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Editorial Results (free)

1. Wharton Suggests Moving High School Football To Days -

Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson said Tuesday, Sept. 30, that Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. has suggested the school system move its night football games to day time hours as one answer to mob violence by teenagers.

2. Drug and Device Firms Paid $3.5 Billion to Care Providers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – From research grants to travel junkets, drug and medical device companies paid doctors and leading hospitals billions of dollars last year, the government disclosed Tuesday in a new effort to spotlight potential ethical conflicts in medicine.

3. Government: NFL TV 'Blackout' Rule Unsportsmanlike -

WASHINGTON (AP) – For years, football fans have bemoaned the rule barring NFL home games that haven't sold out from being televised in the local market.

Well, you can't blame the government anymore.

4. Stuttering Foundation's Fraser Honored for Service -

Jane Fraser, president of the Memphis-based Stuttering Foundation of America, has received an honorary fellowship from the London-based Royal College of Speech & Language Therapists. She was selected for her distinguished service in promoting the profession of speech and language therapy. Fraser, whose father started the nonprofit Stuttering Foundation in 1947, has served as its president since 1981.

5. Whitehaven Flood Response Complicated -

When the Memphis area got seven inches of rain on Sept. 11, a group of Whitehaven homeowners at the state line watched once the rain stopped as their neighbors on the other side of the border got a prompter response in terms of a federal disaster declaration.

6. African-American Icons Highlight Freedom Awards -

The National Civil Rights Museum will honor journalist Charlayne Hunter-Gault, Freedom Summer icon Bob Moses and baseball Hall of Famer Frank Robinson at the 2014 Freedom Awards.

7. Contracts to Buy US Homes Slide in August -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Fewer Americans signed contracts to buy homes in August, suggesting that real estate sales will remain sluggish over the next few months.

The National Association of Realtors said Monday that its seasonally adjusted pending home sales index fell 1 percent over the past month to 104.7. Higher prices and weak wage growth has limited buying, as the index is 2.2 percent below its level from a year ago.

8. US Consumer Spending Up 0.5 Percent in August -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Americans boosted spending by a healthy amount in August, offering welcome evidence that the economy is on solid footing heading into the final quarter of the year.

Consumer spending in August rose 0.5 percent from the previous month after showing no gain in July, the Commerce Department reported Monday. It was the best result since spending also expanded 0.5 percent in June.

9. FedEx Shareholders Reject Proposal Over Redskins -

FedEx shareholders rejected a proposal that the shipping giant end or distance itself from its ties to the Washington Redskins.

The proposal from the Oneida Indian tribe was made Monday, Sept. 29, during the company's annual shareholder meeting in Memphis. The Redskins and companies associated with the National Football League team have come under fire from Native American groups and others who say the team's name is an offensive racial slur. FedEx sponsors the Redskins home field, FedExField, in Washington, D.C.'s Maryland suburbs.

10. Ole Miss, Memphis Move on to Next Hurdles -

Before they played the game, Ole Miss coach Hugh Freeze suggested it amounted to the “Super Bowl” for the University of Memphis. But in many respects it was more of a Blooper Bowl for both teams.

11. Why Rate Hikes are Good News for Stocks -

NEW YORK (AP) – It's no surprise that the prospect of a Federal Reserve rate hike worries stock investors.

The Fed's unprecedented economic stimulus has in large part driven a surge in stock prices since 2009. The central bank has bought trillions of dollars of bonds and kept short-term interest rates close to zero. That's allowed businesses and consumers to refinance their debt at lower rates, freeing up cash to spend.

12. Economy's Q2 Rebound Was Even Faster Than Thought -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy's bounce-back last quarter from a dismal winter was even faster than previously thought, a sign that growth will likely remain solid for rest of the year.

13. US Consumer Sentiment Reaches 14-Month High -

A measure of U.S. consumer confidence reached its highest level since July 2013, led by greater optimism that the economy will grow and incomes will rise.

The University of Michigan said Friday that its index of consumer sentiment rose to 84.6 in September from 82.5 in August. That's the second highest level in the past seven years, although the index has rarely topped 85 since the Great Recession. Before the downturn, it typically stood above 90.

14. I Choose Memphis: Gregory Love -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Gregory Love

15. Violent Crime Rises in Shelby County -

Major violent crime in Memphis was up 7.7 percent from January through August compared to the same period a year ago, according to the Memphis-Shelby County Crime Commission.

The statistics released Friday, Sept. 19, show an 8.1 percent increase in major violent crime countywide, including the city of Memphis, from the same time in 2013.

16. West Clinic Recognized for Quality Care -

The West Clinic has received National Committee for Quality Assurance recognition as a Patient-Centered Specialty Practice for its responsiveness to patients and medical colleagues, cooperation and integration with other health care groups, and dedication to continuous improvement.

17. Level Nine Provides Concierge Staff on Call -

Jimmy Farrell, a partner at Benefit Recovery Inc., a health care cost-containment firm, was searching for reliable and enjoyable transportation to and from Memphis International Airport for himself, his clients and employees.

18. Inferno Celebrates 15 Years, Charitable Milestone -

Anniversaries are a time of reflecting on past successes, and the Memphis-based advertising, marketing, design and PR firm inferno is at just such a moment. Except the 15-year anniversary it’s now celebrating is as much about where it’s going as where it’s been.

19. Vols Hope to Snap 20-Game Road Slump vs. Ranked Opponents -

KNOXVILLE – It doesn’t get much easier for the University of Tennessee’s football team.

The Sept. 20 open date has come and gone. UT’s coaches and players had ample time to digest and dissect details of the 34-10 loss to No. 4-ranked Oklahoma on Sept. 13 and a week to prepare for a challenge just as formidable.

20. Everyone Wants Locker to Succeed, But Can He? -

Perhaps the best thing that Jake Locker has going for him right now is Coach Ken Whisenhunt’s profession of faith.

There is no question that virtually everyone at St. Thomas Sports Park is pulling for Locker to make good in his final chance to be the Titans long-term answer at quarterback.

21. Distler Out to Dispel Old Mass Transit Myths -

“I was never on a bus until I drove one,” admits Dawn Distler, the new Knoxville Area Transit Director and CEO, who once made a living as a bus operator.

In many parts of Tennessee, adults simply don’t take the bus – except on game day, perhaps – and public transportation for a daily commute or a visit to the doctor is never top of mind, so Distler promotes her business by being a customer.

22. New Seat, Same Drive -

Dawn Distler was a bus driver for 10 years, but these days she does her work from the passenger seat.

Knoxville’s new director of transit, on the job since June 1, rides the Knoxville Area Transit buses often, making the most of her commute, traveling to work-related events or taking her staff on a friendly fact-finding mission.

23. Take a Right at Candyland, Cruise Down Memory Lane -

Bill Decker has confessed to committing an “old Nashville” act. The founder of Decker Wealth Management admits he recently gave a friend directions to a certain destination that included a turn at a now-demolished Nashville landmark.

24. University of Tennessee Students Help Design Nashville’s Future -

Nashville may be a city on the rise, attracting new residents by the droves. But it’s also a laboratory for students at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville’s College of Architecture and Design, where they are designing the communities of the future in partnership with the Nashville Civic Design Center.

25. HipD: Donelson Finds Its Cool Side -

The tag “Hip Donelson” evoked plenty of snickers, eye rolls and snarky comments when it first appeared. After all, the local joke goes, Donelson’s known for hip replacements – not hipsters.

26. Editorial: Memphis Should Embrace Season of Change -

By the calendar and by the first change in the air and the trees, autumn has arrived in Memphis. With it, the summer becomes a memory and fall becomes the present on its way to a memory.

The seasons are a backdrop for the changes and consistencies in the life of a city that gives their union a predictable rhythm.

27. Active Community Keeps Sports Medicine Busy -

George Hernandez is not only the CEO of Campbell Clinic, he’s a client.

An avid runner, Hernandez was doing a trail marathon last winter. Conditions were rainy, cold and windy. Worst of all, there were wet leaves underfoot covering protruding tree roots.

28. Searching for Doctors -

So here’s the offer: lower salary – meaning it will take longer to pay down your student loan debt – less prestige, and perhaps even a questioning of your intelligence and skill.

In 2014, that’s what comes with the decision to become a primary care physician. Recently, a fourth-year medical student at the University of Pennsylvania, Mara Gordon, wrote an article for The Atlantic explaining her decision to become a primary care doctor.

29. Average US 30-Year Mortgage Rate at 4.20 Percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Average long-term U.S. mortgage rates declined slightly this week, after marking their largest one-week gain of the year the previous week.

Mortgage company Freddie Mac said Thursday that the nationwide average for a 30-year loan eased to 4.20 percent from 4.23 percent last week. The average for a 15-year mortgage, a popular choice for people who are refinancing, slipped to 3.36 percent from 3.37 percent.

30. Prices at the Pump Head Below $3 in Much of US -

NEW YORK (AP) – The price of a gallon of gasoline may soon start with a "2'' across much the country.

Gasoline prices typically decline in autumn, and this year they are being pulled even lower by falling global oil prices. By the end of the year, up to 30 states could have an average gasoline price of less than $3 a gallon.

31. Ball Challenges Alexander to US Senate Debates -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Democratic Senate candidate Gordon Ball is criticizing incumbent Republican Lamar Alexander for refusing to participate in debates that would highlight differences on issues including abortion, education and guns.

32. Unemployment Benefit Applications Rise -

The number of people seeking U.S. unemployment benefits increased last week after falling sharply two weeks ago. Despite the rise, the level of applications remains near pre-recession levels, a sign that hiring will likely remain healthy.

33. Events -

Playhouse on the Square will present the regional premiere of “One Man, Two Guvnors” Friday, Sept. 26, through Oct. 12 at Playhouse, 66 S. Cooper St. Buy tickets at playhouseonthesquare.org.

34. Roxul Opening 17 Years in Making -

U.S Sen. Roger Wicker of Mississippi searched the 1997 Congressional Record this week before he arrived in Marshall County for the formal opening of the Roxul Inc. plant.

35. Ugwueke to Clarify Health Care Complexities -

Clarity. That’s what anyone attending a seminar on health care is seeking. What’s going on here and across the country? What’s the impact of the Affordable Care Act? What are the trends? What about the looming shortage of primary care physicians?

36. Broadway’s Back -

One of the most acclaimed Broadway shows has returned to Memphis, a show so beloved that a traveling exhibit of elaborate stage costumes from the production also made its way to the city as well to give people an up-close look at costumes from the original show.

37. Viability of Black Creative Districts Explored -

Several weeks ago, Eric Robertson, the president of the neighborhood revitalization intermediary Community LIFT, was showing a group of visitors around the city’s various creative and entertainment districts.

38. Struggling BlackBerry Releases New Phone -

TORONTO (AP) – BlackBerry launched a new smartphone Wednesday as the embattled Canadian company hopes for a comeback.

Chief executive John Chen unveiled a large-screen, square sized phone called the Passport to a Toronto audience. London and Dubai also hosted launch events. No event was held in the U. S. where analysts say there is little demand or carrier interest.

39. Middle-Class Squeeze: From Day Care to Health Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Three years ago, Jason Prosser was stunned to discover the cost of child care for his newborn son – so much so that he and his wife postponed having a second child.

40. Rowan Oak Rovers -

OXFORD, Miss. – We are at Rowan Oak, Susan and I – 719 Old Taylor Road, Oxford, Miss., USA. Once the home of William Faulkner, the Pulitzer and Nobel Prize-winning author, and his family for over 40 years. Built in 1844, and renovated from time to time thereafter, this modest Mississippi mansion is situated on some 30 acres of residential property not far from the town square. Promotional literature says it’s “open year round, from dawn to dusk.”

41. Commitment to Fitness Looks to Reverse Childhood Obesity -

If American children and teenagers are fat, then those in the Mid-South are fatter. And you don’t have to rely on some “Fattest Cities in America” list aimed at generating clicks and views to reach this conclusion.

42. Weirich Sworn In for Eight-Year Term -

Amy Weirich took the oath of office Tuesday, Sept. 23, for a full eight-year term of office, saying the prosecutor’s office has a role in crime prevention as well as prosecuting those accused of crimes.

43. 17 Cuts Among ‘Big Changes’ at CA -

The Commercial Appeal is trimming its staff again as part of ongoing cost-saving efforts, and at the same time it’s making what top editor Louis Graham described in a memo to staff as “major changes” to the physical paper itself.

44. Ride the Roo -

As the Cooper-Young Historic District continued to grow and prosper and Overton Square began its rise from the urban ashes, Ham Smythe IV kept hearing the questions.

Friends and acquaintances wanted to know if Smythe, whose family for decades has transported Memphians via their Yellow and Checker Cab services and Premier Transportation Co., could provide a private shuttle service linking the two popular arts, entertainment and retail destinations.

45. More Insurers to Offer Health Law Plans Next Year -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration says consumers in most states will have more insurance options next year under the president's health care law.

The Health and Human Services department on Tuesday reported a net increase of 63 insurers joining the market in 43 states plus Washington, DC. The preliminary figures show 77 insurers entering for the first time, while 14 are dropping out.

46. Ban Sought on Children Working on Tobacco Farms -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Thirty-five House Democrats are urging the Obama administration to prohibit children from working on tobacco farms, citing concerns about ill health effects.

The lawmakers, led by Reps. David Cicilline, D-R.I., and Matt Cartwright, D-Pa., made their plea in a letter to Labor Secretary Thomas Perez. A copy of the letter was obtained by The Associated Press on Tuesday.

47. Soda Makers Pledge to Reduce Calorie Consumption -

NEW YORK (AP) – Coke, Pepsi and Dr Pepper said Tuesday they'll work to reduce the calories Americans get from beverages by 20 percent over the next decade by more aggressively marketing smaller sizes, bottled water and diet drinks.

48. Robotic Rise of the S&P -

The S&P 500 hit a new all-time high again last week for the 34th time so far this year. However, U.S. stocks appear increasingly detached.

While the S&P 500 has risen nearly 10 percent year-to-date, stocks outside the US have returned less than 3 percent. In fact, U.S. stocks have pummeled their international competition by an astounding 70 percent over the last five years.

49. Top Five Sales Excuses -

Sales greats have the ability to adapt based on their audience, are able to embrace rejection as an express pass to their next “yes,” and generally have a high degree of emotional intelligence. But even veteran sales pros can fall into the trappings of excuse making as a way to cope with sales hurdles.

50. Commission Balks at Ford Appointments -

When the Shelby County Commission moved back into its renovated chamber at the Vasco Smith Administration Building this month, the new chairman of the body, Justin Ford, had a new seating arrangement for the 13 members, including six newly elected commissioners.

51. ‘Super Bowl’ Bound -

For years, fans have been leaving University of Memphis football games early. Home games at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium were a kind of cruel test for the diehard fans.

How long could they sit there while their team was getting pummeled yet again?

52. County Commission Puts Hold on Ford Committee Assignments -

The question of who will lead the Shelby County Commission isn’t completely settled, it turns out.

Two weeks ago, Democratic commissioner Justin Ford was elected the new chairman of the 13-member body with his own vote and the votes of all six of the partisan body’s Republican commissioners. The remaining six Democrats backed fellow Democrat Walter Bailey in the chairmanship fight.

53. US Existing Home Sales Fall in August -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Fewer Americans bought homes in August, as investors retreated from real estate and first-time buyers remained scarce.

Sales of existing homes fell 1.8 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.05 million, the National Association of Realtors said Monday. That snaps a four-month streak of gains. August sales are down from a July rate of 5.14 million, a figure that was revised slightly downward.

54. Plosser, a Leading Fed 'Hawk,' to Retire in March -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Charles Plosser, a leading inflation "hawk" at the Federal Reserve, announced Monday that he plans to retire March 1.

Plosser, who has been president of the Fed's Philadelphia regional bank since August 2006, has been a leader of the officials known as hawks for their concerns that a continuation of low-interest rate policies could ignite inflation.

55. Groundbreaking Held for Arkansas Steel Mill -

Officials say a new $1.3 billion steel mill will be an economic boon for northeastern Arkansas.

A groundbreaking ceremony was held Monday morning near Osceola for the Big River Steel mill, which is expected to bring about 2,000 temporary construction jobs and 500 full-time jobs once it is up and running.

56. West Clinic Recognized for Quality Care -

The West Clinic has received National Committee for Quality Assurance recognition as a Patient-Centered Specialty Practice for its responsiveness to patients and medical colleagues, cooperation and integration with other health care groups, and dedication to continuous improvement.

57. Finding Inspiration at Dawn in Albuquerque -

There aren’t many things in life that will get me out of bed two hours before sunrise.

But on a chilly, predawn October morning in Albuquerque, N.M., there I was, purposely waking up a 6-year-old child at 5 a.m. to stand in the brisk morning air and watch the sun rise over Sandia Peak.

58. Simplifying Financial Aid -

Trying to receive financial aid for college? How do you feel when completing the 10-page FAFSA (Free Application for Financial Student Aid) form? Could reducing it to two questions improve the process?

59. College Football Notebook: September 23, 2014 -

The University of Memphis had lost three straight games to Middle Tennessee and five of the last six. Getting beat by the Blue Raiders each year had become commonplace and another sign of a program in perpetual struggle.

60. FDA Tweaks Food Safety Rules Due Next Year -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The government will rewrite sweeping new food safety rules after farmers complained that earlier proposals could hurt business, the Food and Drug Administration said Friday.

61. SEC May Take Enforcement Action Against ITT -

NEW YORK (AP) – The Securities and Exchange Commission may take enforcement action against for-profit education company ITT Educational Services Inc. over its student loans.

62. Haslam Keeps Door Open to Pre-K; Ramsey Skeptical -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – While Gov. Bill Haslam is keeping the door open to an expansion of the public pre-kindergarten program in Tennessee, any such move would remain a tough sell among some fellow Republicans in the Legislature.

63. Alexander, Corker Honored by Business Association -

U.S. Sens. Lamar Alexander and Bob Corker are being honored by the nation's leading small business association.

The National Federation of Independent Business has named the Tennessee Republicans a Guardian of Small Business for their voting record on behalf of America's small-business owners.

64. Violent Crime Rises in Shelby County -

Major violent crime in Memphis was up 7.7 percent from January through August compared to the same period a year ago, according to the Memphis-Shelby County Crime Commission.

The statistics released Friday, Sept. 19, show an 8.1 percent increase in major violent crime countywide, including the city of Memphis, from the same time in 2013.

65. Ritualizing Your Parenthood -

We are people of ceremony and ritual. Every occasion of transition is cause for celebration. A prescribed formula marks our rite of passage from one status to another.

Significant milestones are pronounced by traditional words stating our readiness to take on the new responsibility. Marriage, membership initiations, military inductions, oaths of office, graduations, even citizenship, are all marked by ritual.

66. The Only Difference: Mindset -

The same truths not brought into action present themselves as lessons, ongoing themes. This one rings with more truth every time I encounter it. Mindset is the real pivot point, the only true sustainable, competitive advantage (other than exclusivity, which is always temporary) for organizations that want to flourish.

67. TSA Expands PreCheck at Memphis Airport -

Pace Cooper, president and CEO of Cooper Hotels, a hospitality development and management company that owns and manages hotels in multiple states, is accustomed to flying and the hassles that sometimes accompany air travel.

68. Consumer Prices Fall 0.2 Percent in August -

U.S. consumer prices edged down in August, the first monthly drop since the spring of 2013, as gasoline, airline tickets and clothing prices all fell. It was the latest evidence that inflation remains under control.

69. Singing Mechanic’s Life Much Like the Songs He Sings -

The Singing Mechanic – “I’ve got that name. Nobody else can use it,” says Billy Devereaux – sits by his worn, 1,200-square-foot, two-room cottage and looks down at Boots, his Dutch Shepherd.

“He’s a possum killer and he runs security,” says Billy, 55, gazing across the swath of remote land separated by a long gravel trail from Smith Springs Road in Antioch.

70. Road to Better Mass Transit -

Picking a new transit chief is critical for a city in transition.

Next year, Nashville residents will elect a new mayor and turn over its large Metro Council.

Davidson County also expects some 200,000 new residents over the next 20 years, and much of the success of future development will depend on the ease of navigating around Nashville – already the nation’s second-worst area for sprawl, according to Smart Growth America.

71. Prep Coaches, Players Sold on Jones the Recruiter -

Nothing surprises Murfreesboro Blackman High School football coach Philip Shadowens when it comes to college recruiting.

Shadowens has seen it all – including the flurry of activity created by Blackman senior quarterback and safety Jauan Jennings, rated the No. 18 athlete in the nation by Rivals.com.

72. Jones’ Wide Net Gathers Old Friends, Top Prospects -

Butch Jones was sitting in the office of Knoxville’s South-Doyle High School athletic director and football coach Clark Duncan during a visit to see recruit Jocquez Bruce last winter.

73. Teacher Surplus Count Drops to Only Four -

Every school year the first estimates come in high in the count of how many school teachers will be surplused – declared excess because of the number of students that are counted at the start of the school year and then reassigned based on the final student head count.

74. Editorial: Growing Rape Kit Backlog Raises More Concern -

The backlog gets bigger. And with the recent news that 196 rape kits dating back to 1976 have been found by Memphis Police, questions never fully answered about the rape kit backlog that surfaced about a year ago become more urgent.

75. ‘Cutting Edge’ -

The first thing to understand about the task that Opera Memphis general director Ned Canty feels is before him is that he’s not leading a music organization that competes only with other music outlets and venues for audiences’ attention.

76. Brighter Economy Driving Up Holiday Hiring Plans -

NEW YORK (AP) – UPS will hire up to 95,000. Kohl's plans to take on 67,000 and FedEx 50,000. Wal-Mart will add 60,000.

One after the other, a flurry of major U.S. retail and transportation companies announced sharp increases this week in the number of temporary workers they plan to hire for the holiday season. Collectively, such hiring could reach its highest point this year for stores since 1999, when the economy was roaring and the Great Recession was still eight years away.

77. Volatile Apartment Sector Reduces US Home Building -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. home construction plunged in August, led by steep decline in the volatile apartment category. But single-family house construction, a larger and more stable portion of the market, fell only modestly.

78. Fed Keeps Rates Low, But Brace for the Inevitable -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Record-low interest rates will be around for at least a few more months, the Federal Reserve made clear Wednesday.

Enjoy the easy money while it lasts.

By mid-2015, economists expect the Fed to abandon a nearly 6-year-old policy of keeping short-term rates at record lows. Those rates have helped support the economy, cheered the stock market and shrunk mortgage rates. A Fed rate increase could potentially reverse those trends.

79. After Record Profits, Airlines Keep Adding Jobs -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The number of jobs at U.S. airlines keeps growing – although slowly – as some of them post record profits.

The U.S. Department of Transportation said Thursday that the nation's passenger airlines employed the equivalent of 386,243 full-time workers in July, up 1.3 percent from the same month last year. It was the eighth straight monthly gain over year-earlier numbers.

80. Are You Sharing Too Much? -

When it comes to job seeking, sometimes less is more. Everything we do – from the clothes we wear to our resumes to our social media accounts – says something about us. These things are pieces of our personal brands.

81. 100 Percent Sure -

IF A PROGRAM IS 100 PERCENT SUCCESSFUL, GET WITH THE PROGRAM. I wrote something three years ago when President Obama visited Booker T. Washington High School. In light of recent events, I’d like to visit those words again.

82. Little Sees ‘Acceptance’ in City Insurance Drama -

City Chief Administrative Officer George Little says he hopes the city’s long debate about health insurance coverage changes will mean a shorter discussion about proposed pension changes to come.

83. Community Advocates Seek Crime Solutions -

In mid-August, Memphis Police brass realized they had a crime problem in different parts of the city.

“We realized we had a spike in crime,” is how Deputy Police Chief Clete Knight put it Wednesday, Sept. 17, to a neighborhood group in East Memphis.

84. Airport Authority Approves RedRover Contract -

Memphis International Airport should have a new team of storytellers on board.

The Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority board voted Thursday, Sept. 18, to engage Memphis-based RedRover Co. LLC to help craft a multi-platform communications and image campaign for Memphis International, which is transitioning from a Delta Airlines hub to an origin-and-destination airport.

85. Michelle's Message -

First Lady Michelle Obama’s visit to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Wednesday, Sept. 18, was a tightly scripted affair that afforded her an up-close look at the world-renowned hospital and a cross-section of its precocious patients, who she met with in an activity room as they worked on a project.

86. Consumer Prices Fall 0.2 Percent in August -

U.S. consumer prices edged down in August, the first monthly drop since the spring of 2013, as gasoline, airline tickets and clothing prices all fell. It was the latest evidence that inflation remains under control.

87. Clueing THEA -

THEA crops up in crosswords occasionally. In an easy puzzle, it’ll be clued as “Ellington’s ‘Take ___ Train’.” Or “Mr. T’s ‘___ Team’.” In more challenging grids, THEA’s clues include “Actress Gill,” “German author von Harbou,” or “Mother of Eos.” Snobby solvers don’t like any of these clues; thus, they don’t like THEA. That’s about to change. Henceforth, a new clue for THEA will be available. I predict a change of attitude toward the answer.

88. Target Date Mutual Funds – Should You Go With the Flow? -

Ray's take: Target date funds take their name from the year in which an investor plans to retire or stop contributing to savings and is increasingly the default choice for 401K plan contributions.

89. Door Remains Open on City Health Insurance Changes -

The political struggle to close the door and lock in changes to city health insurance coverage is proving to be a challenge for the Memphis City Council.

The council voted Tuesday, Sept. 16, to adjust the health insurance changes it approved in June to grandfather in for a year approximately 300 retirees and their spouses when it comes to the 70 percent subsidy on insurance premiums they currently get from the city.

90. City Employees Return to Court Over Benefits -

The basic elements of an overhaul of city health insurance and pension benefits got some changes this week at the Memphis City Council. And it looks like the council might put off a vote on pension benefit changes originally set for a vote in October.

91. Debt of Gratitude -

Robert Wright began working as a truck driver for Intermodal Cartage Co. in March 2006, making runs to cities across the Southeast.

92. Retirees Sue As Council Adjusts Health Insurance Changes -

Three retired Memphis Police officers and the widow of a Memphis Police officer filed suit Tuesday, Sept. 16, against the city of Memphis seeking a temporary restraining order to stop changes in city government health insurance benefits by the time the open enrollment period begins next month.

93. Social Security Resumes Mailing Benefit Statements -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Social Security Administration has resumed mailing statements to workers letting them know the estimated benefits they will get when they retire, the agency announced Tuesday.

94. Seeking Long-Term Outcomes -

Long-term outcomes, such as improved high school graduation rates and reduced dropout rates, are the ultimate objectives of the Memphis Athletic Ministries’ still-young Academic Diligence program.

95. Memphis Police Discover More Rape Kits -

Memphis Police have found in recent weeks 196 more rape kits in previously unsearched areas where police store evidence, Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong told Memphis City Council members Tuesday, Sept. 16.

96. Meritan’s Branch Named Among Top Nurses -

Cindy Branch, Meritan’s associate vice president for health services, has been selected to represent Tennessee as one of the nation’s top 50 home care and hospice nurses by the National Association for Home Care & Hospice and the Home Healthcare Nurses Association. Branch, a registered nurse, has oversight of Meritan’s nursing programs, including home health, private duty nursing and medical residential homes. She will be recognized at NACH’s annual meeting in October.

97. Ball Targets Carr's Tea Party Supporters -

Gordon Ball, the Democratic challenger to Republican U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander, is basing his uphill challenge of Alexander on his specific definition of being a moderate Democrat and where that intersects with tea party followers.

98. Apple: Record 4 Million Orders of iPhones on First Day -

NEW YORK (AP) – Apple had more than 4 million advance orders of its new, larger iPhones in the first 24 hours, exceeding its initial supply, the company said Monday.

The iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus will be delivered to customers starting Friday and throughout September, but many won't be delivered until October, Apple said. Phones will still be available Friday on a walk-in basis at Apple retail stores and from various wireless carriers and authorized Apple resellers.

99. Olive Garden Defends Breadstick Policy -

NEW YORK (AP) – Olive Garden is defending its practice of giving customers as many breadsticks as they want, saying the policy conveys "Italian generosity."

The remark is part of a response by the chain's parent company, Darden Restaurants Inc., to a nearly 300-page criticism released by hedge fund Starboard Value last week. Starboard took Olive Garden and its management to task for a litany of issues, including its liberal distribution of breadsticks, its failure to salt the water used to boil its pasta and even the length of the asparagus it serves.

100. Speculation Swirls Over Fed Language on Rate Hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) – When the Federal Reserve issues a policy statement after it meets this week, the financial world will be on high alert for two words:

"Considerable time."

The presence or absence of that phrase will trigger a rush to assess the likely timing of the Fed's first increase in interest rates since it cut them to record lows in 2008.