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Editorial Results (free)

1. 100 N. Main Keeps Power On for Another Month -

The head of the Downtown Memphis Commission says the skyscraper at 100 N. Main St. suffers from “weak” ownership and that the building would probably be better off with a new, deep-pocketed owner.

2. Fast Growth for Knoxville Diocese -

For the smallest Catholic diocese in the U.S., the Knoxville diocese knows how to draw a crowd of movers and shakers.

At the April 19 groundbreaking for the new $25 million cathedral, the lineup of both secular and non-secular dignitaries attending a weekend of events was impressive.

3. Stones’ Nashville Connections Go Way Back -

While Brad Paisley lives what he calls “a bucket list item” by singing while playing his guitar in typically showy fashion as the opening act for The Rolling Stones, the most important guitarist in rock ‘n’ roll history and a man idolized by Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood will be sitting in his house on Blueberry Hill in the hills of northern Davidson County.

4. Records Show $8 Million Spent on Lawmaker Health Premiums Since '92 -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Newly released records show that Tennessee taxpayers have paid more than $8 million since 1992 for health insurance premiums for sitting lawmakers.

The Tennessean (http://tnne.ws/1Ba8V2j) reports those records show that the state has paid out the most for Johnson City Republican Sen. Rusty Crowe and his family. Records obtained by the newspaper through a public information request show the state paid out $200,000 for Crowe's premiums since he enrolled in the plan in 1992.

5. Cannabis Oil Bill Could Lead to More ‘Evil Weed’ Wins -

Logan and Stacie Mathes were on "pins and needles" as they waited for Gov. Bill Haslam to sign legislation into law allowing cannabis oil to be used to treat seizures and similar medical problems in Tennessee.

6. Will Tennessee Republicans Ever Be Truly Happy? -

Why aren’t Tennessee Republicans happier?

With the GOP so dominate in the Tennessee General Assembly and losses so rare – on the Hill or in elections – the party’s lawmakers should be jubilant with this year’s session. But it’s never enough.

7. Injuries Slow Development of Vols Defensive Players -

Tennessee football fans might want to look past the defensive lineup for the Orange & White Spring Game. It will bear little resemblance to the unit that will start the 2015 season opener against Bowling Green on Sept. 5 at Nashville’s LP Field.

8. County Budget Proposal Includes $6 Million Dilemma -

Some of the numbers crucial to the bottom line of Shelby County’s budget for the upcoming fiscal year are still expected with about four months left in the fiscal year.

But at the outset of county commission budget hearings that begin Wednesday, April 8, here’s what the dollar figures look like.

9. Luttrell's $1.1 Billion Budget Plan Goes to Commission Wednesday -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell takes a $1.18 billion budget proposal to Shelby County Commissioners in Wednesday, April 8, committee sessions.

10. School Competition Shows Promise, Threat -

The competition among Shelby County Schools, the Achievement School District and charter schools has been a positive for public schools, say two Shelby County Schools board members.

But board chairwoman Teresa Jones and board member Chris Caldwell say the competition of the last three school years also has split the funding and could threaten classroom success.

11. Jones Still Battling for Medicinal Marijuana -

State Rep. Sherry Jones is continuing her push for legalization of medical marijuana in Tennessee after taking it further than ever in the legislative process last year.

12. State Legislators Misfire In Rush to Impress NRA Attendees -

With the National Rifle Association bringing 75,000 people to Nashville for its April 10-12 convention, the timing is seemingly right for the General Assembly to impress by passing a bevy of gun bills.

13. County Commission Ponders Local Disaster Fund -

Shelby County Commissioners are considering matching a local disaster relief fund started by the Memphis City Council last year that would total $500,000.

But a resolution to formally join in the fund drew “concern” Monday, March 9, from Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell.

14. Dow Reshuffle: Apple Joins Blue-Chip Index and Boots AT&T -

NEW YORK (AP) – Apple is in. AT&T is out.

In another victory of sorts for the popular and profitable iPhone giant, Apple will replace AT&T in the venerable Dow Jones industrial average on March 19, the manager of the index announced Friday.

15. Wave of New Retail Construction Boosts Contractors -

Retail development in the Memphis area is booming in what construction and retail officials describe as the most active period for retail construction since the recession, with everything from a massive outlet mall in Southaven to grocery stores and smaller, traditional retail centers going up.

16. Yellen Reiterates Fed's Patience in Raising Rates -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Tuesday that the U.S. economy is making steady progress, but that for now the Fed is will remain patient about raising interest rates because the job market is still healing and inflation is too low.

17. Raleigh Springs Mall Tests Town Center Concept -

The idea that a declining shopping mall can be redeveloped and reinvigorated as a “town center” with local government offices as a catalyst for private developers appears to be on its way to a meeting with reality.

18. After Setting iPhone Record, What Does Apple Do Next? -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Apple CEO Tim Cook says consumer demand for new iPhones has been "staggering" and "hard to comprehend." That helped the company report record-smashing earnings for its latest quarter and sent the stock climbing more than 7 percent on Wednesday.

19. Harris Goes to Nashville -

At his last Memphis City Council session, Lee Harris reflected this week on his three years on the council and the group of politicians he joined.

20. Vols’ Barnett Faces Nation’s Best in Iowa’s Scherff -

KNOXVILLE – Derek Barnett is spending most of the Christmas holidays away from his Nashville home, and he wouldn’t have it any other way.

21. Dobbs the Latest in Line of Dual-Threat UT Quarterbacks -

If the University of Tennessee’s football team gains bowl eligibility with a victory Saturday at Vanderbilt, it can look back to a quarterback change Oct. 25 against Alabama as a pivotal point in the season.

22. Amendments, Wine Dominate Election Day -

The last of 2014’s three elections promises to be defined just as much by the questions on the ballot as it is by the choices among candidates.

Election Day is Tuesday, Nov. 4, across Tennessee, with polls open in Shelby County from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

23. Why are Tennesseans So Afraid of an Income Tax? -

The odds of an income tax becoming a reality in Tennessee – one of the nation’s lowest-taxed states – are slim to none.

And, yet there is an amendment on the Nov. 4 ballot that would change Tennessee’s constitution by giving the Legislature authority to prohibit passage of an income tax or payroll tax in the state.

24. Central Centennial -

Central Station is 100 years old, an age that most train stations never reach. And if they do, they get there with some really harrowing years in mid-life.

The landmark at South Main Street and G.E. Patterson Drive marked its centennial this month with hundreds of people taking a look around the now recovered and renovated station as well as Amtrak trains and Canadian National railroad locomotives on the tracks that run by the station.

25. Collins Forms Mayoral Exploratory Committee -

Memphis City Council member Harold Collins has formed an exploratory committee as he considers a run for Memphis mayor in 2015.

26. Luttrell Appoints Two Division Directors -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has appointed Dale Lane as the county’s new director of the Office of Preparedness and Martha Lott as the county’s new director of Community Services.

27. Jones Elected Chair of Shelby County Schools Board -

Teresa Jones is the new chairman of the Shelby County Schools board.

Jones was elected without opposition Tuesday, Sept. 30, at the first meeting of the nine-member school board elected to four-year terms in August. She serves as chairwoman of the board for the next year.

28. Young Volunteers Face Long Odds at Oklahoma -

Two games into the 2014 season, and it’s time for the University of Tennessee to play some big-boy football.

The Vols (2-0) took care of business at Neyland Stadium in the first two games against Utah State and Arkansas State.

29. County Leaders Make Transition to Governing -

For government officials, the oath of office marks the boundary between the ability to get elected and the ability to govern.

But it’s not always apparent to those taking the oath what they have gotten themselves into.

30. Vols Among NCAA’s Youngest Headed Into Sunday Opener -

KNOXVILLE – For better or worse, University of Tennessee football coach Butch Jones won’t need to wait long to see the talent level of his highly touted freshman class.

Jones will find out Sunday night at 7 when the Vols play host to Utah State at Neyland Stadium. The Aggies will be an underdog – probably by a touchdown or so – and a trendy pick for some as an upset special.

31. Is It Really Time to Relax Lending Standards? -

Just when you thought it was safe to believe in the wisdom of the system, they pull this.

Back in 2008, when the Great Recession made its way into Middle Tennessee and the area began to feel the pain that other regions had endured for several years, the financial world collapsed.

32. Tennessee Now Seeks to Renovate Cordell Hull Building -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam's administration is backing off earlier plans to demolish the 60-year-old Cordell Hull office building located next to the state Capitol in Nashville and instead hopes to renovate it.

33. Bigger, Better, Louder -

“When it comes to college football, the South has no equal, because the Southeastern Conference has no equal. Find me a conference with a better commissioner, better players, better head coaches, better staffs, better game-day atmospheres, better-looking coeds – better anything.”

34. Democratic Divide Widens in Election Results -

Democrats have retained their seven-vote majority on the new single-district Shelby County Commission that takes office Sept. 1.

That and the re-election victory of Democratic incumbent Cheyenne Johnson in the race for Shelby County Assessor of Property were the only bright spots for a divided local Democratic Party that lost every other countywide partisan elected position to Republicans in the Aug. 7 county general election, just as they lost every countywide position to Republicans four years earlier.

35. Cohen Prevails, Incumbents Dominate -

Democratic U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen held off Thursday, Aug. 7, the most serious electoral challenge he’s faced since winning the Congressional seat in 2006, in the form of attorney Ricky E. Wilkins.

36. Democratic Sample Ballot Omits Some Names -

Not every candidate who claimed the Democratic nomination in the May county primaries is on the Shelby County Democratic Party’s endorsement ballot that hits the streets this week.

With early voting underway in advance of the Aug. 7 election day, the sample ballot does not include Juvenile Court clerk candidate Henri Brooks, Circuit Court clerk nominee Rhonda Banks, Probate Court clerk candidate William Chism and County Clerk nominee Charlotte Draper.

37. Memphis Bar Judicial Poll Released -

The Memphis Bar Association poll of attorneys on the judicial races on the Aug. 7 ballot shows 16 percent to as high as 38 percent of the attorneys participating have no opinion in many of the judicial races.

38. Events -

The sixth annual Man of the House mentoring event for 12- to 18-year-old boys will be held Saturday, June 14, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the National Civil Rights Museum, 450 Mulberry St. A “power lunch” at noon will feature remarks from Sheriff Bill Oldham and Memphis business leaders. Cost is free. Register at manofthehouse.net or email manofthehousementoring@gmail.com.

39. Jones Requests Election Recount -

Shelby County Commission candidate Martavius Jones has formally requested a recount of the May Democratic primary election results in Commission District 10.

Jones, who finished second in the unofficial primary vote tally to Reginald Milton by 26 votes, hand-delivered a letter to the Shelby County Election Commission Friday, May 16, seeking a recount.

40. Malone Takes Early Vote In Mayoral Primary -

Former Shelby County Commissioner Deidre Malone took the early vote in the three-way Democratic primary for Shelby County Mayor.

The first results of the Tuesday, May 6, election night showed Malone leading rivals county commissioner Steve Mulroy and former Shelby County Schools board member Kenneth Whalum Jr.

41. Jones Grows Into Legislative Career -

Some people are born into politics; others grow into a political career. For Tennessee Rep. Sherry Jones, it was a little bit of both.

42. Tate Uncontested in Tennessee Senate Race -

The day after the filing deadline for the August state and federal primaries, Democratic state Sen. Reginald Tate became an uncontested incumbent, winning another four-year term representing District 33.

43. Harris Files Ford Challenge at Deadline -

Memphis City Council member Lee Harris is challenging Democratic state Sen. Ophelia Ford in the August primary for District 29, the Senate seat held by a member of the Ford family since 1975.

44. ‘Champion of Working Man’ Rep. Turner Set to Retire -

State Rep. and Nashville Democrat Mike Turner is retiring from the General Assembly and considering a run for mayor.

45. Low-Wage Jobs Unexpectedly a Way of Life for Many -

WASHINGTON (AP) – For years, many Americans followed a simple career path: Land an entry-level job. Accept a modest wage. Gain skills. Leave eventually for a better-paying job.

The workers benefited, and so did lower-wage retailers such as Wal-Mart: When its staffers left for better-paying jobs, they could spend more at its stores. And the U.S. economy gained, too, because more consumer spending fueled growth.

46. Election Commission Hears Ballot Challenges -

Shelby County Election Commissioners could complete the ballot for the May Shelby County primary elections Wednesday, March 5, by deciding on challenges to the residency of three candidates in the Democratic primaries.

47. Roland ReElected At Filing Deadline, Two Countywide Races Set For August -

One of the six Shelby County Commission incumbents seeking re-election this year was effectively elected to a new four-year term in a new district with the noon Thursday, Feb. 20, filing deadline for candidates in the May county primaries.

48. Rape Kit Backlog Plan Outlined -

As Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. announced Wednesday, Feb. 12, that the city would have help from a national nonprofit on the Memphis Police Department’s backlog of 12,000 rape kits, criticism was growing of the problems in the local criminal justice system that led to the backlog.

49. County Schools Weighs Charter Rent Waiver -

Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson is considering waiving rent payments by charter schools that lease the school system’s old buildings in return for them taking all children in an area and coordinating their location with Shelby County Schools.

50. Lost Pizza to Open in East Memphis in March -

The Lost Pizza Co. is about two months away from opening the first Memphis location for its fast-casual restaurant concept.

51. Bailey Pulls Petition for Circuit Court Return -

Retired Shelby County Circuit Court Judge D’Army Bailey has pulled a qualifying petition to run for Circuit Court Division 1 judge in the Aug. 7 elections.

Bailey retired in September 2009 as Division 8 judge.

52. Fullilove Pulls Petition For County Clerk -

Memphis City Council member Janis Fullilove has pulled a qualifying petition to run for Shelby County clerk in the 2014 county elections.

53. Tenn. Supreme Court Rules on Defamation Claims -

The Tennessee Supreme Court has ruled that cabinet-level state commissioners have absolute immunity from defamation claims for what they say when they are performing their official duties.

The court ruled Monday, Dec. 23, in the case of Zoyle Jones, a state Department of Corrections employee demoted for allegedly double-billing the state and a private organization for travel expenses.

54. AP Survey: US Income Gap is Holding Back Economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The growing gap between the richest Americans and everyone else isn't bad just for individuals.

It's hurting the U.S. economy.

So says a majority of more than three dozen economists surveyed last week by The Associated Press. Their concerns tap into a debate that's intensified as middle-class pay has stagnated while wealthier households have thrived.

55. Needs of Homeless Change During Holidays -

The needs of the homeless and the hungry rise in prominence during the holidays.

But those who work with those problems year round are always quick to say the problems are still there after the attention wanders once the holidays are over.

56. Audit Critical of Company Hired to Manage Assets -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says the state has benefited from a company hired to manage its assets, despite a comptroller's report that suggests the company may have benefited from its own advice, creating a conflict of interest.

57. New in Rural Tennessee: Discovery Park of America -

UNION CITY, Tenn. (AP) – The gleaming white building with curved exteriors and a spaceship-like tower emerges from the flat landscape of West Tennessee like something out of science fiction, but it's not a villain's lair or superhero's headquarters.

58. Dimmer View of Economy Makes Fed Pullback Unlikely -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A lot can change in six weeks.

When the Federal Reserve last met in mid-September, almost everyone expected it to start reducing the stimulus it's given the U.S. economy to help it rebound from the Great Recession.

59. Blume Named to Tennessee Real Estate Commission -

Gary Blume, a veteran agent with RE/MAX Real Estate Experts, has been appointed by Gov. Bill Haslam to a five-year term on the Tennessee Real Estate Commission. Blume is a past president of the Memphis Area Association of Realtors and has served twice as president of the Tennessee Real Estate Educational Foundation.

60. State Architect Named to Head General Services -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam has named Robert E. Oglesby to become the new commissioner of the state Department of General Services.

Oglesby, who currently serves as state architect, will replace Steve Cates, who is leaving the Cabinet on Aug. 20 to return to private business.

61. Judge: Nineteenth Century Club Owners Can Raze Building -

A judge ruled Wednesday, July 24, that the owners of the historic Nineteenth Century Club building on Union Avenue can move forward with plans to demolish the property.

General Sessions Div. 14 Court Judge Larry Potter said that because no Chancery Court suit alleging an improper sale of the property was filed by Wednesday that he had little choice but to allow the Union Group LLC to move forward with plans to raze the building at 1433 Union Ave.

62. State Delays Office Lease Announcement -

Groups hoping to garner the state’s real estate needs Downtown will have to wait a little longer to find out if they placed the winning bid.

The state had originally planned to issue a notice of awarding the lease for its office space needs Tuesday, July 23, but that date has been changed to Aug. 19, when the executive subcommittee of the State Building Commission meets.

63. Five Groups Bid for State Office Space -

Five groups have submitted bids to become the new home to roughly 900 state workers.

JP-Memphis, Memphis Commerce Square Partners, Peabody Tower GP, Peabody Place Gold GP and Hertz Memphis all submitted bids for the state’s real estate needs.

64. Eastward Bound -

Another Memphis park may be getting a name change just as the controversy over three Confederate-themed parks starts to move again at City Hall.

But unlike the controversy surrounding those parks, there doesn’t appear to be any disagreement about the changes for Columbus Park, a tiny patch of land at Adams Avenue and Third Street.

65. Judicial Election Process Muddied -

The Judicial Nominating Commission had a busy last few days before it went into limbo last week.

The commission sent Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam two slates for each of the three appeals court vacancies to come a year and two months from now when three appellate court judges opt not to run for re-election and end their terms.

66. Deadline Arrives for State’s Office Space Needs -

The future of the state’s role as a major employer and user of office space Downtown could become much clearer next month.

Proposals are due Tuesday, July 2, for 100,000 square feet of office space that will become vacant when the state abandons the Donnelly J. Hill State Office Building Downtown.

67. The Ghost Of Claude Rains -

SHOCKED, SHOCKED. You know who Claude Rains was, don’t you? Played Captain Renault in the 1942 classic “Casablanca”?

Sure you do.

You remember what the corrupt Captain said when he closed the casino – where he gambled every night – in Rick’s Café Américain, “I’m shocked, shocked to find that gambling is going on in here!”

68. Lawsuit Seeks Restoration of Confederate Park Names -

A group of nine Memphians called “Citizens To Save Our Parks” is taking the city of Memphis and the Memphis City Council to court over the council’s February decision to temporarily rename three Confederate-themed parks.

69. Jones Awarded Honor at Riverside Military Academy -

John Paul “Jack” Jones, former publisher of The Daily News, is the recipient of the President’s Philanthropy Award from Riverside Military Academy.

70. State Zeros in on Downtown Office Space -

The future of the state’s role as a major employer and user of office space Downtown could become much clearer this week.

Proposals are due Thursday, May 16, for 100,000 square feet of office space that will become vacant when the state abandons the Donnelley J. Hill State Office Building Downtown. A recent request for proposals from the agency that handles state real estate appears to put the state’s focus entirely on Downtown.

71. Argent Financial Sees Growth in Memphis, Beyond -

Argent Financial Group hasn’t let its foot off the gas since arriving in Memphis.

The Louisiana-based wealth management firm, which is now responsible for more than $5.5 billion in client assets, has continued to expand both in Memphis and beyond.

72. Gun Ban Would Protect More Than 2,200 Firearms -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Congress' latest crack at a new assault weapons ban would protect more than 2,200 specific firearms, including a semi-automatic rifle that is nearly identical to one of the guns used in the bloodiest shootout in FBI history.

73. Pickler Cleared of Conflict Allegations -

A countywide school board ethics committee recommended no board action Wednesday, Feb. 13, against board member David Pickler on conflict of interest allegations made by fellow board member Martavius Jones.

74. Countywide School Board Renews MASE Charter -

The first charter school in Memphis and in the state of Tennessee had its charter renewed Tuesday, Jan. 29, by the countywide school board.

Memphis City Schools administrators had recommended non-renewal of the charter of the 10-year-old Memphis Academy of Science and Engineering based on a drop in student achievement test scores.

75. Final Bell -

From the moment he became Memphis City Schools superintendent, Kriner Cash had competition.

“I’ve been fighting since I got here,” he said in the early stages of what winds up as a five-year tenure that officially comes to an end July 31.

76. US Still Faces Political Fights on Spending, Debt -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A last-minute deal will keep the U.S. from driving off the so-called "fiscal cliff," but higher taxes and continued political fighting in Washington threaten to shake the fragile economy well into 2013.

77. US Economy Could Handle Short Fall Over 'Cliff' -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The economic threat that's kept many Americans on edge for months is nearing reality – unless the White House and Republicans cut a budget deal by New Year's Day.

78. So What Happened to Auburn? -

For years I have been telling my clients that if you desire or need to change something in your life you basically have three options: You can change something about yourself (the least used, most effective option), you can try to change something about someone else (the most used, least effective option), or you can change something about your environment. With this in mind, I recently had an interesting conversation with a friend of mine who happens to be a serious Auburn University football fan.

79. Jones Center Fulfills Dream at First Assembly Christian School -

If the walls could talk in the log cabin on the campus of First Assembly Christian School in Cordova, they might tell stories of home life in 1836 or of the visiting missionaries who used to stay there.

80. Development Accelerator -

The city of Millington didn’t have a city engineer until 2008 when it had to have one in order to have local control over the Veterans Parkway road construction project.

“I thought it was kind of my cross to bear since I was hired in 2008,” Millington City Engineer Darek Baskin said this week of the road.

81. Most in US Won't be Able to Escape 'Fiscal Cliff' -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Everyone who pays income tax – and some who don't –will feel it.

So will doctors who accept Medicare, people who get unemployment aid, defense contractors, air traffic controllers, national park rangers and companies that do research and development.

82. Lawmaker Calls on Governor to Oust Children's Services Chief -

A Tennessee legislator who repeatedly asked the Department of Children’s Services for information is calling for the commissioner’s ouster.

State Rep. Sherry Jones, D-Nashville, is asking Gov. Bill Haslam to remove DSC Commissioner Kate O’Day.

83. Department of Children’s Services Seeks $8 Million From State -

NASHVILLE – The Tennessee Department of Children's Services requested more than $8 million on Thursday to hire new staff and make other improvements to the agency that has been highly scrutinized over children's deaths.

84. Events -

Gallery Fifty Six will hold an opening reception for its autumn group exhibition Friday, Nov. 2, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the gallery, 2256 Central Ave. The Visit galleryfiftysix.com.

85. Child Sex Trafficker Draws 14-Year Prison Sentence -

A Bartlett woman who pleaded guilty to federal child sex trafficking conspiracy and sex trafficking by force, fraud and coercion was sentenced Thursday, Oct. 11, to 14 years in prison.

The sentencing of Kala Bray, 19, by U.S. District Court Judge Samuel “Hardy” Mays drew reaction from U.S. Justice Department officials in Washington who have made such cases a priority and have highlighted investigations of the trafficking by Memphis federal prosecutors and FBI agents.

86. Deberry Defends Head of Department of Children's Services -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A Democratic lawmaker who played a role in the formation of the embattled Tennessee Department of Children's Services says the agency's commissioner shouldn't be blamed for deeply rooted problems that she inherited.

87. Cherry Back to Roots at Dunavant Enterprises -

Russel Cherry, longtime general counsel at Dunavant Enterprises Inc., grew up in a family that raised sporting dogs and had originally planned to be a veterinarian.

88. For the People -

It’s well-known that the Memphis area’s population suffers from a host of chronic health issues, from obesity to hypertension to Type 2 diabetes, making it ground zero for students and researchers dedicated to finding solutions to public health issues.

89. Board of Bankrupt Pinnacle Airlines Gets Update on Headquarters Costs -

Pinnacle Airlines Corp.'s board opened a two-day meeting Wednesday, but isn't expected to decide yet whether to keep company headquarters in Memphis.

90. County Sees 21.6 Pct. Voter Turnout -

Slightly less than 127,000 Shelby County residents – or 21.6 percent of 584,443 registered voters – cast ballots in the Aug. 2 elections.

The turnout in early voting and election day combined was a higher percentage than the 15 percent turnout four years ago in the same election cycle, but it was well below the 44-year high of 39.4 percent set in the August 1992 elections.

91. More Work Follows Schools Plan Approval -

The plan for a consolidated countywide public school system isn’t finished just yet despite last week’s vote by the schools consolidation planning commission.

What was already a complex and unprecedented process gets more complex and involves more people going forward in addition to the 21-member planning commission.

92. State ASD Charter Schools Unveiled -

Memphis City Schools officials formally turned over the school buildings Tuesday, June 5, that will become part of the state-run Achievement School District starting with the new school year in August.

93. Suburbs Move Forward With School Districts -

All six suburban towns and cities are just about set to vote starting in mid-July on forming municipal school districts.

Boards of aldermen in each of the six suburban towns and cities took votes Tuesday, May 30, that sent the requests for the ballot questions to the Shelby County Election Commission.

94. Scott Joins Methodist South as Chief Medical Officer -

Dr. Howard Scott has been named chief medical officer at Methodist South Hospital. Before joining Methodist South, which is part of the Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare system, Scott served as chief medical officer for West Kendall Baptist Hospital in Miami. He has also maintained an active private practice for 29 years.

95. Jones Seeks AG Opinion on Municipal Schools -

Countywide school board member Martavius Jones is seeking through a state legislator from Shelby County a legal opinion from the Tennessee Attorney General on the municipal school districts legislation signed into law last week by Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam.

96. Teacher Surplusing Would Go In Schools Merger Recommendation -

The schools consolidation planning commission is weighing a set of recommendations for teacher hiring, retention and evaluation that would do away with the practice of surplusing teachers.

The recommendations from the group’s human resources committee presented Thursday, May 10, include “not guaranteeing jobs to teachers whose positions have been eliminated.” Under current Memphis City Schools procedures, when a teacher’s position is eliminated at a school or the teacher is not retained at that school, their seniority can allow them to “bump” another teacher at another school if the teachers without a position has more seniority.

97. New Owner For Bartlett Car Wash Property -

A former car wash site in Bartlett has traded hands. Nyan Jaf acquired the 0.71-acre lot at 5960 Summer Ave. from Mr. Carwash LLC for $65,000.

98. Mississippi Senate Adopts Its Redistricting Plan -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – A majority of Mississippi senators voted Wednesday to approve the chamber's redistricting plan, despite complaints from a few colleagues who think they're treated unfairly because their districts are dramatically changed.

99. Fetal Heartbeat Bill Killed by Miss. Senate Chair -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – A Mississippi Senate chairman on Thursday killed a bill that could have led to a homicide criminal prosecution for anyone performing an abortion once a fetal heartbeat is found.

100. Pending Bill Could Raise Solar Taxes -

The week that two solar farms located in Haywood County and Memphis were dedicated, a bill that would increase property taxes on owners of solar production facilities like the two arrays was undergoing more changes in Nashville and encountering increased opposition from the state’s solar industry.