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Editorial Results (free)

1. Affordable Homes in an Unaffordable Market -

The gold rush of residential development throughout Middle Tennessee conceals what some in the region say is a growing crisis in affordable housing.

New homes and condos come on to the market every day, and even more are under construction or still in the planning stage, but those homes are often on the higher end of the price scale.

2. Fairgrounds’ Future -

It’s hard to imagine that a 65,000-seat stadium could be overlooked. Perhaps it’s because the Liberty Bowl wasn’t in the center of the Mid-South Fairgrounds when the stadium was built in 1965; it was on the eastern side of 155 acres of city-owned land, with a rail spur running along its eastern boundary.

3. Problem Properties -

Memphis has a crippling issue with blight, and one nonprofit is front and center with changing the culture that led to the city’s inundation of abandoned properties and lots.

Neighborhood Preservation Inc. was founded in 2012 as a court-appointed receiver of properties taken away from neglectful owners. Over the years, it has evolved to become a robust advocate for stronger legislation and development tools to deal with problem properties.

4. THDA Kicks Off Anti-Blight Loan Effort in Memphis -

The latest blight fight effort from city of Memphis leaders is a $6 million partnership with the Tennessee Housing Development Agency.

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and THDA executive director Ralph Perrey announced the partnership Wednesday, Aug. 5, in the Fairlawn neighborhood in South Memphis near the Lamar Avenue interstate interchange.

5. THDA Kicks Off Anti-Blight Loan Effort in Memphis -

The latest blight fight effort from city of Memphis leaders is a $6 million partnership with the Tennessee Housing Development Agency.

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and THDA executive director Ralph Perrey announced the partnership Wednesday, Aug. 5, in the Fairlawn neighborhood in South Memphis near the Lamar Avenue interstate interchange.

6. Tennessee to Announce $6 Million Blight Elimination Program -

The Tennessee Housing Development Agency will host a press conference Wednesday, Aug. 5, in Memphis to announce a $6 million blight elimination program aimed at transforming eligible, neglected properties into green spaces.

7. Frayser Flexibility -

Steve Lockwood could see the retail row across North Watkins Street from his office at the Frayser Community Development Corp. in the Georgian Hills Shopping Center.

8. East of Cleveland -

Consultants for the Memphis Area Transit Authority are exploring an extension of the Madison Avenue trolley line east of Cleveland Street to Overton Square and North Cooper Street.

It is one of seven Midtown routes the transit authority might change or enhance with a bus rapid transit concept that involves fewer stops, fewer turns off main thoroughfares and shorter travel times.

9. Details Emerge on Planned Binghampton Retail Center -

The Binghampton neighborhood is inching closer to landing a grocery store as plans for a neighborhood retail center there come into clearer focus.

The Binghampton Development Corp. has signed a “letter of intent” with an unidentified national supermarket chain to build a store at the corner of Sam Cooper Boulevard and Tillman Street. It also is pursuing other retailers for the planned development that will bring more goods and jobs to the community.

10. Gulch Approaching 50 Percent Buildout -

Nashville’s storied Gulch, originally the home of the downtown railway terminal, is approaching another milestone in its long history.

Revitalization of the area began in the early 2000s, and The Gulch Improvement District was formed in 2006. Since that time, developers have found great success in luring in upscale residential, commercial and mixed-use tenants.

11. Greening the Region -

A result of a $2.6 million grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and two years of planning, the pre-implementation phase of the Mid-South Regional Greenprint and Sustainability Plan is gaining momentum.

12. Panel Alters Wharton’s Plan for Memphis Fairgrounds -

The Mid-South Coliseum becomes a pavilion with a grove next to a multi-purpose sports center. A 10-acre water park fronts on Central Avenue where a high school gym now stands.

A second north-south Tiger Lane intersects with the current east-west version.

13. Panel Alters Wharton’s Plan for Memphis Fairgrounds -

The Mid-South Coliseum becomes a pavilion with a grove next to a multi-purpose sports center. A 10-acre water park fronts on Central Avenue where a high school gym now stands.

A second north-south Tiger Lane intersects with the current east-west version.

14. Frayser Community Fair Scheduled for Saturday -

NeighborWorks America’s national NeighborWorks Week puts redevelopment, empowerment and civic pride at center stage with a variety of events, including a Frayser community fair this Saturday.

“We wanted to have a fair that connected neighbors and neighborhoods to resources,” said Amy Schaftlein, director of development at United Housing Inc.

15. ULI Fairgrounds Panel Has Busy Schedule -

A team of eight out-of-town planning experts has a busy week ahead as it wades into the simmering local debate about plans to recast the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

And the first hard copy of something the Urban Land Institute-assembled group is likely to get are the comments from four town hall meetings held in different parts of Memphis over two evenings last week.

16. Making the Connection -

Archie Willis III had just earned his master’s degree in business at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill when he returned to Memphis in 1981 to help his father, A.W. Willis Jr., redevelop the Adler Hotel Annex.

17. Oak Park Apartments Demolition Latest in Blight Campaign -

The group of Memphis leaders and Glenview-area homeowners standing in a parking lot last week surrounded by the shells of two two-story apartment buildings and the charred foundation of a third paused for a moment.

18. Eden Square Breaks Ground in Memphis' Hickory Hill -

Marina Cove apartments was known in its 1980s prime for its water features – a set of canals.

And when a crowd of 300 gathered Saturday, May 16, to break ground there for the first phase of the $40 million Eden Square development, a small pond that isn’t in the plans had formed by the tent.

19. 1 in 4 US Renters Must Use Half Their Pay for Housing Costs -

WASHINGTON (AP) – More than one in four U.S. renters have to use at least half their family income to pay for housing and utilities.

That's the finding of an analysis of Census data by Enterprise Community Partners, a nonprofit that helps finance affordable housing. The number of such households has jumped 26 percent to 11.25 million since 2007.

20. Foote Homes Effort Gets Rebrand, New Details -

With Bass Pro Shops formally opening this week, the next big project on City Hall’s drawing board is a remake of Foote Homes.

The ambitious plan to demolish and rebuild the city’s last large public housing project, using it as a catalyst for redevelopment of the much larger south Downtown into South Memphis area, has been on the books longer than The Pyramid. That’s if you start the timeline with the demolition of the first large housing project, LeMoyne Gardens, in the late 1990s.

21. Midtown Momentum -

Kroger Co., buoyed by the Crosstown Concourse development and increased investment in Midtown as a whole, has purchased properties associated with the long-dormant Washington Bottoms project at Poplar Avenue and Cleveland Street.

22. 1 Million New Residents: Where Will They Live? -

At least 1 million people are expected to move to the Nashville region over the next 20 years. Already, the early arrivals have begun to dramatically change the landscape of the suburban counties surrounding the city.

23. Heritage Trail Redevelopment Plan Resurfaces -

A long-delayed city plan to remake a large swath of Downtown’s southern end appears to be making a comeback.

Memphis Housing and Community Development director Robert Lipscomb said Tuesday that the city expects to receive good news on the Heritage Trail development plan sometime this year.

24. Foote Homes Targeted by Federal Jobs Training Grant -

With a HUD official in town last week bearing word of a $3 million job training grant for public housing residents, city leaders remained focused on what Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. calls “the big one.”

25. Taking Action -

The windows on the old Executive Inn on Airways Boulevard where Brooks Road dead ends had been busted out for several years, leaving the curtains in its long-empty rooms fluttering in the wind.

But in January, demolition crews began ripping away at the blighted property at 3222 Airways, providing relief to residents and business owners whose own property values suffered because of the neglected property in that corner of Whitehaven.

26. Love Song to a City -

As the story goes, Al Green wrote the lyrics to “Let’s Stay Together” in about five minutes. In 1972, the song – which spans just three minutes and 13 seconds – reached No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100.

27. Holding On -

The national outlook for traditional enclosed malls is bleak. No new enclosed mall has been built in the U.S. since 2006. More than 24 have closed since 2010, and an additional 60 are teetering on the edge, according to data from Green Street Advisors. Around 15 percent of malls nationwide are expected to close in the next decade.

28. Affordable Housing Gets Foot in the Door in Mayoral Election -

In recent weeks, the mayor’s race has taken a new focus: Affordable housing.

Some in the community feel this is unwarranted and take issue with organizations such as NOAH (Nashville Organized for Action and Hope), which are forcing the candidates to spend more time on social issues, which I support.

29. Southbrook Project Resurfaces Again -

The owners of Southbrook Mall got $1.5 million in improvements from City Hall this week. But it wasn’t the $1.5 million the owners of the Whitehaven mall wanted in 2012, when the city contemplated giving them that sum to fix the roof and make repairs to the mall’s heating and air conditioning system.

30. Goldman Sachs ‘Confident’ in Memphis -

In April, Rachel Diller, managing director of the urban investment group at Goldman Sachs, received a phone call in her New York office from officials at Phoenix-based Dudley Ventures.

The executives at Dudley Ventures, which specializes in large tax-credit supported projects, were arranging financing for the $200 million effort to transform the old Sears Crosstown property and wanted to know if the New York-based investment bank was interested.

31. Alternative Ending -

The city of Memphis secured $6.7 million in federal funding last week to improve and rehab public housing.

Meanwhile, the city’s application for a much larger federal grant to demolish the city’s last large public housing development was making the rounds at the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development.

32. Crosstown Crossroads -

Richard Spore and his colleague at the Memphis office of the Bass Berry & Sims law firm have worked on several ambitious, game-changing projects like the transformation of Overton Square and Bass Pro Shops’ redevelopment of The Pyramid.

33. Women’s Foundation Announces 29 Grants -

The Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis has selected 29 recipients to receive grant funding for its 2014-2015 funding year, with allocations totaling $510,000.

Each year, the foundation invites organizations whose projects or continuing programs fall within its mission, vision and one or more of five areas of focus (economic and financial literacy, entrepreneurship, job readiness/career development, leadership development and non-traditional job training) to apply for funding.

34. Women’s Foundation Announces 29 Grants -

The Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis has selected 29 recipients to receive grant funding for its 2014-2015 funding year, with allocations totaling $510,000.

Each year, the foundation invites organizations whose projects or programs fall within its mission, vision and one or more of five areas of focus (economic and financial literacy, entrepreneurship, job readiness/career development, leadership development and non-traditional job training) to apply for funding.

35. Creative Destruction -

For about three years Veronica Skinner called the two-story, 24-unit apartment building at 480 Tillman St. in the Binghampton neighborhood home.

36. Loeb Acquires Newby’s Restaurant Space -

Memphis-based Loeb Properties has acquired one of the most venerable locations on the Highland strip.

Loeb purchased the long-time home of club and restaurant Newby’s at 535 and 539 Highland St. from Paragon Bank. A purchase price was not disclosed Friday, Jan. 2.

37. Victorian Village Homes See Demand -

A new single-family residential project in the heart of Victorian Village is doing very well, thank you very much.

Five of the eights lots inside Planters Row II, a unique master planned community on Jefferson Avenue in Victorian Village between the Medical Center and Downtown core, are already optioned or under contract after the first day of sales, according to Scott Blake, president of Design 500 Inc.

38. Edison Park Finds Ally in Habitat for Humanity -

This Thanksgiving marks two years that Aisha Lbhalla, her husband and their two young sons have lived in Edison Park.

They have a single-family home that backs up to her older son’s school, Thomas A. Edison Elementary. The house has four bedrooms, brick facing, a garage and nearly 1,500 square feet, Lbhalla says.

39. No Gang Zone Targets Legends Park Area -

In June a group of 100 gang members lined both sides of Mosby Avenue between Dunlap and Ayers Streets, shutting down the area, as they celebrated the birthday of a fellow gang member, according to the local Multi-Agency Gang Unit.

40. New No Gang Zone Targets Dixie Homes Area -

For the second time in a year, local authorities have declared a “safety zone” in Memphis where gang members are forbidden by a civil court order from congregating in public.

The street gang named in the Environmental Court order signed Monday, Oct. 6, by General Sessions Judge Larry Potter is known as the Dixie Homes Murda Gang, 47 Neighborhood Crips and Team 400 among other names.

41. New No Gang Zone Targets Dixie Homes Area -

For the second time in a year, local authorities have declared a “safety zone” in Memphis where gang members are forbidden by a civil court order from congregating in public.

The street gang named in the Environmental Court order signed Monday, Oct. 6, by General Sessions Judge Larry Potter is known as the Dixie Homes Murda Gang, 47 Neighborhood Crips and Team 400 among other names.

42. NashvilleNext Planners Move to Next Step -

As the city shifts into fall, planners are gearing up for the final phase of NashvilleNext, a three-year long planning process that will have a major impact on growth and development patterns in Davidson County over the next 25 years.

43. HipD: Donelson Finds Its Cool Side -

The tag “Hip Donelson” evoked plenty of snickers, eye rolls and snarky comments when it first appeared. After all, the local joke goes, Donelson’s known for hip replacements – not hipsters.

44. Tennessee Steps Up the Fight Against Blight -

While the national economy is still rebounding from the 2008 housing crisis, foreclosures, vacant homes and blighted properties are a lingering issue many markets throughout the country have to address.

45. Will More Rentals Slow Rising Home Prices? -

Hardly a day goes by that a residential real estate broker is not asked: “When will it end?”

Elliot Eisenberg, Ph.D., authors Elliot Eisenberg’s Brief Blog and sends it daily to subscribers. Here’s what he had to say on the subject in his August 25 edition:

46. Memphis Multifamily Sector on Firm Ground -

It was 2008 and Memphis-based Makowsky Ringel Greenberg had just acquired a swath of property inside Boyle Investment Co.’s master planned Schilling Farms community in Collierville for a new multifamily development.

47. Reshaping a City, One Lot at a Time -

John G. Brittle Jr. doesn’t have an office. He has a war room. The space, crowded with maps, charts, books, piles of paper and marked-up spreadsheets, is ground zero for InfillNashville, the 10-person team of site selection specialists that Brittle leads at Village Real Estate Services.

48. Springing to Life -

When Ridgeland, Miss.-based development firm the Bryan Co. broke ground on The Horizon condominium tower in 2007, it was at the peak of the housing bubble and optimism from elected officials and Downtown boosters was equally high.

49. Building Community -

Over a recent weekend, around 30 members of Grace-St. Luke’s Episcopal Church descended on a home in the Northwood Hills community just north of Raleigh.

They came armed with determination and demolition tools, spending most of the weekend ripping out old appliances, tearing away wallpaper that had seen better days and preparing the dog-eared house for a rehabilitation project that will make it a home.

50. French Fort Plan Calls for $150 Million Development -

What would begin as 67 apartments in the former U.S. Marine Hospital and nurses’ quarters on the northern edge of the French Fort neighborhood would grow in phases to a $150 million development south of E.H. Crump Boulevard, according to a plan unveiled over the weekend.

51. Medical Makeover -

After suffering from years of benign neglect, a new, more invigorated Memphis Medical Center is finally beginning to take shape.

A drive or walk around the area these days shows the hallmarks of a changing landscape – bulldozers, backhoes, cranes and construction crews working feverishly to forge the new urban environment.

52. Building Community -

The Carrington at Schilling Farms looks like an apartment community you might find in Downtown Memphis or a town square, but the development – Boyle Investment Co.’s first apartment project in more than 30 years – is in the heart of Collierville.

53. Lessons for Memphis Abound in Atlanta’s Beltline -

The Atlanta Beltline is an infrastructure framework around the urban core of Atlanta – a 22-mile loop of mostly abandoned railroads that is being transformed into a transit greenway.

It is a linear park with streetcars, bicycle paths and pedestrian trails that will connect more than 40 diverse neighborhoods, as well as city schools, historic sites and cultural locales.

54. Heritage Trail Likely to Continue Despite Rejection -

The plan to demolish the last large public housing development in Memphis and use the demolition as a catalyst for a larger redevelopment of the surrounding area did not make the final cut with federal housing officials in Washington.

55. Walker Avenue Remake -

The former Mason YMCA on Walker Avenue near the University of Memphis is getting a new look. The redevelopment of the 11,500-square-foot property is underway and should be complete by the end of the year.

56. CDC Leaders Have Challenges in Communities -

Community development corporations are designed to help create more housing in areas where investors and banks might not normally invest without incentives.

But the CDCs, as they are known, are increasingly in the business of adding business development to the housing in a combination of community building.

57. Heritage Trail Financing Plans Change -

The city of Memphis is making changes in its plans to finance two housing developments that are part of the broader Heritage Trail plan for redevelopment of the area south of FedExForum and into South Memphis.

58. Germantown Planning Commission OKs Plan for Whole Foods -

Developers on Tuesday, Jan. 7, cleared a key regulatory hurdle for a planned Whole Foods Market store in Germantown.

Before a packed house, the Germantown Planning Commission voted to approve a revamped plan for a new Whole Foods store at the southeast corner of the intersection of Poplar Avenue and Pete Mitchell Road, on the eastern edge of Germantown’s Central Business District.

59. Council Opens Unfunded Liability Plan Talks With Questions -

Memphis City Council members again rejected Tuesday, Dec. 17, an increase in the city’s monthly solid waste fee and affirmed a 2.1 percent hike in the Memphis Light Gas and Water Division water rate hike.

60. Soulful Synergy -

What happened at the corner of McLemore Avenue and College Street in the 1960s is nothing short of extraordinary.

At the crossroads of segregated neighborhoods in South Memphis, two white business partners would open the doors wide to whites and blacks alike, who congregated to write and record songs that would set off a soul explosion heard around the world.

61. Traffic Concerns Delay Germantown Whole Foods -

The development team behind a proposed Whole Foods store in Germantown is going back to the drawing board after some neighbors expressed concerns about the project, particularly over traffic.

The development team withdrew its application from the Germantown Planning Commission’s Tuesday, Dec. 3, agenda and will return next month. After that, the development team would need approval from Germantown’s Board of Mayor and Aldermen.

62. Flipping the Switch -

Tim Bolding, executive director of United Housing Inc., had become increasingly interested over the years in energy efficiency, sustainability and alternate energy sources when he saw homes in New Orleans being rebuilt with solar panels.

63. Campus Connections -

The University of Memphis is in the early stages of updating its campus master plan, and it will seek input from its neighbors as it moves into its next century of higher education.

The U of M has hired the Smith Group JJR of Ann Arbor, Mich., to lead the effort with Memphis-based LRK Inc. serving as the local partner.

64. US Bank Accused of Housing Discrimination in Memphis -

A fair housing organization is accusing a second major bank of discriminating against minority neighborhoods and property owners in Memphis for the way it handled bank-owned properties.

The National Fair Housing Alliance on Tuesday, Oct. 15, amended a complaint with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, alleging U.S. Bank failed to maintain and market properties in minority neighborhoods, while paying special care to its homes in predominantly white neighborhoods. The national nonprofit housing alliance said its investigation found that the bank’s properties in predominantly minority neighborhoods were much more likely to have structural and aesthetic problems than its homes in white neighborhoods.

65. MEMFix Goes South -

Of the neighborhoods in which the Mayor’s Innovation Delivery Team has been working to build retail and commercial trade, none has the amount of history, turmoil, potential and perception problems found in the two blocks east and west of Mississippi Boulevard and Walker Avenue.

66. City Explores Crucial Crosstown Funding -

City officials are exploring multiple options for financing $15 million in infrastructure improvements at the Sears Crosstown site, key funding that could make or break the ambitious $175 million project.

67. Complaint Alleges Bank of America Discrimination -

Bank of America allegedly discriminated against minority neighborhoods and property owners in Memphis in the way it handled bank-owned properties, according to an amended complaint filed with the federal government.

68. Complaint: Bank of America Discriminated in Memphis -

Bank of America allegedly discriminated against minority neighborhoods and property owners in Memphis in the way it handled bank-owned properties, according to an amended complaint filed with the federal government.

69. Saddle Creek Growth Sign of Future for City -

The Shops of Saddle Creek is in store for a multimillion-dollar makeover and expansion, a project that will likely be the first of several development dominoes to fall in Germantown.

Texas-based Trademark Property Co., which has operated the retail center since 2011, will expand the portion of the 148,000-square-foot lifestyle center on the southwest side of Poplar Avenue and West Street in Germantown.

70. Neighborhood Vitality -

The history at the Four-Way Restaurant is as rich and soulful as the food.

The walls of the South Memphis institution are decorated with photographs of politicians, athletes, entertainers, business leaders and civil rights icons – including the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. – who made the famous restaurant at Mississippi Boulevard and Walker Avenue a “home away from home.”

71. Likely Labor Rules Would Aid Veterans, Disabled, Unions -

WASHINGTON (AP) – With Thomas Perez now confirmed as head of the Labor Department, the agency is expected to unleash a flurry of new regulations that have been bottled up for months – a prospect that has business leaders worried and labor advocates cheering.

72. Green Shoots -

The busiest time of the year along the Shelby Farms Greenline is also the busiest time of the year for Cheffie’s, an example of a business that is a direct beneficiary of being near the Tillman Street end of the greenline that extends east to Shelby Farms Park.

73. Historic Transformation -

Around nine years ago Scott Blake was walking to St. Mary’s Episcopal Cathedral when he noticed a window in the tower at the historic James Lee House in Victorian Village had been blown out, exposing it to the elements.

74. Downtown Offices Gain Attention -

The Downtown Memphis Commission focuses on living, working and playing Downtown.

Downtown has experienced tremendous success in the living and playing areas over the years, but the “work” part of the equation still needed a boost. So Downtown officials have launched several efforts to bring more workers to the area and promote and capitalize on existing commercial real estate successes.

75. Just Cause -

The concept of environmental justice is joining the issue of sustainability in new discussions about planning and the way cities like Memphis should work.

Local and regional planners meet Friday, April 19, at the University of Memphis to talk about “just sustainability” with the Tufts University planner who has been writing about it for the last decade.

76. Social Suds Brings Services to Soulsville -

With a bubble machine on the roof, the new South Memphis Alliance laundromat and resource center opened Wednesday, April 3, at 1044 S. Bellevue Blvd.

77. Crosstown Leaders Discuss Ambitious Project -

Leaders of the Crosstown Development Project talked this month with The Memphis News editorial board about their plans for the adaptive reuse of the 1.5 million-square-foot, circa-1927 Sears Crosstown building.

78. Aerotropolis Pitch to Council Receives Mixed Reaction -

After years of very general talk about the aerotropolis concept, Memphis City Council members are ready for leaders of the effort to bring it in for a landing in specific terms that work with plans in smaller areas of the district around Memphis International Airport.

79. South Main’s New Life -

The history of the South Main Historic Arts District is as colorful as its present-day users, an alternating rhythm of sorts in Memphis’ songbook.

The area has oscillated from its ritzy suburban roots of the 1800s to the industrial era ghost town of the 20th century and now to its current status as Downtown’s flourishing arts and boutique district and the subject of some $100 million in investment. And it’s all due to stakeholders who braved the status quo in distinguishing the southern end of the Central Business District as that funky place with an indescribable vibe.

80. Riley Takes Reins Of Women Attorneys Group -

Fran Riley was named president of the Association for Women Attorneys at the organization’s 33rd annual banquet and silent auction last month.

Riley is a law clerk to the five judges of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Western District of Tennessee.

81. Tax Zone Would Benefit Fairgrounds -

The Tourism Development Zone that Memphis officials will seek in Nashville over the next three months would generate tax revenue from Cooper-Young, the Midtown Union Avenue corridor and Overton Square for the redevelopment of the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

82. Reardon Cautions Downtowners About Heritage Trail -

The University of Memphis professor spearheading the opposition of demolishing the city’s last remaining public housing project in the Vance Avenue neighborhood says that while the Heritage Trail Community Redevelopment Plan appears to be on “indefinite hold,” it is not dead, and Downtowners should beware.

83. Renewed Focus -

Reginald Milton calls it the “dirty little secret” of nonprofits whose mission is to provide social services.

84. Reardon Speaks Out Against City’s Approach to Housing -

The University of Memphis professor leading the resistance to a still-forming plan to demolish the city’s last large public housing project says the city’s approach to transforming public housing since the late 1990s hasn’t worked.

85. Heritage Trail Plan Raises Concerns -

While the focus of the Heritage Trail Community Redevelopment Plan is on public housing projects Cleaborn Pointe at Heritage Landing and Foote Homes, the 20-year plan has far reaching implications for Downtown stakeholders, especially real estate developers.

86. Expert: Investors Confound Housing -

The role of investor-driven neighborhoods in Memphis is growing, and the impact on different kinds of neighborhoods is largely unstudied and unknown.

For instance, what does it mean that going into 2012, 54 percent of residential property sales were accounted for by investor purchases from the Real Estate Owned (REO) inventory of foreclosing lenders?

87. Rekindling Crosstown -

Video artist Chris Miner says one way to explain the redevelopment of the Sears Crosstown building is likening it to the process of creating art.

“You get into it with a general idea of what you want to do, but then you kind of let it take you wherever you are going to go or wherever the piece wants to go,” he said.

88. Rise of House Flipping Focus Of Seminar -

The impact of the foreclosure crisis on Shelby County home values is intricate and far-reaching.

Recent estimates by real estate information company Chandler Reports suggest that nearly a quarter of Memphis’ total housing stock are non-owner occupied.

89. Soul Map -

The Soulsville arrows beneath the Bellevue Boulevard railroad overpasses near Walker Avenue point north and south. It is the first indication that you are in an area where several possibilities can coexist.

90. Events Showcase Soulsville’s ‘Blank Canvas’ -

A group of organizations working to bring to life the Soulsville community ended a busy weekend that is an indication of the area’s promise at about where the produce section was supposed to be in the Soulsville Towne Center supermarket.

91. Crosstown Stakeholder Pleased With Development’s Direction -

Todd Richardson gave some schemes – albeit changing ones – of the redeveloped Sears Crosstown building in Midtown Friday, Oct. 5, at Universal Commercial Real Estate’s Regional Minority Business Entrepreneur Power Breakfast.

92. Council to Vote on Cleaborn Homes -

With a vote Tuesday, Oct. 2, the Memphis City Council will change the name of the old Cleaborn Homes public housing development to Cleaborn Pointe at Heritage Landing and the name of the larger south Downtown-into-South Memphis Triangle Noir plan to Heritage Trails.

93. LRK Designs Honored With Industry Excellence Awards -

Two of Memphis-based LRK Inc.’s designs have received national acclaim from the Multi-Housing News Excellence Awards, which honor the multifamily industry’s most noteworthy people, companies and properties.

94. Midtown Utopia -

Of Memphis’ tales of humble beginnings, of which there are many, the fluctuating renaissance of the Cooper-Young neighborhood is certainly compelling throughout.

The area has cycled from its 19th century roots to 1970s crime and neglect to its present-day status as one of the largest historic districts in the Southeast, a magnet of all ages and walks of life. All thanks to individuals and organizations that wouldn’t settle for sub-par quality in their tiny town within the bustling Bluff City.

95. Return on Investment -

Most people already know some of the basic elements of the banking business. From the large national lenders with a Memphis presence to the community banks in the suburbs, one common element is they make money by charging borrowers more than the bank pays in interest to depositors.

96. Difference of Opinion -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration and a group of neighborhood leaders in the Vance Avenue area agree on highlighting the significant history of the area south of FedExForum.

Some kind of trail linking up more than a dozen sights is a feature both groups are planning for the area.

97. Vance Collaborative to Unveil Plan -

When the Vance Avenue Collaborative unveils its five-year, six-project plan Thursday, Sept. 13, for revitalizing the area south of FedExForum there will be some differences from what Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration has been thinking.

98. Nonprofit Center Could be New South Memphis Gateway -

The giant milk bottle will outlive the old dairy plant it stands atop in South Memphis. For more than 80 years, the giant milk bottle adorning a now old and crumbling dairy building on Bellevue Boulevard at Walker Avenue has been an icon.

99. Wharton Hosts Fundraiser Amidst Development Blitz -

Less than a year after winning election to a full four year term as Memphis Mayor, A C Wharton Jr. held a campaign fundraiser Tuesday, Aug. 28, at the Memphis Botanic Garden.

The $1,000-a-person event invitation included a letter that said the money could be used for a re-election campaign and/or for donation by Wharton to candidates in other races as well as to donate to organizations.

100. Planning Continues for Broad, Binghampton -

As after-school traffic made its way north and south on Tillman Street last week, a crossing guard whistled children across one of the narrow streets by Lester Community Center.

The traffic was mostly cars, but the occasional bicycle from the nearby western terminus of the Shelby Farms Greenline whizzed by as well.