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Editorial Results (free)

1. With No Real Rival, Tennessee Republicans Attack Their Own -

Republicans are sitting in Tennessee’s political catbird seat, but that doesn’t keep them from flying off in different directions.

Elected political leaders of the same stripe found themselves at odds this year over the Bible as a state book, Common Core education standards and Insure Tennessee, Republican Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to catch 280,000 people in a medical coverage gap.

2. Families Face Tough Decisions as Elder-Care Cost Soars -

NEW YORK (AP) — Doris Ranzman had followed the expert advice, planning ahead in case she wound up unable to care for herself one day. But when a nursing-home bill tops $14,000 a month, the best-laid plans get tossed aside.

3. Barbic To Leave Achievement School District -

The founding superintendent of the state-run Achievement School District is leaving the post at the end of the calendar year, citing the pace of the reform work as well as the need to sustain the work of the schools.

4. Tennessee’s ‘Fighting 26’ Democrats Work to Stay Relevant -

Sometimes Tennessee Democrats must feel like a tree that falls in the forest: Does anyone hear them?

When Democratic legislative leaders called for a special session this summer on Insure Tennessee, Gov. Bill Haslam’s market-based plan to use federal dollars to catch 280,000 working people in a health care coverage gap, they found themselves alone.

5. Special Action on Same-Sex Nuptials a Waste of Time -

With Republican lawmakers scrambling for a response to the U.S. Supreme Court’s gay-marriage ruling, Tennesseans on both sides of the issue say they are seeking "equality."

Immediately after the court’s decision on Obergefell v. Hodges, Democratic U.S. Rep. Jim Cooper of Nashville said, "Love and equality won. I’m glad the Supreme Court ruled on the right side of history."

6. Senate, House Look to Update Bush-Era Education Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's something most Democrats and Republicans in Congress can agree on — an update to the Bush-era No Child Left Behind education law is much needed and long overdue.

7. Memphis Election Fundraising Deadline Prompts Flurry of Appeals -

For the last week, candidates in the October Memphis elections have had fundraising fever.

The campaign finance reports for the period that ended Tuesday, June 30, are due at the Shelby County Election Commission by July 10. That’s followed by the noon July 16 filing deadline for candidates in the races for Memphis Mayor, City Council and City Court Clerk.

8. New Forrest Front -

The political battle over an equestrian statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest and the park that houses it has opened a new front.

9. Uncomfortable Truths in Real Estate Contracts -

Bill Decker of Decker Wealth Management was recently discussing a contract issue he had with one of his vendors, the issue being whether Decker should be allowed to purchase additional product at a certain price.

10. React: Supreme Court’s Gay Marriage Ruling -

A divided U.S. Supreme Court voted 5-4 that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the United States. Here is a roundup of local reaction to the landmark ruling.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam:

11. Truck Stop Restaurant Plan Hits End of the Road -

The developers behind the proposed Truck Stop restaurant on the northwest corner of Central Avenue and Cooper Street have pulled the plug on the project after a year and a half of regulatory hurdles and different standards involved in using intermodal shipping containers.

12. Garibaldi's Temptations Club Celebrates its 1980s Run -

Mike Garibaldi is known for his Memphis restaurant chain, Garibaldi's Pizza.

At the original Garibaldi’s, near the University of Memphis, is a picture on the wall of a smiling waitress in her 50s.

13. Managing an Inherited IRA -

Ray’s take: I remember when the original law went into effect creating IRAs. It was a short read. Now it’s a monster with more options, opportunities, and risks than anyone ever imagined. Here are a few of the most common mistakes made with inherited IRAs:

14. Truck Stop Restaurant Plan Hits End of the Road -

The developers behind the proposed Truck Stop restaurant on the northwest corner of Central Avenue and Cooper Street have pulled the plug on the project after a year and a half of regulatory hurdles and different standards involved in using intermodal shipping containers.

15. Overbey Has No Regrets for Sponsoring Insure Tennessee -

Republican Sen. Doug Overbey took the road less traveled this year when he sponsored Insure Tennessee at the request of Gov. Bill Haslam.

Despite the legislation’s failure in special and regular sessions, he has no regrets and looks forward to continuing the fight in 2016 for a market-based plan to obtain roughly $1 billion annually through the Affordable Care Act to provide coverage to some 280,000 Tennesseans who are caught in a gap between TennCare and the federal plan.

16. Snapshot: Memphis-Based Public Companies -

Here's a look at what's going on at the dozen public companies headquartered in Memphis:

AutoZone Inc.

AutoZone Inc. is one of the largest auto parts retailers and distributors in the U.S., with a store count of 5,476 as of Feb. 14. Since 1998, the company has repurchased $15.7 billion worth of its own shares. At the end of March, AutoZone continued its share buyback program with the authorization to buy back another $750 million in company stock. The company followed that news with plans to pursue a $650 million debt offering to be used for “general corporate purposes.” – Andy Meek

17. Stock-Buyback Programs Hit Record Pace -

If this was a poker game, it could be said that American companies are doubling down – repurchasing their own stock at a record pace instead of betting on new, outside investments.

TrimTabs Investment Research calculated that companies had announced plans to buy back $133 billion of their own stock in April. That was a new monthly high.

18. Swinging Church? Courts to Have Last Laugh -

It’s official: No sex clubs are allowed outside of industrial areas or within 1,000 feet of a home, church or school in Metro Nashville.

The council passed the ordinance recently in response to a proposed swingers club’s attempt to relocate next door to Goodpasture Christian School in Madison.

19. Impasse Season Meets Budget Season at City Hall -

When the Memphis City Council’s three-member impasse committee approved a 3 percent pay raise for Memphis police officers Thursday, May 21, it spoke volumes about the budget season at City Hall.

20. What Grads Must Do to Secure Employment -

Career counselors at many Tennessee colleges and universities say interest from corporate recruiters is higher than they’ve seen it in years.

There are more job postings, internship opportunities, pre-employment trainee classes and technology training programs for all skill levels, but if a recent graduate needs help in pursuing a career, schools want the new alums to come back to them.

21. Corker Talks Crossing the Aisle and ‘Generational Theft’ -

The problem with Congress isn’t a lack of civility, says U.S. Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee.

“There’s always been civility,” the second-term Republican senator from Chattanooga told a Greater Memphis Chamber luncheon last week. “It’s never been a situation of friction. It’s just been an atmosphere of people not having the willingness, the courage or whatever to step across the aisle and actually shake hands and do something that’s not exactly in their interest.”

22. Want a Great-Paying Job? Here’s the Deal -

Want a new career with nearly unlimited upside potential? One that will have employers beating down your door?

Uncle Sam wants you – to join the technology workforce.

Nationwide, skilled tech workers are in short supply, with more than half a million jobs going unfilled. And in Tennessee, where the rapidly expanding economy has companies competing for every qualified worker, the state is going to great lengths to train people in sought-after tech skills – footing the entire bill, in some cases, for adults willing to retool their careers.

23. Haslam Signs Bill Requiring Racial Profiling Ban -

Gov. Bill Haslam has signed legislation that requires all of Tennessee’s law enforcement agencies to adopt written policies to ban racial profiling.

The Republican governor signed the measure earlier this week. It unanimously passed the House 93-0 and was approved 27-0 in the Senate during the recent session.

24. Will Tennessee Republicans Ever Be Truly Happy? -

Why aren’t Tennessee Republicans happier?

With the GOP so dominate in the Tennessee General Assembly and losses so rare – on the Hill or in elections – the party’s lawmakers should be jubilant with this year’s session. But it’s never enough.

25. Memphis & The Law -

Before there was Law Week, there was Law Day.

The observance by the Memphis Bar Association as well as bar associations and attorneys across the country was created in the mid-1950s as a way of promoting the legal community and its impact.

26. Senate OKs Ending Motorcycle Helmet Requirement for Parades -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Senate has voted to allow Tennessee motorcyclists to ride without helmets in parades or funerals.

The chamber voted 22-8 in favor of the bill sponsored by Republican Sen. Mike Bell of Riceville. Riders would have to be at least 21 years old and traveling at speeds of less than 30 mph.

27. Shelby County Schools Seeks New Funding for Classroom Investments -

The bottom line on the Shelby County Schools budget proposal headed to Shelby County Commissioners is $973.5 million, but the dollar figure commissioners will be considering is $14 million.

That’s the amount of new funding the system is seeking from county government for the fiscal year that begins July 1. Otherwise, the school system’s budget is balanced.

28. Congress OKs Bill Reshaping Medicare Doctors' Fees -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Conservatives hated that it's expected to swell federal deficits over the coming decade. Liberals complained that it shortchanged health programs for children and women.

29. Memphis Fire Department to Test New Strategies -

The Memphis Fire Department plans to test software this summer that it hopes will reduce non-emergency ambulance calls it responds to.

The pilot program is one part of a long-term strategy for the department recently rolled out by the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

30. How Government Aims to Protect Low-Income Users of 'Payday' Loans -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Each month, more than 200,000 needy U.S. households take out what's advertised as a brief loan.

Many have run out of money between paychecks. So they obtain a "payday" loan to tide them over. Problem is, such loans can often bury them in fees and debts. Their bank accounts can be closed, their cars repossessed.

31. Haslam to Continue School Funding Discussion Despite Lawsuit -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam said Thursday that he's not going to let a lawsuit several East Tennessee school systems filed against the state over funding derail the administration's efforts to address grievances about the state's school funding formula.

32. Knox County Superintendent 'Surprised' By Hamilton Co. Suit -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The superintendent of Knox County Schools said Wednesday that he's surprised Hamilton County and six Chattanooga-area school systems filed a lawsuit against the state over funding after what he thought was a productive meeting with the governor.

33. Is ‘Getting Rid of Public Schools’ Legislature’s Goal? -

Are Tennessee’s public schools headed for extinction? Not if it’s up to Memphis teachers.

A group from Shelby County recently packed a House committee meeting room at the Legislative Plaza in an effort to turn back bills they consider damaging to their profession and the future of public education.

34. Memphis Fire Department to Test New Strategies -

The Memphis Fire Department plans to test software this summer that it hopes will reduce non-emergency ambulance calls it responds to.

The pilot program is one part of a long-term strategy for the department recently rolled out by the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

35. USDA Proposes Definition of Farming, Limiting Some Subsidies -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The government is revising its definition of what it means to farm, meaning some people who receive farm subsidies but don't do any of the work would receive less government cash.

36. State Legislators Misfire In Rush to Impress NRA Attendees -

With the National Rifle Association bringing 75,000 people to Nashville for its April 10-12 convention, the timing is seemingly right for the General Assembly to impress by passing a bevy of gun bills.

37. Bid to End Tennessee Carry Permit Requirement Fails in House -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A proposal to eliminate Tennessee's requirement to obtain a state-issued permit to openly carry handguns was defeated in a House subcommittee on Wednesday.

Republican Rep. Micah Van Huss Jonesborough said he introduced the measure because he believes that "current laws here in Tennessee infringe on the Second Amendment of our U.S. Constitution."

38. Haslam: Don't Rush Gun Bills Before NRA Meeting in Nashville -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam is urging fellow Republicans in the Tennessee General Assembly not to let the upcoming convention of the National Rifle Association in Nashville influence their consideration of a slew of bills seeking to loosen state gun laws.

39. Eliminating Hall Income Tax Raises New Problems -

Republican lawmakers are lining up legislation to reduce or phase out Tennessee’s Hall income tax on investments, even though Gov. Bill Haslam is concerned about losing revenue amid the state’s economic ups and downs.

40. Auto Industry Slows for Bad Weather, But Stays on Course -

DETROIT (AP) – February threw snowstorms and other roadblocks at the auto industry, but U.S. sales of new cars and trucks are still poised to hit their highest level in more than a decade this year.

41. Tennessee GOP Leader Questions Incentives for Unionized GM Plant -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – State Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey said last week that it may have been "a mistake" for Tennessee to subsidize the development of the General Motors plant outside Nashville because it has a United Auto Workers union contract.

42. Shelby County Schools Board Moves Closer to State Funding Lawsuit -

The Shelby County Schools board voted unanimously Tuesday, Feb. 24, to hire an attorney to work with Tennessee’s other major urban school systems in weighing a possible lawsuit against the state that would force full state funding of the Basic Education Program.

43. Senate Democrats Agree to GOP Plan to Fund Homeland Department -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Senate Democrats on Wednesday signed onto a Republican plan to fund the Homeland Security Department without the immigration provisions opposed by President Barack Obama. The announcement by Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid put the Senate on track to pass the bill as a partial agency shutdown looms Friday at midnight.

44. Wal-Mart Raises Could Help Lift Pay in Lower-Wage Industries -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The modest raises that Wal-Mart has said it will give its lowest-paid workers provide a glimmer of hope for lower-wage workers in other companies and industries.

Other retailers and some fast food restaurants may now feel compelled to follow suit to retain their workers and attract others to fill openings, economists said.

45. Insure Tennessee: Failure by Politics and Procedure -

The momentum that killed the Insure Tennessee proposal and ended the special session of the Tennessee legislature Wednesday, Feb. 4, was fueled by ideological opposition to the Affordable Care Act and President Barack Obama.

46. Student Debt, Rising Rents Take Bite Out of Real Estate Market -

Hefty student loans are a major stumbling block for young Americans as they try to buy their first home, a National Association of Realtors’ annual survey shows.

In spite of an improved job market and low interest rates in 2014, the number of first-time homebuyers dipped to 33 percent, down 5 percent from the previous year and the lowest since the National Association of Realtors began tracking the rate in 1981.

47. Drowning in Student Loan Debt -

Three-and-a-half years after graduating from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Yasameen Hoffman is still trying to land the kind of full-time job that will help her start paying off her student loan.

48. Airlines Expect Another Big Year With Help From Cheaper Fuel -

DALLAS (AP) – Leaders of United and Southwest gave an upbeat forecast for 2015 that combined strong travel demand and cheaper fuel. Airline stocks soared on Thursday.

The price of jet fuel has dropped by about half since September, boosting airline profits and tamping down fear that global economic weakness could hurt the carriers. Analysts expect all four of the biggest U.S. airline operators to post bigger profits this year than in 2014.

49. Obama Renews Push for Paid Leave for Working Parents -

BALTIMORE (AP) – President Barack Obama on Thursday renewed his push for paid leave for parents and other workers, saying he's astonished that so many people don't get paid sick leave.

50. Help Wanted: US Job Openings at 14-Year High -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The rapid hiring that made 2014 a stellar year for job gains is showing no sign of slowing down.

U.S. employers advertised the most job openings in nearly 14 years in November, the Labor Department said Tuesday. That suggests businesses are determined to keep adding staff because they are confident strong economic growth will create more demand for their goods and services.

51. County Commission Endorses Haslam Plan -

At the first Shelby County Commission meeting of 2015, all but one of the 13 commissioners voted for a resolution backing Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam’s Medicaid expansion plan, “Insure Tennessee.”

That included some vocal Republican opponents of the Affordable Care Act in general.

52. Council Signals Return to Schools Funding Mediation -

It’s back to mediation Thursday, Jan. 8, in the six-year long schools funding deadlock between the city of Memphis and Shelby County Schools.

That was the next step several Memphis City Council members pointed to after more than an hour behind closed doors at City Hall Tuesday with their attorney as well as city Chief Administrative Officer George Little.

53. Cities Across Tennessee Deal With Short-Term Rental Safety, Zoning Issues -

Nashville isn’t the only city struggling with how to handle short-term rental properties.

Just about every jurisdiction in the state has been caught off guard by the explosive rise in the new shared economy, and what that means for decades-old zoning laws.

54. Building the Base -

It was late September, and local officials were deeply engaged with retail giant Target as the company explored investing in an online fulfillment center in Memphis when the discussions turned toward a familiar subject.

55. Tobacco Auction System is All But Snuffed Out -

DANVILLE, Ky. (AP) – Tripp Foy's sing-song chant rang out like a sentimental oldie for die-hard farmers clinging to the old way of selling tobacco, as a small procession of buyers shadowed him down long rows of reddish-brown leaf piled in bales.

56. Short stay? Travel Site Also Lauds Knoxville Area -

People with an eye for inexpensive yet great vacation or short getaway destinations are likely to land in Knoxville.

Knoxville ranks ninth in the nation on hotel search trivago.com for Best Value City with a ranking of 91.59, coming in between Springfield, Mo., and Little Rock, Ark.

57. Health Leaders: Improvement Possible -

Tennessee’s place in the 2014 America’s Health Rankings makes one thing very clear: There’s a lot of room for improvement.

Tennessee ranked 42nd among all states in the annual analysis of the health of the nation conducted by UnitedHealth Foundation.

58. Achievement School District Transition Details Emerge -

Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson and Achievement Schools District superintendent Chris Barbic will meet Thursday, Dec. 18, to talk about the coming transition of five schools out of the county district and into the state-run ASD.

59. Dobbs the Latest in Line of Dual-Threat UT Quarterbacks -

If the University of Tennessee’s football team gains bowl eligibility with a victory Saturday at Vanderbilt, it can look back to a quarterback change Oct. 25 against Alabama as a pivotal point in the season.

60. Walk in the Park -

They hike the trails, ride their bikes on the Greenline, maybe even go horseback riding or play disc golf.

“We see that age group out here all day long,” said Coral O’Connor, program assistant at Shelby Farms Park.

61. TDOT Delays Lamar, I-55 Interchange Projects -

Tennessee Transportation Commissioner John Schroer has delayed the construction of an Interstate 55 roundabout on E.H. Crump Boulevard that was to go to bid for construction in December.

And Schroer has delayed right of way acquisition for improvements on Lamar Avenue between Shelby Drive and the Mississippi state line.

62. Changing State Constitution No Easy Task -

Amending Tennessee’s Constitution isn’t as rare as it was in the state’s first 200 years, and yet it remains a tough, drawn-out task, even if the most popular process, the legislative method, is used.

63. Why are Tennesseans So Afraid of an Income Tax? -

The odds of an income tax becoming a reality in Tennessee – one of the nation’s lowest-taxed states – are slim to none.

And, yet there is an amendment on the Nov. 4 ballot that would change Tennessee’s constitution by giving the Legislature authority to prohibit passage of an income tax or payroll tax in the state.

64. Fuel Costs Ease, US Airline Profits Soar -

DALLAS (AP) — Profits are soaring at the biggest U.S. airlines as fuel prices drop — but don't expect fares to fall too.

Heading into the busy holiday-travel period, the airlines expect even cheaper fuel, thanks to the nosedive in crude oil prices. The price of jet fuel, an airline's biggest single expense, has dropped by about one-fifth since mid-June.

65. On Stage -

With a box of old ticket stubs, some photographs he took at the concerts he went to and newspaper ads for concerts he came across on microfilm searches for other things, Ron Hall set out to document as many of the major rock and roll and rock concerts in Memphis he could over a fertile 30-year period.

66. Nashville School News Briefs -

Montgomery Bell Student, Faculty Films Air

Films and videos by Montgomery Bell Academy students and one faculty member will be featured Oct. 23 on the Nashville Education, Community and Arts TV channel’s Artober celebration.

67. Haslam Tells Tennessee Agencies to Plan for Cuts -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican Gov. Bill Haslam is calling on all state agencies to plan for up to 7 percent spending cuts in the upcoming budget year.

The Chattanooga Times Free Press reports the move comes following a spending year in which revenues fell more than $300 million short of projections, leading the governor to cancel planned raises for state workers and teachers.

68. Unintended Consequences: ER Visits Increase -

Hospital officials have been pushing for the state to expand Medicaid health care coverage for thousands of Tennessee’s poorest citizens, despite two significant and related concerns:

Expansion will lead to increased visits to the most expensive place in America for routine health care, the emergency room.

69. Coverage Gap Leaves Rural Tennessee Hospitals on Life Support -

Four rural hospitals have closed and dozens are at risk of shuttering: That’s the fallout, some say, from Gov. Bill Haslam’s decision not to join the Affordable Care Act in 2013 and tap into millions in promised federal funds for Tennessee’s financially-strapped health care institutions.

70. US Budget Deficit Dips to $128.7 Billion in August -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The federal government ran a lower budget deficit this August than a year ago, remaining on track to record the lowest deficit for the entire year since 2008.

The August deficit was $128.7 billion, down 13 percent from the $147.9 billion deficit recorded in August 2013, the Treasury Department said Thursday in its monthly budget report.

71. Authors, Readers Converge for Book Festival -

Earlier this year, interest in the first Mid-South Book Festival, scheduled to take place later this month, began to reach what seemed like a fever pitch, according to Literacy Mid-South executive director Kevin Dean.

72. Reshaping a City, One Lot at a Time -

John G. Brittle Jr. doesn’t have an office. He has a war room. The space, crowded with maps, charts, books, piles of paper and marked-up spreadsheets, is ground zero for InfillNashville, the 10-person team of site selection specialists that Brittle leads at Village Real Estate Services.

73. Haslam, Alexander Look to Boost Republican Turnout -

U.S. Rep. Stephen Fincher remembers the first time that he talked with U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander.

Fincher had been elected to Congress long enough to have made several votes after a 2008 campaign in which he touted his conservative values and stances. And in the process, Fincher admitted to Alexander that he had been critical of Alexander’s voting record during the campaign.

74. Congress Races to Finish VA, Highway Bills -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress ran full-tilt into election-year gridlock over immigration Thursday and headed toward a five-week summer break with no agreement in sight on legislation to cope with the influx of young immigrants flocking illegally to the United States.

75. GOP Blocks Tax Hike on Firms Moving Overseas -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican senators blocked an election-year bill Wednesday to limit tax breaks for U.S. companies that move operations overseas.

The bill would have prohibited companies from deducting expenses related to moving their operations to a foreign country. It also would have offered tax credits to companies that move operations to the U.S. from a foreign country.

76. House Votes to Slash IRS Tax Enforcement Budget -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The GOP-controlled House has voted to slash the budget for the Internal Revenue Service's tax enforcement division by $1.2 billion, a 25 percent cut that would mean fewer audits of taxpayers and make it more likely that people who cheat on their taxes will get away with it.

77. Weirich Says Brown ‘Out of Touch With Reality’ -

Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich says a video posted Tuesday on the campaign website of Democratic challenger Joe Brown questioning her sexual orientation represents a “sad day” in local politics.

78. GOP Lawmakers Demand Education Chief's Resignation -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam's office is dismissing as a "political stunt" a letter signed by 15 Republican lawmakers demanding the resignation of Education Commissioner Kevin Huffman.

79. Senate Republicans Block Student Loan Bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Senate Republicans on Wednesday blocked legislation aimed at letting people refinance their student loans at lower rates, a pre-ordained outcome that gave Democrats a fresh election-year talking point against the GOP.

80. Proposal Would Stop Door-to-Door Mail for Millions -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Millions of Americans would no longer get mail delivered to their door but would go to communal or curbside boxes instead, under a proposed law.

The House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform debated Wednesday a bill to direct the U.S. Postal Service to convert 1.5 million addresses annually – 15 million over the next decade – to the less costly, but also less convenient delivery method.

81. Obama Hosts CEOs Whose Firms are Investing in US -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It's the yin and the yang of the U.S. corporate climate.

At the White House, President Barack Obama played the role of business pitchman Tuesday, saluting executives whose companies have chosen to gain or expand their footprint in the United States.

82. Buffett May Face Questions About Performance -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) – Warren Buffett's failure to beat the stock market in four of the past five years has raised the issue of whether Berkshire Hathaway's 83-year-old CEO has lost his touch.

83. GOP Blocks Democrats' Minimum Wage Try in Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Senate Republicans derailed a Democratic drive Wednesday to raise the federal minimum wage, blocking a cornerstone of President Barack Obama's economic plans and ensuring the issue will be a major feature of this fall's congressional elections.

84. Aitken Talks Next Steps for Collierville Schools -

Budgets for the six municipal school systems and Shelby County Schools are starting to come together.

Shelby County Schools board members could vote in a special meeting Tuesday, April 22, on their budget proposal to the Shelby County Commission.

85. Tennessee House Votes to Express Regret for Slavery -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The state House has voted to express "profound regret" for slavery and segregation in Tennessee, but stopped short of an outright apology.

The chamber voted 97-0 in favor of the resolution sponsored by Democratic Rep. Mike Turner of Nashville.

86. Jones Grows Into Legislative Career -

Some people are born into politics; others grow into a political career. For Tennessee Rep. Sherry Jones, it was a little bit of both.

87. Museum Milestone -

When the National Civil Rights Museum formally reopens Saturday, April 5, it will be with the “breaking” of a ceremonial chain at the new entrance to the building that was once the Lorraine Motel, where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in 1968.

88. Haslam Regrets No Raises for Teachers Next Year -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam said Wednesday that he regrets not being able to give the state's teachers a raise and pledged to find ways to increase their pay after vowing to do so last year.

89. State Employees, Teachers Won't Get Pay Increase -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam said Monday that he won't be able to give state employees and teachers a pay increase next year mainly because of reductions due to an ongoing decline in revenue collections, which state officials are looking into.

90. Ramsey: Pay Raises, Higher Ed Funding Face Cuts -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey says worse-than-expected revenue collections could force Tennessee to cancel planned pay raises for state employees and reduce planned investments in higher education.

91. House Approves Bill to Stop Cut to Medicare Docs -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The House on Thursday passed legislation to give doctors a yearlong reprieve from a looming 24 percent cut in their payments from Medicare.

The bill passed on a surprise voice vote and advanced to the Senate, which hopes to pass it before a Monday deadline. The vote was delayed by an hour amid doubt that the measure could muster the two-thirds vote required under fast-track procedures.

92. Congress Confronts Medicare Cuts to Doctors' Fees -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Hope is fading for a Capitol Hill drive to permanently fix Medicare's outdated payment formula and spare doctors from automatic cuts in their fees next month. Now the question is whether lawmakers can regroup and come up with a short-term solution when the current patch expires.

93. Staples to Close 225 Stores as Sales Move Online -

Staples has become the second major chain to announce the mass closing of stores this week, providing the latest evidence of how the retail landscape is being remade by shifts in American shopping habits.

94. No Sign of Expansion at Plant Where UAW Dealt Loss -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Friday marks the end of the two-week period within which U.S. Sen. Bob Corker promised Volkswagen would announce another line at its factory in Tennessee if workers there rejected representation by the United Auto Workers union.

95. Health Care Law Will Mean Fewer People On the Job -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Several million American workers will reduce their hours on the job or leave the workforce entirely because of incentives built into President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, the Congressional Budget Office said Tuesday.

96. Meghan McMahon Joins Glankler Brown as Associate -

Meghan K. McMahon has joined Glankler Brown PLLC as an associate, concentrating her practice in business and commercial litigation and intellectual property. McMahon previously worked in academic and membership affairs for the NCAA, and has experience with issues relating to NCAA compliance, sports and entertainment contracts, intellectual property.

97. Frigid Weather Pulls January Auto Sales Down 3 Percent -

DETROIT (AP) – Auto sales slid 3 percent in January as bouts of snow, ice and frigid temperatures in much of the country kept buyers snug in their homes instead of venturing out to car dealers.

98. Sanitation Workers Marker to be Unveiled Saturday -

A historical marker in the East Memphis neighborhood where two sanitation workers died in the back of a garbage truck will be unveiled Saturday, Feb. 1, at 10:30 a.m.

The ceremony by the Tennessee Historical Commission and the Memphis Pink Palace Museum comes 46 years to the day after a short circuit in the truck’s compactor crushed Echol Cole and Robert Walker to death at Colonial and Sea Isle roads as their crew made its rounds on a rainy day.

99. Shutting Down Unsafe Bus Companies to Get Easier -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Intercity bus and truck companies with a continuing history of safety problems will be easier to shut down under regulations published online Friday by the Federal Motor Carrier Administration, an agency under fire for its oversight of the industries.

100. Teen Tutors -

Imagine it: Memphis students helping their fellow students make better grades and, in the process, substantially boosting standardized test scores and overall academic performance – a feat school officials have been trying to accomplish for years.