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Editorial Results (free)

1. US Postal Service Loses $2 Billion This Spring -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. Postal Service lost $2 billion this spring despite increasing its volume and charging consumers more money to send mail, officials said Monday.

The loss for the spring quarter, which ended June 30, was significantly higher than the $740 million loss for the same three-month period last year. The agency blamed increases in compensation and benefit costs for the red ink and said it would be unable to make a congressionally mandated payment of $5.7 billion this September for health benefits for future retirees. The loss came despite a 2 percent increase in operating revenue compared to last spring.

2. Cannon Wright Blount Names Wages as Partner -

It might be easy to think of Mike Wages’ line of work as involving stone-faced number-crunchers whose main task involves making sure figures line up correctly, as they focus mostly on gathering and presenting data.

3. Walgreen Turns Down Inversion to Cut Tax Bill -

Walgreen plans to keep its roots firmly planted in the United States, saying it will no longer pursue an overseas reorganization that would have trimmed its U.S. taxes but drew political scorn.

The nation's largest drugstore chain – which bills itself as "America's premier pharmacy" – said Wednesday that it will buy the remaining stake in Swiss health and beauty retailer Alliance Boots that it does not already own.

4. From Despair to Belief -

A July weekday afternoon, about 2:45. It’s the perfect time for just about anyone to be nodding off in class.

But in the basement of Midtown Church of Christ, where HopeWorks Inc. is housed, class is in session and a dozen men and their teacher are having a lively discussion.

5. Council Moves to Bridge Gaps in Health Coverage Changes -

The ad hoc committee that gathered municipal union leaders, city retirees and Memphis City Council members at the same table to talk about city health insurance meets Thursday, July 17, for the first time since the council approved health insurance plan changes that have drawn vocal protests from city employees and retirees.

6. Wharton Courts Alternatives in Benefits Dispute -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. says any alternatives are welcome to the coming health insurance changes for city employees and retirees.

But delaying the roll out of those changes in January is not an option. And neither is reopening the city budget or the city property tax rate.

7. Budget Reality Informs Response to Sick-Outs -

For about a year, Memphis Fire Department Director Alvin Benson has been taking ladder trucks out of service to deal with firefighters on vacation and on sick leave at much lower levels than those that surfaced Wednesday.

8. Highway Crisis Looms as Soon as August, US Warns -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Gridlock in Washington will lead to gridlock across the country if lawmakers can't quickly agree on how to pay for highway and transit programs, President Barack Obama and his top officials warned Tuesday.

9. Timing Key Element of County Tax Rate Debate -

More funding from Shelby County government for prekindergarten classrooms is a matter of timing, say those on both sides of the property tax rate question on which the $2.8 million in additional funding hinges.

10. FAA, Developers Clash Over Tall Buildings -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The government wants to dramatically reduce the allowable height of buildings near hundreds of airports – a proposal that is drawing fire from real estate developers and members of Congress who say it will reduce property values.

11. Battle Lines -

The city’s operating and capital budgets are just about set for the new fiscal year next month. Hard decisions made about health insurance for city employees and retirees Tuesday, June 17, are unlikely to be revisited by the Memphis City Council.

12. IRS to Waive Penalties for Some Overseas Accounts -

The Internal Revenue Service is offering to waive steep penalties for Americans living abroad who haven't been paying their U.S. taxes.

But there is a catch: You have to be able to show that you didn't evade U.S. taxes on purpose.

13. Wal-Mart Faces Big Hurdles -

The world's largest retailer faces new challenges at a time when low prices and one-stop shopping can be a few clicks away on a tablet computer or mobile phone.

Wal-Mart Stores Inc. built its reputation on everyday low prices and convenient supercenters that allow customers to do all their shopping in one place.

14. Now Application 'Inconsistencies' Vex Health Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A huge new paperwork headache for the government could also be jeopardizing coverage for some of the millions of people who just got health insurance under President Barack Obama's law.

15. Bailey Continues Call for Shelby Farms Development -

Walter Bailey is the only serving Shelby County Commissioner who was part of the 1970s debate on the commission about what to do with the farmland that was the old Shelby County Penal Farm.

16. Council Hesitates Over Fire Recruit Class Funding and Charter Restrictions -

Memphis City Council members discussed a new recruit class Tuesday, May 20, for the Memphis Fire Department that is not in Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s budget proposal.

But council members voted down a plan to come up with the $1.7 million for the class of 100 fire recruits from a $3 million cut in the line item for fire department sick leave, proposed by council member Kemp Conrad.

17. IRS Paid at Least $13 Billion in Improper Tax Credits -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Internal Revenue Service paid more than $13 billion in tax credits last year to people who may not have qualified, a government investigator said Tuesday.

The Earned Income Tax Credits were supposed to go to low-income working families.

18. Wal-Mart Jumps Into the Money Transfer Biz, Loudly -

NEW YORK (AP) – Wal-Mart is delving deeper into financial services at its stores and shaking up the money transfer business.

The world's largest retailer introduced a new money transfer service Thursday that it says will cut fees for its low-income customers by up to 50 percent compared with similar services elsewhere. The Walmart-2-Walmart service is being rolled out in partnership with Ria Money Transfer, a subsidiary of Euronet Worldwide Inc.

19. Council Questions Five-Year Wharton Plan -

It’s usually a quick bottom line for any local government budget proposal – does it mean a property tax hike?

The $596 million operating budget submitted to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, April 15, by Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. does not include a property tax hike.

20. IRS Says Tennesseans Owed $12.8 Million for 2010 -

The Internal Revenue Service says more than 16,000 Tennesseans who didn’t file their tax returns in 2010 are due refunds totaling more than $12.8 million.

The IRS says those who are owed refunds have a deadline of April 15 to file their 2010 tax return in order to collect the money.

21. Health Care Law Has Uneven Impact on Companies -

Sarah Curtis-Fawley will have to offer insurance to her workers at Pacific Pie Co. because of the health care overhaul, and the estimated $100,000 cost means she may have to raise prices or postpone opening a third restaurant.

22. IRS Says Tennesseans Owed $12.8 Million for 2010 -

The Internal Revenue Service says more than 16,000 Tennesseans who didn’t file their tax returns in 2010 are due refunds totaling more than $12.8 million.

The IRS says those who are owed refunds have a deadline of April 15 to file their 2010 tax return in order to collect the money.

23. CDC Leaders Have Challenges in Communities -

Community development corporations are designed to help create more housing in areas where investors and banks might not normally invest without incentives.

But the CDCs, as they are known, are increasingly in the business of adding business development to the housing in a combination of community building.

24. 10 Things to Know About Haslam's $32.6 Billion Budget -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Here's 10 items you should know about Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam's $32.6 billion spending proposal for the budget year beginning in July:

DRIVE TO 55: The governor is proposing to waive tuition to two-year colleges in the state as part of his "Drive to 55" campaign to increase higher education graduation rates from the current 32 percent to 55 percent by 2025. The program would be paid for through an endowment created with lottery reserve money. He has also earmarked $15 million in new spending toward the effort.

25. Detractors Call Ballpark Deal Part of Larger ‘Quagmire’ -

Memphis City Council member Wanda Halbert calls it a “serious quagmire.”

And City Hall probably isn’t out of it with last week’s council approval of the AutoZone Park deal.

“Over the last two years, the mayor has come to the council … and said we are financially strapped,” Halbert said on the WKNO-TV program “Behind The Headlines.” “We’ve got to reduce service, raise taxes. The people are saying how are we consistently finding money to do some of these other projects. But we can’t pave streets like we need to.”

26. Council Approves Ballpark Deal -

Memphis City Council members approved the city’s $19.5 million purchase of AutoZone Park Tuesday, Jan. 7, and another $4.5 million in improvements to the baseball park.

The deal includes the St. Louis Cardinals buying the Memphis Redbirds franchise and entering into a 17-year lease with the city of Memphis at $300,000 a year.

27. Debt and Liability -

There is rarely a good answer to the question “How much?” in politics.

With issues including the unfunded pension liability, overall debt, and revenue estimates and their validity, City Hall’s overall money problem begins but hardly ends with the question. It won’t be that simple.

28. Congress OKs New IRS Chief, Ends Turbulent Year -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A cross Congress ended its business for the year Friday as the Senate approved a new boss for the troubled Internal Revenue Service but remained slowed and bitterly riven over majority Democrats' weakening of Republicans' power to filibuster.

29. Bipartisan Budget Agreement Nears Final Passage -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Senate lined up Wednesday to give final congressional approval to legislation scaling back across-the-board cuts on programs ranging from the Pentagon to the national park system, adding a late dusting of bipartisanship to a year more likely to be remembered for a partial government shutdown and near-perpetual gridlock.

30. City Council Questions Pension Plan -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. plans to ask the Memphis City Council sometime in February or March to close the city’s defined benefits pension plan to new hires and those city employees with less than 10 years of service.

31. Council Opens Unfunded Liability Plan Talks With Questions -

Memphis City Council members again rejected Tuesday, Dec. 17, an increase in the city’s monthly solid waste fee and affirmed a 2.1 percent hike in the Memphis Light Gas and Water Division water rate hike.

32. Ending Tax Breaks Eyed as Way to Ease Budget Cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Democrats' new mantra in budget talks is to close tax loopholes for certain businesses, investors and professionals as a way to raise more revenue to help ease autopilot spending cuts that soon are to become more painful.

33. Negotiators Report Little Progress in Budget Talks -

WASHINGTON (AP) – House and Senate budget negotiators say they're not close to an agreement but plan to keep at it.

"We're trying to find common ground but we're not there yet," said House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis. He said Republicans and Democrats have spent lots of time in the recent past airing their differences but it's now time to find a way to strike an accord. "The hard part is figuring out where we agree," Ryan said.

34. Report: IRS Refunded $4 Billion to Identity Thieves -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Internal Revenue Service issued $4 billion in fraudulent tax refunds last year to people using stolen identities, with some of the money going to addresses in Bulgaria, Lithuania and Ireland, according to a Treasury report released Thursday.

35. ‘Pro-Business’ -

The explosive population growth and business-friendly environment in DeSoto County have combined to transform its formerly sleepy suburbs into thriving retail and industrial development centers.

Today, Goodman Road looks more and more like a busy commercial strip in Memphis, and DeSoto County has become the favored location for large industrial developers.

36. ‘Pro-Business Environment’ -

The explosive population growth and business-friendly environment in DeSoto County have combined to transform its formerly sleepy suburbs into thriving retail and industrial development centers.

Today, Goodman Road looks more and more like a busy commercial strip in Memphis, and DeSoto County has become the favored location for large industrial developers.

37. Both Sides Agree: No Major Budget Deal Foreseen -

WASHINGTON (AP) — On this, GOP budget guru Rep. Paul Ryan and top Senate Democrat Harry Reid can agree: There won't be a "grand bargain" on the budget.

38. Shelby County Schools To Apply For Head Start Funding -

Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson said Monday, Oct. 14, the school system will apply for $23 million in federal Head Start funding that now goes to Shelby County government.

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell said Monday, Oct. 14, Porter-Leath children’s service will also make a bid for the Head Start contract county government now operates.

39. Flinn, Whalum Differ on Sales Tax Hike Ballot Question -

To Memphis City Council member Shea Flinn, the only uncertainty about the proposed citywide half-cent sales tax hike on the Nov. 21 ballot is the outcome of the vote.

To former Shelby County Schools board member Rev. Kenneth Whalum, nothing in the ballot question comes close to assuring the money will cover prekindergarten expansion costs the tax is supposed to guarantee.

40. Council Gives Conditional OK to Southbrook Funding -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, Oct. 1, $1.5 million in capital funding for renovations to Southbrook Mall in Whitehaven that are contingent on a legal opinion from the city attorney’s office on whether the use of the bond money amounts to a private use that is prohibited by the federal tax code.

41. City Council Gives Conditional Approval to Southbrook Mall Funding -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, Oct. 1, $1.5 million in capital funding for renovations to Southbrook Mall in Whitehaven that are contingent on a legal opinion from the city attorney’s office on whether the use of the bond money amounts to a private use that is prohibited by the federal tax code.

42. Council Delays Sanitation Changes -

Memphis City Council members put off a final vote Tuesday, Oct. 1, on raising the city’s monthly solid waste fee until December citing an upcoming fix to the city’s pension fund liability crisis.

43. Airlines Promise a Return to Civility, For a Fee -

NEW YORK (AP) – Airlines are introducing a new bevy of fees, but this time passengers might actually like them.

Unlike the first generation of charges which dinged fliers for once-free services like checking a bag, these new fees promise a taste of the good life, or at least a more civil flight.

44. Arkansas Prepares to Launch Insurance Market -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – After two elections and two legislative sessions that were centered on the federal health care overhaul, Arkansas is preparing to implement a key part of the 2010 health law with the launch of its online insurance marketplace.

45. In Government Shutdown, Obamacare Just Rolls On -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Republicans pulling on the budget thread can't neatly unravel President Barack Obama's health care law.

A partial government shutdown next week would leave the major parts of the law in place and rolling along, according to former Democratic and Republican budget officials, as well as the Obama administration itself. Health care markets for the uninsured would open as scheduled on Tuesday.

46. Career Shift Lands Fish in Financial Planning -

To hear the way she speaks of Memphis, and to know the many ways in which she works to better her community, one would never guess that Kathy Fish was not born and raised right here.

47. Schools Move Focus to Early Childhood -

The date still isn’t firm for the Nov. 21 ballot. But the campaign for a half-cent hike in the city’s sales tax rate to fund an expansion of pre-kindergarten in the city of Memphis is underway.

So are the complications that have been a close companion of the idea since it was first proposed a year ago and approved by the Memphis City Council.

48. Mo’ Money Taxes Barred From Operating -

MEMPHIS (AP) – A federal judge has issued a permanent injunction prohibiting the owners and a former manager of a tax preparation service from running such a business and from preparing tax returns for other people.

49. IRS Collections From Enforcement Actions Drop -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A Treasury investigator says tax collections from reluctant taxpayers dropped for the second straight year in 2012.

The Treasury inspector general for tax administration says budget cuts at the Internal Revenue Service are resulting in lower revenues for the federal government. The IG released a report Tuesday that says tax collections from enforcement actions dropped by 9 percent in the 2012 budget year, to a little more than $50 billion.

50. Some Employers See Perks of Hiring Older Workers -

Older people searching for jobs have long fought back stereotypes that they lack the speed, technology skills and dynamism of younger applicants. But as a wave of baby boomers seeks to stay on the job later in life, some employers are finding older workers are precisely what they need.

51. Applying for Health Insurance? Homework Involved -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Getting covered through President Barack Obama's health care law might feel like a combination of doing your taxes and making a big purchase that requires research.

You'll need accurate income information for your household, plus some understanding of how health insurance works, so you can get the financial assistance you qualify for and pick a health plan that's right for your needs.

52. Postal Service Had $740 Million Third-Quarter Loss -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Postal Service has trimmed its losses to $740 million over the last three months by consolidating processing facilities, cutting hours for workers and post offices and reducing workers' compensation costs, the agency said Friday.

53. Salomon Helps Clients Navigate Estate Planning -

For Jason Salomon, an attorney with the trusts estate and personal planning service team of Wyatt, Tarrant & Combs LLP, the kinetic needs of his clients and the challenges turned into opportunities keep him involved and excited on a daily basis.

54. Commissioner Harvey Home to Stay -

As the Shelby County Commission began debating whether or not property tax rates caused homeowners and small-business owners to move out of the county, one commissioner was preparing to move to Dallas.

55. Senate Moves Forward on Transportation Spending -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A $108 billion measure that would boost funding for infrastructure projects and housing subsidies for the poor is moving ahead in the Senate.

The measure cleared a procedural hurdle by a bipartisan 73-26 vote Tuesday, and that sets up days of debate with the goal of passing the measure next week.

56. Council Delays Referendums and OKs Alarm Fee Hike -

Memphis City Council members delayed Tuesday, July 16, several items that would have called for special referendum elections in this off-election year for Memphis voters.

The council delayed final votes to set referendums on civil service changes as well as on a proposed half-percent sales tax hike.

57. Council Delays Referendums, Approves Hike in Alarm Fees -

Memphis City Council members delayed Tuesday, July 16, several items that would have called for special referendum elections in this off-election year for Memphis voters.

The council delayed final votes to set referendums on civil service changes as well as on a proposed half-percent sales tax hike.

58. Council Ponders Use of Reserve To Keep Fire Station Open -

Memphis City Council member considered briefly Tuesday, July 16, using $1.1 million from the $48 million city reserve fund to keep a North Memphis fire station open.

But they dropped the idea after Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. agreed to keep Fire Station #6, on Danny Thomas Boulevard north of Chelsea Avenue open at least until Labor Day.

59. Memphis Tax Rate Sparks Revenue Debate -

The city should have some extra money when the end of the next fiscal year comes on June 30, according to Memphis City Council member Harold Collins.

60. Commission Begins Work on New Tax Rate -

Shelby County Commissioners have several important questions to consider Wednesday, July 17, in committee sessions, all of them having to do with that most volatile of political questions – taxes.

More than two weeks into the new fiscal year, Shelby County government has no new property tax rate. The commission last week on third and final reading voted down the $4.38 tax rate proposed by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell.

61. Council Eyes September Special Election -

Memphis City Council members continue a shift away from budget season Tuesday, July 16, with an agenda that includes allocating some money from the last fiscal year and other money for the new fiscal year.

62. GOP-Led House Seeks to Punish IRS With Budget Cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The GOP-controlled House unveiled slashing cuts to the budget of the Internal Revenue Service on Tuesday, punishing the beleaguered agency after it targeted tea party groups and other nonprofits seeking tax-exempt status.

63. Health Insurers Fear Young People Will Opt Out -

MIAMI (AP) – Dan Lopez rarely gets sick and hasn't been to a doctor in 10 years, so buying health insurance feels like a waste of money.

64. Property Tax Hike Highlights New City Budget -

Memphis City Council members raised the city property tax rate Tuesday, June 26, by 4 cents above the recertified tax rate and put the rest of a turbulent budget season to rest.

The approval of the $3.40 property tax rate and city operating and capital budgets came in a council session that ended at 12:30 a.m. Wednesday morning.

65. Second Round Council Budget Plans Emerge -

Memphis City Council chairman Edmund Ford Jr. and council members Harold Collins and Lee Harris will have plans for the full council to consider when the body meets Tuesday, June 25, in special session.

66. Council to Take Final Votes on Budget -

The most critical vote at last week’s budget-dominated Memphis City Council meeting may have been the vote to adjourn leaving final budget decisions pending.

It left a week for all sides in the ongoing budget drama at City Hall a wealth of time by political standards to build support for their respective positions.

67. Small Businesses are Hiring Again, But Cautiously -

NEW YORK (AP) – Nina Vaca is interviewing job applicants at her staffing company again after putting hiring on hold at the end of last year.

Vaca expects to hire more than 50 people for her firm, Pinnacle Technical Resources, by the end of 2013. Demand is soaring for the high-tech temporary workers it places at large corporations. The reason for her caution: Months of uncertainty about federal taxes and budget cuts has disappeared.

68. S&P Boosts Outlook for US Government’s Long-Term Debt -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Standard & Poor's Ratings Services upgraded its outlook Monday for the U.S. government's long-term debt. S&P cited the government's strengthened finances, a recovering U.S. economy and some easing of Washington's political gridlock.

69. Next Goal for City Budget: Consensus -

For now, Memphis City Council members have more questions than consensus about which end is up on the proposed city budget for the fiscal year that is three weeks away.

Beyond the questions awaits a significant difference of opinion among council members about the general direction city finances should take with the new fiscal year and beyond.

70. Conflicting Laws, Regulations Feed IRS Confusion -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The uproar over the Internal Revenue Service's heavy-handed treatment of conservative groups seeking tax-exempt status can be traced partly to when New York University Law School went into the noodle business.

71. Red Carpet Tour Courts Site Selectors -

Site selection experts from six nationally known firms got a “red carpet tour” from the Greater Memphis Chamber Wednesday, June 5, in a recruitment effort that included a look at the industrial infrastructure of the Memphis area.

72. Watchdog: IRS Enjoy Luxury Rooms at Conference -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Already under siege, the Internal Revenue Service was cited by a government watchdog for a $4.1 million training conference featuring luxury rooms and free drinks, even as conservative figures told Congress Tuesday they had been abused for years while seeking tax-exempt status.

73. Wharton Proposes 14-Cent Tax Hike Above Recertified Rate -

The administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. is proposing a 14-cent city property tax hike on top of the 25 cents added to the current rate of $3.11 to compensate for property value lost in the 2013 property reappraisal.

74. New IRS Head Says Taxpayers No Longer Trust Agency -

WASHINGTON (AP) – His agency under relentless fire, the new head of the Internal Revenue Service acknowledged to Congress on Monday that American taxpayers no longer trust the IRS amid a growing number of scandals – from the targeting of conservative political groups to lavish spending on employee conferences.

75. State Concerns Blow Up City Budget -

When the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. went to the state earlier this year for approval of a $112.4 million refunding bonds issuance, it was the second time in four years City Hall had used a debt tactic known as “scoop and toss.”

76. Obama: No Special Prosecutor to Investigate IRS -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama dismissed the idea of a special prosecutor to investigate the Internal Revenue Service Thursday, saying probes by Congress and the Justice Department should be able to figure out who was responsible for improperly targeting tea party groups when they applied for tax-exempt status.

77. Post Office Had $1.9 Billion Second Quarter Loss -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. Postal Service said Friday it lost $1.9 billion over the last three months and warned that losses would continue to mount without help from Congress.

The loss for the financial quarter ending March 31 was narrower than a $3.2-billion loss for the same period last year, thanks to slightly higher revenues and lower payments towards health benefits for workers who will retire in the future.

78. City Council OKs School Funding Talks -

The newest front in the move to the schools merger in less than two months is an old legal claim that continues to pop up as the countywide school board looks for any new funding it can secure.

Memphis City Council members passed a resolution Tuesday, May 7, to start negotiations among the council, the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and the countywide school board.

79. Police Budget Passes Early Council Test -

The Memphis City Council’s budget committee approved the largest budget for any single city division Tuesday, May 7.

But the committee debate before the vote set the stage for what is expected to be more discussion about how much the Memphis Police Department needs to protect and serve.

80. National, Local Leaders Discuss Nonprofit Challenges -

Nonprofits need multifaceted ways to inform their stakeholders in a world that has grown more volatile, uncertain and complex, Jacob Herold, the president and CEO of GuideStar, told a sold-out audience at the annual Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence conference Wednesday, May 1.

81. Metropolitan Bank Earnings Up 43 Percent -

Metropolitan Bank is starting off its fifth year by reporting another quarter of increased earnings – the 14th straight quarter in which that’s happened.

82. Questions Kick Off City Budget Hearings -

Memphis City Council members opened budget committee hearings Tuesday, April 23, on the clock and with lots of questions about what seemed to some like different budget numbers from last year at this time by the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

83. Fallout for States Rejecting Medicaid Expansion -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Rejecting the Medicaid expansion in the federal health care law could have unexpected consequences for states where Republican lawmakers remain steadfastly opposed to what they scorn as "Obamacare."

84. Pilot Flying J Raid Focuses on Incentive Practices -

NASHVILLE (AP) – When Pilot, the country's largest truck stop chain, bought its nearest competitor Flying J out of bankruptcy in 2009, federal trade officials worried the combined entity owned by the powerful Haslam family could corner the market on diesel fuel.

85. Mo’ Money Fraud Sparks Fed Shutdown Effort -

Less than a week before the April 15 federal tax-filing deadline, U.S. Justice Department attorneys from Washington went to Memphis federal court seeking to shut down a Memphis-based company that operates five tax preparation companies.

86. Obama Budget: Cover Uninsured, Trim Medicare, Tax Cigarettes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama's new budget offers Medicare cuts to entice Republicans into tax negotiations, while plowing ahead to cover the uninsured next year under the health care law the GOP has bitterly fought to repeal.

87. Absolutely, Positively Memphis -

It’s certainly old news to say that the Internet is changing the way we do business today. And most assuredly, we’ve only seen the tip of the iceberg. It’s not so farfetched to imagine a world where virtually everything is delivered, well, virtually. Maybe in the 2060s, the decade in which the futuristic Jetsons cartoon was set. Until then, while eCommerce is having a growing impact on where and how people shop, the fact of the matter is that goods still have to get to the consumer.

88. Council OKs Registry for Blighted Properties -

For months, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and the Memphis City Council had delayed final votes on his proposal to require the registration of property to make it easier for the city to find the owners of blighted property.

89. Mo’ Money Building Facing Foreclosure -

The Mo’ Money Taxes building at 5090 Millbranch Road is facing foreclosure, according to a first-run foreclosure notice in the Friday, March 8, edition of the Daily News.

90. Marston Group Grows Globally, Locally -

A growing accounting and finance firm is going global and local at the same time.

While The Marston Group’s clients branch outward, its members share a wealth of business experience with future business leaders here at home.

91. South Main’s New Life -

The history of the South Main Historic Arts District is as colorful as its present-day users, an alternating rhythm of sorts in Memphis’ songbook.

The area has oscillated from its ritzy suburban roots of the 1800s to the industrial era ghost town of the 20th century and now to its current status as Downtown’s flourishing arts and boutique district and the subject of some $100 million in investment. And it’s all due to stakeholders who braved the status quo in distinguishing the southern end of the Central Business District as that funky place with an indescribable vibe.

92. Tax Zone Would Benefit Fairgrounds -

The Tourism Development Zone that Memphis officials will seek in Nashville over the next three months would generate tax revenue from Cooper-Young, the Midtown Union Avenue corridor and Overton Square for the redevelopment of the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

93. Reardon Cautions Downtowners About Heritage Trail -

The University of Memphis professor spearheading the opposition of demolishing the city’s last remaining public housing project in the Vance Avenue neighborhood says that while the Heritage Trail Community Redevelopment Plan appears to be on “indefinite hold,” it is not dead, and Downtowners should beware.

94. Reconsider Your W-4 Withholding -

Ray’s Take It’s that time of year again. Your mailbox is receiving the annual tax form allotment. In addition to filing your income tax, take time to evaluate your withholding. It might be that you should adjust the deductions on your W-4 form to change the amount withheld from your paychecks.

95. Council Tackles Blue CRUSH, Wage Theft -

Memphis City Council members take up third and final reading Tuesday, Jan. 8, of an ordinance that sets up a local General Sessions Court-based process for settling “wage theft” complaints.

96. US Economy Could Handle Short Fall Over 'Cliff' -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The economic threat that's kept many Americans on edge for months is nearing reality – unless the White House and Republicans cut a budget deal by New Year's Day.

97. Fulton Accounting Firm Gets Rebrand and New Owner -

Fulton CPAs is a full-service accounting firm that has a new name and is under new ownership.

Previously known as Polsgrove & Fulton, the firm initiated a rebrand in the fall that included the new name after owner and CEO Lynn Fulton assumed full ownership of the business.

98. US Economy Could Withstand Brief Fall Off ‘Cliff' -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It's the scenario that's been spooking employers and investors and slowing the U.S. economy:

Congress and the White House fail to strike a budget deal by New Year's Day. Their stalemate triggers sharp tax increases and spending cuts. Those measures shrink consumer spending, stifle job growth, topple stock prices and push the economy off a "fiscal cliff" and into recession.

99. Failures Are Why Public Rejected MATA Funding -

Charles Riley is a Memphian breaking new ground in modern dance.

He’s been written about in The New York Times. YouTube videos of him are widely circulated. And it is a success story that very easily could have never been if Riley, whose stage name in Lil Buck, had to rely on the Memphis Area Transit Authority.

100. Commission to Vote on Industrial Land Sale -

Shelby County Commissioners take up the proposed sale Monday, Dec. 3, of 33.6 acres of land in the Frank C. Pidgeon Industrial Park in southwest Memphis.

Carolyn Hardy, owner of the Hardy Bottling Co. and consultant to the Blues City Brewery operation that later bought the plant, wants to buy the last available roadside acreage in the industrial park for a business to store and stage modular containers.