» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation Links
Search results for 'Bill Parks' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:29
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:105
Middle Tennessee:64
East Tennessee:7
Other:1

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Germantown Was Into Mixed-Use Before It Was Cool -

Even before Mayor Karl Dean’s announcement that the $60 million ballpark would be constructed in Germantown, the area was flourishing – not to the extent that it is now, but it was experiencing growth and development.

2. Recruiter’s Career Twist -

Ask Janet Miller about her remarkable career at the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce and she’ll likely attribute it to good timing or pass credit onto others.

3. Office of Preparedness Director Leaves -

Bob Nations is leaving the Shelby County Office of Preparedness, part of second-term changes by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell.

4. Reshaping a City, One Lot at a Time -

John G. Brittle Jr. doesn’t have an office. He has a war room. The space, crowded with maps, charts, books, piles of paper and marked-up spreadsheets, is ground zero for InfillNashville, the 10-person team of site selection specialists that Brittle leads at Village Real Estate Services.

5. We’re All Invited -

MEMPHIS, SERVED IN THE SHELL. Following up last week’s column, this from a reader:

“We have no civic pride, half the population is intent on killing as many as they can and the other part lives behind walls or gates. There was a time in the fifties when you could leave your front door unlocked and keys in the car.”

6. Memphis Bar Judicial Poll Released -

The Memphis Bar Association poll of attorneys on the judicial races on the Aug. 7 ballot shows 16 percent to as high as 38 percent of the attorneys participating have no opinion in many of the judicial races.

7. Hollingsworth Buys Mississippi Industrial Property -

The Hollingsworth Cos., which operates a prominent industrial development company with holdings across the South, has acquired an industrial building in Senatobia, Miss.

Clinton, Tenn.-based Hollingsworth recently acquired the 198,450-square-foot building at 795 Shands Bottom Road in Senatobia from BMW.

8. Poll Shows Tennessee Voters Favor Free Tuition Plan -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A majority of Tennessee voters support Gov. Bill Haslam's program to cover a full ride at two-year colleges for any high school graduate, as well as higher education standards, according to the latest Vanderbilt University poll released Wednesday.

9. Congress Revives Bill for Women’s History Museum -

Citing history textbooks, national parks and landmarks that mostly leave women out, lawmakers Wednesday are reviving a long-stalled effort to create a National Women’s History Museum in the nation’s capital.

10. Congress Considers Bill for Women's History Museum -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Citing history textbooks, national parks and landmarks that mostly leave women out, lawmakers Wednesday are reviving a long-stalled effort to create a National Women's History Museum in the nation's capital.

11. Across the River -

The Arkansas land between the bridges across the Mississippi River at Memphis doesn’t have a name, at least not yet.

If graffiti is any indication, lots of people go there. And they cross numerous boundaries on dirt and gravel roads and paths that can end abruptly and are posted with “no trespassing” signs and other warnings as well as railroad video cameras.

12. Winners and Losers in Tennessee Legislative Session -

Here is a list of some of the winners and losers of the legislative session that concluded on Thursday.

The following bills passed this session:

— ANNEXATION: Bans cities from annexing land without a referendum. HB2371.

13. Override of Local Bans of Guns in Parks Fails -

A bill seeking to do away with city and county governments' power to ban firearms in parks, playgrounds and ball fields has failed for the year.

The bill sponsored by Republican Rep. Tilman Goins of Morristown did not emerge from the House Finance Subcommittee before the panel closed for the year on Monday night.

14. Winners and Losers in Tennessee Legislative Session -

Here is a list of some of the winners and losers of the legislative session that concluded on Thursday.

The following bills passed this session:

– ANNEXATION: Bans cities from annexing land without a referendum. HB2371.

15. Override of Local Bans of Guns in Parks Fails -

A bill seeking to do away with city and county governments' power to ban firearms in parks, playgrounds and ball fields has failed for the year.

The bill sponsored by Republican Rep. Tilman Goins of Morristown did not emerge from the House Finance Subcommittee before the panel closed for the year on Monday night.

16. Museum Milestone -

When the National Civil Rights Museum formally reopens Saturday, April 5, it will be with the “breaking” of a ceremonial chain at the new entrance to the building that was once the Lorraine Motel, where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in 1968.

17. Harris Files Ford Challenge at Deadline -

Memphis City Council member Lee Harris is challenging Democratic state Sen. Ophelia Ford in the August primary for District 29, the Senate seat held by a member of the Ford family since 1975.

18. Candidates Observe April Fools’ Day -

A busy week on the local political calendar that includes April Fools’ Day proved to be too much for a few local politicians.

Shelby County Commissioner Steve Mulroy announced he was withdrawing from the Democratic primary for Shelby County Mayor in May to become corporate public relations director for the Kellogg’s Corp.

19. Campfield Sticks to Goals of Smaller Government -

For a decade, state Sen. Stacey Campfield has been unafraid of making headlines.

First as a state representative, and then in the Senate, he’s spoken his mind and put forth legislation that meets his stated goals of shrinking government.

20. Haslam Agenda Hits Hard Times in Tennessee Legislature -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam's agenda is falling on hard times with fellow Republicans in the Tennessee General Assembly.

A House vote last week to delay school curriculum and assessment standards was the latest defiance of the governor's wishes. The GOP supermajority in the Legislature this session has also:

21. Exeter Property Group Acquires Industrial Portfolio -

Exeter Property Group has acquired a 4.4 million-square-foot industrial portfolio – including four properties in Memphis – for $132 million.

Exeter recently acquired the properties located in Memphis, Nashville and Columbus, Ohio, from LNR Property LLC, a special servicer appointed to the portfolio upon its transfer from London-based Strategic Realty Advisors Ltd. in June 2013.

22. Guns-in-Parks Proposal Clears 1st House Panel -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A proposal to strip local government control over whether to allow people with handgun carry permits to be armed at parks, playgrounds and sports fields has cleared its first legislative hurdle in the House.

23. Wedding Services Bill Sparks Opposition -

Two Tennessee lawmakers have proposed a bill that would protect wedding-related businesses from lawsuits if they refuse to provide services based on religious beliefs.

Republican Sen. Mike Bell of Riceville and Knoxville Rep. Bill Dunn are sponsoring the proposal.

24. Wedding Services Bill Sparks Opposition -

Two Tennessee lawmakers have proposed a bill that would protect wedding-related businesses from lawsuits if they refuse to provide services based on religious beliefs.

Republican Sen. Mike Bell of Riceville and Knoxville Rep. Bill Dunn are sponsoring the proposal.

25. Harris Questions Ford’s Guns-in-Parks Vote -

Memphis City Council member Lee Harris started raising funds and gauging support for a challenge of state Sen. Ophelia Ford last week by bringing up Ford’s vote earlier in the week in favor of the bill allowing guns to be carried in parks regardless of whether a local government bans the practice.

26. Guns-in-Parks Bill Passes Tenn. Senate -

A measure to do away with local government’s power to decide whether to allow firearms in public parks has passed the Senate.

The measure sponsored by Republican Sen. Stacey Campfield of Knoxville was approved 26-7.

27. Guns-in-Parks Bill Passes Tenn. Senate -

A measure to do away with local government's power to decide whether to allow firearms in public parks has passed the Senate.

The measure sponsored by Republican Sen. Stacey Campfield of Knoxville was approved 26-7.

28. Davis Headlines Fundraiser for Boys and Girls Clubs -

The Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Memphis presents an evening with former Memphis City Council member and business leader Fred Davis Tuesday, Feb. 11, at the organization’s technical training center at 903 Walker Ave.

29. Guns-in-Parks Bill Headed to Full Senate -

A proposal that seeks to do away with local government’s power to decide whether to allow firearms in public parks advanced to a full Senate vote on Tuesday despite opposition from the governor.

30. Beretta to Build New Firearms Plant in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Italian gun maker Beretta said Wednesday that Tennessee's support for gun rights was a major factor in its decision to build a manufacturing and research facility in the Nashville suburb of Gallatin.

31. Guns-in-Parks Bill Headed to Full Senate -

A proposal that seeks to do away with local government’s power to decide whether to allow firearms in public parks advanced to a full Senate vote on Tuesday despite opposition from the governor.

32. Jolly Helpers -

This year, a group of researchers from London’s Centre for Economics and Business Research in London teamed up with the founders of the Big Bang UK Young Scientists and Engineers Fair to tackle some tough Santa statistics.

33. Events -

Playhouse on the Square will host a Four Seasons Cocktail Series happy hour Saturday, Dec. 21, from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Playhouse, 66 S. Cooper St. The event will include guided tours of the theater, including areas off limits to the public. Cost is free; donations benefit Memphis Youth Symphony Orchestra. Visit playhouseonthesquare.org.

34. Events -

The Downtown Memphis Commission board will meet Thursday, Dec. 19, at noon in the commission conference room, 114 N. Main St. Visit downtownmemphiscommission.com.

35. Bipartisan Negotiators Seek Modest Budget Pact -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Republican and Democratic negotiators reached out for a budget agreement Tuesday to reduce automatic spending cuts aimed at programs ranging from parks to the Pentagon, risking a backlash from liberals and conservatives that highlighted the difficulty of compromise within divided government.

36. Flipping the Switch -

Tim Bolding, executive director of United Housing Inc., had become increasingly interested over the years in energy efficiency, sustainability and alternate energy sources when he saw homes in New Orleans being rebuilt with solar panels.

37. New in Rural Tennessee: Discovery Park of America -

UNION CITY, Tenn. (AP) – The gleaming white building with curved exteriors and a spaceship-like tower emerges from the flat landscape of West Tennessee like something out of science fiction, but it's not a villain's lair or superhero's headquarters.

38. Shutdown Over, Obama Surveys Damage and Blames GOP -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The government unlocked its doors Thursday after 16 days, with President Barack Obama saluting the resolution of Congress' bitter standoff but lambasting Republicans for the partial shutdown that he said had damaged the U.S. economy and America's credibility around the world.

39. A Deal: Voting to Avoid Default, Open Government -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Up against one last deadline, Congress raced to pass legislation Wednesday avoiding a threatened national default and ending a 16-day partial government shutdown along the strict terms set by President Barack Obama when the twin crises began.

40. Haslam: Deal to Open National Parks Came Too Late -

CLARKSVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam says a deal to open national parks in Tennessee for the weekend came too late for the state to send money to the federal government.

Haslam told reporters after an economic development announcement in Clarksville on Monday that talks finally reached their conclusion just before 5 p.m. on Friday, with the federal government saying the state would have to wire the money in order for the parks to open.

41. Obama Says Talks OK – After Default Threat Averted -

WASHINGTON (AP) – After weeks of gridlock, House Republicans floated broad hints Tuesday they might be willing to pass short-term legislation re-opening the government and averting a default in exchange for immediate talks with the Obama administration on reducing deficits and changing the three-year-old health care law.

42. Tennessee Republicans at Odds Over Shutdown Blame -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam and fellow Republicans in the Tennessee General Assembly appear to be at odds about who will be blamed for the shutdown of the federal government.

The Republican caucus in the state Senate on Tuesday sent a letter to President Barack Obama, claiming that the president and his Democratic allies in the U.S. Senate are behind the move to close down parts of the federal government to protect the new health care law.

43. Shutdown in Third Day With Debt Trouble Looming -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Efforts to resolve the government shutdown were at a standstill Thursday as President Barack Obama and House Speaker John Boehner traded barbs, the Treasury warned of a dire risk to the economy ahead and work in the Capitol was briefly halted because of gunshots outside.

44. Holiday Shopping is Expected to Be Up ... Unless -

NEW YORK (AP) – Americans, who're increasingly optimistic about improving economic conditions, are expected to spend at a more rapid clip during the upcoming holiday shopping season than they did last year.

45. Americans Anxious, Irritated as Government Shuts Down -

NEW YORK (AP) – The partial government shutdown that began Tuesday threw into turmoil the household finances of some federal workers, with many facing unpaid furloughs or delays in paychecks.

46. Boehner: House Won't Pass 'Clean' Spending Bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) – House Republicans will not simply pass a temporary spending bill from the Democratic Senate after it is shorn clean of a tea party plan to "defund Obamacare," House Speaker John Boehner said on Thursday.

47. Mississippi High Court Upholds Open-Carry Gun Law -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – The Mississippi Supreme Court unanimously upheld the state's open carry-gun law Thursday, allowing it to take effect after a circuit judge's order had kept it on hold about two months.

48. Haslam Awards $1.6 Million to Improve State Parks -

Gov. Bill Haslam is awarding more than $1.6 million in grants to improve Tennessee parks and recreational areas.

The Recreational Trails Program is a federally funded program established to distribute funding for diverse recreation trail projects. Twelve grants are being awarded.

49. Senate Moves Forward on Transportation Spending -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A $108 billion measure that would boost funding for infrastructure projects and housing subsidies for the poor is moving ahead in the Senate.

The measure cleared a procedural hurdle by a bipartisan 73-26 vote Tuesday, and that sets up days of debate with the goal of passing the measure next week.

50. House GOP to Slash Environmental, Arts Funding -

WASHINGTON (AP) – House Republicans Monday proposed slashing cuts to environmental programs and funding for the Smithsonian Institution and the arts as they unveiled the latest legislation to implement the second year of budget cuts required under so-called sequestration.

51. Eastward Bound -

Another Memphis park may be getting a name change just as the controversy over three Confederate-themed parks starts to move again at City Hall.

But unlike the controversy surrounding those parks, there doesn’t appear to be any disagreement about the changes for Columbus Park, a tiny patch of land at Adams Avenue and Third Street.

52. Property Tax Hike Highlights New City Budget -

Memphis City Council members raised the city property tax rate Tuesday, June 26, by 4 cents above the recertified tax rate and put the rest of a turbulent budget season to rest.

The approval of the $3.40 property tax rate and city operating and capital budgets came in a council session that ended at 12:30 a.m. Wednesday morning.

53. Lawsuit Seeks Restoration of Confederate Park Names -

A group of nine Memphians called “Citizens To Save Our Parks” is taking the city of Memphis and the Memphis City Council to court over the council’s February decision to temporarily rename three Confederate-themed parks.

54. Parks Controversy Back to City Council -

The committee recommendations are in for new names for three Confederate-themed city parks. And the long-running controversy about the parks is now back to the Memphis City Council.

The ad hoc committee of nine, which included several historians and two City Council members, held its final meeting Monday, April 29, and voted with little discussion on several ideas for what used to be known as Confederate, Forrest and Jefferson Davis parks.

55. Three Confederate Parks Get New Recommended Names -

An ad hoc committee of the Memphis City Council voted Monday, April 29, on three permanent names to recommend to the City Council for three Confederate themed parks.

The council voted earlier this year to give the three parks temporary names in lieu of further council action.

56. Committee Split on Park Renaming Options -

The nine-member ad hoc committee that is supposed to come up with recommendations for the Memphis City Council on what to call three Confederate-themed city parks displayed a clear rift Monday, April 22.

57. South Main Design Challenge Goes Public at Trolley Tour -

The latest and final part of the South Main Design Challenge, a competition among 35 teams of planners and architects, goes public Friday, April 26, at 431 S. Main St.

58. Lessons Learned -

What happened 15 years ago outside the Shelby County Courthouse between the seated figures of justice and wisdom informed much of what happened Saturday, March 30, when a different Ku Klux Klan group, the American Knights, came to Memphis and rallied at the other southern entrance to the courthouse – between the seated figures of authority and liberty.

59. Klan Rally, Heavy Police Presence Mix With Rain -

A group of 60 robed Ku Klux Klan members and swastika flag bearing members of the National Socialist Movement rallied Saturday, March 30, outside the Shelby County Courthouse.

The protest and a counter protest came with chilly temperatures and a rain that alternated between a mist and a downpour over several hours.

60. Public Hearing Monday on Renaming Parks -

The Memphis City Council ad hoc committee on the renaming of three city parks holds a public hearing Monday, April 1, at 4:30 p.m. at City Hall, 125 N. Main St.

61. Bill to Halt Renaming of Confederate Parks -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A proposal to bar local governments from renaming parks or monuments honoring Tennessee's military figures is headed to the governor for his consideration.

The measure sponsored by Republican Sen. Bill Ketron of Murfreesboro was approved 26-3 by the Senate on Thursday. The companion bill passed the house 69-22 last month.

62. House Approves Bill Preventing Shutdown March 27 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Republican-controlled House approved legislation Wednesday to prevent a government shutdown on March 27 and blunt the impact of newly imposed spending cuts on the Defense Department.

63. Council Delays Sales Tax Votes -

Memphis City Council members delayed Tuesday, March 5, final votes on an ordinance to put a half-percent sales tax hike to Memphis voters sometime before Sept. 30 and a resolution outlining how the estimated $47 million in revenue from the tax hike would be used.

64. State Delays Auto Inspection Takeover -

The state of Tennessee has told the city of Memphis it will probably take two years for it to take over auto inspection duties in Shelby County.

But city funding for the auto inspection stations and employees runs out when the current fiscal year does, at the end of June.

65. Sales Tax Hike Headed to Ballot -

Memphis City Council members take final votes Tuesday, March 5, on a half-percent city sales tax hike referendum and the use of the estimated $47 million in revenue the tax hike will produce.

The council, which meets at 3:30 p.m. at City Hall, 125 N. Main St., is expected to pass the referendum and send it to voters this year.

66. Permit Approved for Planned Klan Rally in Memphis -

MEMPHIS (AP) – A Ku Klux Klan chapter has been granted a demonstration permit to protest the renaming of three Memphis parks that honored the Confederacy and two of its most prominent figures.

67. Patent Law Seminar to be Held at Rhodes -

Bill Parks, an attorney with Wyatt, Tarrant & Combs LLP and the founder and chairman of the Memphis Bar Association’s intellectual property and entertainment law section, will present a seminar to the Memphis business community Feb. 19 explaining the nation’s new patent law requirements that go into effect on March 16.

68. City Council Approves Fairgrounds TDZ Request -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, Feb. 19, plans for a tourism development zone to capture sales tax revenue in a large area for a renovation of the Fairgrounds property at first.

The boundaries of the zone go to the state for approval and city Community and Housing Development division director Robert Lipscomb said such a proposal could be at the state building commission in Nashville in April.

69. Patent Law Seminar to be Held at Rhodes -

Bill Parks, an attorney with Wyatt, Tarrant & Combs LLP and the founder and chairman of the Memphis Bar Association’s intellectual property and entertainment law section, will present a seminar to the Memphis business community Feb. 19 explaining the nation’s new patent law requirements that go into effect on March 16.

70. Give Up These 40 Things for Lent -

40 THINGS TO DO WITHOUT. Lent has begun – a season of reflection and sacrifice for believers seeking spiritual strength, a season bridging the gray gloom of winter and the green promise of spring for those seeking renewal, a season of waffles and chicken hash for those seeking comfort in the caloric basement of Calvary Church – 40 days of all of that for me.

71. Forrest Fire -

When the Memphis City Council got around to the discussion that counted this week on the future of Forrest Park and, as it turns out, two other Civil War-themed parks, council member Myron Lowery was adamant.

72. Outdoor Retail Executive Picked for Interior -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama on Wednesday nominated outdoor business executive Sally Jewell to lead the Interior Department.

73. Legislation Propels Parks Controversy to New Level -

As Shelby County suburban leaders were meeting in Nashville Tuesday, Feb. 5, with Tennessee legislators about possible moves toward some version of suburban school districts, the Memphis City Council was reacting to a pending bill in the state Legislature.

74. Council Changes Names of 3 Civil War Parks -

Nathan Bedford Forrest, Confederate and Jefferson Davis Parks are no more.

75. Council Preps for Late Summer Sales Tax Hike Referendum -

A referendum on a half percent city sales tax hike to fund a city pre kindergarten expansion and roll back the city property tax rate by 20 cents would happen in August or September instead of May.

76. Commission Approves County Building Renovation -

Shelby County Commissioners approved $20 million in renovation work to come on the Vasco Smith County Administration Building. The vote Monday, May 25, came after a delay two weeks ago.

County engineers have said the nearly 50-year-old structure where the commission meets and it, along with the Shelby County mayor, have offices is badly in need of renovations to fix leaking pipes and outdated HVAC systems that cost the county twice as much as utilities do in more modern government buildings.

77. Haslam, Ramsey Wary of Guns in Parking Lots Bill -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam and Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey are among the prominent Republicans trying to put the brakes on a bill seeking to guarantee employees the right to store their firearms in vehicles parked at work.

78. Good News At Tax Time? -

Ray’s Take If you haven’t started taking care of your federal income tax filing with the IRS, it’s time to get a move on: April 15th seems to come around awfully quick. But, while you’re hustling to get your paperwork in order, keep in mind that there’s actually some good news for 2012 when it comes to income taxes.

79. House Seeks to Unload Unneeded Government Property -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The House on Tuesday backed legislation to sell off or consolidate some of the thousands of underused or unneeded federal buildings, potentially saving taxpayers billions of dollars.

80. Lawmakers Discuss Bills to Reduce Tenn. Sales Tax -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The Republican sponsor of a proposal to reduce the sales tax on groceries in Tennessee said Wednesday he's open to working with Democrats who have a similar measure if it would help the legislation's passage.

81. Council to Delve Into Electrolux Incentives -

Memphis City Council members will talk Tuesday, Jan. 17, about getting more information from the mayor’s office about financial incentives used to bring companies to the city.

A resolution asking the administration to give the council a summary sheet of any executed contracts requiring a city investment of more than $250,000 is the topic of the first chairman’s meeting at 10 a.m.

82. Wharton To Consolidate Three City Divisions -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. plans to roll out a 100-day plan for goals for his administration now that he has started a full four-year term of office.

After taking the oath of office Sunday, Jan. 1, at the Cannon Center for the Performing Arts, Wharton told several hundred in attendance that his plan will “begin this new term with energy and urgency.”

83. Obama Seeks to Leverage $1 Trillion Spending Bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama's Democratic allies in the Senate are using a critical year-end spending bill as political leverage to try to force Republicans to negotiate bipartisan legislation to extend payroll tax cuts and unemployment benefits due to expire at the end of the year.

84. $1T-Plus Spending Bill Taking Shape in Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Weary after a year of partisan bickering, lawmakers tried Monday to wrap up a sprawling $1 trillion-plus spending bill that chips away at military and environmental spending but denies conservatives many of the policy changes they wanted on social issues, government regulations and health care.

85. Council Passes Amended City Bonus, Rejects Water Rate Hike -

Memphis City Council members approved a $750 flat bonus for all full time city employees Tuesday, Dec. 6, and a flat bonus of $200 for part time city employees.

Just as the Shelby County Commission did Monday for county employees, the council departed from the mayoral administration’s plan for a bonus as a percentage of pay.

86. Expectations Higher for AutoZone -

Analysts are forecasting a nearly 18 percent jump in earnings per share when AutoZone Inc., the leading auto parts retailer in the nation, reports quarterly earnings next week.

87. Casada Weighs In on Anti-Bias Legislation -

Editor’s Note: This is an occasional series that profiles Tennessee’s state legislators. Credit his friends – and the inspiration of Ronald Reagan – with starting state Rep. Glen Casada on the road to public service.

88. Congress Dodges Shutdown After Disaster Aid Fight -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In agreeing to an emergency spending bill to avoid a government shutdown, Congress achieved the bare minimum while finessing a fight over whether emergency disaster aid ought to be paid for with cuts elsewhere in the budget.

89. House Disaster Vote Sets up Showdown With Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Despite opposition from Democrats and some tea party Republicans, the GOP-controlled House on Wednesday took up $3.7 billion in disaster relief as part of a bill to avert a government shutdown at the end of the month.

90. Old Forest Goes New -

A group of 15 citizens forming an Overton Park conservancy hopes to take a plan to the Memphis City Council by Labor Day.

The group holds the second of two public comment sessions Tuesday, June 28, at 5 p.m. at the Memphis College of Art, in Overton Park.

91. Special Coverage: Mid-South Flooding -

Coverage of the rising waters in the Memphis area

MIM Triathlon Still Planned

Despite rising floodwaters, next weekend’s Memphis in May Triathlon event is still on, the Tunica Convention & Visitors Bureau has announced.

92. Guns on Campus Bill Sparks Republican Infighting -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The demise of a bill seeking to allow faculty and staff to carry guns on the campuses of public colleges has led to a flare-up between Republican lawmakers in the Tennessee House.

93. U.S. Attorney Announces Appointments -

U.S. Attorney for West Tennessee Ed Stanton has completed a reorganization of the federal prosecutor’s office that began last year with the establishment of supervisors for criminal and civil appeals as well as the establishment of a civil rights unit.

94. Dodging the Deluge -

The last time the Memphis river gauge was this high, Memphis was a much different place. In 1937 when the Mississippi River at Memphis topped 48.7 feet, Mud Island was really an island with no levee connecting it to the city and the Wolf River flowing between it and the city proper. Parts of the city were still rural as was the county outside Memphis. Today’s suburban development was a long way off, and Millington was still a few years away from getting the Naval Air Station.

95. Special Coverage: Mid-South Flooding -

Coverage of the rising waters in the Memphis area

Shuttle Prep Made For Barbecue Fest Attendees
Following Monday’s announcement that the Memphis in May World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest is moving from Tom Lee Park to Tiger Lane at the Mid-South Fairgrounds, the Memphis Convention & Visitors Bureau is busy making preparations for shuttle services to accommodate out-of-town attendees and teams staying in Downtown hotels.
The dates of the event will remain the same, May 12 to 14. All other aspects of the event, but the location, will be as scheduled.
Low-cost transportation will run on a continual loop from four Downtown locations to the barbecue contest from late Wednesday afternoon through Saturday evening. The shuttle locations are not yet decided but will be hotel-centric.
“We hear your requests and will definitely make our best efforts to accommodate everyone,” the Memphis In May website reads.
“We are working on shuttle transportation for those of you staying Downtown.”
For more information, visit www.memphisinmay.org.

96. River Rising -

The workweek began at many Memphis companies with a review of flood contingency plans.

The week ahead promises to be a challenging one.

By Monday evening, the National Weather Service had changed its forecast to keep the May 10 crest date for the Mississippi River at Memphis. But they upped the river level from 45 feet to 48 feet.

97. Flood Experts Watch Wolf and Loosahatchie Warily -

Gov. Bill Haslam met with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers officials Friday morning during one of several stops in Memphis.

As the Mississippi River continued to rise toward a projected 45-foot crest on May 10, the tributaries – the Wolf and Loosahatchie Rivers – remained the main source of street flooding in east Shelby County and even along Humphreys Boulevard in East Memphis as well as Wolf River Boulevard between Riverdale and Wolf River Circle.

98. Flood Experts Watch Wolf and Loosahatchie Rivers -

Gov. Bill Haslam met with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers officials Friday morning during one of several stops in Memphis.

As the Mississippi River continued to rise toward a projected 45-foot crest on May 10, the tributaries – the Wolf and Loosahatchie Rivers – remained the main source of street flooding in east Shelby County and even along Humphreys Boulevard in East Memphis as well as Wolf River Boulevard between Riverdale and Wolf River Circle.

99. No Deal Yet as Possible Government Shutdown Looms -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Senate's second ranking Democrat said Wednesday that negotiators on the budget are making progress but that conservative GOP policy prescriptions remain obstacles as they scramble to avert a government shutdown this weekend.

100. Roundtable Tackles Trademark Infringement -

The law firm of Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz PC will hold a roundtable discussion Thursday on the topic “Use of Competitor’s Trademark in Keyword Advertising: Infringement or Not?”

The event is part of the American Bar Association’s Intellectual Property litigation series.