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Editorial Results (free)

1. Karlen Evins Finds Her ‘Most Authentic Self’ in Farming -

A diminutive Karlen Evins walks from her vegetable garden to the reassembled church in which she lives, her arms full of just-picked corn, tomatoes, herbs and okra, and drops them on her kitchen counter.

2. Karlen Evins Finds Her ‘Most Authentic Self’ in Farming -

A diminutive Karlen Evins walks from her vegetable garden to the reassembled church in which she lives, her arms full of just-picked corn, tomatoes, herbs and okra, and drops them on her kitchen counter.

3. Memphis Mayor's Race Poised For Close Finish -

A political summer dominated by the campaign for Memphis mayor begins turning toward fall Friday, Sept. 18, with the opening of the early voting period in advance of the Oct. 8 election day.

All 16 early voting sites are open weekdays from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Oct. 3.

4. Ole Miss, Alabama Face Rematch -

A year ago, Ole Miss put up 13 fourth-quarter points to rally and defeat Alabama 23-17 at Vaught-Hemingway Stadium in Oxford. The victory wasn’t secure until 37 seconds were left in the game and Senquez Golson intercepted a Blake Sims pass in the end zone with an acrobatic catch that required an official’s review to be ruled valid.

5. Is State’s Role to Provide a Service or Turn a Profit? -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam appears to be on the brink of privatizing state government. But he won’t be able to do it without a battle, especially from university unions and Democratic lawmakers.

6. Making the Money Last -

Ray’s Take: Are you ready to live to age 95 or beyond? According to the Society of Actuaries, for an upper-middle-class couple, there is a 43 percent chance that one or both will reach at least age 95.

7. Memphis Redbirds, Grizzlies Partner for ‘Grit & Grind Night’ -

The Memphis Redbirds and Memphis Grizzlies play in different sports and at different levels, but for years the people running the teams acted as though they were quasi-rivals.

Change has been in the works for a while – the annual Cardinals Caravan was at FedExForum this winter when AutoZone Park was getting a makeover – but now a growing partnership is in even greater evidence.

8. Haslam Makes Infrastructure Case In Memphis -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam is traveling across the state to encourage change in how road projects are funded.

But Haslam insists it is not a prelude to a pitch for an increase in the state’s fuel tax. It’s been 26 years since Tennessee made any changes to its road project financing method, Haslam said.

9. Redbirds Manager Shildt Understands the Job -

The best part of being a Triple-A manager is obvious: You get to tell players they are going up to the major leagues.

First-year Redbirds skipper Mike Shildt has had the privilege of doing that many times this season. He says it’s never sweeter than telling a player, for the first time, that he’s going up to the St. Louis Cardinals.

10. East of Cleveland -

Consultants for the Memphis Area Transit Authority are exploring an extension of the Madison Avenue trolley line east of Cleveland Street to Overton Square and North Cooper Street.

It is one of seven Midtown routes the transit authority might change or enhance with a bus rapid transit concept that involves fewer stops, fewer turns off main thoroughfares and shorter travel times.

11. Disruptive Innovation Helps Fill in the Gaps -

Being out of work in today’s economy can be daunting. Even as things continue to improve, finding a job can be tough. In addition to the small number of new positions created each day, the entire hiring process takes longer – despite when you find the perfect job.

12. Is the SEC Still the Best? -

HOOVER, Ala. – The first College Football Playoff was not supposed to be won by a Big Ten team. Nor was a player who began the season as a third-string quarterback supposed to lead the first College Football Playoff champion to victory.

13. Cardwell a Link to Metro’s Past, Present -

Metro Trustee Charlie Cardwell definitely is a member of the “good old boys” network that ran Nashville for decades.

14. Boner, Peel and a Reporter’s Call Spark a City’s Embarrassment -

Nashville’s mayor broke into a broad smile and funny walk, pointing across the main dining room at the old TGI Friday’s on Elliston Place to a young reporter seated at a long table with eight colleagues and friends.

15. House Scraps Vote on Confederate Flag in Federal Cemeteries -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Republican-controlled House scrapped a vote on permitting the Confederate flag at Park Service-run cemeteries – including four in Tennessee – on Thursday, a retreat under fire that only escalated a ferocious attack by Democrats complaining the banner celebrates a murderous, racist past.

16. CTI Unveils Millington Professional Flight School -

CTI Professional Flight Training is set to unveil its FAA-approved flight school at Millington Regional Jetport at a grand-opening ceremony and open house this week.

Festivities are scheduled to begin on Friday, July 10, at 2 p.m. with a formal ribbon-cutting ceremony at its facility, 8101 Hornet Ave., just south of the Millington Regional Jetport Terminal. CTIPFT’s chief flight instructor, Joseph MacDougall, will be on hand to answer questions about pilot training, which ranges from part-time private lessons to full-time FAA commercial training.

17. Building Ballet -

Ask Ballet Memphis CEO and founding artistic director Dorothy Gunther Pugh about her dance company's newly announced move to Midtown, and the conversation doesn't immediately turn to obvious things like the when and the why.

18. Memphis City Council’s Distrust of Wharton Boils to Surface -

If it wasn’t obvious in five previous budget seasons, Memphis City Council members made the point clearer Tuesday, June 16, just before they delayed final city budget votes for another week.

They don’t trust the numbers and explanations they are getting from Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. as they try to rearrange his $656.5 million budget that was proposed in April.

19. NTSB: Amtrak Engineer Wasn't Talking, Texting on Cellphone -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The engineer in last month's fatal Amtrak crash wasn't using his cellphone to talk, text or download anything just before the train sped off the tracks, investigators said Wednesday, addressing one big question about what might have caused the accident but only deepening the mystery of what did.

20. Swinging Church? Courts to Have Last Laugh -

It’s official: No sex clubs are allowed outside of industrial areas or within 1,000 feet of a home, church or school in Metro Nashville.

The council passed the ordinance recently in response to a proposed swingers club’s attempt to relocate next door to Goodpasture Christian School in Madison.

21. Reality Change -

“The ecosystem of the team is always live and is always shifting. You have to be able to adjust with whatever the situation might be at the time.”

– Marc Gasol

Roll those words from Marc Gasol over in your mind. Hold them up to the light so you can see them from every possible angle, so you can find hope, fear, inspiration, desperation and, last but not least, ambiguity and mystery.

22. Five Ways to Save Money on Summer Travel -

Memorial Day signals the start of the summer travel season, when an estimated 37.2 million Americans will travel over the weekend. The 16-week summer travel season from Memorial Day to Labor Day sees Americans make some 650 million trips.

23. Your Fantasy Celebrity Board -

If you could have any five celebrities on your nonprofit board, who would you pick?

Visualize yourself as chair of the board of a nonprofit you believe in. Maybe it’s a university, an early childhood education center, a food bank, international research institute or performing arts company. You pick the nonprofit – and the board members!

24. 90 Years On -

Somewhere in the University of Memphis Libraries’ Special Collections section is a cassette – a relic itself – that holds the voice of Harry Wiersema recalling his time living by the Mississippi River in Memphis.

25. Study Recommends Sweeping Changes in Access to Police Reports -

A monthlong review of just how open public records are within Memphis government recommends some sweeping changes in public access to city police investigations.

The report, issued this week by Plough Foundation executive director and former Shelby County Commissioner Mike Carpenter, recommends making internal affairs investigations of police officers public and publicly releasing all police incident reports within 48 hours, even for “ongoing investigations.”

26. With or Without Conley, Grizz Face Pass-Fail Exam in Golden State -

We will get to the looming challenge that is the Golden State Warriors in just a moment.

But first, something needs to be said.

No matter what it is in your favor, including a 3-0 series lead, you don’t just push a button for automatic passage to the next round of the NBA Playoffs. The Portland Trail Blazers reminded us of this truth when they rallied in Game 4 to bring the series back to Memphis.

27. Open Season -

Mud Island River Park opens for its 34th year Saturday, April 11, with high hopes for the effect a reopened Pyramid will have on its attendance and still moving plans for a tie in to the busier riverfront.

28. US Chamber Of Commerce Honors Knoxville Small Businesses -

As it has been for the last several years, Knoxville is well represented on the 2015 list of U.S. Chamber of Commerce Small Business Blue Ribbon Award winners.

Five Knoxville companies –The Tomato Head, Management Solutions LLC, Design Innovation Architects Inc., Visionary Solutions LLC and AMS Corp. – are among 100 companies nationwide selected for this year’s awards. Only one other Tennessee company made the list.

29. Fashion Forward -

Memphis Fashion Week is celebrating its emergence as a full-fledged event.

For the past three years it has been known as Memphis Fashion Weekend, but a new branding effort through inferno LLC has produced a stable logo and a stable vision.

30. Health Care Revitalization -

Health care is always in the news: advances in health care technology, groundbreaking research, and health care disparities are just a few. Yet there’s one story we rarely hear: the role of hospital or medical center related health care foundations.

31. Tennessee Opposes Sysco-US Foods Merger -

The state of Tennessee has joined nine other states and the Federal Trade Commission in opposing the proposed merger of Sysco and US Foods.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery, in announcing the state’s participation in seeking a temporary restraining order and preliminary injunction barring the merger, specifically cited the impact of the merger in Memphis.

32. Lady Vols Seem to Be Slipping Off National Stage -

KNOXVILLE – There is a bronze statue of legendary Tennessee women’s basketball coach Pat Summitt standing proudly across the street from Thompson-Boling Arena.

Summitt’s arms are crossed and she has a smile on her face. Thousands of Lady Vols fans have walked past the Summitt statue since it was unveiled Nov. 22, 2013.

33. Baseball Heaven Found in Phoenix -

For baseball fans, one of the greatest days is when pitchers and catchers report for spring training.

After a long, cold winter, fans know spring training signifies the start of a new season, not to mention warmer weather is finally near.

34. Tennessee Opposes Merger Between Sysco, US Foods -

The state of Tennessee has joined nine other states and the Federal Trade Commission in opposing the proposed merger of Sysco and US Foods.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery, in announcing the state’s participation in seeking a temporary restraining order and preliminary injunction barring the merger, specifically cited the impact of the merger in Memphis.

35. Crosstown Crossroads -

Richard Spore and his colleague at the Memphis office of the Bass Berry & Sims law firm have worked on several ambitious, game-changing projects like the transformation of Overton Square and Bass Pro Shops’ redevelopment of The Pyramid.

36. Burchett’s Mother, Father Helped Shape His Career -

Homegrown Knox County Mayor Tim Burchett espouses the values of many East Tennessee residents: strong family connections, honoring military service and remembering where he comes from.

37. NFL Players Find Second Careers as Entrepreneurs -

As Eddie George neared the end of his nine seasons in the NFL, the running back began pondering his next play.

38. NFL Players Find Second Careers as Entrepreneurs -

As Eddie George neared the end of his nine seasons in the NFL, the running back began pondering his next play.

39. Three Ways to Evaluate Nonprofit Technology -

Part one of a two-part series. “The main reason nonprofits look to update or implement technology is to acquire additional functionality that will automate more tasks, which they hope will free up time to work on more strategic projects.” – Janna Finch

40. Art Work -

It’s easy to appreciate the art in painter Jared Small’s depictions of dilapidated shacks, shotgun-style homes and other aging structures that appear to be fading away right there on his canvas, images that suggest the creaks of doors and the groans of floorboards to accompany the lonely scenes.

41. Puzzles Live -

“Life’s a puzzle. Let’s fill in the blanks.” That’s the title of a speech I’ve been giving of late. Without being too literal, I find parallels between crosswords and everyday existence.

42. Coming to a Car Near You: Auto Technology at CES -

LAS VEGAS (AP) – Self-driving cars garner much of the attention, but in reality, we're years away from tooling around in something like Knight Rider's KITT. Coming sooner to a car near you: smartphone apps on dash displays, cruise control that adapts to cars around it, remote engine starting and more.

43. End Run Gives Realtor a Come-From-Behind Win -

While the sale of 3306 Belmont Boulevard for $350,000 will not make any Top 10 lists, it was a win in which both teams – buyers and sellers – played well with time expiring.

44. Grizz in Finals? Definite Maybe -

Anything’s possible. And by anything, I mean Mississippi State was No. 1 in the college football poll this year at the same time the Kansas City Royals were playing in the World Series.

That’s about like having simultaneous lunar and solar eclipses.

45. Ardent Studios Founder John Fry Dies -

Back when he was in his mid-teens, John Fry would make frequent trips to the music store in front of Stax, the Satellite Record Shop, where Stax co-founder Estelle Axton would sell the future Ardent Studios founder 45s from behind the counter.

46. Discussion Remains in Schools Settlement -

The Memphis City Council still has a pretty strong case that its approval of a settlement between the city and Shelby County Schools over a six-year-old funding dispute will be necessary at some point.

47. Wharton and Schools Settle Six-Year Funding Dispute Without Council -

It appears Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and the Shelby County Schools board have settled the six-year dispute over city funding for schools without the Memphis City Council.

But the fast-moving compromise will likely require a council vote to fund it.

48. Stars Flock to Music City’s Ernest Tubb Record Shop -

When Bob Dylan drops by, he generally goes right for “a handful” of Hank and Carter Family recordings, although on one Lower Broadway afternoon the old man from the North Country also is reported to have purchased a “Larry the Cable Guy” DVD.

49. According to Foyle -

My early New Year’s resolution is to be more like Christopher Foyle. Demeanor-wise and wisdom-wise. No, I won’t be wearing a vest.

“Foyle’s War” is a British detective series created by Anthony Horowitz. As World War II rages, Inspector Christopher Foyle (played by Michael Kitchen) investigates crimes from his headquarters in Hastings, England. He never raises his voice. He’s never puzzled by an inconsistency. Obvious lies from the devious don’t faze him one bit.

50. Gasol, Grizzlies Refuse Satisfaction -

Odds are, Marc Gasol will not win the NBA’s Most Valuable Player Award this season.

But as Gasol would be the first to tell you, that doesn’t matter.

Neither does it take away from that moment at the end of a recent game here against the Dallas Mavericks. Gasol was at the free-throw line, scoring the last two of his 30 points as the Grizzlies secured a 114-105 victory and improved to 17-4, when the serenade started.

51. Playoff Committee Plays Political Football -

Just to be sure I hadn’t lost my mind, I checked the NFL standings. In every division, the team – or teams – with the best record occupied first place. I found this amazing.

And I’m not even an alum of Baylor or Florida State.

52. Blight of the Living Dead -

When the Smiths moved into a brand new home right before Christmas 2007, they had no idea that construction in their Antioch area subdivision would soon stop cold – and stay stopped for four years.

53. Green Hills in Full Boom Despite Traffic Woes -

Stephen Graw first moved to Green Hills in 2004 right after college, renting a house with a bunch of buddies from school. Like his neighborhood, he’s done a lot of growing in the last decade and is now a senior advisor at Sperry Van Ness Nashville and on the Chamber West Leadership Council.

54. Stunning Loss Casts Doubt on Tigers’ Season Opener -

After Division 2 Christian Brothers University had rocked the local college basketball world with its 74-70 overtime victory over the University of Memphis on Wednesday, Nov. 12, Bucs coach Mike Nienaber knew what was coming.

55. How’s Mettenberger Doing? Same as Other Rookies -

For those who are still watching the Tennessee Titans and hoping that something can go right before the 2014 season is up, it could be a long wait.

After dropping to 2-7 with Sunday’s loss at Baltimore, the Titans get to show the nation how far they have decayed this Monday night when they host the Pittsburgh Steelers at LP Field.

56. Succession Plan Charts Future For Linkous Construction -

As children, Jamie and Rusty Linkous used to hop in the family vehicle with their parents, R.E. and Clare Linkous, and visit work sites, watching firsthand the hard work their parents put into altering the built landscape of the city.

57. Grizzlies Find Respect Hard to Come By -

Perhaps it was a just coincidence. On the day that the results of the annual NBA General Managers’ survey were announced, ESPN was in Memphis for its only scheduled visit of the season.

Or perhaps this was no coincidence at all.

58. Expanding Opportunities -

The popular image of a library may be one of a dowdy old institution that loans out books and demands hushed voices from its patrons. But because of where the library system in Memphis is headed, though, that notion is – no pun intended – overdue for a rethink.

59. Tigers Look to Johnson to be Floor Maestro -

Most of them, the ones that become their college basketball team’s leading scorer or the guy that runs the show from the point, were always obvious talents.

You know the type, best player on the court at age 6 when all the other kids are carrying the basketball like a football or dribbling the ball off their knees.

60. Football Dreams -

Call the doctor, the sports doctor. Because the collective temperature of Mid-South college football fans is at unsafe levels.

Mississippi State and Ole Miss are undefeated and tied for third in the Associated Press poll. The historically downtrodden University of Memphis football program just blasted preseason American Athletic Conference favorite Cincinnati on the road and hung with both Ole Miss and UCLA.

61. Neighborhood Art -

Downtown’s South Main neighborhood may have been part of the first official arts district in the city of Memphis, but that’s not been exactly obvious while looking around on a drive or walk through the area.

62. Road to Better Mass Transit -

Picking a new transit chief is critical for a city in transition.

Next year, Nashville residents will elect a new mayor and turn over its large Metro Council.

Davidson County also expects some 200,000 new residents over the next 20 years, and much of the success of future development will depend on the ease of navigating around Nashville – already the nation’s second-worst area for sprawl, according to Smart Growth America.

63. Tigers Hope to ‘Grind’ Win Against MTSU -

It’s a big game. Big enough that the University of Memphis got the Grizzlies’ Tony Allen – “The Grindfather” – to do a short video urging fans to come out for the football game this Saturday, Sept. 20, against the Middle Tennessee Blue Raiders.

64. Raising Concerns Over Education Coverage -

With just one person reporting on schools in a metropolitan area of more than 1.3 million people, The Commercial Appeal is forging ahead with a relationship with a nonprofit journalism organization dedicated to covering education.

65. Trio of Entrepreneurs Reimagines Furniture in Broad Strokes -

Broad Avenue continues to be a haven for businesses with character, restaurants, art ventures and entrepreneurs who fit neatly into one of the city’s burgeoning cultural scenes.

Broad Strokes, a store specializing in re-creating old pieces of furniture using paint with a dash of imagination, is one of the latest such businesses to set up shop in the neighborhood.

66. City Union Presents Alternative Plan on Benefits -

Memphis Fire Fighters Association president Thomas Malone takes the union’s plan for reversing city employee and retiree health insurance coverage cutbacks to a city oversight committee Thursday, Aug. 21, on employee issues.

67. Fullilove Calls Off Sales Tax Hike Try, Unions May Try -

Memphis City Council member Janis Fullilove pulled the plug Tuesday, Aug. 19, on a proposed November referendum on a citywide half cent sales tax hike.

68. Wharton Reacts to Beale Street Incident -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. said Monday, Aug. 11, it is “upsetting” that a man found bloodied and unconscious in the Beale Street entertainment district over the weekend wasn’t immediately helped by a group of people on the street.

69. Blueprint for the Future -

It was 1992, and architect Joey Hagan was searching high and low for space for his own office.

He turned to his friend David Schuermann – the two had previously worked together at Bologna and Associates – whose firm at the time, DMS Architects, had an office at 88 Union Center Downtown.

70. Neighborhood Health -

As the owner of Inbalance Fitness in Cooper-Young, Scott Lebowitz is focused on the physical health of the clients who walk through his doors.

Starting a few years ago, however, Lebowitz began to wear an additional, albeit less obvious, professional hat. He’s also a commercial property owner, having bought the building in which his business operates as well as the space of other Cooper-Young businesses around him – which means that in addition to his clients’ health, he’s also paying close attention to the health of the neighborhood.

71. Real Pastime: Forgiving Our Stars -

A story on baltimoreravens.com carried the following headline: “Ravens fans give Ray Rice a standing ovation.”

72. ‘Sudden Change’ Means Little Job Security at University of Tennessee -

KNOXVILLE — Don’t look for University of Tennessee football coach Butch Jones to play favorites when fall training camp begins Friday, Aug. 1.

Jones is all about open competition. Every practice. Every session. Every minute.

73. FedEx Founder Highlights Economic Club Fall Slate -

FedEx founder Fred Smith will make a rare public speaking appearance in Memphis Nov. 6, as part of the fall 2014 lineup of speakers planned for the Economic Club of Memphis.

74. Enduring Connections -

When Patrick Woods and three colleagues decided to launch a social organization to connect young professionals in Memphis, the name they gave it reflected the similarity of its demographic to a particular flow of water that moves beneath the surface, one that’s unwise to ignore.

75. Tigers Seek Consistency From Goodwin, Nichols -

Last season, any basketball doctor examining the state of the Memphis Tigers would have started by taking the pulse of the backcourt.

Typically, the Tigers needed at least two of their four senior guards to be pumping out points, energy and defense or the team was going to flounder.

76. TheGRIND Evolves as First Anniversary Approaches -

The one-year anniversary is approaching for theGRIND, a digital publication that launched in January to bring its own take on covering the people, places and events of Memphis.

Leading up to that milestone, the publication has several things in the works that collectively showcase how it’s evolved quickly from an idea to the reality of an ambitious media startup. Editor in chief Kendra Lyons, for example, says plans in the works include a print version of the digital-only outlet, as well as a coffee table-style book that would feature the best photography and stories from theGRIND.

77. Cargill Inc. to Invest $45 Million In West Memphis Grain Facility -

Cargill Inc. will invest $45 million to build a grain handling and shipping facility in West Memphis, the company announced Friday, June 10.

78. Sherman Joins Campbell Clinic as Sports Medicine Physician -

Dr. Henry “Hank” Sherman has joined Campbell Clinic Orthopaedics as a sports medicine family practice physician in its Southaven office. Sherman treats patients who suffer from a variety of orthopedic injuries – from competitive athletes looking to get back in the game to weekend warriors who want to stay active later in life.

79. Digital ‘Buy Local’ Platform MadeIn Set to Launch -

Next week, a venture called MadeIn is launching a new shopping platform in Memphis to connect people to a website where they can buy and sell local goods.

The venture is a digital platform that will act as a kind of local version of Amazon, and MadeIn creator Jennifer Sadler said her startup also will sell curated gift boxes that include an assortment of local products.

80. Juvenile Court Judge Race Remains Hard-Fought -

The candidates are counting down the days to the July 18 start of early voting in advance of the Aug. 7 election day.

With one more weekend of campaigning until early voting dictates a shift in tactics, the sizeable cast of the longest ballot of any Shelby County election cycle is searching at events for crowds comprised of mostly voters rather than other candidates and their campaign workers.

81. Editorial: Time for City, County Residency Standard -

We have a residency problem.

In the world of local politics not everyone we elected from a district lives in that district.

But they should. There are laws that say they should.

Some of the folks we elect who don’t live in the district they represent make those laws that have residency loopholes big enough for them to build a house in.

82. I Choose Memphis: Airika Wallace Gigas -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Airika Wallace Gigas

83. A Wise Sports Fan Appreciates the Journey -

So what does Team USA’s soccer experience and the Memphis Grizzlies experience have in common?

You know, besides the obvious – playing against a bunch of floppers/whiners, be they from Portugal or Lob City?

84. Highway Crisis Looms as Soon as August, US Warns -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Gridlock in Washington will lead to gridlock across the country if lawmakers can't quickly agree on how to pay for highway and transit programs, President Barack Obama and his top officials warned Tuesday.

85. What’s in a Name? -

Let’s consider our own Memphis Grizzlies. The team kept a nickname that migrated from Vancouver because fans here have embraced it. In fact, you or someone in your family probably owns a cap or a shirt bearing the team nickname or the likeness of a grizzly bear.

86. Fewer Americans Apply for Jobless Aid -

Fewer Americans sought unemployment benefits last week, as the number of people collecting jobless aid fell to its lowest level in more than six years.

The Labor Department said Thursday that weekly applications for unemployment benefits fell 6,000 to a seasonally adjusted 312,000. The four-week average, a less volatile measure, declined to 311,750.

87. Fewer Americans Apply for Jobless Aid -

Fewer Americans sought unemployment benefits last week, as the number of people collecting jobless aid fell to its lowest level in more than six years.

The Labor Department said Thursday that weekly applications for unemployment benefits fell 6,000 to a seasonally adjusted 312,000. The four-week average, a less volatile measure, declined to 311,750.

88. Marisol’s World -

When “Marisol: Sculptures and Works on Paper” opens Saturday, June 14, at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, sculptor Marisol Escobar will be at her New York home, where she spends much of her time, working occasionally 40 to 50 years after being in the spotlight of the art world.

89. Merck to Pay $3.85 Billion for Hepatitis C Drug Developer -

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) – Merck & Co. will spend about $3.85 billion for Idenix Pharmaceuticals Inc., a small company developing hepatitis C medicines that, together with Merck's experimental drugs, could produce lucrative combo therapies that quickly cure most patients with the blood-borne virus afflicting tens of millions.

90. Floyd Part of Relationship-Driven Team at Magna -

Banks may tout with increasing frequency their facility with the array of digital tools available today, but there is a downside to that trend as financial institutions race to catch up with their more mobile-oriented customers.

91. Consumer Spending Down 0.1 Percent in April -

U.S. consumers cut back on spending in April for the first time in a year, taking an unexpected pause after a big jump during the previous month. The results, however, are unlikely to derail an expected spring rebound in the economy.

92. Book Serves as ‘Love Letter’ to Memphis -

Samantha Crespo has written her first book with a simple goal: to make readers fall in love with Memphis.

A writer for a few years now of products for the Memphis Convention & Visitors Bureau and Tnvacation.com, Crespo’s book “100 Things to Do in Memphis Before You Die” is exactly what the title suggests.

93. Go Deep or Go Home -

We meet companies and nonprofits who have been marketing to the same lists for years. Often, these lists and the assumptions about the people on their lists are more than a decade old. These aged lists may have been scrubbed, but that is simply for those who have fallen off the grid, one way or another. This point should be obvious to any reader of this column: there are major problems with this scenario.

94. New Redbirds GM has Deep Cardinals Connections -

The huge ring that Craig Unger wears on his finger just doesn’t tell the story of the St. Louis Cardinals’ 2011 World Series triumph, although that’s the story Unger is in the business of trying to help replicate.

95. Editorial: Memphis Must Make Time for Civic Renewal -

New beginnings are a constant throughout our lives as well as the seasons -- religious, cultural, natural, even sports – that many of us rely on to mark the path those lives take.

One of the more difficult aspects of maintaining a new beginning for so many of us is that it often represents a new way of looking at a world that doesn’t appear to have changed that much or even enough to match the change we are undergoing.

96. High-Tech Workshop -

Give a crew of tech-savvy creatives a digital sandbox in which to stretch their imagination, and they’re liable to build something fun and inventive that requires so much inspiration it feeds back into their real job.

97. Yellen: Fed Stimulus Still Needed for Job Market -

NEW YORK (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Wednesday that the U.S. job market still needs help from the Fed and that the central bank must remain intent on adjusting its policy to respond to unforeseen challenges.

98. Avoiding Heartache -

The Grizzlies had just watched the Golden State Warriors score 14 straight points to turn a seven-point deficit into a 100-93 victory. Yet Memphis coach Dave Joerger rejected the notion that the Grizzlies, who also happened to miss their last seven shots in the fourth quarter, had lost the game more than the Warriors had won it.

99. Now Tack! -

In sailing, when the wind shifts direction, you must move your sails or risk losing the wind. The first indication of a shifting breeze comes from the telltales, strips of lightweight material attached to the sails that foreshadow a change in conditions. Recently, the market telltales have been active.

100. Report: Tennessee Offered Contingent Incentives to VW -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Tennessee's incentive offer to Volkswagen was made contingent on the labor situation at the German automaker's plant in Chattanooga developing to the "satisfaction" of Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's administration, according to documents obtained by WTVF-TV in Nashville.