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Editorial Results (free)

1. Orgel Traces Path to School Board -

The first chairman of the consolidated Shelby County Schools board judges how well the school board is performing its duties by how mundane its monthly voting meeting is.

“It’s almost boring to come to a school board meeting,” said Billy Orgel, who was appointed to the 23-member board in 2011 and has been re-elected twice. “There’s not theatrics by anybody and we genuinely all like each other. There’s not a backstory. And there are not factions. I think it’s a good model for other bodies.”

2. Path to Crosstown Difficult, Unexpected -

When Staley Cates bought the Sears Crosstown building in 2007 and the development team behind what is now Crosstown Concourse was taking shape to redevelop the property, another developer dropped by Cates’ office.

3. Women Say Barriers Overcome With Perseverance, Mentors -

Kim Grant Brown calls it the “crazy look” she sometimes gets when she meets a client who wants her to build him a home.

4. Now You See It … -

Ferris Hall is an unassuming brick building on the edge of the University of Tennessee’s College of Engineering campus and home to the Department of Materials Science Engineering. There, Drs. Ramki Kalyanaraman and Gerd Duscher have opened the door to applying the magic of Hogwarts to military camouflage, cancer treatment or even Halloween costumes for a new generation.

5. Saving for Retirement: Obama Proposal Sets Up Wall Street Fight -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Tapping the anxieties of aging baby boomers, President Barack Obama on Monday called for tougher standards on brokers who manage retirement savings accounts, a change that could affect the investment advice received by many Americans and aggravate tensions between the White House and Wall Street.

6. Dream Realized -

Around 2010, Francis Ssebikindu saw people exploring the Sears Crosstown property, kicking the tires of the long-vacant retail and distribution building.

“Five years ago I saw a bunch of guys looking around in my area and I said, ‘what are they doing here?’” said Ssebikindu, pastor of Living Water Community Church near the Sears Crosstown building

7. Crosstown Project Named Crosstown Concourse -

Developers of the old Sears Crosstown building formally broke ground Saturday, Feb. 21, on the project that was five years in the planning and gave it a new name – Crosstown Concourse.

Nearly a thousand people packed a tent in the shadow of the mammoth 1.5 million square foot building on a rainy, cold and overcast day that marked 88 years to the day that ground was broken in 1927 on the original Crosstown structure including the tower that will serve as an apartment building in the multi-use redevelopment.

8. Building Trust In Sales -

A key to sales success is identifying the prospect’s needs. But that knowledge doesn’t mean much if the potential relationship lacks a foundation of trust.

Smart buyers are generally willing to consider the guidance of salespeople provided trust has been established first. If a prospect trusts the seller, the first – and arguably hardest – step to success has been achieved. But how do you build trust with a prospect?

9. All-Star Game Special Night For Brothers Gasol -

Pau Gasol won the historic tip-off from younger brother Marc, making official the Brothers Gasol as the first brothers in league history to start in the NBA All-Star Game.

Marc, the beloved Grizzlies center, finished with six point and 10 rebounds. Pau, a former Grizzly and now a Chicago Bull, scored 10 points with 12 rebounds.

10. Editorial: Crosstown Redevelopment Signals More Change to Come -

Few Memphians can remember the view north on Cleveland when the Sears Crosstown building did not define the horizon.

And there is a whole generation of Memphians who have always known the colossal structure as a boarded-up relic of the era when big stores were really big stores. In this case, the big store could sell you all of the materials to build a house as well as everything you would need for the interior of the house.

11. Insure Tennessee Fails to Win Sound Bite Test -

Fresh off a resounding November re-election victory, Gov. Bill Haslam ran smack dab into the reality of Tennessee politics: The Republican Party abhors anything connected to President Barack Obama.

12. New Zoo Parking Plan Proposed -

The latest proposal to solve the parking tension within Overton Park has none of the major elements of what appeared to be a compromise in the works this past spring when overflow Memphis Zoo parking on the Overton Park greensward prompted protests.

13. New Zoo Parking Plan Reworks Zoo Lots, Keeps Some Greensward Parking -

The city of Memphis is working on a reconfiguration of the Memphis Zoo’s existing parking areas that would add 250 new parking spaces as a solution to the uneasy coexistence between the zoo’s parking needs and the Overton Park greenspace.

14. Tennessee Superintendents Seek to Keep Higher Standards Intact -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A majority of Tennessee's school superintendents want to see a review process of the state's Common Core academic standards fully unfold before lawmakers try to change the standards.

15. More Tax Incentive Changes Likely -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell made the argument last week in his State of the County speech that local economic development and economic recovery is not the singular pursuit of jobs.

16. Vols’ Jones Continues to Impress With Recruiting Skills -

KNOXVILLE – National signing day is in the books, and Tennessee football coach Butch Jones and his staff can relax and savor another top-tier recruiting class.

Oops. Wait a minute. No time off for Jones and his assistants when it comes to recruiting. They’re already busy putting together the 2016 class, and looking at recruits for future classes.

17. Dream Season -

The Grizzlies had just defeated the rival Oklahoma City Thunder before a loud sellout crowd in The Grindhouse and Jerry “The King” Lawler had defended his Memphis championship wrestling belt, albeit with an assist from the Grizzlies’ crack game operations staff.

18. Tigers’ Season: Inconsistent Play, Lukewarm Support -

It has become a nightly ritual at University of Memphis home games. When a member of the stats crew walks down press row holding a sheet of paper displaying the “announced attendance,” members of the Fourth Estate roll their eyes and shake their heads.

19. Groupon Founder Takes a Detour With New Audio Tour App -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Two years ago, Andrew Mason faced an unexpected detour when he was ousted as CEO from the online discount site he founded, Groupon. Now the tech executive's back on the entrepreneurial path, with an iPhone app selling unconventional audio tours of major cities. It's called – you guessed it – Detour.

20. Sewing Seeds of Success at Sunflower Café -

Dreams, cancer, tofu, death, love, loyalty and the quest for good gut bacteria are parts of the story of the hidden little gem that is the Sunflower Café.

Nicole Kidman and Keith Urban are among those who have discovered this comfy vegetarian outpost, tucked behind the Twelve Oaks Motel in Berry Hill, where Chef Brian Storrs and his sister, Kimber Saunders, proselytize healthy eating.

21. Drowning in Student Loan Debt -

Three-and-a-half years after graduating from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Yasameen Hoffman is still trying to land the kind of full-time job that will help her start paying off her student loan.

22. Sports Illustrated: Fuente is Football’s 'Next Hot Coach' -

The University of Memphis men’s basketball team needed a shot from sophomore forward Austin Nichols in the game’s final seconds to escape with a 57-55 victory at Tulane last Saturday.

23. NFL Players Find Second Careers as Entrepreneurs -

As Eddie George neared the end of his nine seasons in the NFL, the running back began pondering his next play.

24. NFL Players Find Second Careers as Entrepreneurs -

As Eddie George neared the end of his nine seasons in the NFL, the running back began pondering his next play.

25. The Journey -

May Branden Canepa will touch down on Spanish soil in late May, realizing a decade-long dream to walk a portion of El Camino de Santiago, the ancient pilgrimage route that winds its way to the tomb of St. James in Santiago de Compostela.

26. Wal-Mart Launches Cash Pickup Option for Tax Refunds -

NEW YORK (AP) – Wal-Mart is launching a service allowing customers to pick up their tax refunds in cash at all stores nationwide.

It's the discounter's latest move to offer more financial services, which is seen as a path to bringing more shoppers to its stores.

27. UAW ‘Considers Itself a Partner’ With GM -

General Motors’ Spring Hill plant is firmly entrenched with the United Auto Workers.

In fact, it might not have retooled and started assembling vehicles again without the union’s efforts.

28. US Foreclosures Fell in 2014 to Levels Before Housing Bust -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – A healthier U.S. housing market and economy helped to winnow foreclosures in 2014 to levels not seen since before the housing bust.

The decline is the latest evidence of how foreclosures have diminished in recent years from a national crisis to a largely market-specific concern.

29. European Job Hunt -

When I visited Dublin, Ireland, in 2013, I was surprised at what I found. It was a European city that in some ways reminded me of home. People were incredibly friendly. The culture was built around music, food and socializing. The city’s core is a similar size to Downtown Memphis, and it’s built around a river.

30. New Record Label Launches in Memphis -

The team behind a new record label that’s launched in Memphis has big ambitions for what it describes as the “musical venture capital” the label wants to share with musicians.

Blue Barrel Records had a quiet launch of sorts in 2014, but it’s making moves this year to establish itself and plant its flag on the scene. Funding for the label comes from founder John Buford, who’s leading its A&R efforts alongside Memphis musician John Kilzer as well as Archer Records collaborators Ward Archer and Brian Dixon.

31. The Long Road to ‘Overnight Success’ -

The label “Overnight Success” has been mistakenly used to describe someone whose achievement is actually the result of a lifetime of hard work, sacrifices and overcoming adversity.

Being an overnight success implies a sudden, surprise appearance of success, like an unexpected guest at the door. Actually, success travels on a well-constructed path and visits the prepared.

32. Empathy For Successful Innovation -

If you unpack the stories of most successful innovations, you’ll find that a deep immersion into the user experience of a product or service is the key that often unlocks the potential of the concept.

33. Command and Control -

On the fourth floor of Module F at a non-descript but sprawling FedEx campus nestled between Winchester Road and Shelby Drive on Airways Boulevard, a massive video wall featuring 36 40-inch LED screens displays real-time information on global weather patterns and the locations of hundreds of FedEx Express jets.

34. Editorial: Pursuit of Authentic Memphis is a Winding Road -

Last year at this time, we talked about city finances and our pursuit of economic development. The year before, it was federal government shutdown.

This year, we will offer a change of pace from that and follow the lead of our cover story, which features suggestions about the city’s promise and its challenges in the year ahead and the year now in the books.

35. Pitts-Murdock Leading Library’s Teen Services -

R. Janae Pitts-Murdock has been named coordinator of teen services for the Memphis Public Library and Information Center, a role in which she’s responsible for coordinating teen programs, partnerships and special initiatives across 18 locations.

36. GOP Leader Announces He'll Undergo Cancer Treatment -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A GOP leader in the state Senate says he has been diagnosed with cancer and plans to undergo treatment.

Republican Caucus Chairman Bill Ketron of Murfreesboro told media on Thursday that he has been diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. He said in a statement that the cancer was found last month after he discovered a lump in his neck.

37. Clean Pathways Revives City Anti-Blight Effort -

The city’s anti-blight contracts with nonprofit groups are back under new terms.

City Public Works division grants of $75,000 each went to Lifeline to Success and Freedom From Unnecessary Negatives to remove blighted conditions in a two- to four-block radius of schools across the city twice a month for four months.

38. Commission Approves Greenline Contracts -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a contract Monday, Dec. 8, buying the section of the old CSX rail line from Mullins Station Road to the old Cordova train station for $2.5 million and a companion contract to build a 4.1-mile-long extension of the Shelby Farms Greenline on it for $2.2 million.

39. Mapping a Path to Success -

Like many other things on paper, maps have largely become extinct as interactive, digital versions have taken over.

But for students of history, as well as those with a keen interest in the neighborhoods and boundaries within cities, the paper map is an irreplaceable document.

40. Congress Told US Lags Other Nations on Drones -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Commercial drone flights are taking off in other countries while the U.S. lags behind in developing safety regulations that would permit unmanned aircraft operations by a wide array of industries, witnesses told a House panel Wednesday.

41. Commission Approves Greenline Contracts -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a contract Monday, Dec. 8, buying the section of the old CSX rail line from Mullins Station Road to the old Cordova train station for $2.5 million and a companion contract to build a 4.1-mile-long extension of the Shelby Farms Greenline on it for $2.2 million.

42. Christmas As It Was -

The hustle and bustle of a 21st Century Christmas and holiday season can be overwhelming, but the Historic Ramsey House offers a view of a bygone era.

Area residents and visitors have an opportunity to travel back to a time when life was slower and an orange in the stocking and a wooden doll under the tree was reason for excitement.

43. Ivey, U of M Seek to Boost Transportation Sector -

Dr. Stephanie Ivey never intended to get into the transportation field. After earning her doctorate in engineering from the University of Memphis, Ivey had planned on being involved in environmental work but, through a series of twists and turns, accepted a position at the U of M focused on transportation.

44. These Retailers Could Use Some Holiday Cheer -

NEW YORK (AP) – The holiday shopping season is always a make-or-break period for struggling retailers.

But this year, the fight to grab shoppers has intensified, making it difficult for stores to use the season that accounts for about 20 percent of the retail industry's annual sales to bounce back.

45. Holden’s Hat -

FINDING MEMPHIS. Last week the Church of the Holy Communion inaugurated a reading group called Words, and enticed an eclectic baker’s dozen of participants with Muddy’s cupcakes. I can’t speak for the rest, but I’ve worked for much less.

46. Education Commissioner Leaving for Private Sector -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Education Department Commissioner Kevin Huffman said Thursday that the scrutiny he received during his nearly four turbulent years at the helm of the state's schools didn't influence his decision to leave for the private sector.

47. Keeping Promises -

With more than 50,000 high school seniors applying for free community college tuition and fees through Gov. Bill Haslam’s Tennessee Promise, it’s reasonable to wonder if Tennessee’s community colleges have the infrastructure – including classroom space and instructors – to handle such an influx of new students.

48. UAW Says Recognition Near at Tennessee VW Plant -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The United Auto Workers union is hailing a new Volkswagen policy as a vehicle to soon gain representation of workers at its first foreign auto plant in the South.

49. Harahan Boardwalk Construction Begins -

It was about four years ago that a group of Memphians flew to Omaha, Neb., to talk with Union Pacific railroad executives about building a bicycle and pedestrian boardwalk on the northern side of the Harahan Railroad Bridge across the Mississippi River.

50. Riverside Drive Bike Lane Critics Remain -

In the five months since the southbound auto traffic lanes on Riverside Drive between Beale Street and Georgia Avenue were turned into bicycle and pedestrian lanes, bicycle usage of the lanes has risen from an average of 400 a month to more than 600 a month.

51. Corker Hits Fellow Republicans Over Immigration -

COLUMBIA, Tenn. (AP) — Republican U.S. Sen. Bob Corker on Thursday criticized members of his own party for launching political attacks against those trying to overhaul immigration laws.

52. Reinventing Your Career -

The desire to want to change careers is a common experience. Turning that desire into reality is a different story. Navigating dramatic shifts in one’s career can be both complex and confusing. The frustration causes many people to drop the idea altogether.

53. Pushing Through the Mud, Grizz Start Fast Their Way -

How early is it in this NBA season? Early enough that a coach will reach for a college football analogy.

“This is a team that we have struggled with, going 1-3 with them in our division, a.k.a. the SEC West in football, where we went 4-12 last year.”

54. Fed Folds Quantitative Easing -

Nearly five years after the conclusion of the Great Recession, the U.S. Federal Reserve has chosen to conclude its quantitative easing program. Ben Bernanke thought long and hard about the potential for Central Bank “emergency measures” like QE throughout his academic career. His devotion to Milton Freidman and the quantity theory of money (money supply * velocity = GDP) provided the orthodoxy for the U.S. response to the financial crisis.

55. Amendments, Wine Dominate Election Day -

The last of 2014’s three elections promises to be defined just as much by the questions on the ballot as it is by the choices among candidates.

Election Day is Tuesday, Nov. 4, across Tennessee, with polls open in Shelby County from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

56. Navigating a New Era of Medical Innovations -

Executive director of Cleveland Clinic Innovations, Gary Fingerhut, discusses the emerging era of medical innovation and commercialized new inventions and platforms.

Fingerhut opens by echoing a recurring theme; innovation begins with empathy. A deep understanding of the humanity, the personal narratives, fears and inspirations of patients empowers better care and inspires hospital systems to treat people differently than in the past.

57. Gordon Creates ‘Happy Place’ With Muddy’s Grind House -

Ever since she opened her East Memphis bakery in 2008, Muddy’s Bake Shop founder and owner Kat Gordon has been repeatedly asked to expand.

None of the approaches from investors or franchise offers ever seemed like the right path to take, though, especially for a business that prides itself on a distinctiveness that manifests itself in everything from the fun, funky vibe to Gordon’s proud aversion to advertising.

58. City, County Take Different Paths on Insurance -

City of Memphis human resources director Quintin Robinson came from City Hall on the other side of the Main Street Mall last week to watch how Shelby County government handled changes to its health insurance plan for employees.

59. Finding Many Uses for ‘Beat’ -

What do a dead horse and a hasty retreat have in common? Same thing that around the bush has in common with a path to your door. They all become in-the-language phrases when the word beat is placed in front of them.

60. UT Homecoming Weekend Events -

“Tennessee Traditions” is this year’s Homecoming theme.

Colleges and student organizations will host reunion activities throughout the weekend. For a list of all event details including registration information, visit www.volsconnect.com.

61. Connecting Creatives -

In a body of water, an undercurrent is something that moves beneath the surface and which, though it might be unseen, is unwise to ignore, especially when it flows in the opposite direction of currents visible on the surface.

62. Joining the Team -

As football and basketball seasons start up again, questions have started to arise about working in professional sports. Let’s be honest. Who wouldn’t want to get up and go to work for their favorite sports franchise? Every day would be fun and exciting – and we might even meet a few of the players!

63. Local Tech Startup Growth On Right Path -

More than 500 Memphis business leaders, investors, entrepreneurs and innovators gathered at the Orpheum Theatre in late August, but they weren’t there for the latest show from Broadway.

They convened to participate in Start Co. Demo Day, when 15 innovative startups from a variety of sectors unveiled their products.

64. Top Advertising Week Trends -

Advertising geeks from across the nation unite annually at “Advertising Week” to hear industry experts share opinions on the current state of advertising and predictions for the future.

65. Judicial Retention Travels Complex Path -

The 2014 election year is proving to be a long one for those interested in the judicial races on the ballot.

Voters in Shelby County decided the local judicial races and participated in the August statewide retention races for appellate court positions, including three on the Tennessee Supreme Court.

66. Probate Court Trio Returns for New Terms -

The two judges and clerk whose court is at the center of the practice of estate law in Shelby County were returned to their offices by Shelby County voters in the August county general elections.

Probate Court Judges Karen D. Webster and Kathleen N. Gomes as well as Probate Court Clerk Paul Boyd each faced challengers in the election that drew a 27 percent voter turnout overall.

67. Soft Skills for Emerging Leaders -

As a professional, as a leader, even as a brand ask yourself this critical question: are you empathetic? Do you have the genuine ability to “understand and share the feelings of another.”

68. Searching for Doctors -

So here’s the offer: lower salary – meaning it will take longer to pay down your student loan debt – less prestige, and perhaps even a questioning of your intelligence and skill.

In 2014, that’s what comes with the decision to become a primary care physician. Recently, a fourth-year medical student at the University of Pennsylvania, Mara Gordon, wrote an article for The Atlantic explaining her decision to become a primary care doctor.

69. Alexander, Ball to Debate at Candidate Forum -

Republican U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander and his Democratic challenger Gordon Ball will share the same stage Oct. 16 at the Tennessee Farm Bureau candidate forum in Cookeville, Tenn.

70. City Council Approves $8.8 Million Utility Contract -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, Sept. 16, an $8.8 million Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division contract with a Lexington, Ky., construction company – a countract that has had a politically turbulent path to passage.

71. Road to Better Mass Transit -

Picking a new transit chief is critical for a city in transition.

Next year, Nashville residents will elect a new mayor and turn over its large Metro Council.

Davidson County also expects some 200,000 new residents over the next 20 years, and much of the success of future development will depend on the ease of navigating around Nashville – already the nation’s second-worst area for sprawl, according to Smart Growth America.

72. Alexander, Ball to Debate at Candidate Forum -

Republican U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander and his Democratic challenger Gordon Ball will share the same stage Oct. 16 at the Tennessee Farm Bureau candidate forum in Cookeville, Tenn.

73. City Council Approves $8.8 Million Utility Contract -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, Sept. 16, an $8.8 million Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division contract with a Lexington, Ky., construction company – a countract that has had a politically turbulent path to passage.

74. Door Remains Open on City Health Insurance Changes -

The political struggle to close the door and lock in changes to city health insurance coverage is proving to be a challenge for the Memphis City Council.

The council voted Tuesday, Sept. 16, to adjust the health insurance changes it approved in June to grandfather in for a year approximately 300 retirees and their spouses when it comes to the 70 percent subsidy on insurance premiums they currently get from the city.

75. Tennessee Steps Up the Fight Against Blight -

While the national economy is still rebounding from the 2008 housing crisis, foreclosures, vacant homes and blighted properties are a lingering issue many markets throughout the country have to address.

76. Education Secretary Calls for System-Wide Reforms -

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan saw much that he liked in Memphis Wednesday, Sept. 10, at the end of his three-day “back to school” bus tour of schools in three states.

The last stop was Cornerstone Prep Elementary School in Binghampton.

77. Duncan Bus Tour Ends With Binghampton Kudos -

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan wrapped up a three-day “back to school” bus tour of schools in several states Wednesday, Sept. 10, at Cornerstone Prep Elementary School in Binghampton.

78. City's Response to Poplar Plaza Attack Charts New Path -

The next front in City Hall’s discussion of youth violence won’t be another crime summit.

The last one happened just days before and within a mile of the Poplar Plaza shopping center where a mob of teenagers attacked, beat and injured three people Saturday, Sept 6.

79. Home Depot CEO: Probe of Possible Breach Continues -

NEW YORK (AP) – Home Depot's outgoing CEO Frank Blake told investors Thursday that the nation's largest home-improvement chain continues to investigate a potential breach at the company and reassured that customers will not be liable for any potential fraudulent charges.

80. Tigers Look for Hollywood Script -

The Memphis Tigers and their long-suffering fans were excited. Who could blame them?

For the list of things we should never take for granted in Memphis includes low humidity, years without city elections, and wins by the local college football enterprise.

81. ‘People’s Mayor’ to Share Story at RISE Gala -

Every politician has a past, but not like this one.

Evelyn Wynn-Dixon was, at the low point, a homeless single mother so distraught she believed her four young children would be better off without her. She considered jumping from a bridge overlooking Interstate 75 in Atlanta.

82. Redbirds’ Easley, Scruggs Enjoy Stellar Season -

Oscar Taveras, Randal Grichuk and Stephen Piscotty. Those were the St. Louis Cardinals’ hot outfield prospects stashed in Memphis at season’s start.

Taveras and Grichuk have shuttled between the Cardinals and Redbirds and both are with the big club as the Redbirds’ regular season winds down. Piscotty has stayed with the Redbirds, but throughout the year Cardinals general John Mozeliak openly has talked about having playing time in St. Louis for Piscotty in the near future.

83. Mortarville to Memphis -

On the walls of his office at Hickory Ridge Middle School, principal Cedric Smith has a poster of an Iraqi flag. It’s from the time his Army reserve unit was called up in 2009 and stationed on a base that soldiers nicknamed “Mortarville” for how often it was hit by enemy shells.

84. US Economy Forecast to Grow By 1.5 Percent in 2014 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Congressional Budget Office on Wednesday forecast that the U.S. economy will grow by just 1.5 percent in 2014, undermined by a poor performance during the first three months of the year.

85. Beset by Money Woes, Crittenden Hospital to Close -

WEST MEMPHIS, Ark. (AP) – The Crittenden Regional Hospital in West Memphis stopped admitting patients Monday and will shut down permanently on Sept. 7, despite the recent passage of a sales tax increase intended to help the financially struggling facility.

86. TVA to Replace Allen Plant With Natural Gas -

The 55-year-old Allen Fossil Plant in southwest Memphis will be replaced with a new $975 million natural gas plant to be built in the shadow of the original facility, the Tennessee Valley Authority board decided Thursday, Aug. 21, in Knoxville.

87. Turning Five -

When she was first handed the reins of the I Love Memphis blog almost a year ago, Holly Whitfield said she planned to keep the blog’s brand intact and to keep reminding Memphians why the city is worth their affection.

88. Patient-Centered Focus -

The best ideas accomplish more than one thing. And so it is with Church Health Center’s commitment to earning accreditation as a Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH).

“We certainly didn’t have to do it,” said Jenny Bartlett-Prescott, CHC’s director of clinical services. “But it’s a way of providing patient care we believe in. It was a road map, if you will, for a path forward.”

89. Discovering the World of Travel -

What does travel mean? On one hand, it’s a vacation from everyday life, an escape. It’s an opportunity to have your physical pains massaged away in a spa while an ocean breeze momentarily relieves your stress and worry.

90. New Business Helps Clients Organize Homes, Lives -

When Amy Tuggle and her mother, Fran Cutshall, moved to Memphis from St. Louis recently they each decided to make a career change.

91. Levy Dermatology Celebrates Five Years in Memphis -

Dr. Alan Levy owns a 5-year-old dermatology practice in Memphis, and to understand why business is booming for him right now, it helps to consider how medical advances are making it possible for people to live longer lives these days.

92. The Press Box: Mississippi State, Prescott Set High Expectations -

Confidence does not always take the predictable path.

The 2013 Mississippi State Bulldogs were heartbroken over the one that got away at Auburn, and reveled in the one that didn’t in the Egg Bowl victory over Ole Miss in Starkville.

93. Pera: Development, Re-Signing Gasol Keys to Success -

Grizzlies controlling owner Robert Pera introduced new additions to the team’s front office during a press conference Friday, Aug. 1, at FedExForum, and took questions from reporters. But mainly he delivered the message that the franchise’s path to contending for a championship will come through player development and not free agency.

94. Congress Races to Finish VA, Highway Bills -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress ran full-tilt into election-year gridlock over immigration Thursday and headed toward a five-week summer break with no agreement in sight on legislation to cope with the influx of young immigrants flocking illegally to the United States.

95. To Stay or to Go -

Job seeking can be a long, difficult process. If you’re currently looking for a job, there’s a good chance it’s because something at your current job isn’t right. Whether it’s your boss, the pay, or the job itself, you just aren’t happy. And, you probably haven’t been happy for a while. Most people have to reach a certain breaking point before they are willing to volunteer to experience the discomfort of job searching.

96. New Life for Old Malls -

Since 1957, when the first modern, fully enclosed shopping mall was built in Edina, Minnesota, shopping became an American pastime. New shopping malls changed the landscape in communities across the country at the rate of 140 a year.

97. IMF Sees US Growth at Weakest Since Recession -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. economic growth this year will likely be at the weakest pace since the Great Recession ended, the International Monetary Fund said, mostly because of a sharp, weather-related contraction in the first quarter.

98. Allergan to Cut 1,500 Employees in Restructuring -

Botox maker Allergan will cut about 13 percent of its workforce as part of a push to become more efficient while it fights a hostile takeover bid from Valeant Pharmaceuticals.

The Irvine, California, company said Monday it plans to trim about 1,500 employees and around 250 vacant positions as it restructures to focus on its "highest value opportunities."

99. I Choose Memphis: Hillary Quirk -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Hillary Quirk

Job title and company: Community Manager, Start Co.

100. Microsoft Cutting 18,000 Jobs, Signals New Path -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – Microsoft announced the biggest layoffs in its history Thursday, saying it will cut 18,000 jobs as it streamlines its Nokia mobile device business to focus on using the Windows Phone operating system.