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Editorial Results (free)

1. Election Commission Certifies August Vote -

The Shelby County Election Commission certified the August election results Monday, Aug. 25, at the beginning of a week that includes an early oath of office for those elected to county offices on the ballot.

2. Sheriff’s Race Reflects Different Law Enforcement Cultures -

Bennie Cobb remembers how he got his first job in the local criminal justice system.

It was 1980, and Cobb – then 19 years old – went to apply for a job at the old City Jail.

3. Memphis Economic Indicator Presents Latest Snapshot -

On the qualitative side of the latest Memphis Economic Indicator, a survey measuring general business sentiment produced jointly by The Daily News and Dixon Hughes Goodman LLP, respondents tended to put Memphis at a kind of inflection point at the moment.

4. Stephens Joins Maintenance Team at Commercial Advisors -

Timothy Stephens has joined Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors as a maintenance mechanic at One Commerce Square. In his new role, Stephens will performing plumbing, painting and general maintenance services.

5. Meghan McMahon Joins Glankler Brown as Associate -

Meghan K. McMahon has joined Glankler Brown PLLC as an associate, concentrating her practice in business and commercial litigation and intellectual property. McMahon previously worked in academic and membership affairs for the NCAA, and has experience with issues relating to NCAA compliance, sports and entertainment contracts, intellectual property.

6. Smaller Manufacturers Feel Device Tax -

Controversy continues to swirl around the new medical device excise tax that went into effect on Jan. 1.

The flat 2.3 percent tax is applied to every dollar of sales for medical device manufacturers, and for many small- to mid-sized companies the tax is crippling their ability to grow and invest much needed funds into other areas like research and development, sales and marketing, and hiring additional staff.

7. Events -

The Greater Memphis Chamber will host a conversation with Bill Strickland, CEO of Manchester Bidwell Corp. and author of “Making the Impossible, Possible,” Wednesday, Aug. 21, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at The Peabody, 149 Union Ave. Strickland’s topic is “The Art of Leadership & The Business of Social Change.” Cost is $35 for members and $40 for nonmembers. Visit memphischamber.com or call 543-3571.

8. Events -

Playhouse on the Square will present a Great Wine Performances wine tasting and theater contest Tuesday, Aug. 20, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Playhouse, 66 S. Cooper St. Characters from “Les Miserables” will serve 10 French wines and tests attendees’ knowledge of the musical for prizes. Cost is $65 at the door. Visit playhouseonthesquare.org.

9. Events -

Playhouse on the Square will present a Great Wine Performances wine tasting and theater contest Tuesday, Aug. 20, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Playhouse, 66 S. Cooper St. Characters from “Les Miserables” will serve 10 French wines and tests attendees’ knowledge of the musical for prizes. Cost is $50 in advance or $65 at the door. Visit playhouseonthesquare.org.

10. Events -

Playhouse on the Square will host a performance of “Les Miserables” to benefit the Memphis Child Advocacy Center Saturday, Aug. 17, at 8 p.m. at Playhouse, 66 S. Cooper St. A pre-performance reception and silent auction begin at 6 p.m. Tickets are $60 and are available through MCAC, 888-4342.

11. Events -

Memphis Rotary Club will meet Tuesday, July 30, at noon at the University Club of Memphis, 1346 Central Ave. Shelby County Sheriff Bill Oldham will speak. Cost for nonmembers is $18. R.S.V.P. to Taylor Hughes at taylor@memphisrotary.org.

12. Events -

Memphis Rotary Club will meet Tuesday, July 30, at noon at the University Club of Memphis, 1346 Central Ave. Shelby County Sheriff Bill Oldham will speak. Cost for nonmembers is $18. R.S.V.P. to Taylor Hughes at taylor@memphisrotary.org.

13. Events -

Talk Shoppe will meet Wednesday, June 19, from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. at DeVry University, 6401 Poplar Ave., sixth floor. Cost is free. Visit talkshoppe.biz.

14. Events -

The city of Germantown will host The Millionaires as part of its Groovin’ and Chillin’ Concert Series Tuesday, June 18, from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in the Kiwanis pavilion at Municipal Park on Exeter Road. The free concert starts at 7 p.m.; hot dog and hamburger combos will be available for purchase beforehand. Visit germantown-tn.gov.

15. Events -

The Rebel on Beale summer country music concert series will kick off with Emerson Drive Thursday, June 20, at 7:30 p.m. in W.C. Handy Park at Beale and South Third streets. Cost is free. Visit rebel953.com.

16. Events -

Kiwanis Club of Memphis will meet Wednesday, June 12, from noon to 1 p.m. at The University Club of Memphis, 1346 Central Ave. U.S. District Judge John Fowlkes will speak. Cost is $18 for nonmembers.

17. Events -

The University of Memphis Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation will host a business boot camp information meeting for active and retired military personnel Monday, June 10, at 5 p.m. at the Family & Support Service Center on the Naval Support Activity Mid-South base, 5722 Integrity Drive. The boot camp kicks off with skills-building classes Saturday, June 22, at The University of Memphis. For details, email kcnklnpn@memphis.edu or call 678-5266.

18. Events -

The Rotary Club of Memphis East will meet Wednesday, May 22, at noon at The Racquet Club of Memphis, 5111 Sanderlin Ave. Bill West, founder of The West Clinic, will speak. Cost is $17. R.S.V.P. to Lee Hughes at lmhughes@bellsouth.net.

19. Internet Sales Tax Bill to Hit Roadblock in House -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A bill to require Internet shoppers to pay sales taxes for online purchases may be cruising through the Senate but it will soon hit a roadblock in the House.

"There's a lot of political difficulty getting through the fog of it looking like a tax increase," said Rep. Steve Womack, R-Ark., one of the main sponsors of the bill in the House.

20. Events -

New Ballet Ensemble will present Springloaded Friday, April 12, through Sunday, April 14, at Playhouse on the Square, 66 S. Cooper St. The annual event fuses ballet, contemporary and urban dance with works by local and guest choreographers. Visit nbespringloaded13.eventbrite.com for times and tickets.

21. Health Care Challenge -

To cap off National Public Health Week, The Daily News held an in-depth discussion about health care reform and the daunting task of trying to digest and comprehend the new Affordable Care Act, which encompasses more than 2,800 pages of law and more than 100,000 pages of regulations and rules.

22. Events -

Memphis Area Association of Realtors and Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir will host the 2013 Residential Real Estate Summit Tuesday, April 2, from 8:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Germantown Performing Arts Centre, 1801 Exeter Road. Lawrence Yun, National Association of Realtors chief economist, will discuss the current state of the local and national real estate market. Cost is free. Visit maar.org/residentialsummit to register.

23. Events -

University of Memphis Habitat for Humanity Campus Chapter and Students Advocating Service will kick off Act! Speak! Build! Week Monday, April 1, at 10 a.m. in the University Center Bluff Room, 499 University St. Guests include Sen. Reginald Tate and Jessica Hord of Habitat for Humanity of Greater Memphis. Cost is free. Visit memphishabitat.com.

24. Seminar Will Highlight US Health Reform -

The Affordable Care Act provides incentives for the U.S. health care system to integrate care across the entire care continuum – from acute care to outpatient care to better provide care for patients.

25. Events -

Memphis Rotary Club will meet Tuesday, March 26, at noon at the University Club of Memphis, 1346 Central Ave. Commercial Appeal publisher George Cogswell will speak. Cost is $18. R.S.V.P. to Taylor Hughes at taylor@memphisrotary.org.

26. Events -

Memphis Rotary Club will meet Tuesday, March 26, at noon at the University Club of Memphis, 1346 Central Ave. Commercial Appeal publisher George Cogswell will speak. Cost is $18. R.S.V.P. to Taylor Hughes at taylor@memphisrotary.org.

27. Events -

The Cotton Museum will host Patrick O’Daniel, discussing his book “When the Levee Breaks: Memphis and the Mississippi Valley Flood of 1927,” Thursday, March 28, at 5 p.m. at the museum, 65 Union Ave. Cost is free and includes a complimentary museum tour and reception. Visit memphiscottonmuseum.org.

28. Daily News Seminar Highlights Affordable Care Act -

Beginning in October, millions of Americans will be able to shop for health insurance through newly created health care exchanges dubbed the Health Insurance Marketplace.

This is also a critical period for businesses of all sizes as they navigate the 2010 Affordable Care Act and their responsibilities under the new law. The law requires employers with more than 50 employees to pay a fee if they don’t provide affordable coverage to their employees, while smaller firms are exempt from the employer responsibility requirements.

29. Events -

HopeWorks will hold its fifth annual A Morning of Hope fundraiser Saturday, March 2, from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. at Woodland Hills Event Center, 1000 Woodland Hills Drive. Bill Courtney, entrepreneur and the former coach featured in “Undefeated,” will present the keynote. Tickets are $50. Visit whyhopeworks.org or call 272-3700.

30. Events -

The Blues Foundation will host the 29th annual International Blues Challenge Tuesday, Jan. 29, through Saturday, Feb. 2, in Beale Street venues and other Downtown locations. Visit blues.org for a schedule and tickets.

31. Events -

Luna Nova presents the Robert Patterson Memorial Concert Monday, Jan. 28, at 7 p.m. in the Hardie Auditorium of Palmer Hall at Rhodes College, 2000 North Parkway. The program includes a new work titled “Mountain Paths” as well as works by several well-known composers. Cost is free. Visit rhodes.edu/music for details.

32. Events -

The Blues Foundation will host the 29th annual International Blues Challenge Tuesday, Jan. 29, through Saturday, Feb. 2, in Beale Street venues and other Downtown locations. Visit blues.org for a full schedule and tickets.

33. Events -

The Rotary Club of Memphis East will meet Wednesday, Jan. 23, at noon at The Racquet Club of Memphis, 5111 Sanderlin Ave. Unified Shelby County School Board Chairman Billy Orgel will speak. Cost is $17. R.S.V.P. to Lee Hughes at lmhughes@bellsouth.net.

34. Events -

Memphis Child Advocacy Center will hold its 20th anniversary and honors day celebration breakfast Wednesday, Nov. 14, from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. at Memphis Botanic Garden Hardin Hall, 750 Cherry Road. Teresa Huizar, executive director of the National Children’s Alliance, will deliver the keynote. Email doglesby@memphiscac.org or call 888-4342.

35. Events -

Memphis Rotary Club will meet Tuesday, Oct. 23, at noon at the University Club of Memphis, 1346 Central Ave. Bill Seely of Varsity Brands will discuss cheering as an NCAA sport. Cost is $18. R.S.V.P. to Taylor Hughes at taylor@memphisrotary.org.

36. Events -

The Church Health Center Komen Club will host a women’s health conference Monday, Oct. 22, from 8:30 a.m. to noon at Church Health Center Wellness, 1115 Union Ave. The event will include health screenings, consultations with a registered dietician, stress relief techniques and more. Visit churchhealthcenter.org.

37. Events -

The Black Business Association of Memphis will hold a small-business loan workshop Monday, Sept. 10, at 5:30 p.m. at Renaissance Business Center, 555 Beale St. Cost is free, and pre-registration is not required. Visit bbamemphis.com or call 526-9300.

38. Events -

The National Association of Women Business Owners – Memphis will meet Tuesday, Aug. 14, from 11:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. at Napa Cafe, 5101 Sanderlin Ave., suite 122. Author and trainer Jodi Santangel will present “Cracking the Code to Connecting Powerfully With People.” Cost is $18 for members and $20 for nonmembers. Register at nawbomemphis.org.

39. Events -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir will address the Collierville board of aldermen Monday, Aug. 13, at 6 p.m. at Collierville Town Hall, 500 Poplar View Parkway. The open forum will include an update on property tax revenue and future economic trends affecting the community. Visit shelbycountytrustee.com.

40. Events -

The Arc Mid-South will hold a self-advocacy workshop and panel discussion for individuals with disabilities Monday, July 30, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library meeting room A, 3030 Poplar Ave. R.S.V.P. to bcarter@thearcmidsouth.org or ljones@thearcmidsouth.org.

41. Events -

The Center City Development Corp. board of directors will meet Wednesday, March 21, at 9 a.m. at 114 N. Main St.

42. Events -

The Better Business Bureau will host a breakfast seminar Tuesday, March 20, from 7:30 a.m. to 9 a.m. at the BBB, 3693 Tyndale Drive. Robert Sutton of Mass Mutual Financial Group will discuss government benefits and special needs planning. Cost is free for BBB-accredited businesses and $10 for guests. For reservations, call Susan Harris at 757-8617.

43. Events -

The National Association of Women Business Owners will meet Tuesday, Jan. 10, from 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. at The Crescent Club, 6075 Poplar Ave. The discussion will focus on topics of the audience’s choice. For more information or to register, call Nita Black at 413-1315.

44. Events -

The Memphis Rotary Club will meet Tuesday, Dec. 6, at noon at the University Club of Memphis, 1346 Central Ave. Bill Gibbons, commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Safety & Homeland Security, will speak. Cost is $18 per person. For reservations, email Taylor Hughes at taylor@memphisrotary.org.

45. Events -

Kyle Durrie will bring her Moveable Type Truck to Memphis for a print workshop and presentation with Crosstown Arts Monday, Dec. 5, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the parking lot of the Sears Crosstown building, at Cleveland Avenue and North Watkins Street. Visitors can tour the truck and print their own letterpress art to take away. For more information, visit www.powerandlightpress.com or www.type-truck.com.

46. Local Companies Working to Navigate Economic Straits -

The financial services business seems like a tough one to be in these days.

Investors have for the last few weeks treated bank stocks like the piñata of Wall Street. Bankers, attorneys and investment professionals have boiled a massive government overhaul of the country’s financial regulations down to clipped phrases like “finreg” and “Dodd-Frank” that they speak of often with a grumble or a shaking of the head.

47. Events -

Healthy Memphis Common Table will meet Monday from 11:45 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at The Racquet Club of Memphis, 5111 Sanderlin Ave. Dr. Bonnie L. Zell will speak on the topic “How Collaboration Can Improve the Health and Health Care of Memphis and Shelby County.” For more information, contact Simi Atolagbe at 273-2693 or simi.atolagbe@healthymemphis.org.

48. Events -

The Greater Memphis Chamber will host a forum titled “Healthcare Reform 101: How the Historic Bill Will Affect Your Business and Your Wallet” Tuesday from 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. at the Holiday Inn Select Memphis East, 5795 Poplar Ave. For reservations, e-mail Ericka Milford at emilford@memphaischamber.com or visit www.memphischamber.com.

49. Events -

The Memphis Farmers Market will hold a Farm to Fork dinner Monday at 6 p.m. at Majestic Grille, 145 S. Main St. Seating is limited. For reservations, call 522-8555. For more information, visit www.memphisfarmersmarket.org.

50. Springdale Fights Back -

In the mile of Springdale Street between Chelsea and Jackson avenues there are five churches. That’s not counting the churches on side streets.

On Eldridge Avenue, one of those side streets, between two tiny churches is a pair of identical small houses – both boarded up.

The one closest to the corner has faded blue spray paint stenciled across the plywood.

In inner-city Memphis, the stenciling is as familiar as gang graffiti. It’s the mark of the Memphis Police Department’s Blue CRUSH campaign.

Five years into the crackdown guided by a devotion to crime statistics, crime is down in Memphis.

But the statistical drop in crime has come with lingering questions and concerns in Springdale and other neighborhoods with Blue CRUSH houses.

“Once we board them up, we really have to depend on the community to let us know if drug dealers have broken back into them,” Shelby County District Attorney General Bill Gibbons said. “If we don’t know about it, sometimes drug dealers can get right back in there.”

In the neighborhoods, homeowners lament that street level dealers are easily replaced and soon released from jail to resume their place in the neighborhoods – now with a criminal record that makes a move away from drug dealing even more unlikely.

Last year, a team from Memphis that included a police officer, a state prosecutor, a federal prosecutor, a University of Memphis researcher, the head of the Memphis Leadership Foundation and the pastor of one of those five churches along Springdale went to several cities to get training in a new anti-drug strategy.

“We were really interested in changing people’s lives, not locking them up,” Springdale Baptist Pastor Derrick Hughes told The Memphis News. Hughes wasn’t sure at first if he would be part of the Drug Market Intervention (DMI) program.

“It sounded as if possibly it was just another program that was going to possibly just put criminals in jail without rehabilitation,” he said. “And I wanted to make sure that if we were going to be a part of something that it was going to look at rehabilitating the person, changing lives, changing them from a holistic point of view as well as a spiritual point of view.”

Gibbons said some of his prosecutors and some police brass also had their doubts as they looked for an area to test out DMI Memphis style.

“It was based primarily on looking at crime patterns and in particular drug activity in that area,” he told The Memphis News. There was plenty of open drug dealing in the Springdale area.

Drug Market Intervention is picking several street level drug dealers in a community, confronting them with the evidence against them and telling them they have one more chance to get out of the business. The police are involved in making a decision not to prosecute a few as they target dozens of others in an area.

Others on the team are community leaders from the neighborhood. And some are with proven programs to provide job training and other help in getting a legitimate job.

High Point, N.C., was the first stop for the Memphis group because it is the birthplace of DMI. It seems an unlikely example for Memphis with a population of fewer than 100,000. But in 2003, High Point had several open air drug markets. The city’s new police chief, James Fealy, attacked them using what became the DMI strategy.

David Kennedy, director of the Center for Crime Control and Prevention at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, replicated DMI in other cities with money from the federal Bureau of Justice Assistance. The BJA funded the training of the Memphis team and came here.

Kennedy’s philosophy is specific to open air drug markets. It doesn’t pretend to eliminate all drug dealing.

“Open air drug markets are found primarily in our cities and in African-American neighborhoods,” Kennedy wrote in a 2008 article for the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) Journal. “Although we are loathe to admit it, this issue is soaked in race.”

Kennedy said police complained to him that the families of the drug dealers and others in the surrounding communities knew they were selling drugs, did nothing to stop it and profited from it.

But Kennedy said those living in the communities countered that police were only interested in locking up as many people as they could as part of a conspiracy to destroy the community.

Kennedy said each side had a point and each side was wrong.

“The crime is real and overwhelmingly the arrests are legitimate. But we are destroying the village in order to save it,” he wrote. “And none of this gets rid of the crime. The drug markets and violence continue to exist.”

Kennedy didn’t try to tackle the long-standing racial issues and their lengthy back story. The conversations that formed the basis for the DMI strategy were about drug markets.

It was hard for some on the Memphis team to believe that hardened drug dealers would respond when the threat of arrest, prison time, drive-by shootings and gang turf tripwires hadn’t discouraged them from the life.

Nevertheless, when they returned to Memphis, the planning began for several months of undercover drug buys in the Springdale area by the police Organized Crime Unit. For months, the officers bought repeatedly from dozens of street dealers in a two-mile radius of Springdale. And they recorded the drug buys on video – not just one buy but multiple buys.

Prosecutors reviewed the cases against more than 60 men and women and prosecuted 51 of them. Five were indicted on federal drug charges. Six others – five men and a woman – were the first candidates for the Memphis DMI program.

“It was taking a look at individuals who obviously were involved in drug trafficking, but a little more on the periphery – not an extensive drug record,” Gibbons said.

A few days after New Year’s Day, police descended on the Springdale area serving the arrest warrants and putting up a fresh crop of plywood with blue stenciling on the drug houses in the area. The neighborhood grapevine buzzed anew about the heavy police presence.

It was still buzzing when on the coldest day of the year – Jan. 8 – the Memphis group knocked on six doors in the Springdale area. The temperature never got near freezing and was in single digits part of the day.

No one inside the six houses knew they were coming. No one approaching the doorsteps knew what the reaction inside would be.

It was the first indication the six people involved and inside those homes had that they had sold drugs to undercover Memphis police officers and had been recorded on video making multiple drug sales to the officers.

The father of one of the six was among those who had been arrested.

When the DMI team knocked on his door, his grandmother answered.

“He did not want his grandmother to know why we were standing at the door,” Peggie Russell, the DMI coordinator and a University of Memphis researcher and community resource specialist, said. “He said, ‘It’s OK grandmother.’”

Howard Eddings, president of the Memphis Leadership Foundation, said the young man didn’t deny he was a drug dealer.

“He wanted to basically shut the door,” Eddings told The Memphis News. “She might not have known exactly what he was doing. She was an older lady. He didn’t like the fact that we were knocking on her door.”

He and the other five got a letter asking them to come to Springdale Baptist Church a few days later. If they came, the letter from Police Director Larry Godwin said they would not be prosecuted this time.

For Hughes the pledge was crucial. He wanted to be able to say, “I give you my word, you will not be arrested,” with certainty and conviction.

Five of the six showed up at Hughes’ church where the congregation and other community leaders were waiting in the sanctuary. On the walls were posters of the 51 defendants who weren’t getting the chance they were about to get. The posters included the possible prison sentences those defendants faced.

The five “guests” sat in a reserved front row with a friend or family member.

Their faces blurred in a video of the event, they listened as Assistant District Attorney Amy Weirich told them, “We’ve had it,” and called their names individually. “The Memphis Police Department is tired of picking up dead bodies in the street.”

Russell remembers some denying they had done anything wrong. Then police showed the video.

They watched video of themselves selling drugs numerous times to undercover police officers.

The woman’s denials stopped.

“She got caught during the first time. I don’t necessarily know that we believed it was the first time,” Eddings remembered. “But she was so embarrassed as a mom who had small kids who was put in the spotlight. … All of her junk is coming to the forefront.”

Russell said some of the others were telling those who came with them that they had no idea why they were summoned to the church.

“You’re sitting there and you’re telling your family member, ‘No, I didn’t do it,’” Russell said. “Then the tape started rolling … and you see yourself. It’s reality. You can’t hide it. I think that was a turning point for most of them.”

Hughes told the group of five that the church cared about them and was willing to help.

Some of his congregants spoke up too.

“Our congregants said, ‘Listen, we’re tired of watching you sell drugs. We’re tired of being afraid of coming in and out of our communities. We want our community back,’” Hughes recalled. “During the call in, some of our residents had an opportunity to look in their faces and say, ‘We are tired of the way you’ve been running down our communities. This used to be a wonderful community where people had pride, where people had hope. … Now a lot of us are afraid.’”

After the tough talk and the confrontation came a commitment to work with the five DMI candidates. Eddings emphasized there are no guarantees.

“We were careful not to promise them that we were going to get them jobs or that even if we could get them a job that it was going to pay them something comparable to what they were making on the street,” he said. ”We said the opposite. We can’t do that at all. But one thing we do know for sure. If you stop doing what you’re doing, you don’t go to jail.”

Russell, who gets much of the credit for pushing to give DMI a try and has become the program’s de facto coordinator, described the response as “something totally new.”

“It’s not about those five,” she said. “They are supposed to stay out of trouble for two years to make the necessary transition in their lives. But it’s really about the Hollywood Springdale community, changing the response of the community to open air drug sales.”

Eddings was surprised by the response.

“Most of these guys’ mamas know what they’re doing. But to know now that other mamas and other grandparents and other church leaders and the community have their eye on you, it has a different motivation,” he said. “Some of these guys are hardened. They’ve been doing it for a while and they’ve been out there on the streets. So, not much embarrasses them. But I could tell by looking at them and even some of the denials.”

The Memphis Leadership Foundation already works with convicted felons trying to make the difficult transition after prison. There are even fewer guarantees for those with a substantial prison record.

Marcus, who didn’t want his last name used, vented about how hard it’s been to find a legitimate job since he did prison time in 2006 for felony drug dealing.

“It’s not like people want to sell drugs,” he began. “On a lot of applications they are saying they don’t discriminate. They’re lying. … They’re ready to end the session right then. They might tear up the application in your face.”

If drug dealers like him bring blight to areas like Springdale and violence and a hard life for law-abiding citizens, Marcus said society has responded with its own brand of hardness.

“They ain’t reaching out anymore,” he said. “They expect for the world to be better because we’re building more jails. We’re putting more cops out. If somebody killed me today – the person who killed me, they want to put him in jail. But why put him in jail when y’all treating this man he killed like he’s a nobody anyway.”

Eddings said with criminal records or without, street level drug dealers have problems as they get older because they have no legitimate work history. He started to say there aren’t transferable skills before thinking about it.

“Actually, some of the skills do transfer. They’ve just got to get access,” he said. “It’s really a reshaping, a little bit more recognition that they need to deal with in terms of how they see themselves and how they can use those skills that they utilize on the streets to do something positive and pursue a legitimate way of life.”

The young man Eddings is working with seems not to have hit the wall that Marcus is at yet.

“He is simply trying to figure out how to put one foot in front of the other. They go from having some source of income to having no source of income,” Eddings told The Memphis News. “We’re convincing him now that getting his GED ought to be a decision that he ought to make. He’s been a little slow in that.”

Hughes said he would get the occasional dope boy showing up at his church before DMI.

“Very rarely. I did hear one or two stragglers you come across who say, ‘Yes, I do want to change.’ Often times, it’s usually because of a pending trial or they are in trouble,” he said. “Since that time, we’ve had a lot of people coming, wanting to change their lives.”

Gibbons is reviewing some neighborhoods where DMI might go next but he’s not saying where because of the undercover police work involved. He wants to see it replicated based on lessons learned in Memphis and he hopes to get a federal grant to hire a full-time coordinator.

The sixth man given a chance in the DMI program didn’t come to the church and was prosecuted. He pleaded guilty to five counts of selling drugs and was sentenced to four years in prison and fined $10,000. But the sentence was suspended and he was put on a diversion program.

Weirich recalled Criminal Court Judge John Fowlkes asking the man why he didn’t respond. He told Fowlkes, “It sounded too good to be true.”

...

51. Events -

The Greater Memphis Chamber will hold a breakfast forum today from 7:30 a.m. to 9 a.m. at the Memphis Marriott East, 2625 Thousand Oaks Boulevard. Meri Armour, president and chief executive officer of Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital, will speak. Cost is $25 for members and $35 for nonmembers. To register, contact Ericka Milford at 543-3518 or emilford@memphischamber.com.

52. Events -

The Center City Revenue Finance Corp. will meet today at 9 a.m. at the Center City Commission, 114 N. Main St. For more information, call 575-0540.

53. Events -

Methodist Hospice will hold a grief class today at 1 p.m. at Saint Luke’s United Methodist Church, 480 S. Highland St. Classes discuss a broad range of issues related to grief. Registration is not required. For more information, contact Mary Elizabeth Jones at 516-1604 or jonemar@methodisthealth.org.

54. Events -

The Friends of the Library Spring Book Sale will be held today and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library, 3030 Central Ave. About 15,000 items will be on sale. For more information, call 415-2840.

55. Events -

The Better Business Bureau of the Mid-South will hold a breakfast seminar today from 7:30 a.m. to 9 a.m. at the BBB, 3693 Tyndale Drive. Darren Howard of Dale Carnegie Training will speak. For reservations, contact Nancy Crawford at 757-8627 or ncrawford@bbbmidsouth.org.

56. Events -

The Better Business Bureau of the Mid-South will hold a breakfast seminar Tuesday from 7:30 a.m. to 9 a.m. at the Better Business Bureau of the Mid-South, 3693 Tyndale Drive. Darren Howard of Dale Carnegie Training will speak. For reservations, contact Nancy Crawford at 757-8627 or ncrawford@bbbmidsouth.org.

57. Visible School Names Ellis To Modern Music Ministry Faculty -

Bill Ellis has been hired to the Visible School faculty in the Modern Music Ministry program.

Ellis will teach guitar, the history of pop music and hands-on courses in world music and ethnomusicology.

58. Thompson to Publish Memoir -

Fred Thompson, the former Tennessee senator and 2008 Republican presidential candidate, has penned his memoir and given it a title that reflects his early days in small-town Tennessee.

The 67-year-old former politician, actor and avuncular radio host who graduated from the University of Memphis titled his book “Notes from a Country Lawyer.” It’s scheduled for release in May.

59. Caputo Joins Baker Donelson’s Construction Law Practice -

Chris Caputo has joined Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz PC. Caputo concentrates his practice in construction law and has experience in representing public and private owners, contractors and subcontractors, suppliers, insurers, financial institutions and design professionals.

60. Events -

The Greater Memphis Chamber will present the third breakfast meeting in its Human Health Series today from 7:30 a.m. to 9 a.m. at The Crescent Club, 6075 Poplar Ave. The meeting is free to members and prospective members. For reservations, contact Ericka Milford at emilford@memphischamber.com or 543-3518.

61. Nuisance Actions Keep Piling Up -

When Memphis police arrived to close Hughes Uptown this past weekend, the North Memphis nightspot’s security guards bailed out of their golf cart and left behind two handguns – a .45 caliber and a .40 caliber semi automatic pistol.

62. Right to Work Foundation Prez. Discusses Legislation Impact -

Mark A. Mix, president of the National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation, will be the featured speaker at today’s 2009 Labor & Employment Conference at The Hilton Memphis on Ridge Lake Boulevard. The conference is sponsored by Kisewetter Wise Kaplan Prather PLC.

63. Events -

The Shelby County Board of Commissioners will hold committee meetings today beginning at 8:30 a.m. in the fourth floor committee room of the Shelby County Administration Building, 160 N. Main St. For more information, call Steve Summerall at 545-4301.

64. Events -

The Freedom Award Dinner and Ceremony will be held today at 6:30 p.m. at the Memphis Cook Convention Center, 255 N. Main St. The annual award ceremony will pay tribute to the people whose accomplishments depict the spirit of the civil rights movement. Faith Hill and Oleta Adams will perform. Cost is $200. For more information, call 521-9699, Ext. 237.

65. Blindness Research Could Apply to Other Areas -

When the retina does not get enough of a protein known as Epo, it can lead to degenerative blindness, but scientist Tonia Rex has a strategy to stop that disease in its tracks.

And since the eye is part of the brain, her biotechnology also might be useful in treating Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, and even strokes. She foresees the day, perhaps 10 years from now, when these and a number of other neurological ailments can be treated with a single shot in the hip.

66. Shoemaker Financial's Allen Earns Circle of Excellence -

Frank Allen, a certified financial planner and financial adviser with Shoemaker Financial, has achieved the Circle of Excellence award from Securian Financial Services for his performance in 2007.

67. Events -

The Memphis Rotary Club will meet today at noon in Ballroom B of the Memphis Cook Convention Center, 255 N. Main St. A lunch buffet will be provided for $18. Dr. Vivian Morris, director of the New Teacher Center at the University of Memphis, will speak on "Seven Steps to Improve Student Achievement in Memphis." Reservations should be made to Taylor Hughes at 526-1318 or taylor@memphisrotary.org.

68. Events -

The Shelby County Board of Commissioners committee meetings will begin today at 9 a.m. in the fourth floor conference room of the Shelby County Administration Building, 160 N. Main St. For a complete schedule of commission meeting times, call Steve Summerall, chief administrator, at 545-4301.

69. Former Legal Investigator Turns Event Planning Into Full-Time Gig -

When Michelle Hughes was looking for someone to help with her sister Tamekia's wedding, she thought of Jackie Sharif, owner of Yours Event Management Co., to help ensure everything was perfect for the big day.

70. Restaurateurs EarnTop Awards from MRA - The Memphis Restaurant Association has named Sam Hughes, owner of The Butcher Shop and The Pier, its restaurateur of the year. Dimitri and Costa Taras and Angelo Liollio, owners of Jim's Place East, have received the organization's pioneer award. Bil

71. Med Nurse Earns State Leadership Award -

The Tennessee Nurses Association recognized Dr. Diane Todd Pace with the Alma E. Gault Leadership Award. Pace is a nurse practitioner/nurse scientist with the Regional Medical Center at Memphis/Health Loop Clinics. She earned a doctorate from the University of Tennessee.

72. Archived Article: Newsmakers - St

St. Jude Researcher Named to Royal Society

Dr. Tom Curran, chair of the department of Developmental Neurobiology and the co-leader of the Neurobiology and Brain Tumor program at St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital, was elected to the Fello...

73. Archived Article: Newsmakers - Rotary Club Presents Public Servant Awards

Rotary Club Names Public Servant Award Winners

The Rotary Club of Memphis East selected Shelby County District Attorney Bill Gibbons and chief administrative officer of the Shelby County Registers Off...

74. Archived Article: Resorts P.2 - Resorts prepare for hard winter

Resorts prepare for hard winter

Skiers and snowboarders could be the winners as some of the West's most popular ski resort towns are already cutting their budgets in case air service cutbacks and a declining eco...

75. Archived Article: Law Focus (laws) - By STACEY WIEDOWER New laws put brakes on some bad driving habits By STACEY WIEDOWER The Daily News The beginning of July brings more than hotter weather and fireworks to the Memphis area as the start of the fiscal year, it puts into effect a host o...

76. Archived Article: Calendar - Feb Feb. 2 Buckeye Toastmasters will meet at 7:15 p.m. at Germantown United Methodist Church, 2331 S. Germantown Road. For more information, call 753-8604. Feb. 3 Rotary Club of East Memphis will meet at noon at the Racquet Club, 5111 Sanderlin Ave....

77. Archived Article: Memos - Gary L Gary L. Osing has joined the Waring Cox law firm as chief operating officer. He formerly was director of administration for the law firm of Hand Arendall LLC in Mobile, Ala. He is a graduate of the University of South Alabama and Springfield ...

78. Archived Article: Calendar - Sept Sept. 15 East Memphis Business and Professional Women will meet at the Lulu Grille, 565 Erin Drive. Networking begins at 6 p.m., and dinner is served at 6:30 p.m. The speaker will be attorney Patrick B. Mason, who will discuss the Tax Relief Ac...

79. Archived Article: Calendar - Sept Sept. 8 The Laurelwood Business and Professional Women will meet at Davis-Kidd Booksellers, 387 Perkins Road Extended from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. For more information, call 685-0495. The Shelby County Republican Womens Club will meet at 11 a.m. at...

80. Archived Article: Benchmark - Andrew Love and Wayne Jackson, individually and d/b/a The Memphis Horns vs Andrew Love and Wayne Jackson, individually and d/b/a The Memphis Horns vs. Al Green. Two local musicians are suing performer Al Green over the alleged infringement of the se...