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Editorial Results (free)

1. Process Outlined to Review State Academic Standards -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Gov. Bill Haslam on Wednesday laid out a process for a public review of the state's K-12 academic standards in English and math amid continuing discussion about Common Core.

2. Incentive Applications Lag Previous Years -

Until a spate of activity this month, Memphis and Shelby County were on pace to tie a record-low for the number of payment-in-lieu-of-taxes agreements granted to companies in a year.

Through September, the city-county Economic Development Growth Engine, the primary business incentive body in Memphis and Shelby County, had awarded just four PILOTs, tied with 2006 for the lowest amount of PILOTs issued in a year since 2002.

3. Yellen: Greatly Concerned By Widening Inequality -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen sounded an alarm Friday about widening economic inequality in the United States, suggesting that America's longstanding identity as a land of opportunity was at stake.

4. McManus Joins Patrick Accounting -

Michelle McManus, a Memphis native and certified public accountant, has joined Patrick Accounting and Tax Services PLLC as manager. In her new role, McManus will supervise and review the monthly accounting process for a section of clients. She will also prepare and review tax returns and work closely with clients, assisting them with ongoing tax planning.

5. Johnson Named Memphis Law School Registrar -

Jamie M. Johnson has joined the University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law as law school registrar.

In her new role, Johnson will have direct oversight of the registrar’s office and duties relating to enrollment verification, managing student’s academic records, and ensuring the accuracy, integrity, maintenance and delivery of all law school institutional data. Johnson will also work closely with the dean of academic affairs to administer exams, determine class rank and report grades.

6. Ritualizing Your Parenthood -

We are people of ceremony and ritual. Every occasion of transition is cause for celebration. A prescribed formula marks our rite of passage from one status to another.

Significant milestones are pronounced by traditional words stating our readiness to take on the new responsibility. Marriage, membership initiations, military inductions, oaths of office, graduations, even citizenship, are all marked by ritual.

7. Road to Better Mass Transit -

Picking a new transit chief is critical for a city in transition.

Next year, Nashville residents will elect a new mayor and turn over its large Metro Council.

Davidson County also expects some 200,000 new residents over the next 20 years, and much of the success of future development will depend on the ease of navigating around Nashville – already the nation’s second-worst area for sprawl, according to Smart Growth America.

8. US Wealth Gap Putting the Squeeze on State Revenue -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Income inequality is taking a toll on state governments.

The widening gap between the wealthiest Americans and everyone else has been matched by a slowdown in state tax revenue, according to a report being released Monday by Standard & Poor's.

9. Coverage Gap Leaves Rural Tennessee Hospitals on Life Support -

Four rural hospitals have closed and dozens are at risk of shuttering: That’s the fallout, some say, from Gov. Bill Haslam’s decision not to join the Affordable Care Act in 2013 and tap into millions in promised federal funds for Tennessee’s financially-strapped health care institutions.

10. Huckabee: 'Stop the Fight' Over Common Core -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Conservatives should "stop the fight" over Common Core and instead consider the benefits that the academic standards offer students in struggling schools, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee said Friday. The position puts him at odds with a significant bloc of Republicans.

11. Class is In -

For Collierville Schools superintendent John Aitken, the demerger of public schools in Shelby County didn’t become “real” until teachers reported the week before the Aug. 4 first day of classes.

12. Apple's Tech Jobs Held Mostly By White, Asian Men -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Apple primarily relies on white and Asian men for its top-paying technology jobs, feeding the perception that Silicon Valley's economic boom is largely excluding women, blacks and Hispanics.

13. Pew: Split Views on Robots' Employment Benefits -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In 2025, self-driving cars could be the norm, people could have more leisure time and goods could become cheaper. Or, there could be chronic unemployment and an even wider income gap, human interaction could become a luxury and the wealthy could live in walled cities with robots serving as labor.

14. US Job Growth Eases but Tops 200,000 for a Sixth Month -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A sixth straight month of solid 200,000-plus job growth in July reinforced growing evidence that the U.S. economy is accelerating after five years of sluggish expansion.

15. Visible College Basement Opens New Opportunities -

There was a time, in the years surrounding the bankruptcy of the Stax Records label decades ago, when the vault of the old C&I Bank Building Downtown housed masters from the label.

16. Nurse-Family Partnership Benefits Mothers, Children -

At one level, the results of a clinical trial that studied low-income families in Memphis for more than 20 years delivered about what was expected.

“I don’t think it was a surprise to anyone that some of the families living in our impoverished areas, the young moms, were not prepared for parenthood and rarely understood how best to care for their (young children),” said Meri Armour, president and CEO of Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital.

17. GOP Lawmakers Demand Education Chief's Resignation -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam's office is dismissing as a "political stunt" a letter signed by 15 Republican lawmakers demanding the resignation of Education Commissioner Kevin Huffman.

18. Departing PDS Head Says Education Needs ‘Disruption’ -

The departing headmaster of Presbyterian Day School says American education needs more of a revolution than evolution.

Lee Burns is leaving the East Memphis private school to become head of school at the McCallie School in Chattanooga, Tenn., after 14 years in Memphis. He was the keynote speaker Wednesday, June 11, for the second day of the Martin Institute for Teaching Excellence’s two-day summer conference on the PDS campus.

19. Obama Moves to Extend Student Loan Payment Relief -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Aiming to alleviate the burden of student loan debt, President Barack Obama expanded a program Monday that lets borrowers pay no more than 10 percent of their income every month, and threw his support behind more sweeping Senate legislation targeting the issue.

20. Regions Partners in Inner-City Business Program -

To use a metaphor to illustrate the purpose of a new program to help inner-city businesses in Memphis grow, the program represents the difference between focusing on rowing your boat and scouting the horizon for a new port to direct your boat toward.

21. Life’s Many Graduations -

Delivering a commencement speech is the easy part. Writing one is more difficult. It take years, if not decades, to understand what it take to survive, to succeed, to thrive, to find your passion, to encourage others, and to understand that the things that go wrong often lead to the things that go right.

22. RNC Changes Debate Rules for 2016 -

MEMPHIS (AP) – Lunging for control of the GOP ahead of high-stakes elections, the Republican National Committee on Friday took steps to end free-for-all presidential debates and vowed to punish potential contenders who participate in rogue forums.

23. Technology Keeps Hatcher’s Landscape Business Booming -

Whether it was pagers, two-way radios, fax machines or the Internet, Michael Hatcher has always been quick to embrace technological advances as a way to help grow his small business, the landscaping firm Michael Hatcher & Associates Inc.

24. Massey Looks to Grow CCIM Reach -

Shawn Massey is a commercial real estate broker by trade, but he has a burning passion for education.

Massey has co-founded a business-focused charter school in Frayser called Memphis Business Academy and he teaches a master’s level real estate class at the University of Memphis.

25. Paying for the College Dream -

Ray’s Take: Education is one of the greatest gifts you can give, and the value is clearly calculable. It’s also something that deserves a serious conversation.

Per Sallie Mae’s article “How Americans Save for College 2014,” roughly 50 percent of families are saving for college. Of those not saving, 22 percent expect their children to obtain financial aid or scholarships to pay for college and 16 percent believe it is their children’s responsibility to pay. So should parents pay for college, or should the kids “have some skin in the game” and pay for part or all of it?

26. The Business Case for Investing in Green Space -

Editor’s Note: This column will appear Tuesdays through April in honor of Sustainability Month for Memphis and Shelby County.

During 2013 the Greater Memphis Chamber formed the Chairman’s Circle, a group of over 100 Memphis business leaders organized to push for action on key issues to accelerate the regional economy. Early in the life of the organization we created “moon missions,” which are coordinated efforts to truly transform our community.

27. Victory University to Close in May -

For the 1,879 students at Victory University, the last day of the spring semester, May 2, will also be the end of the 73-year-old institution that began as Mid-South Bible College.

University officials announced abruptly last week that the university will close at the end of the spring semester because of financial problems.

28. Victory University To Close in May -

For the 1,879 student at Victory University, the last day of the spring semester, May 2, will also be the end of the 73-year-old institution that began as Mid-South Bible College.

University officials announced abruptly last week that the university will close at the end of the spring semester because of financial problems.

29. Norris Finds Legislative Leadership Has its Price -

Many people who like problem solving usually tackle a tough crossword, or maybe Sudoku.

Collierville’s Mark Norris opted for politics.

30. GAO Report: Too Few Pilots or Too Little Pay? -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The nation's regional airlines are having trouble hiring enough pilots, the government says, suggesting one reason may be that they simply don't pay enough.

A pool of qualified pilots is available, but it's unclear whether they are willing to work for low entry-level wages, the Government Accountability Office said in a report released Friday.

31. I Choose Memphis: Bradley James Leon -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Bradley James Leon

32. IRS Loses Appeal on New Rules for Tax Preparers -

McLEAN, Va. (AP) – The IRS on Tuesday lost a federal appeal in a legal battle over its effort to institute competency exams and other new regulations for as many as 700,000 paid tax preparers.

33. Forgiveness Lessons From the Heart -

It is said that when everything changes, change everything. It’s quick advice, but a long-term process, especially if holding on to the past is easier than moving on. So what makes the difference in being stuck in a negative situation and being able to discover what lies ahead on the other side of change?

34. The Year That Was -

2013 brought plenty of unique and out-of-the-ordinary moments, as well as the launch of new events, businesses and civic ventures that collectively made the Memphis experience richer.

Much of it was covered in these pages, including in recent days a U.S. Supreme Court justice eliciting chuckles from and sharing his constitutional philosophy with an audience of Memphis lawyers.

35. Civil Rights Museum Successes -

“To everything there is a season and a time to every purpose under the heavens." This is the biblical quote Beverly Robertson, president of the National Civil Rights Museum used to begin our conversation.

36. Finding Vision for the Future -

It is said that the future belongs to those who see possibilities before they become obvious. I have met more than a few of these visionaries right here in Memphis on my radio show Seize the Day (KWAM 990, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. Wednesdays).

37. Humane Aid -

The Humane Society of Memphis & Shelby County wants to take its spay and neutering services to the streets, but the nonprofit organization needs the help of local businesses to get the initiative rolling.

38. Test Progress Bolsters Haslam’s Education Reform Aspirations -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam picked up more statistics last week for his arsenal in the political battle over education reform in Tennessee.

And he touted the statewide growth rate in the 2013 National Assessment of Education Progress results at a Memphis school – a poignant choice because Shelby County is the epicenter for the reform efforts Haslam has made his own in the last three years after his predecessor, Gov. Phil Bredesen, began the effort in his second term of office.

39. New in Rural Tennessee: Discovery Park of America -

UNION CITY, Tenn. (AP) – The gleaming white building with curved exteriors and a spaceship-like tower emerges from the flat landscape of West Tennessee like something out of science fiction, but it's not a villain's lair or superhero's headquarters.

40. Race for the Cure Ready at New Home -

Participants in Saturday’s Komen Memphis-MidSouth Race for the Cure will see some significant changes this year.

One of them will be a change of scenery. After 20 years at The Shops of Saddle Creek in Germantown, the race is moving to Carriage Crossing in Collierville.

41. Richland’s McNary Recognized For Achievement -

When the school year began in August, Richland Elementary School principal Sharon McNary gave her teachers plastic action figures that could stretch.

42. Diverse Corporate Experience Leads Crosby to Form PeopleCap -

Meg Crosby’s career might be summed up as an exercise in adaptation.

A principal with the boutique human resources firm PeopleCap, Crosby left her hometown of Memphis for college at the University of Richmond for a double major in English and interpersonal communications. Her pragmatic father insisted on throwing some business courses into the mix.

43. Jurex Teaches Nurses to Use Skills in Law -

Memphis attorney Elizabeth Rudolph wants to help nurses all over the country broaden their financial horizons.

44. Smarrelli Works to Enhance CBU’s Return on Investment -

Christian Brothers University president John Smarrelli still makes it into the classroom once or twice a semester to lecture on biochemistry.

“It allows me to get a feel for my students,” he said. “I’ve done a few research presentations over the past couple of years.”

45. Holding Court -

As has been reported in national newspapers and business magazines for months, the fall’s law school enrollment nationally is down from this time last year and beyond.

The American Bar Association’s ABA Journal reported in August that “Law school applications for the fall of 2013 have dropped 17.9 percent and applicants are down 12.3 percent.”

46. Affordable Care Act -

On Oct. 1, a new shopping website will launch in Tennessee.

Much like Amazon.com, it will offer a place where consumers can compare products from different sellers and buy the one that best suits their needs.

47. Casting Call -

One of Pat Halloran’s favorite memories of The Orpheum Theatre Memphis happened back in 1986, when he got the chance to kick around town with Cary Grant for three days.

48. New Study Warns of US Long-Term Debt Problems -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The government could run out of cash to pay its bills in full and on time sometime between the end of October and the middle of November if lawmakers fail to increase its $16.7 trillion borrowing cap, Congressional Budget Office Director Doug Elmendorf said on Tuesday.

49. Nonprofit Alliance Retools Logo, Website, Message -

About this time last year, CEO Nancy McGee of the Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence decided to evaluate the organization’s internal and external messaging.

50. Pared-Down School Board Begins to Set Goals -

Countywide school board members began the process Tuesday, Sept. 3, of setting goals and a vision for the one year they will operate as a seven-member body.

And the four-hour retreat ended with a goal of working toward 100 percent literacy in reading for third-grade students in the school system.

51. United Housing Places 3,000th Homeowner -

Lisa Brice was living in a Memphis-area townhouse with her two teenage daughters when the water was turned off in the community back in January.

52. Urban Child Institute Devoted to Helping Memphis Kids -

There is a persistent and ever widening divide in our country between those who have plenty and those who suffer poverty.

Nowhere are the effects of that divide more harmful, and often irreversible, than in the lives of the children born into poverty. It is in the experiences of those early years, from conception through age three, when the brain develops to 80 percent of its capacity, that a course for long-term well-being is set.

53. FDA: Menthol Cigarettes Likely Pose Health Risk -

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) – A Food and Drug Administration review concludes that menthol cigarettes likely pose a greater public health risk than regular cigarettes but does not make a recommendation on whether to limit or ban the minty smokes – one of the few growth sectors of the shrinking cigarette business.

54. White Paper: Young Alumni are Unique Givers -

When it comes to charitable donations, members of the so-called millennial generation are in a unique class of givers.

Being somewhere between 18 and 35 years old, their memories of paying high college tuition costs and loans may still be fresh – they may still, in fact, be paying those bills. Others may not yet have the well-paying jobs they studied for immediately out of college.

55. Deal Emerging on Student Loans, Talks Continue -

WASHINGTON (AP) – An emerging deal to lower interest rates on student loans took shape Thursday, offering Democrats promises that interest rates would not reach 10 percent and giving Republicans a link between borrowing terms and the financial markets.

56. Commission Awaits Next Budget Steps -

When Shelby County Commissioners get together Wednesday, July 17, for committee sessions, they will probably begin to fill in some of the blank space left in the wake of their decision this week to vote down a $4.38 county property tax rate.

57. Commission Votes Down $4.38 Tax Rate -

Shelby County Commissioners voted down a $4.38 county property tax rate Monday, July 8, in a decision that could reopen the county’s operating budget for the fiscal year that began July 1.

At the least, the commission vote means it will be mid August at the earliest before the commission sets a tax rate. But if the commission lowers the tax rate from $4.38, it would force reconsideration of a county operating budget that is based on that higher tax rate.

58. Watchdog: IRS Fought Oversight in Tea Party Cases -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Internal Revenue Service long has resisted efforts by an internal watchdog to help groups seeking tax-exempt status, creating a culture that enabled agents to improperly target such organizations for additional scrutiny, the National Taxpayer Advocate reported Wednesday.

59. Birthrights -

As Deidra Stephens Clark’s due date approached, she made a straightforward birth plan that included a vaginal birth, an epidural for pain relief and her desire to breastfeed immediately after birth.

60. Senate Introduces No Child Left Behind Successor -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The one-sized-fits-all national requirements of No Child Left Behind would give way to standards that states write for themselves under legislation Senate Democrats announced Tuesday.

61. Tennessee Receives Grant for Workforce Development -

The Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce has announced the United States Department of Labor awarded the state $697,963 for exceeding all performance goals that were set for the state’s workforce development and education activities.

62. Changes Coming to Literacy Mid-South -

Major changes are on the way to Literacy Mid-South, which has been helping adults and young adults learn to read for nearly four decades.

During a breakfast announcement at Bryan Campus Life Center at Rhodes College, Literacy Mid-South leaders announced eight of the most significant developments in the program’s 40-year history.

63. Editorial: School System Can’t Settle for Status Quo -

When schools across Shelby County open on Aug. 5, the consolidation of the city and county public school systems will remain a work in progress.

And that is not the way this was supposed to work.

64. Thomas & Betts Donates $1 Million -

Thomas & Betts Corp. executives marked one year since the acquisition of the Memphis-based power and electric utility devices company by ABB Group of Zurich Thursday, May 9, with three contributions from both. The contributions, totaling $1 million, went to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital and the Memphis Development Foundation.

65. Thomas & Betts Donates $1 Million -

Thomas & Betts Corp. executives marked one year since the acquisition of the Memphis-based power and electric utility devices company by ABB Group of Zurich Thursday, May 9, with three contributions from both. The contributions, totaling $1 million, went to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital and the Memphis Development Foundation.

66. Thomas & Betts - ABB Donate $1 Million -

Thomas & Betts Corporation executives marked one year since the acquisition of the Memphis-based power and electric utility devices company by ABB Group of Zurich Thursday, May 9, with three contributions from both totaling $1 million to St. Children’s Research Hospital, Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital and the Memphis Development Foundation.

67. New Common Core Standards Raise Questions in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Proponents of a new set of uniform benchmarks for math and reading say they're needed to better prepare students for college and the workforce, but critics of the measures contend they don't know enough about them and are concerned about the federal government's involvement.

68. Schools Could Get Additional $4 Million -

When Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell presented his consolidated county government budget proposal last week to county commissioners, he made an important change that may have upped the amount of new revenue available for the consolidated school district.

69. Koury’s Success Defined by Partnerships, Programming -

Heather Baugus Koury has been executive director of the American Institute of Architects Memphis chapter for more than a decade, and although she was just named to the distinguished status of Honorary AIA, she’s never considered becoming a practitioner.

70. AIA Memphis Director Given Honorary Membership -

Heather Baugus Koury was recently named Honorary AIA for The American Institute of Architects, the highest honor bestowed on a person outside the architecture profession.

Membership is granted only if the accomplishments of the nominee are truly outstanding and of national significance. During her 10-year tenure as executive director of AIA Memphis, Koury has enhanced the chapter’s programming and its involvement in community outreach programs, including the Distinguished Architects of the World speakers series, the Discovering Architecture summer day camp for high school students, and the Junior Girl Scout Architecture Badge Camp.

71. AIA Memphis Director Given Honorary Membership -

Heather Baugus Koury was recently named Honorary AIA for The American Institute of Architects, the highest honor bestowed on a person outside the architecture profession.

Membership is granted only if the accomplishments of the nominee are truly outstanding and of national significance. During her 10-year tenure as executive director of AIA Memphis, Koury has enhanced the chapter’s programming and its involvement in community outreach programs, including the Distinguished Architects of the World speakers series, the Discovering Architecture summer day camp for high school students, and the Junior Girl Scout Architecture Badge Camp.

72. Mark Weaver Elevated to Fellow of AIA -

Mark Weaver, principal with Hnedak Bobo Group, was recently elevated to a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects.

A past president of AIA Memphis and AIA Tennessee, Weaver was recognized for advancing the science and art of planning and building by advancing the standards of architectural education, training and practice.

73. Weaver Elevated to Fellow of AIA -

Mark Weaver, principal with Hnedak Bobo Group, was recently elevated to a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects.

74. Year of Change for Smith & Nephew -

On the heels of laying off 63 employees in Memphis and as it grapples with challenging business conditions locally and worldwide, London-based medical device maker Smith & Nephew sees a bright spot in the Bluff City: the new Centre for Innovation.

75. Memphis Higher Education Included in Budget Proposal -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has included funding in his budget proposal for a $62 million renovation at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and a $45 million center for the University of Memphis’s nursing and audiology programs.

76. ‘Positive Experience’ -

Do not mention the reality TV show “Toddlers & Tiaras” to pageant producer Renee Horvath of Millington.

She’ll tell you it’s nothing like the world she knows.

77. Haslam Says Downtown State Workers to Stay Downtown -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has included funding in his budget proposal for a $62 million renovation at the University of Tennessee Center for the Health Sciences in Memphis and a $45 million center for the University of Memphis’s nursing and audiology programs.

78. Immigration Reform on Horizon -

November’s presidential election clarified a need for bipartisan immigration reform; Republican intransigence on this issue melted away as they watched about 71 percent of Latinos vote in favor of the Democratic candidate.

79. Haslam Addresses School Vouchers Issues -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says the third year of significant education reform legislation in the Tennessee General Assembly will include vouchers but added that “ultimately our efforts in Tennessee are going to be around the vast majority of kids that are in public schools.”

80. Final Bell -

From the moment he became Memphis City Schools superintendent, Kriner Cash had competition.

“I’ve been fighting since I got here,” he said in the early stages of what winds up as a five-year tenure that officially comes to an end July 31.

81. Lawmakers to Resume Education Focus in New Session -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Legislation that would allow parents to decide the fate of a struggling school is among several education-related proposals lawmakers are likely to discuss during the 108th Tennessee General Assembly that convenes Tuesday.

82. Mississippi Lawmakers Face April Deadline for Budget -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Mississippi budget writers have released their initial proposals. But they're months away from deciding exactly how much the state will spend on education, health care and other services during fiscal 2014, which begins July 1.

83. Nonprofit Tech Innovators Inspire New Philanthropy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Scott Harrison knows his charity has funded nearly 7,000 clean water projects in some of the poorest areas of the world in the past six years. How many of those wells are still flowing with drinking water months or years later, though? That's a tough question to answer.

84. Caylor to Lead Home Builders Through Changing Times -

Don Caylor has been in the construction business for more than three decades and has been a member of the Memphis Area Home Builders Association for just as long.

He started Summerset Homes Inc. with his brother Bob Caylor in 1982, back when out-of-the-office messages were relayed through pink “while you were out” notepads and nearby dime-operated payphones were the main source of contact while out on the job.

85. Huffman Brings Leverage to Possible Mediation -

Tennessee Education Commissioner Kevin Huffman would bring lots of political leverage with him should he mediate the coming merger of schools in Shelby County.

86. It’s Past Time to Start Over -

START. STOP. START SOMETHING NEW. There we were in our shirtsleeves, playing golf on a 70-degree Saturday in December, when my old friend, cart mate and Republican said, “I could get used to this global warming stuff.” Unable to resist the smart-ass opening I had just been provided, I replied, “Must be tough on you guys these days – not only do you have to admit to global warming, you have to throw Grover and the pledge under the elephant.”

87. The Next Steps -

About a half hour before the ruling by U.S. District Court Judge Samuel “Hardy” Mays in the municipal school district lawsuit, the chairman of the countywide school board called for his board and the school boards for the six suburban municipal school districts to get together.

88. Jones Center Fulfills Dream at First Assembly Christian School -

If the walls could talk in the log cabin on the campus of First Assembly Christian School in Cordova, they might tell stories of home life in 1836 or of the visiting missionaries who used to stay there.

89. Memphis Area Legal Services Relies on City’s Legal Community -

The description of Memphis Area Legal Services Inc. as a law firm works in some ways.

But unlike conventional law firms, the attorneys work with clients across several institutional boundaries that might not ordinarily be part of the services offered by a conventional law firm.

90. Early Results: Vesta Exceeds Expectations -

Don Glays, executive director of the Memphis Area Home Builders Association, has three words to describe how the past few days of the Vesta Home Show have performed:

“Beyond our expectations.”

91. Building Business -

Dr. Leonard Greenhalgh brought a wake-up call with him to Memphis at the end of August, when he came to the city as one of several featured speakers for the Memphis Minority Business Council Continuum’s 2012 Economic Development Forum.

92. School Serves Our ‘Public’ Very Well -

Kayla Larson, the head of the Public Health Student Association at the University of Memphis School of Public Health, got right to the heart of the discussion.

“If you’re going to be in public health, you need to be in the areas that need you most,” she said in this week’s cover story. “This area is where public health professionals need to be.”

93. Pro Bono Requirement Added For Law Students -

The University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law has been making some changes to the school’s curriculum that better reflect, and help prepare students for, the changing nature of the legal profession.

94. School Board to Consider Aitken’s Role in Transition -

Countywide school board members have been known to debate what is on their agenda for as long as an hour or so before moving on to other matters.

That may be the case Tuesday, Aug. 28, when the board picks up where it left off at their work session a week ago.

95. Varied Career Led Spurlock to The Urban Child Institute -

Katy Spurlock, director of education and dissemination at The Urban Child Institute, has had a varied career in which every step along the way seems to have led her right to where she’s meant to be.

96. Ruling Alters Fayette County Education Landscape -

A court case, school closings, attendance zone changes as well as school system and county government differences.

The familiar sounding elements of a school system in transition, in this case, apply not to Shelby County Schools but to Fayette County Schools.

97. Transcript: Luttrell Discusses Schools, Other Issues Facing County -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell talked several weeks ago with The Memphis News editorial board about the coming merger of schools and the creation of municipal school districts.

The conversation took place a few days before voters in all six suburban towns and cities approved the creation of municipal school districts.

98. Glankler Brown’s Humphreys Carrying on Family Name -

R. Hunter Humphreys Jr. considers himself a rare breed of law student – one that didn’t want to pursue a legal career in litigation.

Now an associate at Glankler Brown PLLC, Humphreys specializes in secured lending, commercial and residential real estate and general business transactions. He occasionally makes an appearance in Probate Court, but his practice does not typically require much courtroom activity.

99. Wright Medical Profit Drops in Q2 -

Wright Medical Group Inc. earned a second-quarter profit of $0.7 million, or $0.02 per diluted share, down from $6.1 million or $0.16 per diluted share in Q2 2011, the global orthopedic medical device maker reported Wednesday, Aug. 1.

100. Methodist to Honor Four Recipients With Living Awards -

The Methodist Healthcare Foundation is preparing to honor three individuals and one organization for their significant commitments to faith and healing in the Mid-South community and beyond.

Those local heroes will be celebrated during the 2012 Living Awards, which will be held at 7 p.m., Thursday, Aug. 16, in the Grand Ballroom of The Peabody hotel, 149 Union Ave.