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Editorial Results (free)

1. Haslam Says Common Core a Standard, Not Ideology -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam said the Tennessee legislature’s discussion and coming vote about the state’s public education standards is “critically important.”

And while Haslam has said several times that the term for those existing standards – Common Core – has become too politically charged to continue to be used, he added last week in Memphis that the standards under review are “very specific academic oriented standards.”

2. Paragon Bank Closes the Book on Busy 2014 -

Paragon Bank has closed the book on 2014, an active year for the bank with milestones that included, among other things adding a wealth solutions team, executing new leases for two banking centers and forming a small business capital group.

3. Brooks Plea Coda to Political Whirlwind -

It could have gone either way for Henri Brooks at just about this time a year ago. The Shelby County Commissioner had plans to continue a nearly 20-year political arc beyond a political track record that included seven terms in the state House and the two-term limit on the Shelby County Commission.

4. European Cruise Giant Viking Plans Mississippi River Tours -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) – European river cruise giant Viking, already gaining a high profile in the United States with its sponsorship of popular PBS television shows, announced Tuesday that it will make New Orleans its first North American home port for Mississippi River cruises expected to begin by late 2017.

5. 2015 Financial Markets Off to Converse Start From 2014 -

The first two months of the calendar year can present an intriguing opportunity to examine the state of the financial markets, as fourth quarter earning’s season is basically complete. Let’s take a look first at the broad equity markets, starting with a 2014 review:

6. Attorneys Recall Role of Law in Events of 1968 -

David Caywood still remembers the memorandum of understanding that almost settled the 1968 sanitation workers strike before Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination.

7. Williams Says Mayoral Bid Based On Change -

Saying there is a pulse in the city for change, Memphis Police Association President Mike Williams announced Monday, Feb. 23, he will run for Memphis mayor in the October city elections.

8. City Requests Fairgrounds Review by ULI Experts -

The upcoming review of the Fairgrounds redevelopment concept by a group of Urban Land Institute experts will move quickly and could be a political wild card.

The city’s request last week for a review by Urban Land Institute’s Advisory Services goes to a part of the planning and land use nonprofit that has been specializing in such political hot potatoes since 1948.

9. Relevant Again? 10 Keys to Success for UT Baseball -

KNOXVILLE – Tennessee baseball coach Dave Serrano wasn’t pushing the panic button after his team lost two of three games in their season opening series at Florida International University in Miami last weekend.

10. City Wants Urban Land Institute to Review of Fairgrounds -

City Housing and Community Development Director Robert Lipscomb wants the Urban Land Institute to “review, evaluate and issue recommendations” on the Wharton administration’s Fairgrounds redevelopment plan after leading a set of public hearings and discussions that would take place over a five-day period.

11. Facing Militant Threat, Corker Shoulders Matters of War -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Two years ago, Sen. Bob Corker wondered aloud whether the standstill Senate was worth a grown man's time.

Now the combination of Republicans' political fortunes in last November's elections and brutal terrorism overseas have put the two-term Tennessee lawmaker in the limelight. He heads the Foreign Relations Committee and is in charge of the weightiest question to ever face members of Congress: whether to authorize war.

12. Attorney General: Constitutionality of Abortion Laws Unclear -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – An advisory opinion by the Tennessee attorney general's office says it's not clear that abortion restrictions struck down by the state Supreme Court 14 years ago would be upheld today, despite a change to the state constitution.

13. Tennessee Lawmaker Operated Hog Farm Without Proper Permits -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Republican lawmaker from northwestern Tennessee operated his hog farm without proper state permits, and an inspector said he was discouraged by upper management from enforcing violations.

14. Cassius Cash Begins Job as New Superintendent of Smokies -

GATLINBURG, Tenn. (AP) – Growing up in Memphis, the son of a homicide detective and a cosmetologist, Cassius Cash didn't dream of one day being the superintendent of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

15. Knoxville Mayor Orders Sunshine Law Training -

An East Tennessee mayor has ordered more training for those appointed to city boards after she found possible violations of the state’s sunshine laws.

The move stems from a public records request by the Knoxville News Sentinel in relation to a proposed $9 million digital radio system being discussed by the Knox County E-911 Board of Directors. The newspaper reports the city gave it copies of emails on Thursday that show some board members discussed the contract in private.

16. One Team, Two Coaches: Grizzlies A Product of Hollins-Joerger -

Lionel Hollins’ departure from the Grizzlies was awkward, messy, ill-timed and could have been the start of a very disheartening chapter in franchise history.

“It could have been a train wreck, honestly,” point guard Mike Conley said.

17. Beyond Gaming -

Nearly 60 years ago – even before the Hernando DeSoto Bridge was built across the Mississippi River – Southland Park opened with greyhound dog racing in West Memphis.

Since then it has become Southland Park Gaming and Racing with gambling on horse races simulcast from Oaklawn as well as slot machines and table games.

18. 2-Year College Presidents Back Tennessee Academic Standards -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The presidents of Tennessee's 13 community colleges say the state's higher academic standards for elementary and secondary schools are necessary to help students succeed in higher education.

19. Balancing Campaign and Small Business on Vitter's Agenda -

NEW YORK (AP) – The new chairman of the Senate Committee on Small Business & Entrepreneurship has big issues on his agenda, but he'll have to fit them in with a high-profile gubernatorial campaign.

20. Haslam: "No Regrets" on Insure Tennessee, Problems Still Exist -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam opened his State of the State address Monday, Feb. 9, where the special legislative session on Insure Tennessee ended last week – the defeat in committee of his Medicaid expansion proposal.

21. Haslam: "No Regrets" on Insure Tennessee, Problems Still Exist -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam opened his State of the State address Monday, Feb. 9, where the special legislative session on Insure Tennessee ended last week – the defeat in committee of his Medicaid expansion proposal.

22. Local Elections Ramp Up With Gumbo Fest -

There were so many contenders for the District 5 seat on the Memphis City Council at the Sunday, Feb. 8, Tennessee Equality Project Gumbo Contest that they occasionally went for the same voter’s hand in the crowd of several hundred.

23. Family Entertainment Chain Coming to Memphis -

Main Event Entertainment is bringing its “Eat. Bowl. Play.” experience to Memphis with a 50,056-square-foot entertainment center and restaurant at Appling Road and Interstate 40.

The Dallas-based family entertainment chain bills itself as “the fastest-growing family entertainment chain in America.”

24. Wharton Not Giving Up on Fairgrounds Plan -

Nashville is a more turbulent place than usual these days, especially Capitol Hill. So Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and his administration probably won’t tempt the turbulence there by taking their plan for a Tourism Development Zone to finance a Mid-South Fairgrounds renovation to the Tennessee Building Commission later this month.

25. More Tax Incentive Changes Likely -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell made the argument last week in his State of the County speech that local economic development and economic recovery is not the singular pursuit of jobs.

26. ‘Government’s Too Big and People are Sick of It’ -

Knox County Mayor Tim Burchett is an enigma of the modern civil servant, a career politician who doesn’t seem to take himself too seriously. He thinks he’s paid too much (his salary is state mandated) and brings it up often in interviews with the media.

27. Nashville’s Most Romantic Restaurants -

Romance means something different for everyone, but most people can agree that if there is low lighting, soft music, a charming companion and something delicious to eat, you’ve already got the makings of one outstanding evening.

28. Flying High -

Young visitors to the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library will soon find themselves on cloud nine.

Make that Cloud901.

That’s the new name for a state-of-the-art teen learning lab under development at the library, for which more than $1.6 million already has been raised. The lab will be packed with cutting-edge technology and space for creative potential to flourish once it’s complete.

29. FCC Chairman Proposes Regulating Internet Like Phone Service -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Declaring that the Internet must not be taken over by big business interests, a top U.S. regulator on Wednesday proposed dramatically expanding the government's power to oversee Internet service providers and establishing new rules that would prohibit companies from blocking or slowing data.

30. Council Gives Third Look at Beale Street Authority -

For a third consecutive session, Memphis City Council members are scheduled to vote Tuesday, Feb. 3, on establishing a Beale Street Tourism Development Authority.

The resolution establishing the authority to oversee and further develop the entertainment district was delayed two weeks ago as some council members, led by Harold Collins and Wanda Halbert, talked about the council approving actions of the development authority.

31. Task Force to Examine Tennessee Sentencing Laws -

A task force formed by Gov. Bill Haslam was scheduled to meet Thursday in Nashville to examine Tennessee’s sentencing structure and examine ways to reduce the state’s high recidivism rate.

32. Wharton Administration No Show At Fairgrounds Forum -

No one from the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. showed up Wednesday, Jan. 28, for a public forum on Wharton’s still-developing plan for the redevelopment of the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

33. Wharton Defends, Touts Record at State of the City -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. defended and touted Thursday, Jan. 29, his administration’s pursuit of the economic development projects that his challengers in the October city elections will likely use to make their case.

34. Grizz Atop Southwest Division Despite Challenges -

Playing without starting point guard Mike Conley (left wrist sprain) and swingman Tony Allen (left ankle sprain), the Grizzlies pounded the Mavericks 109-90 Tuesday night, Jan. 27, in Dallas and perhaps delivered a message to the rest of the Western Conference:

35. Questions Still Surround Future of Arkansas Medicaid Plan -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – While Gov. Asa Hutchinson has made it clear he wants to keep Arkansas' compromise Medicaid expansion in place through the end of next year, what's less certain is what happens after that for the thousands receiving health coverage through the program.

36. Haslam on Statewide Tour to Tout Insure Tennessee -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says he isn’t counting votes in the Tennessee legislature just yet for his Insure Tennessee Medicaid expansion proposal.

At least he’s not counting hard votes for the upcoming Feb. 2 special legislative session as he holds a series of nine public forums across the state.

37. Justices Debate Judicial Candidates' Campaign Appeals -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court's conservative and liberal justices clashed Tuesday over campaign finance restrictions in a dispute involving candidates for elected state and local judgeships.

38. Medicare Chief Steps Down, Ran Health Care Rollout -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Medicare's top administrator unexpectedly resigned Friday, becoming the latest casualty in the turmoil over the president's health care law, which is still struggling for acceptance even as millions benefit from expanded coverage.

39. Opponents of Big River Steel Mill Defend Suit Against Plant -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – Opponents of a new steel mill under construction in eastern Arkansas argued in a court hearing Friday that they didn't forfeit their right to sue to stop the plant just because the state had already issued a permit.

40. Library Foundation Plans Teen Lab Groundbreaking -

The Memphis Library Foundation has announced it will break ground for its teen lab space in early February.

The foundation has reached its first fundraising benchmark of $1.9 million for the state-of-the-art teen learning lab, where young people will have a chance to pursue their interest in technology with audio and video production equipment, a sound mixing lab, an art studio, performance stage, creation stations, a gaming zone, a 3-D printer and more.

41. Hitting the Accelerator -

Five years after the Great Recession rocked the nation and nearly destroyed auto manufacturing in Tennessee, the Midstate’s industry is booming again.

Nissan’s growth is no small part of that, largely because of the company’s confidence in the state of Tennessee and Gov. Bill Haslam, according to José Muñoz, executive vice president of Nissan Motor Co. and chairman of Nissan North America, which is headquartered in Franklin.

42. Library Foundation Plans Teen Lab Groundbreaking -

The Memphis Library Foundation has announced it will break ground for its teen lab space in early February.

The foundation has reached its first fundraising benchmark of $1.9 million for the state-of-the-art teen learning lab, where young people will have a chance to pursue their interest in technology with audio and video production equipment, a sound mixing lab, an art studio, performance stage, creation stations, a gaming zone, a 3-D printer and more.

43. A Better Sports Village Than We Knew -

When the historic 2014 University of Memphis football season was just getting started, hope and doubt were still equally matched opponents.

The athletic department, as we all know now, had gone with a risky slogan: “Wait Til This Year.”

44. Tentative Deal Limits Role of Beale Street Development Corp. -

In the beginning of the redevelopment of Beale Street, city leaders of the late 1970s put in place the Beale Street Development Corp. in a role they saw as a cultural guardian of the district between Fourth and Second streets.

45. Strickland In Mayor's Race, Wharton Responds -

After months of speculation, Memphis City Council member Jim Strickland confirmed Thursday, Jan. 15, he is in the 2015 race for Memphis mayor.

46. Morris: Public Transit Tops Downtown Goals -

A stronger and more vital public transportation presence in Downtown and a plan for development of land south of Central Station are two priorities of the Downtown Memphis Commission for the coming year.

47. Haslam Names Panel to Recommend Judicial Candidates -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam has named the members of an 11-person council to recommend candidates to fill judicial vacancies in Tennessee.

Fellow Republicans in the Legislature had allowed a previous version of the panel to expire before voters in November ratified a constitutional amendment to keep in place the state's current judicial selection system in which the governor fills vacancies on appeals courts and justices and judges then stand for yes-no retention votes.

48. Southwind Annexation Moves Past Two New Judges -

Chancellor Oscar Carr has been on the bench in Chancery Court four months and he’s already had the kind of case his judicial colleagues warned him about at his formal swearing-in ceremony last week.

49. Coalition Announces Effort to Preserve Nashville's Music Row -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Fresh off their successful effort to prevent the demolition of a Nashville studio that once recorded the likes of Elvis Presley, Willie Nelson and Waylon Jennings, advocates want to include all of the city's Music Row area in their preservation efforts.

50. I Choose Memphis: Gene Baker -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Gene Baker

51. Commercial Success -

If, as the saying goes, everyone gets 15 minutes of fame, Bart Durham’s has come in 15- and 30-second spurts – the length of the commercials that depict him as a lawyer everyman, ever-ready to tilt at windmills for the sake of justice for the working class.

52. UT Medical School Looking at Expansion -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The University of Tennessee Health Science Center says it is looking at expanding its program in Nashville.

The Tennessean reports UTHSC Chancellor Steve J. Schwab said in a statement that the institution, which is based in Memphis, is eyeing "a major construction project" that would bring allow it to attract more medical students to Middle Tennessee.

53. County Commissioners to Discuss Medicaid Expansion -

In their first committee sessions of 2015, Shelby County Commissioners will discuss Wednesday, Jan. 7, the impact the proposed Insure Tennessee program will have on Regional One Health, Memphis’ public hospital.

54. Wharton Indicates Greensward Parking Possible -

A New Year’s eve letter from Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. indicates that when spring crowds begin to reach parking capacity in Overton Park, the park’s greensward will be used for overflow automobile parking at the Memphis Zoo.

55. Miss. Agriculture Values Projected to Top $7.7B -

The overall projected totals for Mississippi's crop values should top $7 billion for the third straight year, experts say, despite low prices for some goods.

John Michael Riley, agricultural economist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said his preliminary estimate of 2014 is over $7.7 billion. Final figures will be available in May.

56. Miss. Agriculture Values Set to Top $7.7 Billion -

The overall projected totals for Mississippi’s crop values should top $7 billion for the third straight year, experts say, despite low prices for some goods.

John Michael Riley, agricultural economist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said his preliminary estimate of 2014 is over $7.7 billion. Final figures will be available in May.

57. Events -

Memphis Zoo hosts the final night of SunTrust Zoo Lights Tuesday, Dec. 30, from 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. at the zoo, 2000 Prentiss Place. Visitors can enjoy free rides through Zoo Lights on a tram, children’s activities, live reindeer, animal encounters and more. Cost is $6 for members and $8 for nonmembers. Visit memphiszoo.org.

58. Market Square, Old City Vie for Knoxville Revelers -

Christmas wrapping packed away? Check. 2014 all but in the books? Check. Resolutions for 2015 made? Maybe. Check. Making plans for New Year’s Eve? Check. Check.

New Year’s Eve revelers have choices of how they want to ring in 2015 while celebrating a successful – or at least completed – 2014. There’s no time yet for making resolutions when two of the year’s biggest parties are about to blast Knoxville with noisemakers and fireworks.

59. Events -

Hard Rock Cafe Memphis will host the seventh annual Hard Rock Guitar Drop Wednesday, Dec. 31, from 6:30 p.m. to Thursday, Jan. 1, at 2 a.m. at Hard Rock, 126 Beale St. The event will feature live music inside and outside the cafe, including a headline performance by The Bar-Kays. General admission is $20. Visit hardrock.com/memphis for more information.

60. Memphis Resolutions -

The end of the year hastens a season of resolutions about the year ahead, resolutions about what to include on the blank canvas of a new year.

No matter who you are, the road to 2015 starts at the same place – through the experience of 2014. With that in mind, we surveyed many of the people we’ve covered in these pages in the last year to talk about the possibilities ahead.

61. Unions Make Push to Recruit Protected Immigrants -

CHICAGO (AP) – Unions across the U.S. are reaching out to immigrants affected by President Barack Obama's recent executive action, hoping to expand their dwindling ranks by recruiting millions of workers who entered the U.S. illegally.

62. Events -

The 56th AutoZone Liberty Bowl, featuring the Texas A&M Aggies and the West Virginia Mountaineers, will be held Monday, Dec. 29, at 1 p.m. at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium, 335 S. Hollywood St. Big & Rich will perform at halftime. Buy tickets at autozonelibertybowl.org.

63. Addressing the Post Office -

“Dear Judge Vic, I am writing about the U.S. Postal Service. My wife and me send several things each month to the same address in a major city in another state. To the home of our kids. A house we’ve stayed at. A place with a porch, where the mail guy leaves packages. A few weeks ago, we sent a box with some presents in it.

64. Pitts-Murdock Leading Library’s Teen Services -

R. Janae Pitts-Murdock has been named coordinator of teen services for the Memphis Public Library and Information Center, a role in which she’s responsible for coordinating teen programs, partnerships and special initiatives across 18 locations.

65. Lane Closures Halted on Tennessee Roads for Holidays -

The state Transportation Department is halting all lane closures on interstates and state highways over the holidays.

According to a news release, the department expects 2 million drivers of Tennessee roadways over Christmas and New Year.

66. Knoxville Area a Magnet for Retirees -

Retired air traffic controller Sterling King moved to Knoxville when his brother needed him. Five years later, he has fallen in love with the area and everything it has to offer.

Moderate weather, without the bone-chilling Northern winters or the searing heat of Florida summers, is a big draw, along with its location in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains, says King, 58, who migrated from Dayton, Ohio, to Raleigh, North Carolina, and then to Knoxville.

67. More Veterans Calling Middle Tennessee Home -

When Scott Ledermann, a military health care recruiter in Nashville, retired from the Army in October, it didn’t take him long to land a job with a local company.

Nashville-based HCA Healthcare, a company that has made hiring veterans a priority, scooped him up in no time. Now, he’s working in human relations at the company’s operations center in Donelson.

68. Evolving Identity -

Some of the most telling views of Memphis are the ones many of us see for only seconds at a time as we drive on viaducts that take us and our cars just above the treetops and rooftops of older neighborhoods interrupted by the roadways.

69. Troubled Youth Center Making Improvements -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A troubled Middle Tennessee youth detention center has increased security and is making changes to its behavior-modification program in hopes of preventing future rioting and escapes, officials said Thursday.

70. Nearly 500 to Lose Jobs in Shelby County -

Nearly 500 employees in Shelby County will lose their jobs by next June, including 210 at Cargill Inc. and 84 at Delta Airlines, according to the state Department of Labor and Workforce Development.

71. High Court to Decide on Secrecy of Execution Team -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Tennessee Supreme Court will hear arguments Thursday in a legal challenge from death row inmates that has already postponed two scheduled executions.

Eleven inmates have sued the state over its lethal injection and electrocution procedures, claiming they are unconstitutional.

72. Health Leaders: Improvement Possible -

Tennessee’s place in the 2014 America’s Health Rankings makes one thing very clear: There’s a lot of room for improvement.

Tennessee ranked 42nd among all states in the annual analysis of the health of the nation conducted by UnitedHealth Foundation.

73. Haslam Addresses Public Safety Summit -

While there's been progress in making Tennessee a safer state, much remains to be done, particularly on domestic violence, Gov. Bill Haslam said Monday.

The Republican governor kicked off a public safety summit in Nashville that also focused on Tennessee's sentencing laws, homeland security concerns, drug abuse and trafficking and other issues.

74. Stars Flock to Music City’s Ernest Tubb Record Shop -

When Bob Dylan drops by, he generally goes right for “a handful” of Hank and Carter Family recordings, although on one Lower Broadway afternoon the old man from the North Country also is reported to have purchased a “Larry the Cable Guy” DVD.

75. Old Friends Conspire to Get Tennessee a Better Bowl -

For all the tough times University of Tennessee football has endured in recent years, a turn for the better was bound to happen.

It certainly did early this week.

UT’s invitation to the Gator Bowl in Jacksonville – now called the TaxSlayer Bowl – was a stunning coup for a 6-6 team that seemed destined for anything but a January bowl on the beach.

76. Community Hospitals Becoming Endangered Species -

The state of Mississippi has 110 hospitals and three-fourths of them are, as you might expect, in rural areas.

“And 56 of them have fewer than 50 beds,” said Mendal Kemp, director of the Center for Rural Health at the Mississippi Hospital Association.

77. Fuente, Players Win Conference Honors -

University of Memphis head coach Justin Fuente was named the American Athletic Conference’s 2014 Coach of the Year and senior linebacker Tank Jakes and sophomore place-kicker Jake Elliott earned post-season honors.

78. Fuente, Players Win Conference Honors -

University of Memphis head coach Justin Fuente was named the American Athletic Conference’s 2014 Coach of the Year and senior linebacker Tank Jakes and sophomore place-kicker Jake Elliott earned post-season honors.

79. Haslam Addresses Public Safety Summit -

While there's been progress in making Tennessee a safer state, much remains to be done, particularly on domestic violence, Gov. Bill Haslam said Monday.

The Republican governor kicked off a public safety summit in Nashville that also focused on Tennessee's sentencing laws, homeland security concerns, drug abuse and trafficking and other issues.

80. Memphis Protests Channel Outrage, History -

The mantra was steady in the courtyard of the National Civil Rights Museum last week as a group of 70 people lay on the cold bricks near the balcony where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated.

81. Festive Drinks and Fun Venues -

A number of new places opened in Nashville this year, bringing a bevy of new bourbons, crafted brews and incredible places to sit, relax and sip. If you are looking for more than a meal and want that genuine, trendy Nashville experience, here are a few hot spots.

82. Average Affordable Care Premiums Going Up in 2015 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Many people covered under President Barack Obama's health care law will face higher premiums next year, the administration acknowledged Thursday. While the average increases are modest, it's more fodder for the nation's political battles over health care.

83. Playoff Committee Plays Political Football -

Just to be sure I hadn’t lost my mind, I checked the NFL standings. In every division, the team – or teams – with the best record occupied first place. I found this amazing.

And I’m not even an alum of Baylor or Florida State.

84. Graceland Plan Highlights Blurred Lines in Financing -

There are private funds and public funds. And when a private project has the potential to up the tax revenue taken in by local and state governments, that money enters a middle ground between the two.

85. Craft Beer Boom -

Looking to replace that regular beer with something more exotic? Get hoppy and explore Knoxville’s craft-beer scene, because by bottle and tap, growler and flight, the national beer movement has come to East Tennessee in a very substantial way.

86. EDGE Approves Graceland Taxing District -

A special taxing district to help pay for a massive redevelopment of the sprawling Graceland campus is one step closer to reality.

The board of the city-county Economic Development Growth Engine approved Tuesday, Nov. 25, the creation of a Tax Increment Financing, or TIF, district around Graceland, one of the city's most visited attractions and powerful economic engines.

87. Mid-South Grows in Popularity for Retirees -

Florida or bust?

Not necessarily, not anymore.

Retirees coming from the Midwest and Northeast are realizing they have other options, and increasingly they are acting on them. Several Mid-South states have developed formal recruitment programs with the hope of luring out-of-state retirees – new money, in economic development parlance.

88. After-School Programs Give Youth Educational Boost -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – As Tennessee strives to stay at the forefront of student academic improvement, some education advocates say the hours after the last bell rings could be crucial to maintaining that edge.

89. New FDA Rules Will Put Calorie Counts on Menus -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Whether they want to or not, consumers will soon know how many calories they are eating when ordering off the menu at chain restaurants, picking up prepared foods at supermarkets and even eating a tub of popcorn at the movie theater.

90. More Questions Than Answers -

In the aftermath of the Memphis Tigers’ season-opening loss to Wichita State, new information has come to light:

For starters, junior point guard Kedren Johnson, who transferred from Vanderbilt to run the Memphis offense, has told coach Josh Pastner he’ll be in basketball shape by the Bradley game (that’s Dec. 6) or a little bit later.

91. Rogero Talks ‘Smart Growth,’ Democratic Politics -

Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero became the first woman to hold that office when she won the election in 2011.

She’s been actively involved in a number of local issues since her election, from urban-core revitalization and business recruitment to broader social issues such as marriage equality.

92. After the Campaign -

The 2014 election year began in January with dissent from the floor.

At the end of the Shelby County Democratic Party’s annual Kennedy Day fundraiser in January, former Memphis City Council member and state Rep. Carol Chumney, who was not among the speakers, challenged the party establishment from her table to do more to support women running for office.

93. Patients Before Profit -

When Hillary Clinton visited St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital 20 years ago to dedicate the then new patient care center, she was the first lady.

Clinton – the former first lady, U.S. senator and secretary of state – was back at St. Jude on Thursday, Nov. 20, to attend the dedication of the hospital’s Marlo Thomas Center for Global Education and Collaboration.

94. If You Don’t Come Across … -

Ten years ago this month, as I was immersing myself into the nuances of cruciverbalism – the art of writing crosswords – these lines came to me:

“If you don’t come across, I’m gonna be down/Your love to me is a mystery and the clues are all around.” (I know, that’s songwriting, not puzzle-writing, but stay with me on this.)

95. Shelby County Commissioners Agree to Drop Lawsuit -

Voices were raised and gavels were used to rule people and motions out of order. Motives were questioned and potential conflicts of interest were cited.

But Shelby County commissioners appeared Monday, Nov. 17, to have a compromise in place that will lead to the lawsuit filed by seven commissioners against chairman Justin Ford being dropped as early as Tuesday, Nov. 18.

96. Commission Compromise Promises to End Rules Lawsuit -

Shelby County commissioners appeared Monday, Nov. 17, to have a compromise in place that will lead to the lawsuit filed by seven commissioners against chairman Justin Ford being dropped as early as Tuesday.

97. County Commission to Consider Fairgrounds Deal -

The idea of reconfiguring the Mid-South Fairgrounds as a public recreation area financed by the city of Memphis with sales tax revenue from retail development has come back to life under new terms.

98. Lottery Champion Cohen Not Pleased With Haslam's ‘Game-Changer’ -

To say Congressman Steve Cohen is unenthusiastic about the Tennessee Promise is an understatement.

99. Keeping Promises -

With more than 50,000 high school seniors applying for free community college tuition and fees through Gov. Bill Haslam’s Tennessee Promise, it’s reasonable to wonder if Tennessee’s community colleges have the infrastructure – including classroom space and instructors – to handle such an influx of new students.

100. New Look -

A new season brings optimism – or marketing, if you want to be cynical about it – but also some reflective truth-telling.

Go back to this time last year for the University of Memphis basketball team. They were going to be really good, or maybe even great, because of the four senior guards. Those guards – Joe Jackson, Chris Crawford, Geron Johnson and Michael Dixon – were going to be leaders, defensive dynamos and 3-point sharpshooters.