» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'Think Signs' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:2
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:0
Middle Tennessee:0
East Tennessee:0
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Shelby County Building Permits Rise 3.4 Percent -

Shelby County’s homebuilding industry showed slight improvement in the third quarter, with builders filing 3.4 percent more permits in the quarter than in the same three-month period a year ago.

2. Is Showing a House to a Stranger Worth the Risk? -

The real estate community was saddened last week to learn of the murder of one of its own when the body of Little Rock real estate broker Beverly Carter was discovered in a shallow grave days after she had been reported missing.

3. Five Reasons to Consider Traverse City -

Here are a few rules: American beach vacations must take place in Florida, wine getaways in Napa, snow adventures in Colorado, and leaf-viewing excursions in New England.

If that’s what you think, think again. In fact, if you’re looking for a year-round destination that features all of these activities and more, you can find it in and around Traverse City, Mich.

4. Cummins Eyes Memphis Site for Expansion -

Cummins Inc. is eyeing a Memphis property for a planned expansion of the company’s distribution operations, a move that would be welcome news for Memphis officials.

5. Fed Keeps Rates Low, But Brace for the Inevitable -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Record-low interest rates will be around for at least a few more months, the Federal Reserve made clear Wednesday.

Enjoy the easy money while it lasts.

By mid-2015, economists expect the Fed to abandon a nearly 6-year-old policy of keeping short-term rates at record lows. Those rates have helped support the economy, cheered the stock market and shrunk mortgage rates. A Fed rate increase could potentially reverse those trends.

6. Tigers Hope to ‘Grind’ Win Against MTSU -

It’s a big game. Big enough that the University of Memphis got the Grizzlies’ Tony Allen – “The Grindfather” – to do a short video urging fans to come out for the football game this Saturday, Sept. 20, against the Middle Tennessee Blue Raiders.

7. ‘Love Mob’ Responds to Poplar Plaza Attack -

The amount of traffic that comes through the intersection of Highland Street and Poplar Avenue has made it a favorite of causes through the years – from war protestors and advocates to those on both sides of the death penalty, and, more recently, city employees upset over benefit changes.

8. Fed Survey Finds Moderate Growth Across the US -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy strengthened in all regions of the country in July and August, in areas from consumer spending to auto sales to tourism, the Federal Reserve reported in a survey released Wednesday.

9. Yellen: Job Market Makes Fed Hesitant on Rate Hike -

JACKSON HOLE, Wyoming (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Friday that the Great Recession complicated the Fed's ability to assess the U.S. job market and made it harder to determine when to adjust interest rates.

10. Titans Offense Looks Like NFL Product -

Exciting. Now, there’s a word that hasn’t been associated much with the Tennessee Titans in recent years.

But based on the early preseason, Coach Ken Whisenhunt is fielding a Titans team that might actually be worth watching.

11. Applications for US Unemployment Aid Fall to 298,000 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Fewer people applied for U.S. unemployment benefits last week, another sign the job market is improving.

The Labor Department said Thursday that weekly claims for jobless aid fell 14,000 last week to a seasonally adjusted 298,000. The prior week's figures were revised up slightly to 311,000.

12. Humes Rises From Bottom 5 Percent of Tennessee Schools -

Humes Preparatory Academy is no longer in the bottom 5 percent of schools in the state in terms of student achievement, as measured by state education officials.

That according to school-by-school test data from the Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program (TCAP) and Tennessee Value Added Assessment System (TVAAS) data, released by state education officials Tuesday, Aug. 19, in Nashville.

13. Fight to Save Printers Alley a Family Affair -

“How does it feel to be on your own?” Fritz Hester turns Dylan’s “Like a Rolling Stone” into a surging blues tune that spills out of the Bourbon Street Blues and Boogie Bar into the thick, cigarette and beer-flavored humidity stifling Printers Alley

14. Reshaping a City, One Lot at a Time -

John G. Brittle Jr. doesn’t have an office. He has a war room. The space, crowded with maps, charts, books, piles of paper and marked-up spreadsheets, is ground zero for InfillNashville, the 10-person team of site selection specialists that Brittle leads at Village Real Estate Services.

15. US Job Growth Eases but Tops 200,000 for a Sixth Month -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A sixth straight month of solid 200,000-plus job growth in July reinforced growing evidence that the U.S. economy is accelerating after five years of sluggish expansion.

16. As US Job Market Strengthens, Many Don't Feel It -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For millions of workers, happy days aren't quite here again.

Though the U.S. unemployment rate has plunged since the start of last year to a five-year low of 6.1 percent, the Gallup Organization has found that consumers' view of the economy is the glummest it's been in seven months.

17. Uphill Climb -

Shelby County’s homebuilding industry is off to a slow start in 2014, with builders filing 16.6 percent fewer permits in the second quarter than in the same three-month period a year ago.

Builders filed 245 permits in Shelby County in the second quarter, compared with 294 permits in the second quarter of 2013, according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, www.chandlerreports.com. Builders filed 191 permits in the first quarter.

18. US Companies Post Most Jobs in 7 Years in May -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. employers advertised more jobs in May than in any month in the past seven years, a sign that this year's strong hiring trend is likely to continue.

More Americans also quit their jobs, a good sign because it usually occurs when workers find new and higher-paying jobs. It also opens up more positions for those out of work.

19. Why a Grim US Economic Picture is Brightening -

WASHINGTON (AP) – When the government updates its estimate Wednesday of how the U.S. economy fared last quarter, the number is pretty sure to be ugly. Horrible even.

The economy likely shrank at an annual rate of nearly 2 percent in the January-March quarter, economists estimate. That would be its bleakest performance since early 2009 in the depths of the Great Recession.

20. Calm Amidst the ‘Storm’ -

The S&P 500 continues to inch ever so closer to the 2,000 mark, while volatility measures remain historically low. Furthermore, there have been 43 consecutive days where the S&P 500 has registered a daily return mark within the -1 percent to +1 percent band.

21. Average US 30-Year Mortgage Rate at 4.17 Percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Average U.S. rates on fixed mortgages eased slightly this week, remaining near historic lows.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said Thursday the average rate for a 30-year loan declined to 4.17 percent from 4.20 percent last week. The average for the 15-year mortgage dipped to 3.30 percent from 3.31 percent.

22. Yellen: US Economy Still Needs Help From Fed -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy still isn't healthy enough to grow at a consistently strong pace without the Federal Reserve's help.

That was the message Fed Chair Janet Yellen sent Wednesday at a news conference after the central bank ended a two-day policy meeting.

23. Wilkins Targets Cohen as ‘Career Politician’ -

Ricky Wilkins told a packed campaign headquarters in Poplar Plaza on a busy campaign weekend that U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen is waging a dirty campaign while complaining that Wilkins is doing the same.

24. Median CEO Pay Crosses $10 Million in 2013 -

NEW YORK (AP) – They're the $10 million men and women.

Propelled by a soaring stock market, the median pay package for a CEO rose above eight figures for the first time last year. The head of a typical large public company earned a record $10.5 million, an increase of 8.8 percent from $9.6 million in 2012, according to an Associated Press/Equilar pay study.

25. Protesters Oppose New Tennessee Electric Chair Law -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Protesters at the state Capitol voiced opposition Tuesday to a new law signed by Gov. Bill Haslam allowing the use of the electric chair if lethal injection drugs are unavailable to execute condemned prisoners.

26. Across the River -

The Arkansas land between the bridges across the Mississippi River at Memphis doesn’t have a name, at least not yet.

If graffiti is any indication, lots of people go there. And they cross numerous boundaries on dirt and gravel roads and paths that can end abruptly and are posted with “no trespassing” signs and other warnings as well as railroad video cameras.

27. Area Industrial Market Poised for Solid Year -

All signs are pointing toward a strong year for the Memphis-area industrial market.

The Memphis market closed the first quarter with 897,829 square feet of absorption and the total vacancy rate for the Memphis market – 10.8 percent - is the lowest the market has experienced in 14 years, according to CB Richard Ellis Memphis.

28. Tactical Urbanism: Citizen Projects Go Mainstream -

MEMPHIS (AP) – The city painted a crosswalk and installed tennis-ball green signs, but the cars just kept on zooming through. But rather than wave a white flag, Sarah Newstok grabbed an orange one instead.

29. Obama Backs Cohen, Brooks Charges ‘Voter Suppression’ -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen is touting the endorsement of President Barack Obama in his current re-election bid.

30. First-Quarter Bankruptcies Remain Flat -

Bankruptcies in Shelby County were almost the same in number for the first three months of 2014 as they were for the first quarter of 2013.

There were 3,036 bankruptcies filed in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Western District of Tennessee in the first quarter, a slight increase from the 3,031 filed during the first quarter of 2013, according to The Daily News Online, www.memphisdailynews.com.

31. Winter Drags Down Q1 Building Permits -

Shelby County’s homebuilding industry, plagued by poor weather early in 2014, got off to a slow start in the first quarter, with builders filing 14.2 percent fewer permits than in the same three-month period a year ago.

32. New Media Explosion -

One of the defining features of a traditional newspaper is the content bundle, a broad selection of topics and stories meant to appeal to the widest group of readers possible.

Increasingly, though, upstart digital media outlets are launching in Memphis that take the opposite approach. They’re focusing their brands on content that doesn’t seek to be all things to all people, going after specific niches that the founders of these outlets feel get short shrift from legacy media.

33. Past, Present, Future -

The weekend before the formal reopening of the National Civil Rights Museum, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s voice could be heard in the museum plaza.

34. US Home Market: Few Buyers and Not Enough Sellers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Entering the 2014 spring buying season, the U.S. housing market faces an unusual dilemma: Too few people are selling homes. Yet too few buyers can afford the homes that are for sale.

35. Caught in the Middle -

Even before the Affordable Care Act came along, Deborah Casey was living between a logistical rock and an economic hard place. Casey, a 61-year-old widow, draws a monthly Social Security check based on her husband’s earnings. She works part-time for Shelby County (no benefits), and to continue receiving the same amount in that Social Security check, she has to keep tabs on how much she makes. This is exactly how someone who wants to provide for herself winds up on a “fixed income.”

36. Report: Digital Sites Bring Momentum to News -

NEW YORK (AP) – Growing digital outlets are bringing "a sense of momentum" to the news business even as long-term problems continue to plague the industry, a journalism think tank said on Wednesday.

37. US CEOs' Optimism on Economy Reaches 2-Year High -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. chief executives have grown more optimistic about economic growth this year, and more of them plan to boost spending and hiring within the next six months.

The Business Roundtable said Tuesday that its CEO outlook index rose to 92.1 in the first quarter of this year, the highest level in two years. The index measures chief executives' expectations for sales, investment spending and hiring.

38. ‘Champion of Working Man’ Rep. Turner Set to Retire -

State Rep. and Nashville Democrat Mike Turner is retiring from the General Assembly and considering a run for mayor.

39. Yellen to Put Fed's New Leadership on Display -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Janet Yellen era at the Federal Reserve begins in earnest this week with a two-day meeting, a policy statement and fresh economic forecasts. Yet all that will be a prelude to the marquee event: Yellen's first news conference as Fed chair.

40. Shockey ‘Ideal Fit’ as Chamber Chair -

Leigh Shockey had gone to Memphis International Airport in her role as an executive for the family business – Drexel Chemical Co.

41. Reedy Thriving As Housing Investments Skyrocket -

Jim Reedy began selling real estate in 1976 while he was a student at the University of Memphis, and within three years, he moved into selling investment properties.

42. Few Eligible Patients Can Get Weight Loss Surgery -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Like 78 million other Americans, MaryJane Harrison is obese.

And like many critically overweight Americans, Harrison cannot afford to have weight loss surgery because her health insurance doesn't cover it. The financial burden makes it nearly impossible for her to follow the advice of three physicians who have prescribed the stomach-shrinking procedure for Harrison, who is four-feet, 10 inches and weighs 265 pounds.

43. Fears of Slowdown Sharpen Focus on US Jobs Report -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Fears of an economic slowdown are heightening anticipation of what Friday's U.S. jobs report for January might reveal.

Stock markets have sunk after signs of weaker growth in the United States, Europe and China. Turmoil in developing countries has further spooked investors. The upheaval has renewed doubts about the Federal Reserve's next steps.

44. Survey: US Companies Add 175,000 Jobs in January -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A private survey shows that businesses added jobs at a modest pace in January, a sign that hiring may have rebounded after a disappointing figure in December.

Payroll processor ADP said Wednesday that companies added 175,000 jobs last month. That's down from 227,000 in December, which was revised lower. But it was much better than the government's official figure of just 74,000 new jobs in December.

45. Despite Market Unrest, Fed Likely to Pare Stimulus -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Just as Ben Bernanke prepares to turn the chairmanship of the Federal Reserve over to Janet Yellen, global markets are on edge over the prospect that she'll extend a policy he began: a steady pullback in the Fed's extraordinary economic stimulus.

46. Hip Preservation -

Looking back, Cathy Rogers sees there were clues that then seemed mere oddities.

When her son Joshua was in middle school, he could make a “popping sound” with his left hip. Though Joshua was active and sometimes would take three-mile runs, she eventually noticed that he didn’t tie his shoes like anyone else in the family.

47. Madoff-Related Fraud to Cost JPMorgan $2.5 Billion -

NEW YORK (AP) – For more than 15 years, there were signs something was amiss with what federal prosecutors in Manhattan call the "703 account" at JPMorgan Chase & Co.

48. Will Surge of Older Workers Take Jobs From Young? -

CHICAGO (AP) – It's an assertion that has been accepted as fact by droves of the unemployed: Older people remaining on the job later in life are stealing jobs from young people.

One problem, many economists say: It isn't supported by a wisp of fact.

49. Factory, Construction Growth Boost 2014 Outlook -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Expectations are rising for a stronger U.S. economy in 2014 after reports Thursday showed solid growth in manufacturing and construction spending at the end of last year.

50. Banner Year for East Memphis Office Space -

The Memphis office real estate market began showing signs of life in 2013, with the market for Class A office space in the East Memphis submarket fueling the resurgence.

While the city’s overall office market numbers may not appear very strong, the city’s most desired office submarket – East Memphis around Poplar Avenue and Interstate 240 – began showing strong signs of improvement in the second half of the year.

51. US Economy Expands at 4.1 Percent Rate -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy grew at a solid 4.1 percent annual rate from July through September, the fastest pace since late 2011 and significantly higher than previously thought. Much of the upward revision came from stronger consumer spending.

52. Solid US Job Growth Cuts Unemployment to 7 Percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. job market is proving sturdier than many had thought.

Solid job growth in November cut the U.S. unemployment rate to 7 percent, a five-year low. The surprisingly robust gain suggested that the economy may have begun to accelerate. As more employers step up hiring, more people have money to spend to drive the economy.

53. All Signs Point to Breakthrough for ‘Josh’ -

Josh.

Say only that, and everyone in Memphis knows you’re talking about the University of Memphis basketball coach.

A first name. Like Michael, LeBron or Kobe. OK, not exactly like that, but sort of like that because it captures who he is. To say “Pastner” sounds too formal, doesn’t do justice to the gentle, but enthusiastic and optimistic soul – Josh! – that at 19 applied for the Los Angeles Clippers’ head coaching position.

54. Record Crowds Over Weekend, But Spending Declined -

NEW YORK (AP) – Retailers got Americans into stores during the start to the holiday shopping season. Now, they'll need to figure out how to get them to actually shop.

Target, Macy's and other retailers offered holiday discounts in early November and opened stores on Thanksgiving Day. It was an effort to attract shoppers before Black Friday, the day after Thanksgiving that traditionally kicks off the holiday shopping season.

55. Team Players -

The key players, from Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. to St. Louis Cardinals chairman and CEO Bill DeWitt Jr., grabbed the microphone at an invitation-only rally held on the club level of AutoZone Park and made their best pitches.

56. Yellen Stands by Fed's Low Rate Policies -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Janet Yellen made clear Thursday that she's prepared to stand by the Federal Reserve's extraordinary efforts to pump up the economy when she's chairman, if that's what it needs.

57. Commercial Real Estate Market Reawakens -

After suffering through a prolonged slump, the Memphis commercial real estate market this year began to shake off the rust that gathered during the “Great Recession,” and brighter days could be ahead for the prime markets in the apartment, retail, office and industrial sectors, according to local experts.

58. Oldham Opens Sheriff Re-Election Bid -

Shelby County Sheriff Bill Oldham opened his re-election campaign Saturday, Nov. 2, with something he didn’t have four years ago: a record.

59. Sebelius Brings Health Care Talk to Town -

Forty-eight hours after a congressional committee grilled her over problems related to the new health insurance website, U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius was in Memphis, flanked by defenders.

60. Experts to Provide CRE Outlook at Seminar -

Class A office space in East Memphis reigns supreme, which should continue to drive up rental rates, while industrial developers are ramping up activity outside the city of Memphis.

Those trends and others in commercial real estate will be the subject of discussion Thursday, Nov. 7, during the 2013 Commercial Real Estate Review & Forecast, one of six seminars in The Daily News’ 2013 Seminar Series.

61. Rapid Return -

Downtown to Whitehaven on a city bus in a half hour is quite an achievement in a city with limited experience with modern bus express service.

The concept is called “bus rapid transit” and the Memphis Area Transit Authority’s first try at the concept with a Poplar Express lasted less than a year before MATA’s board pulled the plug for lack of ridership.

62. Shutdown Over, Obama Surveys Damage and Blames GOP -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The government unlocked its doors Thursday after 16 days, with President Barack Obama saluting the resolution of Congress' bitter standoff but lambasting Republicans for the partial shutdown that he said had damaged the U.S. economy and America's credibility around the world.

63. Shelby County Home Sales Climb 12 Percent in Quarter -

Shelby County’s housing market continued to show signs of improvement in the third quarter, posting double-digit increases in several key areas over the same period last year.

The county netted 4,686 home sales in the third quarter, a 12 percent increase from 4,176 in the third quarter of 2012, according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, www.chandlerreports.com.

64. Editorial: Memphis Moves Way Beyond BBQ -

Memphis food is more than barbecue. Much more.

There – we’ve said it.

And moderation is not only possible but advisable because the burgeoning food scene in Memphis shows no signs of fading. It is growing as the dish crawl series of events demonstrate.

65. As Shutdown Drags On, Time to Call in Mediator? -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Maybe it's time to call in a mediator – if there's one not on furlough.

President Barack Obama and congressional Republicans are in stalemate over a partial government shutdown now in its second week. And a looming crisis over the federal debt limit is rapidly approaching, with economists saying that could have a devastating effect on the U.S. economy.

66. What Tigers, Vols Need Now is Finishing Touch -

They weren’t supposed to be in the game. Not the Tennessee Volunteers at home against Georgia, not the Memphis Tigers at home against Central Florida.

But then that’s the view from the outside, which is not always clearer than the view from the inside.

67. Watch Your Language Serves as Professional Grammar Police -

Most people probably have one, the self-described grammar police ready to correct an error in tense or any participle left dangling.

But Elinor Grusin and Bill Brody are certified, called upon by newspaper editors and university deans, looked up to by college students. With a century of the written word in their arsenal, Grusin and Brody have teamed up to offer guidance and red marks as Watch Your Language LLC, an editing and writing service for the linguistically challenged.

68. Holding Court -

As has been reported in national newspapers and business magazines for months, the fall’s law school enrollment nationally is down from this time last year and beyond.

The American Bar Association’s ABA Journal reported in August that “Law school applications for the fall of 2013 have dropped 17.9 percent and applicants are down 12.3 percent.”

69. Let’s Start Fixing City’s Broken Windows -

In 1982, two sociologists published their research on the causes of crime and the significance of deteriorating neighborhoods on rising crime rates.

James Wilson and George Kelling’s work, called “The Broken Window Theory,” states, “If you go into a neighborhood and you see a lot of broken windows, it tells you that nobody cares, that nobody is looking out for the neighborhood, and if you break some more windows, nobody will do anything about it.”

70. Census: No Sign of Economic Rebound for Many in US -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Even as the economy shows signs of improvement and poverty levels off, new U.S. census data suggests the gains are halting and uneven. Depending on education, race, income and even marriage, not all segments of the population are seeing an economic turnaround.

71. Muddled US Jobs Picture to Weigh on Fed Decision -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Employers are sketching a hazy picture of the U.S. job market for the Federal Reserve to weigh in deciding this month whether to reduce its stimulus for the economy – and, if so, by how much.

72. US Trade Deficit Widens to $39.1 Billion in July -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. trade deficit widened in July from a four-year low in June. American consumers bought more foreign cars and other imported goods, while U.S. companies exported fewer long-lasting manufactured goods.

73. Martin Sets University of Memphis Priorities -

On the first day of the academic year at The University of Memphis, Monday, Aug. 26, yoga was on the schedule of the university’s interim president, Brad Martin.

74. Shelby County to Play Key Role in 2014 State Election -

As prospective candidates weigh special election races in the next three months for a state House seat and suburban school boards, there are also signs of life in Shelby County in the statewide races on the 2014 election ballot.

75. Group Kicks Off National Tour on Health Law Defunding -

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP) – One of the chief backers of a plan to defund the federal health care law by tying it to budget negotiations said Monday that he didn't believe Republicans would be blamed for a government shutdown as supporters of the approach launched a national tour to spur support for the idea.

76. Colliers Continues Role as Major Commercial Real Estate Player -

Wilkinson & Snowden Inc. helped lead the industrial warehouse revolution in Memphis at a prescient time.

77. Learning Curve -

When the first day of the first school year of the unified county school system opened Monday, Aug. 5, a group of school board members, staff and interim superintendent Dorsey Hopson stopped at Millington Middle School.

78. Solid US Job Gains Could Bolster Second-Half Growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Robust hiring in July would mark a fourth straight month of solid gains, an encouraging sign for a U.S. economy that is still struggling with high unemployment.

Economists predict that employers added 183,000 jobs – a figure that would show that businesses are growing more confident despite weak economic growth. More jobs would boost consumers' ability to spend, allowing for stronger growth in the second half of the year.

79. Industrial Readiness -

Laura Hine remembers her first week at the Workforce Investment Network office in Memphis.

She specifically recalls a table filled with job applications for Blues City Brewing and how few of those applying were ready for one of the first signs of new life in Memphis’ manufacturing sector.

80. US Economy Grew at Sluggish 1.7 Percent Pace in Second Quarter -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy grew from April through June at an annual rate of 1.7 percent – a sluggish pace but stronger than in the previous quarter. Businesses spent more, and the federal government cut less, offsetting weaker spending by consumers.

81. Bass Pro Wins Signage Approval -

Bass Pro Shops won overwhelming approval Tuesday, July 30, for its latest signage plans for The Pyramid, clearing a potential obstacle to the public-private initiative to turn the shuttered arena into a destination attraction.

82. Design Review Board Approves Bass Pro Shops Pyramid Signage -

Bass Pro Shops won overwhelming approval Tuesday, July 30, for its latest signage plans for The Pyramid, clearing a potential obstacle to the public-private initiative to turn the shuttered arena into a destination attraction.

83. Memphis Economic Indicator Surveys Landscape -

The inaugural Memphis Economic Indicator, a new online survey launched by Dixon Hughes Goodman LLP and The Daily News to measure general business sentiment, shows little consensus about the local economy.

84. Improving Real Estate Metrics Offer Hope -

The 2013 countywide reappraisal resulted in a historic drop in property values, but improving real estate metrics are providing a glimmer of hope for the local economy.

That was the message industry professionals heard Thursday, July 25, at real estate information company Chandler Reports’ 2013 Mid-Year Master Your Market seminar at the Memphis Marriott East.

85. Bass Pro Shops’ Signage Has ‘Classier’ Look -

Bass Pro Shops has changed signage plans for The Pyramid and is including a “sky ride” to the top of the building along with two new balconies outside the two-level observation deck, all part of an effort to embrace the structure’s iconic place in the city’s skyline.

86. Bumper Crop -

Unless you see the signs, it is hard to tell when you have crossed the Tennessee-Mississippi state line where Fayette County, Tenn., meets Marshall County, Miss., not too far from the southern city limits of Collierville.

87. Commission Awaits Next Budget Steps -

When Shelby County Commissioners get together Wednesday, July 17, for committee sessions, they will probably begin to fill in some of the blank space left in the wake of their decision this week to vote down a $4.38 county property tax rate.

88. Attorneys Busy With Nuances of US Health Care Reform -

Most businesses are well aware of key provisions in the Affordable Care Act, like the mandate for larger employers to provide health care insurance coverage to employees.

But attorneys are busy at work on some of the lesser-known aspects of the new health care law.

89. Slower US Growth Might Lead Fed to Delay Tapering -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy may not be strong enough for the Federal Reserve to slow its bond purchases later this year.

That's the takeaway from economists after the government cut its estimate Wednesday of growth in the January-March quarter to a 1.8 percent annual rate, sharply below its previous estimate of a 2.4 percent rate. The main reason: Consumers spent less than previously thought.

90. Some Reasons Why (Not) to Take the Money and Run -

The most exhilarating, stressful, satisfying, frustrating, rewarding and anxious event for an entrepreneur is raising capital to fund his business. Statistics show that less than a third of startups actually receive funding. With these odds, why would anyone ever turn down money?

91. Optimism Returns to Industrial Market -

Following the bloody recession and its brutal aftermath, one word has begun to creep back into the local industrial real estate lexicon: optimism.

“I wouldn’t say we’re out of the woods yet but there’s a bunch of positive momentum out there,” said Jim Mercer, executive vice president of brokerage services at CB Richard Ellis Memphis. “People are cautiously optimistic.

92. Screwpulp Aims to Make Publishing Simpler -

With a name like Screwpulp, it’s not hard to figure out how the founders of the startup feel about the current state of the publishing industry.

Screwpulp is one of six companies participating in Seed Hatchery, a tech-focused business accelerator for high-growth companies that wraps up its third season this month. Richard Billings is the founder of Screwpulp, which he and his team have built to help writers do an end run around traditional publishing outlets.

93. IRS Apologizes for Targeting Tea Party Groups -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Internal Revenue Service apologized Friday for what it acknowledged was "inappropriate" targeting of conservative political groups during the 2012 election to see if they were violating their tax-exempt status.

94. Apostrophe Yes or No? -

Henry Chu of the Los Angeles Times reported in late March that “To grammarians’ delight, officials in southwest England who had considered expunging apostrophes from street signs threw out the idea … and vowed to follow the rules of proper English.” Ha! Good luck with that!

95. Fitzhugh: Legislature Fixing Things Not Broken -

As the state legislature moves toward completion, state Rep. Craig Fitzhugh, D-Ripley, offers his assessment:

96. Selling Homes Becomes ‘Forever Job’ for Dacus -

Ashley Dacus got started as a Realtor in the worst possible economic climate, but with residential sales beginning to show signs of life, her optimism has been renewed.

97. Signs of Life -

Home sales activity picked up in the first quarter of this year across the Mid-South, and brokers believe the market recovery is gaining traction.

Shelby County home sales rose 6 percent during the first quarter, with 3,382 sales from January to March compared to 3,179 during the first quarter of 2012, according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, www.chandlerreports.com.

98. Welfare Penalty for Parents Dead This Session -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The sponsor of a proposal to dock the welfare payments of parents whose children fail school refused to listen to a little girl opposing the measure Thursday, saying she was being used as a prop.

99. The Means to be Mean -

PIECE OF CAKE. Lately, and this is disturbing, I’ve been thinking about Sen. Brian Kelsey, R-Germantown, as Marie Antoinette, complete with a powdered wig and a cute little stick-on beauty mark, running up and down the halls inviting the poor to eat cake when they run out of bread. But these are not the halls of her Petit Trianon in Versailles at the time of the French Revolution. These are the halls of the state capitol in Nashville at the time of the super majority.

100. Panera Trying New Pay-What-You-Want Experiment -

ST. LOUIS (AP) – Order a bowl of turkey chili at a St. Louis-area Panera Bread cafe and it'll cost you a penny. Or $5. Or $100. In other words, whatever you decide.

Three years after launching the first of five pay-what-you-want cafes, the suburban St. Louis-based chain on Wednesday quietly began its latest charitable venture that takes the concept on a trial run to all 48 cafes in the St. Louis region.