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Editorial Results (free)

1. Vols Nearly Set on Offense as Season Approaches -

With Tennessee’s football team three weeks into fall camp, the offensive depth charts are set at some positions, while others remain open.

UT coach Butch Jones enters the 2015 season with no questions at quarterback or running back. His has plenty of receivers and all should get their share of playing time.

2. Jernigan Sees Big Market for Company He's Moving to Memphis -

Dean Jernigan spent the better part of a roughly 40-minute earnings presentation to analysts early Wednesday, Aug. 12, detailing not just the latest quarterly results for his newly public company, Jernigan Capital, but also why it exists in the first place.

3. Summer Jobs Programs Mark End of Season -

With the school year about to begin, two summer jobs and job-training programs marked the end of their work for the summer.

The Earn and Learn Summer Youth Experience of the Workforce Investment Network graduated 19 teenagers and young adults, ages 16-21, Thursday, July 30. The graduates earned information technology certification while making about $13 an hour for eight weeks.

4. Summer Jobs Programs Mark End of Season -

With the school year about to begin, two summer jobs and job-training programs marked the end of their work for the summer.

The Earn and Learn Summer Youth Experience of the Workforce Investment Network graduated 19 teenagers and young adults, ages 16-21, Thursday, July 30. The graduates earned information technology certification while making about $13 an hour for eight weeks.

5. Family Room -

Family homelessness may be an extraordinarily difficult problem to solve, but in Sister Maureen Griner’s experience many homeless families are just regular folks.

“Ordinary families with ordinary problems,” she said.

6. Daniel Allen Joins Red Door As Financial Adviser -

Daniel Allen has joined Red Door Wealth Management as vice president, financial adviser, marking Red Door’s first hire of a financial adviser since its inception in 2010. In his new role, Allen helps develop client relationships and financial strategies that solve complex financial issues and create value for clients.

7. Memphis Mayoral Field Set at 10 -

Shelby County Election Commissioners have certified the Memphis election ballot for Oct. 8.

These are the names to appear on that ballot for the 15 elected offices.

The commission met hours after the noon Thursday, July 23, deadline for candidates to withdraw from the ballot if they wished.

8. Tennessee’s ‘Fighting 26’ Democrats Work to Stay Relevant -

Sometimes Tennessee Democrats must feel like a tree that falls in the forest: Does anyone hear them?

When Democratic legislative leaders called for a special session this summer on Insure Tennessee, Gov. Bill Haslam’s market-based plan to use federal dollars to catch 280,000 working people in a health care coverage gap, they found themselves alone.

9. Madeline Patterson Joins Burson Campaigns -

Madeline Patterson has joined the Memphis office of Burson Campaigns, the corporate issues management unit of Burson-Marsteller, as a vice president. In her new role, Patterson will work with Burson clients on issues and crisis management, communications strategy, and integrated marketing and communications campaigns.

10. $10 Bill Change Rankles Descendant of Alexander Hamilton -

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) – Doug Hamilton is just fine with plans to put a woman's portrait on U.S. paper money, but he'd prefer that the Treasury Department leave the $10 bill alone – particularly the prominent visage of his great-great-great-great-great-grandfather, Alexander Hamilton.

11. Teen Truckers? Bill Would Drop Big-Rig Driver Age to 18 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Parents may hesitate to hand teens the keys to the family car, but Congress is proposing to allow drivers as young as 18 to get behind the wheel of big rigs on the nation's interstates

12. GTx Names New Medical Director -

Dr. Diane C. Young is the new vice president, chief medical officer, of GTx Inc.

The Memphis-based biopharmaceutical company announced Young’s appointment Wednesday, July 8.

13. Cardwell a Link to Metro’s Past, Present -

Metro Trustee Charlie Cardwell definitely is a member of the “good old boys” network that ran Nashville for decades.

14. Former Mayor Purcell Traces Nashville Transformation to 1978 Election -

Former Mayor Bill Purcell lived through the transition from the good old boys who ran Nashville to the “new Nashville,” in which a displaced Yankee became mayor in 1991 and began the type of forward-thinking, executive-style leadership that has propelled Nashville to skyline-shattering status on the national stage.

15. Boner, Peel and a Reporter’s Call Spark a City’s Embarrassment -

Nashville’s mayor broke into a broad smile and funny walk, pointing across the main dining room at the old TGI Friday’s on Elliston Place to a young reporter seated at a long table with eight colleagues and friends.

16. Boner, Fate and the Summer of Shame -

Phil Bredesen knew what he was trying to do. He just didn’t know if he could accomplish it.

“I had this sense that Nashville was ready for change,” says the former Metro mayor and Tennessee governor, reflecting on his early motivation for taking on the system that had run Nashville for decades.

17. GTx Names New Medical Director -

Dr. Diane C. Young is the new vice president, chief medical officer, of GTx Inc.

The Memphis-based biopharmaceutical company announced Young’s appointment Wednesday, July 8.

18. I Choose Memphis: Isaac Rodriguez -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Dr. Isaac Rodriguez

19. New Laws Include 48-Hour Waiting Period for Abortion -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A mandate for a 48-hour waiting period before an abortion is one of many new Tennessee laws taking effect Wednesday.

The abortion measure affects all seven of the state's abortion clinics. Another law will require abortion facilities performing more than 50 abortions a year be held to the same health and safety standards as other outpatient surgical facilities.

20. Financial Literacy for Young Adults -

We spend about 18 years preparing our children for the challenges they will face after setting out on their own. However, many parents forget an important detail: the value of preparing children for their financial future.

21. Study Finds Merit In Youth Villages' Transitional Program -

Youth Villages’ 17-year-old transition program for children aging out of the foster care system at age 18 improved participants’ outcomes in housing stability, economic well-being, and employment and earnings, according to a new clinical study by nonprofit research organization MDRC.

22. Gay Marriage Marks First Day in Memphis -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam was in Memphis taking a tour of the Nike plant expansion in Frayser when the highly anticipated U.S. Supreme Court decision on gay marriage was released Friday, June 26, in Washington, D.C.

23. Truck Stop Restaurant Plan Hits End of the Road -

The developers behind the proposed Truck Stop restaurant on the northwest corner of Central Avenue and Cooper Street have pulled the plug on the project after a year and a half of regulatory hurdles and different standards involved in using intermodal shipping containers.

24. Bishop Hears Stronger Call After ‘Fighting God’ -

The reason Richard Stika entered the seminary was to get thoughts of being a priest out of his system

It didn’t turn out that way.

On Dec. 14, the bishop of the Knoxville Catholic diocese will mark his 30th anniversary as a priest.

25. Garibaldi's Temptations Club Celebrates its 1980s Run -

Mike Garibaldi is known for his Memphis restaurant chain, Garibaldi's Pizza.

At the original Garibaldi’s, near the University of Memphis, is a picture on the wall of a smiling waitress in her 50s.

26. Truck Stop Restaurant Plan Hits End of the Road -

The developers behind the proposed Truck Stop restaurant on the northwest corner of Central Avenue and Cooper Street have pulled the plug on the project after a year and a half of regulatory hurdles and different standards involved in using intermodal shipping containers.

27. Stones’ Nashville Connections Go Way Back -

While Brad Paisley lives what he calls “a bucket list item” by singing while playing his guitar in typically showy fashion as the opening act for The Rolling Stones, the most important guitarist in rock ‘n’ roll history and a man idolized by Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood will be sitting in his house on Blueberry Hill in the hills of northern Davidson County.

28. Ramsey: No Medicaid Expansion Until 2017 -

The Tennessee legislative session ended in late April, giving itself a little more than two and a-half months to handle the state’s business. That’s plenty of time, according to Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey.

29. Ramsey Uses ‘System’ to Reshape State’s Political Landscape -

Senate Speaker and Lieutenant Gov. Ron Ramsey laughs at the notion he’s changed since being elected to the Legislature 23 years ago, that he’s lost touch with the common man or become “arrogant” as lieutenant governor of Tennessee.

30. What Grads Must Do to Secure Employment -

Career counselors at many Tennessee colleges and universities say interest from corporate recruiters is higher than they’ve seen it in years.

There are more job postings, internship opportunities, pre-employment trainee classes and technology training programs for all skill levels, but if a recent graduate needs help in pursuing a career, schools want the new alums to come back to them.

31. Editorial: Overton Square History Tells Story of Aspirations -

It’s easy to forget when you see all of the smiling faces in the old photos. They don’t seem to have a care in the world.

But Memphis was far from perfect when Overton Square opened for business in 1970.

32. Long-Delayed Nuclear Plant in Tennessee Nears Completion -

SPRING CITY, Tenn. (AP) – Tom Wallace started working at the Watts Bar nuclear plant as a young man in 1979, hoping he could eventually become a reactor operator.

33. TCAT’s 27 Campuses Offer ‘A Different Life’ -

Ready for a new career? If you’re looking for a fresh start, Tennessee may be one of the best places in the world to find it.

Through May 15, residents who want to retrain in a new career field can apply for a full scholarship to the Tennessee College of Applied Technology, a unique and highly effective system of technical colleges with 27 main campuses around the state.

34. Youth Fund Kicks Off With MLGW Partnership -

The city of Memphis’ summer jobs program and its Memphis Ambassadors Program are seeking private donations to expand through regular contributions via the monthly Memphis Light Gas and Water Division bill.

35. Memphis Youth Fund Kicks Off With MLGW Partnership -

The city of Memphis’ summer jobs program and its Memphis Ambassadors Program are seeking private donations to expand through regular contributions via the monthly Memphis Light Gas and Water Division bill.

36. Cannabis Oil Bill Could Lead to More ‘Evil Weed’ Wins -

Logan and Stacie Mathes were on "pins and needles" as they waited for Gov. Bill Haslam to sign legislation into law allowing cannabis oil to be used to treat seizures and similar medical problems in Tennessee.

37. Students Not Giving Up on Tuition Equality -

Tennessee students without citizenship say they’ll continue the battle for in-state tuition in 2016 after a measure to help them overcome the financial hurdle of out-of-state tuition barely failed on the House floor.

38. New State Chair Wants All-GOP Legislature -

With more than six years of experience in the House of Representatives, Knoxville Republican Ryan Haynes is leaving the post to take on a new job: Tennessee Republican Party chairman.

39. Rieger Begins Work at Memphis Chamber -

Tom Rieger recently joined the Greater Memphis Chamber as senior vice president of member development, a role in which he will oversee major fundraising activities, conduct membership drive campaigns and implement revenue enhancement opportunities.

40. Memphis & The Law -

Before there was Law Week, there was Law Day.

The observance by the Memphis Bar Association as well as bar associations and attorneys across the country was created in the mid-1950s as a way of promoting the legal community and its impact.

41. Bass Pro Announces Opening Week Lineup -

Bass Pro Shops has unveiled the celebrity lineup and schedule for its opening festivities, kicking off with a free Evening for Conservation event Wednesday, April 29, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Here is the press release from Bass Pro:

42. An ‘Epiphany’ for Legislators on In-State Tuition -

Tina Sharma grew up in Tennessee, graduated from Martin Luther King High School in Nashville and enrolled at Belmont University. She calls the Volunteer State home.

43. Wharton's Way -

City elections in Memphis begin unadorned.

Yard signs don’t bloom until mid- to late summer, when the strategic use of television ads and the much higher cycle of radio advertising kick in.

44. Injuries Slow Development of Vols Defensive Players -

Tennessee football fans might want to look past the defensive lineup for the Orange & White Spring Game. It will bear little resemblance to the unit that will start the 2015 season opener against Bowling Green on Sept. 5 at Nashville’s LP Field.

45. Wagner and Spears Head Local Political Parties -

In weekend conventions, local Democrats and Republican elected new leaders for their parties.

Mary Wagner is the new Shelby County Republican Party chairwoman, chosen by delegates to the local GOP convention held Sunday, March 29, at the Bartlett Station Municipal Center.

46. Scroggs Helping MAAR Track Realty Legislation -

Every so often, members of the Tennessee General Assembly attempt to amend the Professional Privilege Tax, a tax levied for having a license to operate a myriad of occupations.

Accountants, engineers, architects, real estate agents and others are subject to the tax. Recently, lawmakers wanted to extend the $400 tax to all real estate agents, no matter if they’re a broker or an associate broker.

47. New Local Party Leaders Talk Rebuilding -

The two new chairwomen of the local Democratic and Republican parties each talk about the work of rebuilding.

But Mary Wagner and Randa Spears lead political groups whose fortunes couldn’t be more different.

48. Wagner and Spears Head Local Political Parties -

In weekend conventions, local Democrats and Republican elected new leaders for their parties.

Mary Wagner is the new Shelby County Republican Party chairwoman, chosen by delegates to the local GOP convention held Sunday, March 29, at the Bartlett Station Municipal Center.

49. Ford Talks Then And Now Of Politics -

Former U.S. Rep. Harold Ford Jr. still talks about his early political schedule as a first-time candidate in 1996 speaking to Memphis kindergarten students.

Now he is 45 and has been out of elected office for nearly nine years. Ford is at a point where he can talk about “kids” in the public policy class he teaches at the University of Michigan.

50. Council Honors Streets Ministries Founder Bennett -

The founder of Memphis Streets Ministries has been awarded the Memphis City Council’s annual Humanitarian Award, the highest award the council gives.

Ken Bennett, Streets Ministries’ self-described director of soul, founded the nonprofit ministry in 1987 with a mission of working with and encouraging young Memphians growing up in poverty in the city’s toughest and most blighted neighborhoods.

51. Council Honors Streets Ministries Founder Ken Bennett -

The founder of Memphis Streets Ministries has been awarded the Memphis City Council’s annual Humanitarian Award, the highest award the council gives.

Ken Bennett, Streets Ministries’ self-described director of soul, founded the nonprofit ministry in 1987 with a mission of working with and encouraging young Memphians growing up in poverty in the city’s toughest and most blighted neighborhoods.

52. Common Core is Working – So Kill It -

Common Core determines what Tennessee’s K-12 students should know and when they should learn it, yet like many other issues it has become a political pariah, especially for the state’s Republican leaders.

53. Student Debt, Rising Rents Take Bite Out of Real Estate Market -

Hefty student loans are a major stumbling block for young Americans as they try to buy their first home, a National Association of Realtors’ annual survey shows.

In spite of an improved job market and low interest rates in 2014, the number of first-time homebuyers dipped to 33 percent, down 5 percent from the previous year and the lowest since the National Association of Realtors began tracking the rate in 1981.

54. Drowning in Student Loan Debt -

Three-and-a-half years after graduating from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Yasameen Hoffman is still trying to land the kind of full-time job that will help her start paying off her student loan.

55. Youth Take Charge of Ignite Memphis Event -

Ignite Memphis is a popular event young professionals typically pack each time it’s held, in addition to participating as speakers. The events revolve around a group of people making slide-based presentations about any topic they want, featuring whatever they want to say about anything they think can hold a crowd’s interest.

56. Haslam Names Panel to Recommend Judicial Candidates -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam has named the members of an 11-person council to recommend candidates to fill judicial vacancies in Tennessee.

Fellow Republicans in the Legislature had allowed a previous version of the panel to expire before voters in November ratified a constitutional amendment to keep in place the state's current judicial selection system in which the governor fills vacancies on appeals courts and justices and judges then stand for yes-no retention votes.

57. Obama Proposes Publicly Funded Community College for All -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – President Barack Obama on Friday proposed to bring the cost of two years of community college "down to zero" for all Americans, an ambitious nationwide plan based on a popular Tennessee program signed into law by that state's Republican governor.

58. Deborah Tate Named Director of Tennessee Administrative Office of Courts -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Tennessee Supreme Court has appointed former Federal Communications Commissioner Deborah Taylor Tate as director of the Administrative Office of the Courts.

59. Building the Base -

It was late September, and local officials were deeply engaged with retail giant Target as the company explored investing in an online fulfillment center in Memphis when the discussions turned toward a familiar subject.

60. New Laws OK Wine Shipments, Ban Tiger Selfies -

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) – New state laws taking effect Thursday give livestock in California more living room, approve direct-to-consumer wine shipments in Massachusetts and levy the ultimate punishment on wannabe teen drivers in Nevada by denying them licenses if they skip too much school.

61. Vols’ Barnett Faces Nation’s Best in Iowa’s Scherff -

KNOXVILLE – Derek Barnett is spending most of the Christmas holidays away from his Nashville home, and he wouldn’t have it any other way.

62. Evolving Identity -

Some of the most telling views of Memphis are the ones many of us see for only seconds at a time as we drive on viaducts that take us and our cars just above the treetops and rooftops of older neighborhoods interrupted by the roadways.

63. Roth Conversion, Should You Do It? -

Ray’s Take There’s been a lot of discussion in recent years about Roth accounts, specifically the Roth IRA and the Roth 401(k). Maybe you’re wondering if you should convert your own accounts but aren’t sure.

64. From Sweden to Memphis -

Swedish retail giant Ikea will open a 225-employee store in the Wolfchase Galleria area in 2016.

The furniture retailer will locate the 269,000-square-foot store on a 35-acre site in Memphis near Interstate 40 and Germantown Parkway.

65. Recruiting Wars -

Memphis Grizzlies point guard Mike Conley is in his eighth year in the NBA. But he’s just 27 years old and his 10-year class reunion at Lawrence North High School in Indianapolis is still an event in the future.

66. Justices Weigh Bias Claim of Pregnant UPS Driver -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Two of the three women on the Supreme Court vigorously questioned a UPS lawyer Wednesday over the company's refusal to give lighter duty to a pregnant worker, a closely watched case with potentially broad impact for female workers and their employers.

67. Page Robbins Provides Safe ‘Middle Ground’ -

The youngest is 53 and the oldest is 98. Some appreciate classical music and others prefer Elvis, the Mamas & the Papas or the Beatles, and others John Denver, Arlo Guthrie or Bruce Springsteen.

68. How Much Do You Know About How the Internet Works? -

WASHINGTON (AP) – We may be the Internet generation. But we don't know much about how it works.

A new Pew Research Center survey released Tuesday found most people can recognize Microsoft founder Bill Gates and know that hashtags belong in tweets, but are confused about whether having a privacy policy means that a company actually keeps consumer information confidential.

69. Slatery Stays Out of GOP Attorney General Letter on Obama -

New Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery isn't joining a group of Republican colleagues from other states in issuing a statement vowing "appropriate action" on President Barack Obama's executive order on immigration.

70. Rogero Talks ‘Smart Growth,’ Democratic Politics -

Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero became the first woman to hold that office when she won the election in 2011.

She’s been actively involved in a number of local issues since her election, from urban-core revitalization and business recruitment to broader social issues such as marriage equality.

71. Why are Tennesseans So Afraid of an Income Tax? -

The odds of an income tax becoming a reality in Tennessee – one of the nation’s lowest-taxed states – are slim to none.

And, yet there is an amendment on the Nov. 4 ballot that would change Tennessee’s constitution by giving the Legislature authority to prohibit passage of an income tax or payroll tax in the state.

72. For-Profit Programs Face 'Gainful Employment' Rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) – For-profit colleges with graduates unable to pay back their student loans could soon face scrutiny by the federal government.

Schools with career-oriented programs that fail to comply with the new rule announced Thursday by the Obama administration stand to lose access to federal student-aid programs.

73. State of Black Memphis Symposium Monday -

The Memphis Urban League Young Professionals release their findings Monday, Oct. 27, in a State of Black Memphis report and symposium at the National Civil Rights Museum.

The group releases an annual report that is a complation of data.

74. Recruiter’s Career Twist -

Ask Janet Miller about her remarkable career at the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce and she’ll likely attribute it to good timing or pass credit onto others.

75. Central Centennial -

Central Station is 100 years old, an age that most train stations never reach. And if they do, they get there with some really harrowing years in mid-life.

The landmark at South Main Street and G.E. Patterson Drive marked its centennial this month with hundreds of people taking a look around the now recovered and renovated station as well as Amtrak trains and Canadian National railroad locomotives on the tracks that run by the station.

76. Commissioner Rethinking Handling of Older Teens -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The head of the state Department of Children's Services is considering whether older teens should be moved from the department's custody into the adult correctional system after a third major escape attempt from one of its juvenile detention centers in less than a month.

77. Searching for Doctors -

So here’s the offer: lower salary – meaning it will take longer to pay down your student loan debt – less prestige, and perhaps even a questioning of your intelligence and skill.

In 2014, that’s what comes with the decision to become a primary care physician. Recently, a fourth-year medical student at the University of Pennsylvania, Mara Gordon, wrote an article for The Atlantic explaining her decision to become a primary care doctor.

78. Ban Sought on Children Working on Tobacco Farms -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Thirty-five House Democrats are urging the Obama administration to prohibit children from working on tobacco farms, citing concerns about ill health effects.

The lawmakers, led by Reps. David Cicilline, D-R.I., and Matt Cartwright, D-Pa., made their plea in a letter to Labor Secretary Thomas Perez. A copy of the letter was obtained by The Associated Press on Tuesday.

79. Tennessee Justices Name Slatery Attorney General -

The state Supreme Court on Monday named Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's top legal adviser, Herbert Slatery, as Tennessee's next attorney general.

The announcement comes in the aftermath of a failed conservative campaign to oust three Democratic justices who make up a majority on the five-member court. That effort focused heavily on incumbent Attorney General Bob Cooper's refusal to take part in a multistate lawsuit challenging President Barack Obama's health care law.

80. Tennessee Justices Name Slatery as Attorney General -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The state Supreme Court on Monday named Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's top legal adviser, Herbert Slatery, as Tennessee's next attorney general.

The announcement comes in the aftermath of a failed conservative campaign to oust three Democratic justices who make up a majority on the five-member court. That effort focused heavily on incumbent Attorney General Bob Cooper's refusal to take part in a multistate lawsuit challenging President Barack Obama's health care law.

81. Senior Americans Burdened With Student Debt -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Rosemary Anderson could be 81 by the time she pays off her student loans. After struggling with divorce, health problems and an underwater home mortgage, the 57-year-old anticipates there could come a day when her Social Security benefits will be docked to make the payments.

82. Governor Gets Report on Tennessee Juvenile Jails -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A security audit will be performed on all three of the state's youth development centers after a recent breakout and violence at the facility in Middle Tennessee, according to a preliminary report sent to the governor.

83. A Tasteful List 2014 -

MEMPHIS ON A PLATE. Presenting the fourth edition of the Tasteful List, updated for 2014 – second, third and fourth helpings, this year’s specials, delicious memories – an alphabetical survey of local flavor in one decidedly local man’s opinion.

84. 8 Apply to Become Next Tennessee Attorney General -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Eight candidates have applied with the Tennessee Supreme Court for the next eight-year term as state attorney general.

Tennessee is the only state where the high court appoints the attorney general.

85. Vols Among NCAA’s Youngest Headed Into Sunday Opener -

KNOXVILLE – For better or worse, University of Tennessee football coach Butch Jones won’t need to wait long to see the talent level of his highly touted freshman class.

Jones will find out Sunday night at 7 when the Vols play host to Utah State at Neyland Stadium. The Aggies will be an underdog – probably by a touchdown or so – and a trendy pick for some as an upset special.

86. Few Clues to Tennessee Attorney General Applicants -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The deadline to apply to become Tennessee's next attorney general is Friday, but anyone still on the fence about whether to join the fray won't have the benefit of sizing up the competition first.

87. 3 Ways Insurers Can Discourage Sick From Enrolling -

Insurers can no longer reject customers with expensive medical conditions thanks to the health care overhaul. But consumer advocates warn that companies are still using wiggle room to discourage the sickest – and costliest – patients from enrolling.

88. GM to Move Cadillac SRX Production to Tennessee -

SPRING HILL, Tenn. (AP) – General Motors is moving production of the next-generation Cadillac SRX crossover SUV from Mexico to a factory in Spring Hill, Tennessee.

The company also announced Wednesday that it will add production of some small gasoline engines to the Spring Hill complex.

89. Reshaping a City, One Lot at a Time -

John G. Brittle Jr. doesn’t have an office. He has a war room. The space, crowded with maps, charts, books, piles of paper and marked-up spreadsheets, is ground zero for InfillNashville, the 10-person team of site selection specialists that Brittle leads at Village Real Estate Services.

90. Congress Races to Finish VA, Highway Bills -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress ran full-tilt into election-year gridlock over immigration Thursday and headed toward a five-week summer break with no agreement in sight on legislation to cope with the influx of young immigrants flocking illegally to the United States.

91. Sherman Joins Campbell Clinic as Sports Medicine Physician -

Dr. Henry “Hank” Sherman has joined Campbell Clinic Orthopaedics as a sports medicine family practice physician in its Southaven office. Sherman treats patients who suffer from a variety of orthopedic injuries – from competitive athletes looking to get back in the game to weekend warriors who want to stay active later in life.

92. Tommy John Surgery Growing More Common -

Envision a baseball board game with dice and a spinner in which players try to go from Little League to pitching and winning Game 7 of the World Series.

Let’s call our fictional game “Bringing the Heat.” One can imagine positive squares where players learn “you just struck out 12 in a game, move ahead two spaces” or “you just had your fastball clocked at 94 MPH as a junior in high school, move ahead three spaces.”

93. Baker’s Career Mirrored State’s Political Story -

As the week begins, political leaders of both parties and across several generations will gather in East Tennessee for the funeral of former U.S. Sen. Howard Baker.

94. Sheriff’s Race Reflects Different Law Enforcement Cultures -

Bennie Cobb remembers how he got his first job in the local criminal justice system.

It was 1980, and Cobb – then 19 years old – went to apply for a job at the old City Jail.

95. Senate Republicans Block Student Loan Bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Senate Republicans on Wednesday blocked legislation aimed at letting people refinance their student loans at lower rates, a pre-ordained outcome that gave Democrats a fresh election-year talking point against the GOP.

96. Obama Moves to Extend Student Loan Payment Relief -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Aiming to alleviate the burden of student loan debt, President Barack Obama expanded a program Monday that lets borrowers pay no more than 10 percent of their income every month, and threw his support behind more sweeping Senate legislation targeting the issue.

97. Moman on Bill for Elvis Week -

Legendary music producer Chips Moman will be in Memphis for Elvis Week events at Graceland in August, marking the anniversary of Elvis Presley’s death in 1977.

Elvis Presley Enterprises announced this week that Moman, who produced Presley’s Memphis sessions at Moman’s American Sound studios in North Memphis, will be part of the Elvis Insiders panel discussion Aug. 14 at 9 a.m. at Graceland’s main stage in Graceland Plaza.

98. Local Connection -

When The Chinese Connection Dub Embassy takes the stage in Handy Park on Beale Street Friday, June 6, the band’s reggae beat and style will be something new for a park that has seen everything from church choirs to jug bands to blues bands playing “Mustang Sally” and similar hits for tourists.

99. Collierville Schools' Central Office Moves -

The central office of the new Collierville Schools system moved Monday, June 2, from Collierville Town Hall to the old Collierville Middle School, 146 College St.

100. U.S. Senate Primaries Feature Different Realities -

The statewide primary races for U.S. Senate on the August ballot feature the longest and best-known political back story in Tennessee politics and competing realities about what it takes for Democrats to end their shutout in statewide offices.