advocates are still urging citizens to vote “yes” and school consolidation opponents are still urging citizens to vote “no.”
“The lay of the land has changed, so will people consider the lay of the land or what? That statement stands. It’s on the ballot and everyone knows what it’s designed to do,” said Memphis City Council chairman Myron Lowery. “This occurred after the question was put on the ballot. If someone wants to make that stretch, they’re jumping over a lot of hurdles. This was not in place when this was put on the ballot.”
Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr., along with Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell, sought a transition period even as political positions began to harden. He doesn’t see what’s in the law as a transition period.
“The way it’s structured, there’s every incentive not to reach an agreement. It looks to me like it falls off the face of the earth,” Wharton said. “There was nothing in there that states where do you go if at the end of this (the planning process) there is nothing resolved.”
State Sen. Mark Norris, R-Collierville, disagrees.
“The state has a compelling interest in assuring that the administration of schools is properly discharged,” Norris wrote in an op-ed piece for The Memphis News last week. “To do otherwise defies common sense and common decency.”
Pickler said if voters approve the question, he will quickly move to assemble a team to work on the transition. It’s a transition that Pickler has always emphasized will be controlled by the county school system. That is one point on which the attorneys seem to agree.
“Clearly we understand that this issue is not about educational outcomes,” he said during a WKNO forum last week. “We still do not believe that creating a mega district … doesn’t do anything to improve education.”
MCS board member Tomeka Hart, at the same forum, countered “We do here as an economic issue,” a reference to the University of Memphis study showing special schools district status could cost MCS half of the county property tax base it relies on for funding. “It’s time to rewrite all of this,” Hart concluded.
Here is the timeline – to date – of the ongoing schools showdown:

94. Metro Consolidation Case Stays Alive -

The Shelby County Election Commission can certify the results of the Nov. 2 referendum on the metro consolidation charter.

But U.S. District Court Judge Thomas Anderson also ruled Thursday that he will not dismiss the federal court case that challenges the requirement that the charter had to win approval in two referenda – one in the city of Memphis and the other in Shelby County outside Memphis.

95. Events -

The Memphis Gavel Club will meet Friday at 11:30 a.m. at the Holiday Inn University of Memphis, 3700 Central Ave. For more information, call Bob Gray 494-8639.

96. Events -

The Buckman Arts Center at St. Mary’s School will present a performance by Leon Redbone Thursday at 7 p.m. at Buckman, 60 Perkins Road Extended. Tickets are $35 for adults and $31.50 for students and seniors. For more information or tickets, call 537-1483 or visit www.buckmanartscenter.com.

97. AG Opinion Says Memphis-Only Vote On MCS Charter Surrender -

Another day, another in a series of legal opinions that continue to better define the terms of the standoff between Shelby County’s two public school systems.

Tennessee Attorney General Bob Cooper has issued a legal opinion that confirms only Memphis voters would vote in a referendum on a Memphis City Schools (MCS) system charter surrender.

98. Cohen Forecasts "Difficult" Year In Congress -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen said earmarks have turned into “phonemarks” in the new Congressional reality. And that new reality will be “difficult” for the city.

99. Events -

The Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence will hold a workshop Tuesday from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at its office, 5100 Poplar Ave., suite 502. Participants will become familiar with basic concepts in program evaluation. Cost is $99 for members, $150 for nonmembers and $89 for those in the Program for Nonprofit Excellence. For more information, call 684-6605 or visit www.npexcellence.org.

100. Events -

The Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence will hold a workshop Tuesday from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at its office, 5100 Poplar Ave., suite 502. Participants will become familiar with basic concepts in program evaluation. Cost is for $99 for members, $150 for nonmembers and $89 for those in the Program for Nonprofit Excellence. For more information, call 684-6605 or visit www.npexcellence.org.