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Editorial Results (free)

1. Metro Nashville’s Local-Hire Rule Gets Battered On Many Fronts -

The ink wasn’t dry on standards for Metro Nashville’s local-hire charter amendment when new Mayor Megan Barry put the measure on hold – despite sizable support in the August election.

2. Redshirting: Waiting an Extra Year to Start Kindergarten Has Its Risks -

Mary-Michael and Joe Horowitz know their son Armour, 5, can handle the academics of kindergarten. But instead of pushing him through to meet state age cutoff standards, they decided to delay his start until next year when he is older and emotionally ready.

3. Vote on Loosening Emissions Testing Awaits Tenn. Lawmakers -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee lawmakers are set to vote on loosening vehicle emissions testing requirements as soon as they return in January, undeterred by Volkswagen's recent admission that it had been gaming the tests already in place.

4. All Men’s Day Of Prayer Is Saturday -

The Memphis District Laymen are calling all men of faith to gather and pray for Memphis during the third annual All Men’s Day of Prayer.

The 2015 theme is “A State of Emergency Exists.” Several city officials and community leaders will address the men of Memphis and how they can help individually and collectively.

5. Young Energy Could Boost Veteran Grizzlies -

Of the 15 Grizzlies players on guaranteed contracts, four are entering their second season in the NBA and one is a rookie.

While all of those players currently reside outside the team’s regular rotation, the four second-year players have a chance to carve out a niche for themselves; rookie forward Jarell Martin fractured his foot in a summer workout and his development figures to be delayed.

6. Grizzlies Bites: October 2-8 -

FedExForum Increases Security for Grizzlies Games: Walk-through magnetometers (metal detectors) have been installed at all entrances to FedExForum, and will be standard practice for entering fans starting with the Memphis Grizzlies’ first preseason game Tuesday, Oct. 6, vs. the Houston Rockets.

7. Veteran Grizzlies Working Hard to Prevent Injuries -

Just before the Grizzlies departed for California and the start of their preseason training camp this week, point guard Mike Conley explained why he was going to continue wearing that mask. You know, the one he made famous with his superhero performance in Game 2 of the Western Conference semifinals when the Grizzlies beat the Golden State Warriors on their home floor.

8. Bass, Berry & Sims Launches Nonprofit Practice Group -

The nonprofit sector represents a sizable chunk of the Memphis-area economy – some 8 percent of total employment, with almost 45,000 jobs.

That’s according to former Tennessee Attorney General Bob Cooper, citing figures from the Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence to explain why the law firm Cooper is back practicing with, Bass, Berry & Sims PLC, has started a practice group focused on nonprofits. Cooper has been tapped to lead that group, following his service as the state’s attorney general from 2006 to 2014.

9. Resurrection Health's Donlon: Expanding Primary Care is Paramount -

Expanding a base of primary physician care – in Memphis and elsewhere – is increasingly seen as a compelling answer to fixing some of the things that are broken about health care.

Yes, money continues to flow to the industry’s high-dollar fringes. Innovations and breakthroughs lead to expensive new technologies, which come with big price tags and costs that get passed down to the end user. And who can blame medical students, who’ve gone through very expensive medical school, for choosing to specialize in a specific corner of medicine that certainly pays a lot more than a primary care doctor’s salary?

10. Helping Hand -

On the first morning of his group’s visit to a hospital in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, as part of a medical mission trip, fourth year Campbell Clinic resident Dr. Eric Bowman was taken aback by the patients’ response.

11. Public Outcry Kills Tennessee Bill to Charge for Public Records -

People of every political stripe across Tennessee are rising in protest to legislation allowing government to charge fees for inspection of public records.

Fisk University student Justin Jones said such a financial imposition would place an “undue burden” on his fellow collegians seeking information from public records as part of research papers and other assignments.

12. Memphis Mayoral Contenders Talk Public Transit -

The four major contenders for Memphis mayor all favor keeping the Mid-South Coliseum in some form and a Memphis Zoo parking garage.

But the positions were limited to yes-or-no answers during the Memphis Rotary Club debate Tuesday, Sept. 22, among Mayor A C Wharton and challengers Harold Collins, Jim Strickland and Mike Williams.

13. New Deputy Memphis AD Mark Alnutt Has Power Five Aspirations -

Looking back, Mark Alnutt always was an inside guy.

As a kid, this wasn’t by choice. His asthma was so bad that flare-ups would have him spending several days in hospital oxygen tents.

Not until he was in the sixth grade, when inhalers were readily available, did Alnutt get to play little league football.

14. Thursday Game a Big One for Memphis Brand -

It’s not an accident that the University of Memphis and University of Cincinnati are playing each other on ESPN’s Thursday night game this week.

When the game went on the schedule for 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 24, at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium, it was with the knowledge that the teams had shared the American Athletic Conference title in 2014.

15. Clinton Adds Details to Plans on Prescription Drug Costs -

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Vowing to build upon President Barack Obama's signature health law, Hillary Rodham Clinton is unveiling a sweeping plan to hold down the rising cost of prescription drugs and target pharmaceutical companies that flood the airwaves with ads.

16. Memphis Poised to Become Regional Anchor for Entrepreneurs -

A federal agency’s attention to Memphis’ entrepreneurial ecosystem could bring stronger investment and resources for startups.

On Friday, Sept. 18, Memphis was the kick-off site of the Delta Challenge pitch competition, a six-city tour organized by federal-state partnership Delta Regional Authority to identify and support exceptional startups.

17. Southaven Debates Solutions to Declining Property -

SOUTHAVEN, Miss. (AP) — Southaven is wrestling with how to address blighted property, and answers aren't coming easily.

After more than 30 minutes of debate, aldermen last week tabled consideration of a proposed maintenance code offered by Mayor Darren Musselwhite and city staff. They agreed to further discussion on dealing with deteriorating residential properties, although two aldermen — Kristian Kelly and Raymond Flores — wanted a vote on the plan suggested by Musselwhite during a special meeting Sept. 4.

18. The Field -

The most competitive race for Memphis mayor in 24 years is in the hands of Memphis voters who will determine whether it will be as close as recent polls suggest it could be.

Early voting in advance of the Oct. 8 election day opened Friday, Sept. 18, with all 13 Memphis City Council seats on the ballot as well as the race for the City Court Clerk’s office.

19. Developers Threaten to Pull Out of Mall of Memphis Site -

Developers of the former Mall of Memphis site were again delayed as the board of the Economic Development Growth Engine tabled a vote on a payment-in-lieu-of-taxes benefit for the speculative industrial site.

20. Don’t View Sunday’s Opener as Mariota vs. Winston -

Don’t think for a minute that the schedule makers at the NFL office didn’t set this one up.

It is more than coincidence that Marcus Mariota opens his professional football career against fellow rookie Jameis Winston when the Titans face the Tampa Bay Buccaneers on Sunday.

21. Small-Business Tips: Research, Network and Have Cash -

Small business ideas – dreams, if you will – take time. To create, to develop, to implement and to sustain.

Until recently, Jennifer McCullough’s entrepreneurial dream was just starting to heat up. She had not yet become the successful seafood brand now known as Chef Jenn that spans 18 products in about 1,200 mostly Kroger and Wal-Mart stores.

22. Events -

New Ballet Ensemble & School will present “FreeFall” Friday and Saturday, Sept. 11-12, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, Sept. 13, at 2:30 p.m. at Hattiloo Theatre, 37 S. Cooper St. The performance showcases eclectic dance pieces, collaboratively performed by students and the ensemble. All performances are pay-what-you-can. Visit newballet.org for tickets.

23. Fuente, Tigers Now Nitpick Imperfections as Winning Continues -

As season openers go, it had just about everything: a big crowd, with more than 41,000 showing up at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium; spirited tailgating on Tiger Lane; and really cool replica rings given out to the first 3,500 fans in celebration of the team’s 10-win season, share of the American Athletic Conference title and victory in the Miami Beach Bowl.

24. Wharton, Strickland Roll Out Anti-Crime Platforms -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton and challenger Jim Strickland rolled out anti-crime platforms Wednesday, Sept. 9, that signal a shift in the Memphis mayoral race after months of bickering over whether the city’s crime rate is up or down.

25. Health Care Suffers As Rural Hospitals Continue Slow Fade -

Fayette County is the latest victim of hospital closings in Tennessee as many rural health care facilities continue to struggle financially.

Methodist Healthcare-Fayette Hospital closed in late March, bringing to four the number of shuttered hospitals in West Tennessee after Gibson General, Humboldt General and Haywood Park Community called it quits in 2014.

26. Books from Birth Surpasses 4 Million-Book Mark -

For adults, mail isn’t very exciting. It’s typically a bill or insurance statement. Maybe it’s a catalog or coupon booklet. But for kids, mail has a different connotation.

Maybe it’s a birthday invitation or a postcard from a well-traveled relative. And for 100,000 children so far in Shelby County, it comes every month in the form of a new book.

27. Tennessee Revenue Department to Offer Free Tax Workshops -

The Tennessee Department of Revenue will host a series of free tax workshops for new Tennessee businesses.

The workshops – to be held in Chattanooga, Johnson City, Knoxville, Memphis and Nashville – will take place from Sept. 9 to Sept. 16.

28. Record-Setting Freshman Class Settles in at UT Knoxville -

Murfreesboro’s Madison Underwood, 18, admits the University of Tennessee-Knoxville was not her first choice after graduating Siegel High School this spring.

But it soon became a serious contender – and ultimate winner – thanks to a combination of value, community and programming.

29. Memphis Representative -

4,880 MILES MORE SOUTHERN. There he was again. Nora and I were watching a show about historic homes in Memphis on WKNO and when they paused to pitch for support, he was one of the volunteers manning the phone bank behind those pitching.

30. Trezevant Hires Resident Services Head -

Kimberly O’Donnell has joined Trezevant as director of resident services. In her new position, she will be responsible for managing a variety of programs and functions while serving as liaison to the residential community.

31. Events -

Networking in Memphis will hold its fifth-year celebration, hosted by The Bar-Kays, on Tuesday, Aug. 25, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at 300 Art Gallery, 300 S. Main St. Admission is $10; all proceeds go to the Memphis Entrepreneurship Academy. Tickets sold online only. Visit networkinginmem.com.

32. Cloverleaf Shopping Center Sells in $4.8 Million Deal -

5071, 5079 and 5150 Summer Ave.
761 N. White Station Road
Memphis, TN 38122

33. The Remarkable Life of Dr. Richard Briggs -

Richard Briggs is recognized in East Tennessee as a respected heart and lung surgeon, a one-time county commissioner and most recently an elected state senator, the Republican who defeated Stacey Campfield in 2014, ending his rather colorful tenure in the General Assembly.

34. New Tennessee Law: No Auto Insurance, No Vehicle Registration -

DYERSBURG, Tenn. (AP) – Though it's been mandatory for 40 years, Tennessee automobile liability insurance requirements will soon become much more enforceable. It's then when the "James Lee Atwood Jr. Law" will take effect forcing all Tennessee county court clerks to confirm insurance compliance before issuing new vehicle registration tags.

35. Hooker Fights for Right to Die on His Terms -

John Jay Hooker, a household name in Middle Tennessee if nowhere else, is suffering from stage 4 metastatic cancer with weeks, not months to live.

36. Ardent to Host Two Days of Recording Sessions -

Ardent Studios is preparing to host “16 Over 48,” a series of 16, two-hour recording sessions over 48 hours Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 15-16.

The way it works: 16 Memphis bands will bring their instruments and voices to record in Ardent’s renovated Studio C. Ardent will have everything the artists need to make a professionally produced recording, including a backline of drums, guitar and bass amps, bass, piano and organ, all set and ready to track through a new state-of-the-art SSL Duality console.

37. Real Deal -

They were tossing around numbers, trying to guess the win total for the 2015 University of Memphis football season.

In the not-too-distant past, the two Highland Hundred members and longtime season-ticket holders might have been able to add their guesses together and still come up short of the six victories needed for their favorite team to be bowl-eligible.

38. Ardent to Host Two Days Of Recording Sessions -

Ardent Studios is preparing to host “16 Over 48,” a series of 16, two-hour recording sessions over 48 hours Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 15-16.

The way it works: 16 Memphis bands will bring their instruments and voices to record in Ardent’s renovated Studio C. Ardent will have everything the artists need to make a professionally produced recording, including a backline of drums, guitar and bass amps, bass, piano and organ, all set and ready to track through a new state-of-the-art SSL Duality console.

39. When Should You Resolicit? -

When is the right time to solicit a gift from a current donor? Do you send a letter once a year and hope for a gift? That’s one strategy.

Some nonprofits believe it is a good one. Their logic: “We don’t want our donors to feel we’re always asking for a gift.” Here’s our guidance: Begin the solicitation process when you say “thank you.”

40. Joe Cooper Case Raises Questions About County Election Commission Discretion -

The definitive ballot for the Oct. 8 Memphis election was a bit late because of a challenge by city council contender Joe Cooper.

41. Best Hotel Rooms in Nashville – With or Without Helicopter -

Tod Roadarmel, director of sales and marketing for the nearly 2-year-old Omni Hotel downtown, is awestruck by the vitality of Nashville’s hospitality industry. In town since 1988, he remembers when pre-Bridgestone Arena Broadway was not a place you’d want to be late at night.

42. Bikesmith Ready to Roll Into First Brick-and-Mortar Store -

Memphis’ traveling bike repairman has finally found a home. A year and a half after enrolling in the Mayor’s Innovation Delivery Team initiative MEMMobile, Jim Steffen, known as The Bikesmith to cyclists needing an adjustment or a hail-Mary overhaul, has signed a lease on a brick-and-mortar extension of his mobile repair truck.

43. Legal Heat -

A utility vehicle loaded with gear, ladders and lift buckets just isn’t complete without a large water cooler strapped to the rear, especially in the hot Memphis summer.

But the coolers, and other every day sights like wet towels draped under a worker’s hardhat or a crew taking a mandatory break in the shade, are the best evidence of workplace planning that meets a legal standard.

44. Memphis Picked to Win AAC West Division -

In a poll of media members who cover the American Athletic Conference, the University of Memphis football team was picked to edge out both Houston and Navy to win the American Athletic Conference West Division.

45. Ramsey Clear in Push to Politicize Supreme Court -

Republican Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey has a penchant for igniting flames of partisanship, and the retirement of Tennessee Supreme Court Justice Gary Wade is no exception.

46. Moving Slowly, Growing Quickly -

Time was, crossing Lower Broadway safely only meant dodging woozy country music fans, speeding cabs and the occasional errant tour bus.

They’re all still there, but they’ve been joined by a wide and growing variety of small-motor or human-powered vehicles shuttling residents and tourists in and around downtown Nashville.

47. Unlikely Path -

It all started on whim. Cassius Cash was on his way to band practice at the University of Arkansas when he decided to practice his interview skills instead.

“Someone informed me the (U.S.) Forest Service was doing recruitment, but I had no intention of going in there and landing the internship,” says Cash of that interview for a wildlife biologist internship. “I thought the interview was about as far as I was going to go to chase my dreams.”

48. Director of Tennessee Food Program Resigns, Criticizes Leadership -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The director of an $80 million food program for impoverished children has resigned following a story in The Tennessean reporting at least $1.8 million in questionable spending last year by contractors.

49. Haunted History, A Story Retold -

WORRY ABOUT THE DOGS. Depending on who’s talking and when, history around Fort Pillow changes.

At the time of this story – one I shared first in a 2013 column – it was called the Cold Creek Correctional Facility, a minimum-security operation farming about 6,000 acres in Lauderdale County. Next it was called the Fort Pillow Prison and Farm, next door to something called the West Tennessee High Security Facility, now the West Tennessee State Penitentiary.

50. Cooking Companies -

One indication of the pervasiveness of an area’s startup culture is arguably the presence of incubators and accelerators focused on a variety of narrow purposes.

It’s why the Memphis area is home to plenty of such organizations focused on tech startups, social startups, medical device startups and startups led by women. And it’s why a kitchen incubator in West Memphis that launched in recent weeks is focused on startups in the food industry.

51. County Term-Limit Changes Proposed -

Just as the ballot was set for the October Memphis elections last week, some politicos were laying the groundwork for the 2016 election season in Shelby County.

That foundation includes two proposed amendments that would undo two Shelby County government charter amendments approved by voters in 2008.

52. New Daisy Renovation Signals New Era for Historic Building -

With a national partner found in Live Nation Entertainment, the New Daisy Theater is getting all dolled up to host nearly 200 musical acts annually.

The job doesn't just call for a new coat of paint to cover the decades of graffiti: the historic theater at 330 Beale is getting a complete overhaul.

53. Tennessee Among 7 States Getting Extended NCLB Waiver -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee is among seven states that have received extended No Child Left Behind waivers.

The education law expired in 2007, though its mandates remained in place.

54. Gov. Walker Shuns Trump's Presidential Primary Attention -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker said Wednesday that he's not worried about the attention Donald Trump is getting in his bid for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination.

55. Charles Hughes to Head Rhodes’ Memphis Center -

Dr. Charles L. Hughes has been named director of Rhodes College’s Memphis Center, an academic hub focused on the human experience of the Memphis and Mid-South region. He will be teaching classes on Memphis history and culture, coordinating student projects and developing programs, and also will be continuing his own research on the area.

56. Tennessee, Georgia Tech To Meet in 2017 Kickoff Game -

Tennessee and Georgia Tech will open their 2017 seasons by facing each other Sept. 4 in the Chick-fil-A Kickoff Game in Atlanta.

Their prime-time matchup was announced Monday.

The Georgia Tech-Tennessee meeting is expected to be one of the first college games to take place at the new home stadium of the NFL’s Atlanta Falcons, which is set to open in 2017.

57. Digital Diaspora -

The ubiquitous connectivity that permeates today's workplace is having a profound effect on company cultures, most notably in the digitally-fueled diaspora unfolding in which employees can work from just about anywhere.

58. New Park, New Affiliation Deliver for Nashville Sounds -

Engagement. Wedding. Honeymoon. That pretty much describes the past year for general manager Garry Arthur and the Class AAA Sounds, who are proudly flashing a sparkling new diamond just north of downtown Nashville.

59. Vols, Titans Fight to Fill Empty Stadium Seats -

When it comes to giving the consumer what it wants, few sports programs can match University of Tennessee football.

Neyland Stadium, which 40 years ago could accommodate only 70,000 fans, has swelled to a capacity of 102,455, fifth largest in college football. It has a $4 million, 4,580-square-foot Jumbotron, W-Fi connections for fans and enough flashing lights around the stadium’s interior to shame the Las Vegas Strip.

60. SEC is Better With Steve Spurrier in It -

HOOVER, Ala. – If you’re a Tennessee fan, you don’t like him. He was the one who said you can’t spell Citrus without “U-T.”

He started his record-setting 23rd appearance as a coach at the 2015 SEC Media Days by zinging the Vols for their 7-6 season, saying they were “celebrating big” while casting South Carolina’s 7-6 season as a disaster averted.

61. Auburn Picked to Win SEC Championship -

HOOVER, Ala. – Only once in the previous six years did the media correctly pick the Southeastern Conference champion in the annual voting that is part of SEC Media Days. That was last year, when media accurately projected Alabama as conference champion.

62. Memphis Filing Deadline Features Last-Minute Shifts, Intrigue -

The decision Tuesday, July 14, by a sixth Memphis City Council member to pass up a place on the Oct. 8 ballot has added some intrigue on the way to the noon Thursday, July 16, filing deadline for the Memphis elections.

63. Madeline Patterson Joins Burson Campaigns -

Madeline Patterson has joined the Memphis office of Burson Campaigns, the corporate issues management unit of Burson-Marsteller, as a vice president. In her new role, Patterson will work with Burson clients on issues and crisis management, communications strategy, and integrated marketing and communications campaigns.

64. State Audit Uncovers Millions in Questionable Spending -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – An audit of the Tennessee Department of Human Services found a lack of oversight led to at least $1.8 million in questionable spending last year from contractors operating programs to feed the needy. In 2013, the questioned costs were $4.3 million. And that is just in the small sample of agencies auditors reviewed.

65. Tennessee Promise Students Head to 'Academic Boot Camp' -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Hundreds of Tennessee Promise students across the state are beginning an inaugural three-week "academic boot camp" to help them overcome some of the challenges that officials say are typically faced by first-generation college students.

66. With Data Breaches, Bad News Can Show Up Well Down the Road -

NEW YORK (AP) – The revelation that the data breach at the U.S. government's personnel office was actually much worse than the government originally thought is following a familiar script.

67. Want to Get Into Knoxville-Area Showbiz? Here’s How -

“Chasing the fun” keeps Jaime Hemsley, founder and owner of Gage Models and Talent Agency, in high gear to find her clients opportunities in the entertainment business.

“There’s lots of different ways to get involved in the industry,” she says, adding that her clients work both locally and nationally. Her agency recently booked a client with a TV reality dating show. Gage is headquartered in Knoxville but has clients throughout the southeast and works with agencies in New York and Los Angeles.

68. Wild Side -

No chance of being attacked by a hippo, which despite its size can outrun a man and is responsible for more human deaths in Africa than any other large animal.

No chance of being caught between the powerful jaws of a Nile crocodile and dragged underwater, drowned and devoured like a wildebeest in a National Geographic video.

69. Muslims Blast Handling of Tennessee Mosque Attack Plan Case -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Muslim groups say a judge's decision to release from federal custody a Tennessee man accused in court records of planning an attack on a mosque in New York state represents a double standard and should be revisited.

70. House Scraps Vote on Confederate Flag in Federal Cemeteries -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Republican-controlled House scrapped a vote on permitting the Confederate flag at Park Service-run cemeteries – including four in Tennessee – on Thursday, a retreat under fire that only escalated a ferocious attack by Democrats complaining the banner celebrates a murderous, racist past.

71. Back-to-School Fair Planned in Whitehaven Saturday -

The Academy for Youth Empowerment, along with business leaders and community organizations, are sponsoring the 15th annual Back to School Health Fair and Family Festival on Saturday, July 11.

The annual health fair is a public event where medical professionals offer various free services for both children and adults, including immunization shots, preschool physicals, dental screening, eye exams, blood pressure checks and HIV testing, among others.

72. Insure Tennessee Path Still Facing Many Turns -

There’s a move in Nashville for a special session of the Tennessee General Assembly, but it would have nothing to do with the February special session on Gov. Bill Haslam’s Insure Tennessee proposal.

73. Gasol to Sign Max Contract, Udrih to Return to Grizzlies -

Big Spain is staying in the Bluff City.

Marc Gasol ended his free agency by agreeing to a new contract with the Memphis Grizzlies, according to ESPN’s Marc Stein. The five-year dealis valued at $110 million.

74. Memphis City Council to Vote on Forrest Statue Removal -

[Update: Adds specifics of City Council's proposal on Nathan Bedford Forrest. The council will vote on the Forrest statue removal today.] With the city budget season done, Memphis City Council members turn their attention Tuesday, July 7, to development in the Pinch district, the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest and redrawing council district lines.

75. A Zoo With a View Toward Conservation -

Two western lowland gorilla babies were born at the Knoxville Zoo in June. Around the same time, a rare snake and an equally rare piglike little thing made their debuts, as well.

Few things are cuter than baby animals, and they can be quite a draw when the public can view them.

76. Building Boom Strains Labor Pool, Supply Chain -

Middle Tennessee’s red-hot construction boom is becoming a victim of its own success. Architects, contractors and everyone in between, including Metro Codes, are up to their necks in work.

It’s a happy time of an industry that also can see long, slow periods of stagnation.

77. Shelby Farms Greenline Gardens Gets Makeover -

The Greenline Gardens at Shelby Farms Park – the centerpiece of a handful of park programs including the Farm-to-Fork Fellowship and the Greenline Garden Club Workshop series – has been given a long-overdue makeover.

78. Trade Schools Have to Find Grads Jobs, or Lose Financial Aid -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Exotic dancers hired as admissions counselors. Recruiters told to seek out "impatient" individuals who have "few people in their lives who care about them." Military personnel still recovering from brain damage told to sign on the dotted line.

79. Grizzlies Rookies Jarell Martin, Andrew Harrison Have Much to Prove -

The bottom-line question about Memphis Grizzlies rookies Jarell Martin and Andrew Harrison is the same as after every other NBA Draft: What does the team really have in these guys?

80. Supreme Court Upholds Use of Controversial Execution Drug -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Trading sharp words, a deeply divided Supreme Court upheld the use of a controversial drug in lethal-injection executions Monday, even as two dissenting justices said for the first time they think it's "highly likely" the death penalty itself is unconstitutional.

81. Sea Isle Principal Prepares ‘The Island’ for New School Year -

Cardboard letters on the cinderblock wall just inside the entrance to Sea Isle Elementary School in East Memphis welcome students to “the island” – a much quieter place in these summer days but not a deserted island.

82. Baptist's Healing Hand -

Comprised of 14 hospitals and more than 4,000 affiliated physicians spanning three states, Baptist Memorial Health Care Corp. is obviously known as a place where patients can turn to address their physical health.

83. Wharton Proposes to Move Forrest Statue and Grave -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. is proposing to remove the statue of Confederate General, slave trader and Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard Nathan Bedford Forrest from the park formerly named in his honor.

84. Supreme Court Upholds Nationwide Health Care Law Subsidies -

The Supreme Court on Thursday upheld the nationwide tax subsidies under President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, in a ruling that preserves health insurance for millions of Americans.

85. Haslam Needs to Back Up Call for More Local Control -

If Gov. Bill Haslam is trying to build political capital, he’s making the right move by trying to light a fire under local officials.

He might also want to turn up the flame on his own game.

86. ‘If It’s on His Mind, You’re Going to Know It’ -

The state legislature’s vote this year to make the Bible the official book of Tennessee raised eyebrows among believers and nonbelievers statewide.

Although the bill passed the House of Representatives, it was tabled by the Senate following questions about its constitutionality and opposition from the governor, other elected officials and community leaders statewide.

87. Climate Change as Faith Issue a Tough Sell -

It’s been a tough few years for Tennessee Interfaith Power and Light. The state affiliate of a national network of faith communities, the organization offers its members a spiritual way to respond to climate change issues and challenges from political and other sources.

88. Building Green in a Red-Hot Market -

Counting cranes has become a Nashville pastime, and the perks of all that development are clear – a robust economy, vibrant real estate market and more jobs.

Naturally, there is concern among some residents that all of the construction and increased population could harm the area’s environment, water and air quality and green space.

89. The Irish in Us -

BOOM. HERE’S TO THE IRISH. Recently, Ireland became the first country in the world to legalize same-sex marriage by popular vote. Ireland. Stereotypically, a country where conservative is a matter of degree not choice, where killing each other over religion isn’t current news but DNA, where progress is measured in pints.

90. Garibaldi's Temptations Club Celebrates its 1980s Run -

Mike Garibaldi is known for his Memphis restaurant chain, Garibaldi's Pizza.

At the original Garibaldi’s, near the University of Memphis, is a picture on the wall of a smiling waitress in her 50s.

91. Feds Charge Joe Armstrong With Fraud, Tax Evasion -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Democratic state Rep. Joe Armstrong of Knoxville has been indicted on federal fraud and tax evasion charges connected to an increase in the state's cigarette tax in 2007.

92. Federal Appeals Court Asked to Throw Out TennCare Case -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee is asking a federal appeals court to throw out a class-action lawsuit that claims the state left thousands of TennCare applicants in indefinite limbo, with their applications neither approved nor rejected.

93. LeMoyne-Owen Change Latest for Memphis Higher Ed -

Andrea Miller is the latest of three new higher education leaders in Memphis in just more than a year.

94. Awards Spotlight Knoxville's Top Achievers -

The depth and strength of the Knoxville area business community was highlighted recently with the Knoxville Chamber’s 11th annual Pinnacle Business Awards presentation.

A dry cleaner, government contractor, clothing designer, technology innovator and media executive were among the Knoxville area companies and business leaders recognized for their achievements.

95. IRS Taking Steps to Combat Taxpayers' Identity Theft -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The IRS is joining with state and private industry to combat identity theft by sharing more data about how tax returns are filed and taking other steps, officials announced Thursday. The effort is aimed at stemming a problem that has victimized thousands of taxpayers and cost the government billions of dollars from fraudulent returns.

96. Overbey Has No Regrets for Sponsoring Insure Tennessee -

Republican Sen. Doug Overbey took the road less traveled this year when he sponsored Insure Tennessee at the request of Gov. Bill Haslam.

Despite the legislation’s failure in special and regular sessions, he has no regrets and looks forward to continuing the fight in 2016 for a market-based plan to obtain roughly $1 billion annually through the Affordable Care Act to provide coverage to some 280,000 Tennesseans who are caught in a gap between TennCare and the federal plan.

97. Haslam Calls on Locals to Influence 'Changing Legislature' -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam on Tuesday issued an appeal to officials from Tennessee cities and towns to help influence what he described as a "changing" state Legislature less concerned with the interests of traditional institutions.

98. Collierville Commits -

Right after the Collierville Board of Mayor and Aldermen voted Monday, June 8, to raise the town’s property tax rate by 20 cents, a flash of lightning flared outside the town hall chamber’s windows.

99. Finding SoCal Vibe in Carlsbad -

The Carlsbad experience is as simple as waking up one morning to enjoy a run along scenic California Highway 1 as surfers ride their bikes to the beach to catch a few waves before work in nearby San Diego.

100. The Soul of Memphis -

What if there was one place that could give a meaningful identity to a new generation of Memphians, preserve the sacred story of Memphis’ social and musical history and communicate the city’s soul to the rest of the world?