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Editorial Results (free)

1. Tennessee Recidivism Among Key Topics During Hearings -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The chairman of a legislative panel examining criminal justice reform in Tennessee says he will share information from hearings this week with a special task force the governor has appointed.

2. Justices to Announce New Attorney General on Monday -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee Supreme Court justices plan to announce their choice for the next state attorney general on Monday.

According to a news release issued Thursday, the announcement will take place at 11 a.m. in the courtroom at the Supreme Court Building in Nashville.

3. Unintended Consequences: ER Visits Increase -

Hospital officials have been pushing for the state to expand Medicaid health care coverage for thousands of Tennessee’s poorest citizens, despite two significant and related concerns:

Expansion will lead to increased visits to the most expensive place in America for routine health care, the emergency room.

4. Coverage Gap Leaves Rural Tennessee Hospitals on Life Support -

Four rural hospitals have closed and dozens are at risk of shuttering: That’s the fallout, some say, from Gov. Bill Haslam’s decision not to join the Affordable Care Act in 2013 and tap into millions in promised federal funds for Tennessee’s financially-strapped health care institutions.

5. Education Secretary Calls for System-Wide Reforms -

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan saw much that he liked in Memphis Wednesday, Sept. 10, at the end of his three-day “back to school” bus tour of schools in three states.

The last stop was Cornerstone Prep Elementary School in Binghampton.

6. Authors, Readers Converge for Book Festival -

Earlier this year, interest in the first Mid-South Book Festival, scheduled to take place later this month, began to reach what seemed like a fever pitch, according to Literacy Mid-South executive director Kevin Dean.

7. Duncan Bus Tour Ends With Binghampton Kudos -

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan wrapped up a three-day “back to school” bus tour of schools in several states Wednesday, Sept. 10, at Cornerstone Prep Elementary School in Binghampton.

8. ‘Love Mob’ Responds to Poplar Plaza Attack -

The amount of traffic that comes through the intersection of Highland Street and Poplar Avenue has made it a favorite of causes through the years – from war protestors and advocates to those on both sides of the death penalty, and, more recently, city employees upset over benefit changes.

9. Governor Gets Report on Tennessee Juvenile Jails -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A security audit will be performed on all three of the state's youth development centers after a recent breakout and violence at the facility in Middle Tennessee, according to a preliminary report sent to the governor.

10. Democrats Choose State Senate Nominee -

When Shelby County Democratic Party leaders gather Monday, Sept. 8, to pick their party’s nominee in the November special general election for state Senate District 30, it will also be an indication of how deep the wounds run from the party’s disastrous August election outing.

11. Safe House -

She talks about the bad old days easily now. That’s what years of steady sobriety will do. For the last three-plus years, Amy Phillips, 54, has worked as a program coordinator at Grace House of Memphis, a recovery program for women with alcohol and/or drug problems and, in many cases, co-occurring mental health disorders.

12. Focus on Teens ‘At Risk of Being Homeless’ -

Not only is Crossroads Campus a successful non-profit operation that’s building a bridge to help homeless animals and potentially homeless young people, it’s also a thriving retail business operation driven by the savvy of executive director Lisa Stetar and her staff.

13. Redbirds Prepare for Playoffs Appearance -

First-year Memphis Redbirds general manager Craig Unger grew up a St. Louis Cardinals fan and he spent the last five years working in the team’s front office. He even wears a huge World Series ring from the team’s 2011 championship.

14. Redbirds’ Easley, Scruggs Enjoy Stellar Season -

Oscar Taveras, Randal Grichuk and Stephen Piscotty. Those were the St. Louis Cardinals’ hot outfield prospects stashed in Memphis at season’s start.

Taveras and Grichuk have shuttled between the Cardinals and Redbirds and both are with the big club as the Redbirds’ regular season winds down. Piscotty has stayed with the Redbirds, but throughout the year Cardinals general John Mozeliak openly has talked about having playing time in St. Louis for Piscotty in the near future.

15. Vols Among NCAA’s Youngest Headed Into Sunday Opener -

KNOXVILLE – For better or worse, University of Tennessee football coach Butch Jones won’t need to wait long to see the talent level of his highly touted freshman class.

Jones will find out Sunday night at 7 when the Vols play host to Utah State at Neyland Stadium. The Aggies will be an underdog – probably by a touchdown or so – and a trendy pick for some as an upset special.

16. A More Earth-Friendly Burial Option Now Available -

When Dara Ashworth’s father died this spring after battling metastatic melanoma, she and her two sisters struggled with the best way to honor his life, his memory and his body.

Their father, Leonard Daniel Hamby, 64, a lab technician with the Tennessee Department of Health, didn’t have a specific plan, but the family knew enough about his wishes and knew that he didn’t want a traditional burial.

17. Embracing Cremation -

As business decisions go, this was a tricky one.

Jeff and Steve Murphy, owners of Music City Mortuary, opened their Nashville business in 2001, catering primarily to the needs of other funeral directors, providing transportation, embalming and preparation services, shipping – everything a mortuary business provides.

18. People Power -

Meg Crosby and her fellow principals at the HR-focused consulting firm PeopleCap chose that name for their organization because of the way they think about the modern workplace – particularly, the ever-changing nature of the employees who populate it.

19. Kirby, Wiseman Campaign for Judicial Selection -

Attorney Lang Wiseman says there will be no return to the days when Tennessee legislators had no direct role in who the governor appointed to be appellate court judges if an amendment to the Tennessee Constitution is defeated in November.

20. Longtime Tennessee Civil Rights Lawyer Dies at 86 -

NASHVILLE (AP) – George Barrett, a longtime Tennessee civil rights lawyer known for handling a case that ultimately desegregated the state's public colleges and universities, has died. He was 86.

21. Cohen: Ferguson Police Could Have ‘Shot to Wound’ -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen said police in Ferguson, Mo., could have shot to wound instead of shot to kill Michael Brown in the fatal incident there this month that has prompted national and international reaction to a number of race-related issues beyond the shooting.

22. Appeals Panel Weighing Occupy Nashville Suit -

CINCINNATI (AP) – A special three-judge panel focused on issues of camping, protests, free speech and executive power on Monday during arguments in an appeal of a lawsuit brought by Occupy Nashville protesters arrested on War Memorial Plaza in October 2011.

23. Jackson Ruling Draws Line on Comments to Juries -

Prosecutors and defense attorneys sometimes get right up to the line that separates proper from improper when it comes to their closing statements to a jury during a trial.

The closing statements offer both sides some room in terms of their descriptions or overviews of the case with judges commonly reiterating that what attorneys on either side say there and in opening statements are to be considered evidence.

24. Mason: Vanderbilt Success More Than Defeating UT -

Coach Derek Mason is determined to put his own mark of toughness on the Vanderbilt University football program as it continues its climb into the ranks of conference heavyweights.

25. Vols: Looks Like 6-6 Season -

Pull out your 2014 schedules, UT fans.

Fall camp is done, and it’s time to get in game-week mode with the season opener against Utah State fast approaching.

So go to the little box next to each of UT’s opponents on the 2014 schedule and pick the winner.

26. Kaaa-BOOM! -

This Labor Day weekend, hundreds of Knoxvillians will be working harder than ever so hundreds of thousands can kick back and relax.

Knoxville is hosting a huge street festival and one of the biggest fireworks shows in the country on Saturday, followed by the first UT game of the season on Sunday.

27. Belmont Welcomes Largest-Ever Freshman Class -

If you graduated from Belmont 20 years ago, you might not recognize the campus today.

Near ceaseless on-campus construction and a huge spike in enrollment has changed the once-sleepy little school into a major player in Nashville and in national collegiate circles.

28. E-Books Cut Costs for Tennessee State Students -

Tennessee State University students face higher costs, tacked on by state government, but that downer could be offset by “e-books” that can save students $735 each semester.

TSU is set to offer the electronic books to freshmen and sophomores for general education courses in an effort to lower the cost of traditional books, according to the university.

29. SEC’s New Quarterbacks Ready to Prove Themselves -

They are the SEC quarterbacks left behind. The quarterbacking gods, with names like Manziel, McCarron, Mettenberger and Murray – what is it about M’s? – have ascended to a higher place: playing on Sundays in the NFL.

30. Another Round -

Some time in October, lovers of local craft beers could enjoy a cold brew in a new tasting room at Memphis Made Brewing Co.’s facility in the Cooper-Young district.

31. Southwest’s Essex to Retire In 2015 -

The leader who guided the merger of the city’s two community colleges announced Tuesday, Aug. 19, that he will retire in June.

Nathan Essex became president of Shelby State Community College and State Technical Institute at Memphis in 2000 as the two institutions were merging to become Southwest Tennessee Community College.

32. Commission Ends Term with Residency Guidelines and School Board Pay Raises -

At the last meeting of their current four-year term of office, Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, Aug. 18, a specific set of guidelines for future commissions to weigh residency challenges of elected county officials.

33. Council Reviews Pension Investment Changes -

For the first time in months, Memphis City Council members have no committee discussions scheduled Tuesday, Aug. 19, on city health insurance benefits or proposed pension plan changes.

But the council will vote on the first in a series of pension plan changes to come.

34. 5 Tennessee Sites Added to National Register -

Five Tennessee sites, including one in Memphis, have been added to the National Register of Historic Places.

The registry is part of a nationwide program that coordinates and supports efforts to identify, evaluate and protect historic resources. The Tennessee Historical Commission administers the program in Tennessee.

35. Commission Reopens Anti-Discrimination Debate -

Six of the 13 Shelby County Commissioners attend their last meeting Monday, Aug. 18.

The finale of the four-year term of office will feature renewed discussion about a proposed anti-discrimination ordinance and attempts to make the residency requirement for county commissioners more specific.

36. Reshaping a City, One Lot at a Time -

John G. Brittle Jr. doesn’t have an office. He has a war room. The space, crowded with maps, charts, books, piles of paper and marked-up spreadsheets, is ground zero for InfillNashville, the 10-person team of site selection specialists that Brittle leads at Village Real Estate Services.

37. Bigger, Better, Louder -

“When it comes to college football, the South has no equal, because the Southeastern Conference has no equal. Find me a conference with a better commissioner, better players, better head coaches, better staffs, better game-day atmospheres, better-looking coeds – better anything.”

38. Local Leaders Work to Keep Cummins in Memphis -

Memphis and Shelby County are preparing to fight a border battle with Mississippi to keep hundreds of jobs inside the city.

The state of Mississippi is aggressively courting diesel engine manufacturer Cummins Inc. to move most of its Memphis operations south of the state line to DeSoto County, according to sources familiar with the effort.

39. Sentencing Changes Sought for Business Crimes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The federal panel that sets sentencing policy eased penalties this year for potentially tens of thousands of drug dealers. Now, defense lawyers and prisoner advocates are pushing for similar treatment for an arguably less-sympathetic category of defendants: swindlers, embezzlers, insider traders and other white-collar criminals.

40. Pinch District Could Lose Historic Designation -

The Pinch District, one of the city’s oldest commercial districts, could lose its designation on the National Register of Historic Places, a move that would jeopardize existing buildings but possibly make some new development easier.

41. Editorial: Economic Woes Pose Questions for Memphis -

It may be gone. But the recession sure took its time in departing after taking a heavy toll on economic development in Memphis. And some of us aren’t sure it has totally left the premises, especially in a city that is watching as other parts of the state are rebounding and recovering at a much quicker pace than Memphis.

42. Problem Property -

The city of Memphis and the Downtown Memphis Commission suffered a stinging setback this week in their quest to rid a key section of Main Street of a deteriorating eyesore, one that has survived multiple attempts to be sold and defied repeated orders to clean up.

43. Johnson to Lead Pink Palace Fundraising Efforts -

Cathi Johnson has joined the Pink Palace Family of Museums as director of development. In her new role, she’ll design, implement and manage the museum system’s fundraising efforts, including individual and corporate gifts and sponsorships, grant writing, capital funds and planned giving.

44. Utility to Pay Tennessee Coal Ash Victims $27.8 Million -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The nation's largest public utility has agreed to pay $27.8 million to settle claims from Tennessee property owners who suffered damages from a huge spill of toxin-laden coal ash sludge.

45. School’s In -

When public schools open Monday, Aug. 4, for the academic year across Shelby County, the merger of public education into one school system will give way to the demerger into seven separate public systems.

46. August 1-7: This week in Memphis history -

2013: Owners of the Nineteenth Century Club began preliminary demolition work on the Union Avenue mansion, which would later be stopped by court order.

1978: Shaun Cassidy at the Mid-South Coliseum.

47. End in Sight -

One more weekend of early voting and then it’s the four-day sprint to election day for candidates, their campaigns and the voters who didn’t vote during the early voting period.

Because of the length of the ballot – the longest of any election cycle in Shelby County political history – state election officials are encouraging voters who have made their decisions to vote early.

48. Suburban Precincts Lead in Early Vote Turnout -

Seven of the top 10 precincts for early voter turnout through this past weekend and the first of two weeks of early voting in Shelby County are in the suburbs.

Through Monday, July 28, a total of 43,725 citizens had voted early in Shelby County, which is 8.1 percent of the voters in Shelby County. The highest turnout by day so far since early voting opened July 18 was 7,038 on July 22.

49. Events -

B.I.G. for Memphis, a business interest group that connects Memphis Police colonels and business leaders, will meet Wednesday, July 30, from 9:45 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Phelps Security, 4932 Park Ave. Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell will present the State of the County. Visit phelpssecurity.com.

50. School Year Brings New Lessons for Teachers -

When the school year begins on Aug. 4 for Shelby County Schools and the six suburban public school systems, the learning process will begin not only for students but for teachers.

As the larger system-wide changes of the demerger have played out, teachers across the county have been preparing for the world inside classrooms that always offers change at the beginning of a new school year.

51. Signs, Space Occupy Final Weeks of Elections -

In the closing weeks of the summer campaign to the Aug. 7 election day, the political struggle has come to the place all hard-fought campaigns ultimately come at this point – signs and space.

52. Democratic Sample Ballot Omits Some Names -

Not every candidate who claimed the Democratic nomination in the May county primaries is on the Shelby County Democratic Party’s endorsement ballot that hits the streets this week.

With early voting underway in advance of the Aug. 7 election day, the sample ballot does not include Juvenile Court clerk candidate Henri Brooks, Circuit Court clerk nominee Rhonda Banks, Probate Court clerk candidate William Chism and County Clerk nominee Charlotte Draper.

53. Supreme Court Justices Make Campaign Push -

Among the candidates going door to door in Memphis this summer looking for votes was a Tennessee Supreme Court justice.

Sharon Lee, one of three justices seeking re-election in the yes-no retention races on the August ballot, campaigned Saturday, July 19, in Hickory Hill.

54. Dueling Rulings: Courts Split on Health Law Clash -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama's health care law is snarled in another big legal battle, with two federal appeals courts issuing contradictory rulings on a key financing issue within hours of each other Tuesday.

55. Tennessee Gets High Marks in Child Welfare Report -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The latest national ranking of the well-being of children shows Tennessee is among five states that made the biggest improvement in the last year.

The Kids Count Data Book, an annual report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation, grades states on education, health care and poverty.

56. Beale Street Landing Looks Beyond Early Curiosity -

The Riverfront Development Corp. is filling in a calendar of events at the newly opened Beale Street Landing that stretches into the fall and demonstrates the role of programming in holding the larger public’s interest beyond those coming to the landing now out of curiosity.

57. Mississippi Jobless Rate Rises to Worst in Nation -

Mississippi registered the worst jobless rate in the nation in June, as unemployment rose in the state while improving elsewhere. The jobless rate rose to 7.9 percent in June as the number of jobless Mississippians rose back above 100,000.

58. Health Department Seeking Input on State Health Plan -

The Tennessee Department of Health is seeking public input on the State Health Plan.

The plan is required by state law and acts as the health department’s guide for protecting, promoting and improving the health of people in Tennessee.

59. County Commission Continues Prekindergarten Debate -

Shelby County Commissioners pick up Monday, July 21, where they left off earlier in the month about a way to fund prekindergarten programs.

The commission faces dueling resolutions, with one setting up further study on an expansion, and the other dedicating $3 million in surplus funds from the just-ended fiscal year and the first $3 million of any surplus from the current fiscal year to Shelby County Schools and the suburban school systems.

60. Wharton Ready to Shift Talk on Benefits Debate -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. is trying to turn the page on the emotional City Hall debate over cuts in health insurance benefits to city employees and retirees and also close the book on the city budget for the two-week old fiscal year.

61. No Crying in Vanderbilt Football, Not Anymore -

HOOVER, Ala. – Before James Franklin, Vanderbilt never had been to consecutive bowl games. He took them to three in three years.

62. SEC Media Days Notebook: July 16 -

HOOVER, Ala. – Although the first games involving Southeastern Conference football teams are not until Aug. 28, the league’s full-on blitz in promoting the new SEC Network has been going on for a while now.

63. Uber, Lyft Operating Despite Cease-and-Desist Notices -

Uber and Lyft continued to shuttle customers back and forth early this week, undaunted by the city’s decision last week to send the companies cease-and-desist letters.

A representative from Uber said the company had not received any notice from the city by Tuesday, July 15, and indicated the company has no intention of putting the brakes on the app-based service.

64. Juvenile Court Reform Moves to Child Welfare Cases -

For the last two years, much of the attention in Juvenile Court reforms has been on delinquent children who come to the court for their actions.

But this fall, the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges will begin an examination of its child welfare program – the reason that most children come to the court.

65. Uphill Climb -

Shelby County’s homebuilding industry is off to a slow start in 2014, with builders filing 16.6 percent fewer permits in the second quarter than in the same three-month period a year ago.

Builders filed 245 permits in Shelby County in the second quarter, compared with 294 permits in the second quarter of 2013, according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, www.chandlerreports.com. Builders filed 191 permits in the first quarter.

66. Welcoming Home Baby Boomers -

Part two of a two-part series. Talented leadership is always in high demand. The question is: Where do you look for leaders, who are you overlooking and how do you effectively sustain their involvement?

67. Wharton Courts Alternatives in Benefits Dispute -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. says any alternatives are welcome to the coming health insurance changes for city employees and retirees.

But delaying the roll out of those changes in January is not an option. And neither is reopening the city budget or the city property tax rate.

68. Changing Landscape -

It’s been confusing from a distance.

The formal groundbreaking for Shelby Farms Park’s $70 million “Heart of the Park” improvements, including an expansion of Patriot Lake, came the same week last month the Memphis City Council voted to delay for one year the city’s portion of funding for the Shelby Farms Parkway.

69. Riverfront Cornerstone -

Beale Street Landing seems an unlikely choice as a cornerstone, considering its troubled path to completion.

At this point, it’s almost a motto – not on time and over budget, and by a lot on both counts.

70. Archer-Malmo Hits Record-High Headcount -

In terms of its headcount, Memphis-based marketing communications agency archer-malmo is at a high-water mark.

The agency’s growth – in everything from its creative talent to its physical footprint and client roster – hasn’t slowed down this year. In the second quarter alone, for example, archer-malmo added seven new hires, bringing its employee roster to a record high of 160.

71. Checkered Progress on Disabled Care Despite Ruling -

Brent Kaderli has a wheelchair-accessible van waiting in the driveway, a hospital bed in a spare bedroom and an electric lift that's left unused. If the 30-year-old quadriplegic had his way, he'd be living here, in his father's house, with help from aides. Instead, he is in an institution, hoping each day for a place that feels more like a home.

72. Tunica Roadhouse Launches Free Concert Series -

Tunica Roadhouse Casino & Hotel has announced it is hosting a free concert series starting July 5.

The first show will feature the band Fuel, with a free fireworks show immediately after the concert. Additional concerts will take place Aug. 2 and Sept. 6, with the bands being announced the first week of July.

73. Editorial: Park Should Be Place to Unify Community -

There is something about an economic impact study of a 4,500-acre park that at first glance seems out of place.

But given the recent travels of Shelby Farms Park through our local political machinery, further proof of the park’s worth is still needed.

74. 'Get a Warrant' to Search Cellphones, Justices Say -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In an emphatic defense of privacy in the digital age, a unanimous Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that police generally may not search the cellphones of people they arrest without first getting search warrants.

75. Civil Rights Museum Sit-In Exhibit Goes Digital -

Raumesh Akbari remembers her first encounter with the sit-in exhibit at the National Civil Rights Museum.

As a sixth-grader, she had heard and read about the lunch counter sit-ins of the early 1960s. But like many visitors to the museum, she was too young to have encountered them herself.

76. Heart of Arlington -

When Sandy Brewer and her family moved more than eight years ago from Cordova to a turn-of-the-century home just two blocks from Arlington’s Depot Square, she said it felt like taking a step back in time.

77. Hopson Contract Extension Represents Reform Mandate -

Public school superintendents in Tennessee are not elected in a popular vote anymore. They are appointed by school boards – the only hiring decision school boards make.

So when the Shelby County Schools board voted 6-0 Monday, June 23, to extend the three-year contract of superintendent Dorsey Hopson through June 2018, it was a mandate by the board for the student achievement gains Hopson and the board have set as goals.

78. Ni Hao, Y'all: US Hinterlands Woo Chinese Firms -

PINE HILL, Ala. (AP) – Burdened with Alabama's highest unemployment rate, long abandoned by textile mills and furniture plants, Wilcox County desperately needs jobs.

They're coming, and from a most unlikely place: Henan Province, China, 7,600 miles away.

79. Accountability and Trust: Keys to Partnership -

Part two of a three-part series. Are you considering a private/public partnership to advance the work of your nonprofit? Learn from those who have already waded into the waters.

Cathy Davis, executive director of Bayview Hunters Point Multipurpose Senior Services, Inc. (BHPMSS) in California is a leader with experience.

80. New Health Chief Moves to Put Stamp on Overhaul -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Aiming to avoid more insurance chaos this fall, the nation's new health care chief announced Friday she's revamping the management of President Barack Obama's health overhaul.

81. Heart of Park Advances as Shelby Farms Parkway Stalls -

Within the space of a few days this month, the Shelby Farms Park Conservancy formally broke ground on the park’s $70 million Heart of the Park project and then its leaders watched as the Memphis City Council delayed the Shelby Farms Parkway project for a year.

82. Identity Theft and Social Media -

Ray’s take: You just logged into your online banking and your account is empty. You go to apply for a loan and are told you don’t qualify due to overextended credit. You file your tax return only to discover it has already been filed and your refund check issued and cashed. These are some of the very real things that have happened due to identity theft.

83. County Budget Season Not Over Yet -

The Shelby County Commission defeated two competing versions of the county property tax rate for the new fiscal year on the second of three readings Monday, June 16.

But they both advance to third and final readings when the commission meets in July.

84. Creating a Nonprofit Private-Public Partnership -

Part one of a three-part series. Private-public partnerships are promoted as a collaborative way to bring people and resources together across sectors.

A recent example is the development of senior housing in San Francisco, California’s Bayview Hunters Point community. We are proud to be affiliated with this project and have witnessed the many twists and turns it has taken over the years. We asked Cathy Davis, executive director of the Bayview Hunters Point Multipurpose Senior Services Inc. (BHPMSS), to share specifics of her partnership so you imagine what a partnership could look like for your organization or institution. Her story is specific to her community; your story will be specific to Memphis.

85. Cash Reflects on ‘Long Way Home’ -

As Graceland marks the anniversary of the death of Elvis Presley in August, another important artist from Sun Records will be remembered in Dyess, Ark.

The opening of Johnny Cash’s childhood home in Dyess as a museum is Aug. 16.

86. Wilkins Targets Cohen as ‘Career Politician’ -

Ricky Wilkins told a packed campaign headquarters in Poplar Plaza on a busy campaign weekend that U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen is waging a dirty campaign while complaining that Wilkins is doing the same.

87. Conduit Global Opens Call Center -

Civic and business leaders celebrated Conduit Global’s new call center with a ribbon-cutting ceremony Wednesday, June 11.

The $8 million call center and back-office support operation at 7000 Goodlett Farms Parkway will eventually employ 1,000 people, making it one of the largest local job creation projects in recent history.

88. Conduit Global Opens Call Center -

Civic and business leaders celebrated Conduit Global’s new call center with a ribbon-cutting ceremony Wednesday, June 11.

The $8 million call center and back-office support operation at 7000 Goodlett Farms Parkway will eventually employ 1,000 people, making it one of the largest local job creation projects in recent history.

89. Departing PDS Head Says Education Needs ‘Disruption’ -

The departing headmaster of Presbyterian Day School says American education needs more of a revolution than evolution.

Lee Burns is leaving the East Memphis private school to become head of school at the McCallie School in Chattanooga, Tenn., after 14 years in Memphis. He was the keynote speaker Wednesday, June 11, for the second day of the Martin Institute for Teaching Excellence’s two-day summer conference on the PDS campus.

90. Conduit Global Opens Call Center -

Civic and business leaders celebrated Conduit Global’s new call center Wednesday, June 11, with a ribbon-cutting ceremony.

The $8 million Conduit Global call center and back-office support operation at 7000 Goodlett Farms Parkway will eventually employ 1,000 people, making it one of the largest local job creation projects in recent history.

91. Tennessee Democrats Hire Abortion Amendment Staffer -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The Tennessee Democratic Party has hired a new staffer to work against a proposed constitutional amendment to give lawmakers more power to regulate abortion in the state.

92. Council Hears Tentative Plans for Office Building -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration would move the Memphis Police Department, information technology services and six city agencies renting offices on Union Avenue Extended into the Donnelley J. Hill office building if the city goes through with a plan to swap the office building with state government in exchange for parking spaces in the Peabody Place garage.

93. City Council Hears Tentative Plans for Office Building -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration would move the Memphis Police Department, information technology services and six city agencies renting offices on Union Avenue Extended into the Donnelley J. Hill office building if the city goes through with a plan to swap the office building with state government in exchange for parking spaces in the Peabody Place garage.

94. Plough Grant Requires All Rape Kits Be Tested -

Before they agreed to put up $750,000 toward funding the disposition of the city’s untested rape kit backlog, leaders of the Plough Foundation wanted assurances that the city would process every rape kit.

95. Commission to Vote on Budget, Tax Rate -

Shelby County Commissioners take final votes Monday, June 2, on a $1.1 billion operating budget and a $75 million capital budget for Shelby County government, and the first of three votes on a new property tax rate for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

96. Judge: East Tennessee City Can Change Name to Rocky Top -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A federal judge has given a former coal mining town in East Tennessee the go-ahead to change its name to Rocky Top – a move that developers have said is needed to entice them to build a massive tourist complex in the town of 1,800 people.

97. School Board Unveils Digital Devices -

Shelby County Schools board members got a look this week at the new digital devices students in 16 schools will get when the new academic year begins in August.

The first Lenovo Yoga and Yoga 11e convertible laptops to arrive were unwrapped before the board vote Tuesday, May 27, for the $5.4 million contract with Unistar-Sparco Computers Inc. to lease 13,000 devices for three years.

98. Administration Announces US Manufacturing Regions -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration on Wednesday named 12 regions of the country that will receive special attention under a new federal program designed to help make them more attractive to manufacturing companies looking for a place to set up operations, provide a boost to the U.S. manufacturing industry and create jobs.

99. Commission Prepares Final Budget Moves -

When Shelby County Commissioners make the last adjustments to the county budget in committee sessions Wednesday, May 28, they will likely increase the 2.5 percent pay raise county Mayor Mark Luttrell proposed for county employees to 3 percent.

100. Haslam Vetoes Reduction of Penalties for Pollution -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Republican Gov. Bill Haslam on Thursday vetoed a bill over what he called an unintended consequence of reducing the criminal penalties for pollution in Tennessee.

The bill sponsored by Sen. Stacey Campfield of Knoxville and fellow Republican Rep. Andy Holt of Dresden was aimed at penalizing retail vandalism by "flash mobs." It had passed the Senate 29-0 and the House 63-31.