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Editorial Results (free)

1. Craft Beer Boom -

Looking to replace that regular beer with something more exotic? Get hoppy and explore Knoxville’s craft-beer scene, because by bottle and tap, growler and flight, the national beer movement has come to East Tennessee in a very substantial way.

2. EDGE Approves Graceland Taxing District -

A special taxing district to help pay for a massive redevelopment of the sprawling Graceland campus is one step closer to reality.

The board of the city-county Economic Development Growth Engine approved Tuesday, Nov. 25, the creation of a Tax Increment Financing, or TIF, district around Graceland, one of the city's most visited attractions and powerful economic engines.

3. Mid-South Grows in Popularity for Retirees -

Florida or bust?

Not necessarily, not anymore.

Retirees coming from the Midwest and Northeast are realizing they have other options, and increasingly they are acting on them. Several Mid-South states have developed formal recruitment programs with the hope of luring out-of-state retirees – new money, in economic development parlance.

4. After-School Programs Give Youth Educational Boost -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – As Tennessee strives to stay at the forefront of student academic improvement, some education advocates say the hours after the last bell rings could be crucial to maintaining that edge.

5. New FDA Rules Will Put Calorie Counts on Menus -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Whether they want to or not, consumers will soon know how many calories they are eating when ordering off the menu at chain restaurants, picking up prepared foods at supermarkets and even eating a tub of popcorn at the movie theater.

6. More Questions Than Answers -

In the aftermath of the Memphis Tigers’ season-opening loss to Wichita State, new information has come to light:

For starters, junior point guard Kedren Johnson, who transferred from Vanderbilt to run the Memphis offense, has told coach Josh Pastner he’ll be in basketball shape by the Bradley game (that’s Dec. 6) or a little bit later.

7. Rogero Talks ‘Smart Growth,’ Democratic Politics -

Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero became the first woman to hold that office when she won the election in 2011.

She’s been actively involved in a number of local issues since her election, from urban-core revitalization and business recruitment to broader social issues such as marriage equality.

8. After the Campaign -

The 2014 election year began in January with dissent from the floor.

At the end of the Shelby County Democratic Party’s annual Kennedy Day fundraiser in January, former Memphis City Council member and state Rep. Carol Chumney, who was not among the speakers, challenged the party establishment from her table to do more to support women running for office.

9. Patients Before Profit -

When Hillary Clinton visited St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital 20 years ago to dedicate the then new patient care center, she was the first lady.

Clinton – the former first lady, U.S. senator and secretary of state – was back at St. Jude on Thursday, Nov. 20, to attend the dedication of the hospital’s Marlo Thomas Center for Global Education and Collaboration.

10. If You Don’t Come Across … -

Ten years ago this month, as I was immersing myself into the nuances of cruciverbalism – the art of writing crosswords – these lines came to me:

“If you don’t come across, I’m gonna be down/Your love to me is a mystery and the clues are all around.” (I know, that’s songwriting, not puzzle-writing, but stay with me on this.)

11. Shelby County Commissioners Agree to Drop Lawsuit -

Voices were raised and gavels were used to rule people and motions out of order. Motives were questioned and potential conflicts of interest were cited.

But Shelby County commissioners appeared Monday, Nov. 17, to have a compromise in place that will lead to the lawsuit filed by seven commissioners against chairman Justin Ford being dropped as early as Tuesday, Nov. 18.

12. Commission Compromise Promises to End Rules Lawsuit -

Shelby County commissioners appeared Monday, Nov. 17, to have a compromise in place that will lead to the lawsuit filed by seven commissioners against chairman Justin Ford being dropped as early as Tuesday.

13. County Commission to Consider Fairgrounds Deal -

The idea of reconfiguring the Mid-South Fairgrounds as a public recreation area financed by the city of Memphis with sales tax revenue from retail development has come back to life under new terms.

14. Lottery Champion Cohen Not Pleased With Haslam's ‘Game-Changer’ -

To say Congressman Steve Cohen is unenthusiastic about the Tennessee Promise is an understatement.

15. Keeping Promises -

With more than 50,000 high school seniors applying for free community college tuition and fees through Gov. Bill Haslam’s Tennessee Promise, it’s reasonable to wonder if Tennessee’s community colleges have the infrastructure – including classroom space and instructors – to handle such an influx of new students.

16. New Look -

A new season brings optimism – or marketing, if you want to be cynical about it – but also some reflective truth-telling.

Go back to this time last year for the University of Memphis basketball team. They were going to be really good, or maybe even great, because of the four senior guards. Those guards – Joe Jackson, Chris Crawford, Geron Johnson and Michael Dixon – were going to be leaders, defensive dynamos and 3-point sharpshooters.

17. Bowl-Eligible Tigers Look for More This Season -

It was just another score on the bottom-of-the-TV-screen scrawl: Memphis 16, Temple 13.

For most of the country, that’s all it was. If it came with any history, it was only the immediate history of Jake Elliott kicking the game-winning field goal. Or of the Tigers getting their sixth win, which knowledgeable college football fans understand is the magic number: six wins equals a bowl game.

18. Southaven Rises on Memphis’ Tide -

While our country's economy seems to be making a turn in the right direction, cost of living remains one of the top reasons that individuals and families choose to live where they do.

Recently, data from the Missouri Economic Research and Information Center and other resources, pulled from the first quarter in 2014, showed that the Mid-South ranked as the most affordable place to live, with Mississippi at No. 1 and Tennessee at No. 2.

19. Mississippi State’s Historic Season Continues -

No doubt, Mississippi State’s season turns on what happens next Saturday at Alabama. But for a moment, let us consider what the Bulldogs have done so far in running out to a 9-0 start, 5-0 in the SEC, and claiming the top spot in the national polls.

20. Thinking Independent -

The origin story, if it could be called that, for many of the shops and restaurants in the burgeoning Broad Avenue Arts District tends to start the same way.

Their future proprietors were in the area and just fell in love with it – the neighborhood, and sometimes a specific building. That’s the way it was for Lisa and Luis Toro, working to open the new store City & State at 2625 Broad Ave. in a few months, with the former describing the process of settling on a building as a little like falling in love with the right wedding dress.

21. Analysts: How GOP Congress Could Boost US Economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Voters made clear Tuesday that they're worried about the economy, despite steady job gains, a robust stock market and faster economic growth this year.

So what can – and should – the now-dominant Republicans in Congress and President Barack Obama do together to benefit more Americans?

22. Report: Casino Revenue Up As Economy Strengthens -

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) – Revenue at U.S. casinos jumped more than 6 percent in 2012, the first significant increase in three years as economic growth picked up speed and more casinos opened in several markets.

23. Tennessee Lawmakers Readying New Abortion Restrictions -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – With the passage of a constitutional amendment that gives Tennessee lawmakers more power to restrict abortion, they are planning to do just that.

Although Tennessee has some restrictions, the state lacks the mandatory counseling and waiting periods that are in place in all eight states that share its border.

24. Ole Miss Stays Focused With Heartache Nearby -

OXFORD, Miss. – There wasn’t a good place to watch that fateful play near game’s end. Whether on the sideline, in the stands, or following on TV, the result was going to be the same and for all members of Rebel Nation it was going to hurt like hell.

25. Alumni United -

By background, Maria Lensing perhaps doesn’t fit the expected parameters of someone quick to defend Memphis and eager to take on the challenge of revitalizing a local university’s alumni association.

26. Tigers One Win From Bowl Eligibility -

It has been six years since the University of Memphis football team played in a bowl. But it’s now just about impossible to imagine that streak extending to seven seasons.

The Tigers beat Tulsa 40-20 on Halloween night at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium for their fifth win. Get to six, and they’re bowl eligible.

27. Gold Strike to Host Miss Mississippi Pageants -

Gold Strike Casino Resort will host the 2015 Miss Mississippi USA and Miss Mississippi Teen USA pageant this weekend in the Millennium Theatre.

This is the first time the pageants have been held at the Tunica resort. Thirty contestants from across the state will vie for title of Miss Mississippi USA, and 31 will compete for the title of Miss Mississippi Teen USA.

28. Mixed-Use Project Looms for Former Lakeland Mall -

Get used to the name Lake District. You’ll probably be hearing more about it in the near future. Lake District is the new name for the revamped project being planned at the old Lakeland Factory Outlet Mall site.

29. Group Examines Tennessee Sentencing Laws, Recidivism -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A task force formed by Gov. Bill Haslam met Wednesday to examine Tennessee's sentencing structure and look at ways to reduce the state's high recidivism rate.

The group held its second meeting since being formed by Haslam earlier this year.

30. Achievement Schools Opposition Finds Frustration -

Charter school operators who are being considered for the next round of schools entering the state-run Achievement School District are facing the most organized opposition effort in the three-year history of the district in Memphis.

31. Churchill Joins Gateway Group -

Natalie Churchill has joined Gateway Group Personnel as recruiting assistant for the temporary staffing division. In her new role, Churchill will source, qualify and interview candidates to place in positions ranging from accounting, administration (receptionists to executive administrative assistants), medical office, human resources and customer service.

32. Commission Chair Sued by Seven Members -

Seven Shelby County Commissioners are suing commission chairman Justin Ford for stopping them from adding items to the body’s agenda.

33. Shareholder Seeks AutoZone Political Disclosures -

AutoZone’s board of directors is recommending shareholders vote against the motion a shareholder plans to present at the company’s annual meeting in December that would ask the auto parts retailer to provide greater detail on its political spending.

34. Grizzlies Part of Crowded Western Conference Race -

Calling it the Wild West just doesn't do it justice anymore.

The NBA's Western Conference is brutal. It's loaded with talent. And the eight teams that make it through a gruelingly competitive regular season to reach the playoffs will only find slugging their way to the NBA Finals even more daunting.

35. $2.4M Spent on Ads for Ballot Measures -

Supporters and opponents of a proposed amendment to the Tennessee Constitution to give lawmakers more power to regulate abortion are flooding the television airwaves to try to influence voters ahead of next month's election.

36. Editorial: Senate Race Shows Landscape is Changing -

What the race on the November ballot for the U.S. Senate says about our current political environment goes beyond whatever the results will be.

To us, it says our politics is changing. The deck is being shuffled and there are new players at the table. There are also new potential players watching the game.

37. $2.4 Million Spent on TV Ads For Ballot Measures -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Supporters and opponents of a proposed amendment to the Tennessee Constitution to give lawmakers more power to regulate abortion are flooding the television airwaves to try to influence voters ahead next month's election.

38. Grizzlies Find Respect Hard to Come By -

Perhaps it was a just coincidence. On the day that the results of the annual NBA General Managers’ survey were announced, ESPN was in Memphis for its only scheduled visit of the season.

Or perhaps this was no coincidence at all.

39. US to Track Everyone Coming From Ebola Nations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Stepping up their vigilance against Ebola, federal authorities said Wednesday that everyone traveling into the U.S. from Ebola-stricken nations will be monitored for symptoms for 21 days. That includes returning American aid workers, federal health employees and journalists, as well as West African travelers.

40. Winless SMU on Tap for 3-3 Tigers -

They aren’t No. 18 East Carolina and they aren’t winless SMU. Halfway through the 2014 season, the Tigers are in the middle. The University of Memphis is 3-3 overall, 1-1 in the American Athletic Conference and in a large pack of teams whose seasons could yet reach lofty heights … or tumble down to the lowly place everyone knows too well.

41. Spirited Revival -

One of the oldest and most prominent names in Memphis business is in the midst of transforming a Downtown warehouse, reviving a premium liquor brand that disappeared with Prohibition and restoring its prominent role in the community.

42. Mississippi Hospitals, Clinic Receiving Updates on Ebola -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — State health officials say Mississippi hospitals will be capable of handling any Ebola cases that may arise.

State Epidemiologist Dr. Thomas Dobbs said some hospitals are updating procedures based on information provided by the state Department of Health and the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

43. Carr Appointed to Chancery Court Vacancy -

Attorney Oscar C. Carr III is the newest Shelby County Chancery Court judge. Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam announced Thursday, Oct. 16, his appointment of Carr to the vacancy on the court created when Chancellor Kenny Armstrong was appointed to the Tennessee Court of Appeals earlier this year.

44. How Bad is Knoxville Crime? -

From murders to burglaries, most of Knoxville’s crime can be attributed to illegal drugs, police say.

But even as crime figures have remained static for years, where you live likely determines how you feel about crime and safety.

45. Ben Little's: Service Station Service in Self-Serve World -

The gentle soul who used to get his hair cut by an Everly Father a couple of doors down – and who pumped 100 percent pure gas to keep country immortal Ernest Tubb movin’ on – has enjoyed the last four-plus decades next to what used to be called Hailey’s Shopping Center.

46. UT Who? Vols-Ole Miss Game a Mirror Image of ’69 -

KNOXVILLE – Bud Ford usually had no problem wearing the orange blazer in his early days as assistant sports information director at the University of Tennessee.

Not on this day, though. It was Nov. 15, 1969.

47. Carr Appointed to Chancery Court Vacancy -

Attorney Oscar C. Carr III is the newest Shelby County Chancery Court judge.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam announced Thursday, Oct. 16, his appointment of Carr to the vacancy on the court created when Chancellor Kenny Armstrong was appointed to the Tennessee Court of Appeals earlier this year.

48. Events -

Memphis Zoo will host Zoo Boo Friday, Oct. 17, through Sunday, Oct. 19, and Oct. 24-26 from 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. at the zoo, 2000 Prentiss Place. Activities include trick-or-treat stations, not-so-haunted tour of Primate Canyon, straw maze, haunted hayride and more. Tickets are $12 for members and $15 for nonmembers. Visit memphiszoo.org.

49. Schools Leaders Move Toward Cooperation -

As the Achievement School District weighs a short list of a dozen low-performing Memphis schools for the state-run school district in the next school year, Shelby County Schools officials are involved in the selection process far more than they have been in past years.

50. State Rolls Out New Election App -

Just in time for early voting, the Tennessee Secretary of State’s office is out with a Smartphone app that can answer common questions from voters in every election about where they can vote early, the polling place for their election day precinct and directions to it and some of the districts they live in.

51. Kingsport Schools Pursues ‘Comprehensive Approach’ -

Kingsport City Schools goes about improving learning by coming at students and staff from every direction.

“We don’t have the luxury of having random acts of greatness,” Superintendent Lyle Ailshie says.

52. Maryville City Schools Wants Another Win -

Maryville City Schools doesn’t rest on its laurels.

After being named a finalist three out of four years for the State Collaborative on Reforming Education [SCORE] Prize and winning recognition as the top Tennessee district for student learning in 2011, it could claim another victory this year.

53. Harpeth Hall: ‘Tenacious’ Curriculum, Dedication to Tradition -

Harpeth Hall’s new head of school is a fierce proponent of single-sex education who says that an all-girls school can nurture a female mind, especially one interested in going into a STEM fields – science, technology, engineering and math.

54. Tigers Expect Bigger Crowd, Shorter Lines -

Everyone among the 46,000-plus fans attending the University of Memphis football team’s 36-17 over Middle Tennessee three weeks ago at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium, seemed to have a good time.

Well, once they got inside the stadium.

55. On Faulkner and the Use of Punctuation -

Regarding the recent Faulkner column, Tracy writes that she got “a solid feel for the place and the time of year. Thank you for not honoring your subject by writing paragraph-long sentences with intricate layers of subordination.”

56. Haslam Touts State Constitutional Amendments -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam intends to vote for all four of the proposed amendments to the state Constitution on the Nov. 4 ballot, he said during a stop in Memphis Monday, Oct. 6.

Haslam was in Memphis to campaign specifically for the amendment that would require approval from the Tennessee Legislature of appellate court judges nominated by the governor. Amendment 2 would also leave in place judicial retention elections.

57. Haslam Favors Abortion Amendment -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam said Monday, Oct. 6, he intends to vote for all four of the proposed amendments to the state Constitution on the Nov. 4 ballot.

Haslam commented during a stop in Memphis to campaign for the amendment that would require approval from the Tennessee Legislature of appellate court judges nominated by the governor. It would leave in place judicial retention elections.

58. Wealthy Giving Less to Charity; Utah Tops States -

NEW YORK (AP) – Even as the income gap widens, the wealthiest Americans are giving a smaller share of their income to charity, while poor and middle-income people are donating a larger share, according to an extensive analysis of IRS data conducted by the Chronicle of Philanthropy.

59. Tennessee Voters to Decide on Abortion Amendment -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee voters will have a chance this November to decide whether they want to give the state Legislature more power to regulate abortions.

In 2000, the Tennessee Supreme Court struck down laws requiring a two-day waiting period and mandatory physician-only counseling and preventing second-trimester abortions from taking place anywhere but in a hospital.

60. Despite Rules, Nursing Homes Still Lack Sprinklers -

Tens of thousands of the country's most vulnerable people are living in nursing homes without adequate sprinklers or that are missing them altogether, according to government data.

Despite a history of deadly nursing home fires and a five-year lead-up to an August 2013 deadline to install sprinklers, 385 facilities in 39 states fail to meet requirements set by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the federal agency whose duties include regulating nursing homes. Together, those facilities are licensed to house more than 52,000 people, according to data from the agency known as CMS.

61. Downtown Knoxville Tourism Finally Finds its Stride -

When Kim Trent moved to Knoxville in 1990, she could stand along Gay Street on a Sunday and be the only soul in sight. Today, she’s a face in the crowd.

62. Yoga, Pilates Provide Workout Options -

Whether it’s a desire to slim down in advance of holiday binging or a New Year’s resolution reboot, many people look at the fall as a good time to kick-start their exercise efforts.

For some, this just means dusting off that gym membership or home treadmill, getting back to spin class, lifting weights or whatever their preferred activity might be.

63. Judicial Retention Travels Complex Path -

The 2014 election year is proving to be a long one for those interested in the judicial races on the ballot.

Voters in Shelby County decided the local judicial races and participated in the August statewide retention races for appellate court positions, including three on the Tennessee Supreme Court.

64. Room for Growth -

Sardor and Gulam Umarov are used to fighting battles with seemingly long odds.

Between 2005 and 2009, the brothers waged a high-profile human rights campaign against the authoritarian government in their native Uzbekistan for the release of their father, Sanjar Umarov, a Germantown businessman thrown into prison for opposing the regime.

65. Williams-Sonoma Growth Highlights DeSoto Push -

In 1999, Williams-Sonoma Inc. opened its first DeSoto County distribution center on Polk Lane in Olive Branch.

66. Whitehaven Flood Response Complicated -

When the Memphis area got seven inches of rain on Sept. 11, a group of Whitehaven homeowners at the state line watched once the rain stopped as their neighbors on the other side of the border got a prompter response in terms of a federal disaster declaration.

67. State Supreme Court Reverses Bartlett Murder Conviction -

The man convicted and sentenced to death for the brutal 2003 double murder of a husband and wife in Bartlett will get a new trial, the Tennessee Supreme Court ruled last week.

The court decision Thursday, Sept. 25, in the case of Henry Lee Jones is the latest reversal of a conviction in Shelby County Criminal Court by the highest court in the state.

68. Vols Hope to Snap 20-Game Road Slump vs. Ranked Opponents -

KNOXVILLE – It doesn’t get much easier for the University of Tennessee’s football team.

The Sept. 20 open date has come and gone. UT’s coaches and players had ample time to digest and dissect details of the 34-10 loss to No. 4-ranked Oklahoma on Sept. 13 and a week to prepare for a challenge just as formidable.

69. HipD: Donelson Finds Its Cool Side -

The tag “Hip Donelson” evoked plenty of snickers, eye rolls and snarky comments when it first appeared. After all, the local joke goes, Donelson’s known for hip replacements – not hipsters.

70. Roxul Opening 17 Years in Making -

U.S Sen. Roger Wicker of Mississippi searched the 1997 Congressional Record this week before he arrived in Marshall County for the formal opening of the Roxul Inc. plant.

71. Middle-Class Squeeze: From Day Care to Health Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Three years ago, Jason Prosser was stunned to discover the cost of child care for his newborn son – so much so that he and his wife postponed having a second child.

72. Woodland Expansion Reflects Broader Changes -

From the outside, the most noticeable change to the campus of Woodland Presbyterian School is the new building for the seventh- and eighth-graders at the pre-K through 8 independent private school in East Memphis.

73. Pre-K’s Place -

It isn’t an application for federal pre-kindergarten funding the state filed earlier this month in Washington, the office of Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam emphasizes.

“It’s a note of intent to apply,” said Dave Smith, Haslam’s communications chief, last week.

74. Technology Key to Knoxville’s Improving Economy -

Multiple industry sectors have always been a strength for the Knoxville job market, and that deep bench is helping the area once again as state and national economies improve.

From high-tech spinoffs out of both the University of Tennessee and Oak Ridge National Laboratories to a strong manufacturing climate, the area is benefiting as both companies and investors ramp up their expansion and hiring efforts, says Rhonda Rice, who serves as executive vice president of the Knoxville Chamber

75. Road to Better Mass Transit -

Picking a new transit chief is critical for a city in transition.

Next year, Nashville residents will elect a new mayor and turn over its large Metro Council.

Davidson County also expects some 200,000 new residents over the next 20 years, and much of the success of future development will depend on the ease of navigating around Nashville – already the nation’s second-worst area for sprawl, according to Smart Growth America.

76. Education Secretary Praises Local Schools Leaders -

Sustainability is a term associated with environmental efforts, though innovation is a much more popular term across causes from economic development to education reform.

But when U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan came to Memphis this month as the last stop on a three-state bus tour of school districts, it was the word sustainability that came up more often than innovation.

77. Editorial: Growing Rape Kit Backlog Raises More Concern -

The backlog gets bigger. And with the recent news that 196 rape kits dating back to 1976 have been found by Memphis Police, questions never fully answered about the rape kit backlog that surfaced about a year ago become more urgent.

78. Tennessee Recidivism Among Key Topics During Hearings -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The chairman of a legislative panel examining criminal justice reform in Tennessee says he will share information from hearings this week with a special task force the governor has appointed.

79. Justices to Announce New Attorney General on Monday -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee Supreme Court justices plan to announce their choice for the next state attorney general on Monday.

According to a news release issued Thursday, the announcement will take place at 11 a.m. in the courtroom at the Supreme Court Building in Nashville.

80. Unintended Consequences: ER Visits Increase -

Hospital officials have been pushing for the state to expand Medicaid health care coverage for thousands of Tennessee’s poorest citizens, despite two significant and related concerns:

Expansion will lead to increased visits to the most expensive place in America for routine health care, the emergency room.

81. Coverage Gap Leaves Rural Tennessee Hospitals on Life Support -

Four rural hospitals have closed and dozens are at risk of shuttering: That’s the fallout, some say, from Gov. Bill Haslam’s decision not to join the Affordable Care Act in 2013 and tap into millions in promised federal funds for Tennessee’s financially-strapped health care institutions.

82. Education Secretary Calls for System-Wide Reforms -

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan saw much that he liked in Memphis Wednesday, Sept. 10, at the end of his three-day “back to school” bus tour of schools in three states.

The last stop was Cornerstone Prep Elementary School in Binghampton.

83. Authors, Readers Converge for Book Festival -

Earlier this year, interest in the first Mid-South Book Festival, scheduled to take place later this month, began to reach what seemed like a fever pitch, according to Literacy Mid-South executive director Kevin Dean.

84. Duncan Bus Tour Ends With Binghampton Kudos -

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan wrapped up a three-day “back to school” bus tour of schools in several states Wednesday, Sept. 10, at Cornerstone Prep Elementary School in Binghampton.

85. ‘Love Mob’ Responds to Poplar Plaza Attack -

The amount of traffic that comes through the intersection of Highland Street and Poplar Avenue has made it a favorite of causes through the years – from war protestors and advocates to those on both sides of the death penalty, and, more recently, city employees upset over benefit changes.

86. Governor Gets Report on Tennessee Juvenile Jails -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A security audit will be performed on all three of the state's youth development centers after a recent breakout and violence at the facility in Middle Tennessee, according to a preliminary report sent to the governor.

87. Democrats Choose State Senate Nominee -

When Shelby County Democratic Party leaders gather Monday, Sept. 8, to pick their party’s nominee in the November special general election for state Senate District 30, it will also be an indication of how deep the wounds run from the party’s disastrous August election outing.

88. Safe House -

She talks about the bad old days easily now. That’s what years of steady sobriety will do. For the last three-plus years, Amy Phillips, 54, has worked as a program coordinator at Grace House of Memphis, a recovery program for women with alcohol and/or drug problems and, in many cases, co-occurring mental health disorders.

89. Focus on Teens ‘At Risk of Being Homeless’ -

Not only is Crossroads Campus a successful non-profit operation that’s building a bridge to help homeless animals and potentially homeless young people, it’s also a thriving retail business operation driven by the savvy of executive director Lisa Stetar and her staff.

90. Redbirds Prepare for Playoffs Appearance -

First-year Memphis Redbirds general manager Craig Unger grew up a St. Louis Cardinals fan and he spent the last five years working in the team’s front office. He even wears a huge World Series ring from the team’s 2011 championship.

91. Redbirds’ Easley, Scruggs Enjoy Stellar Season -

Oscar Taveras, Randal Grichuk and Stephen Piscotty. Those were the St. Louis Cardinals’ hot outfield prospects stashed in Memphis at season’s start.

Taveras and Grichuk have shuttled between the Cardinals and Redbirds and both are with the big club as the Redbirds’ regular season winds down. Piscotty has stayed with the Redbirds, but throughout the year Cardinals general John Mozeliak openly has talked about having playing time in St. Louis for Piscotty in the near future.

92. Vols Among NCAA’s Youngest Headed Into Sunday Opener -

KNOXVILLE – For better or worse, University of Tennessee football coach Butch Jones won’t need to wait long to see the talent level of his highly touted freshman class.

Jones will find out Sunday night at 7 when the Vols play host to Utah State at Neyland Stadium. The Aggies will be an underdog – probably by a touchdown or so – and a trendy pick for some as an upset special.

93. A More Earth-Friendly Burial Option Now Available -

When Dara Ashworth’s father died this spring after battling metastatic melanoma, she and her two sisters struggled with the best way to honor his life, his memory and his body.

Their father, Leonard Daniel Hamby, 64, a lab technician with the Tennessee Department of Health, didn’t have a specific plan, but the family knew enough about his wishes and knew that he didn’t want a traditional burial.

94. Embracing Cremation -

As business decisions go, this was a tricky one.

Jeff and Steve Murphy, owners of Music City Mortuary, opened their Nashville business in 2001, catering primarily to the needs of other funeral directors, providing transportation, embalming and preparation services, shipping – everything a mortuary business provides.

95. People Power -

Meg Crosby and her fellow principals at the HR-focused consulting firm PeopleCap chose that name for their organization because of the way they think about the modern workplace – particularly, the ever-changing nature of the employees who populate it.

96. Kirby, Wiseman Campaign for Judicial Selection -

Attorney Lang Wiseman says there will be no return to the days when Tennessee legislators had no direct role in who the governor appointed to be appellate court judges if an amendment to the Tennessee Constitution is defeated in November.

97. Longtime Tennessee Civil Rights Lawyer Dies at 86 -

NASHVILLE (AP) – George Barrett, a longtime Tennessee civil rights lawyer known for handling a case that ultimately desegregated the state's public colleges and universities, has died. He was 86.

98. Cohen: Ferguson Police Could Have ‘Shot to Wound’ -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen said police in Ferguson, Mo., could have shot to wound instead of shot to kill Michael Brown in the fatal incident there this month that has prompted national and international reaction to a number of race-related issues beyond the shooting.

99. Appeals Panel Weighing Occupy Nashville Suit -

CINCINNATI (AP) – A special three-judge panel focused on issues of camping, protests, free speech and executive power on Monday during arguments in an appeal of a lawsuit brought by Occupy Nashville protesters arrested on War Memorial Plaza in October 2011.

100. Jackson Ruling Draws Line on Comments to Juries -

Prosecutors and defense attorneys sometimes get right up to the line that separates proper from improper when it comes to their closing statements to a jury during a trial.

The closing statements offer both sides some room in terms of their descriptions or overviews of the case with judges commonly reiterating that what attorneys on either side say there and in opening statements are to be considered evidence.