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Editorial Results (free)

1. Wharton Courts Alternatives in Benefits Dispute -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. says any alternatives are welcome to the coming health insurance changes for city employees and retirees.

But delaying the roll out of those changes in January is not an option. And neither is reopening the city budget or the city property tax rate.

2. Finding Forever Homes -

It isn’t that there are not compelling animal stories. There are.

In fact, visit the Humane Society of Memphis & Shelby County on Farm Road and those stories are just about everywhere, including in the administrative offices on the second floor, where two Labrador retrievers – Bambino and DeMarco – have run of the place.

3. Benefits Debate Goes Larger Than City Hall -

When several hundred firefighters, police officers and other city employees and retirees formed a picket line around City Hall Tuesday, June 24, it signaled the beginning of an escalating political dispute bigger than the City Council’s decision a week earlier to cut health insurance benefits for employees and retirees.

4. Local Firms Benefiting from Cycling, Walking Paths -

For years Memphis was labeled as a backwater when it came to walking trails and bike lanes, showing up on list after list highlighting the worst cities for pedestrians and cyclists.

That has changed dramatically over the last several years and there are now 150 more miles of new trails and bike lanes planned over the next three years.

5. Parking Wars -

It’s been a hot, humid and restless spring at Overton Park.

The park has been crowded, but not as crowded as expected given the political tempest over parking on Overton’s greensward.

6. Heart of Park Advances as Shelby Farms Parkway Stalls -

Within the space of a few days this month, the Shelby Farms Park Conservancy formally broke ground on the park’s $70 million Heart of the Park project and then its leaders watched as the Memphis City Council delayed the Shelby Farms Parkway project for a year.

7. Wilkins Targets Cohen as ‘Career Politician’ -

Ricky Wilkins told a packed campaign headquarters in Poplar Plaza on a busy campaign weekend that U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen is waging a dirty campaign while complaining that Wilkins is doing the same.

8. Wilkins Maps Different Challenge of Cohen -

Ricky Wilkins is promising to match U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen’s energy level and be more of a presence in the district than Cohen if he upsets the incumbent in the August Democratic primary for the 9th Congressional District.

9. Invest Early For the Best Retirement -

Ray’s Take The very best friend a young investor has is time. Someone who puts $4,000 per year into retirement accounts starting at age 22 could have $1 million by age 62, assuming an 8 percent average return. Waiting 10 years to start contributing means you would need to put in $8,800 per year to get the same results.

10. Memphis Repertory Orchestra Plans More Growth -

Coming off a year in which it found a home at the Buckman Performing Arts Center and released a CD of its music, the Memphis Repertory Orchestra – a small, all-volunteer chamber group – is looking to do even bigger things in 2014.

11. Business Leaders Optimistic About Local Economy -

As they have for a few quarters now, Memphis-area business leaders continue to acknowledge an incremental sense of optimism about specific aspects of their companies and the economy, according to the results of the third Memphis Economic Indicator.

12. Early Advantage -

Talk, touch, read and play.

These four words focused on early childhood development have helped to shape the mission of the Urban Child Institute for the past four years, and now they are traveling beyond the building and into the Memphis Pink Palace Museum. The important message bears repeating and repetition in creating bright young minds, and the institute is focused on spreading the word as far and wide as possible – starting with their kiosk-like exhibition, “The Early Advantage.”

13. Williams Honored by Tennessee Urban Forestry Council -

Laurie Williams, adult education coordinator at Memphis Botanic Garden, was recently awarded the Tennessee Urban Forestry Council’s President’s Award for her contribution to establishing and maintaining viable community forests in Tennessee. Williams was one of seven individuals the urban forestry council honored this year.

14. Memphis Economic Indicator Shows Business Optimism -

The results of the second Memphis Economic Indicator, a new survey measuring general business sentiment jointly produced by The Daily News and Dixon Hughes Goodman LLP, reflect a modest overall improvement in optimism among business leaders compared to last quarter’s survey results.

15. Fullilove’s Funding Push Raises Legal Questioning -

Memphis City Council member Janis Fullilove pushed hard for $1.5 million in city funding for the renovation of Southbrook Mall in Whitehaven.

16. Health Care’s ‘Lost Opportunity’: A Q&A with Phil Bredesen -

More than two years after leaving state office, Phil Bredesen, the popular former governor and mayor of Nashville, is still on the go. While enjoying a post-political life in Nashville that includes gardening and grandparenting with his wife, Andrea Conte, Bredesen remains active in promoting bipartisan solutions to issues such as the national debt as a speaker and as a member of the Governors’ Council of the Bipartisan Policy Center, a Washington, D.C.- based think tank.

17. Coffield Finds Home to Contribute to Memphis -

When Ashley Coffield accepted the position as president and CEO of Planned Parenthood Greater Memphis Region last spring, it was a sort of homecoming for the Rhodes College graduate.

Only, she didn’t have to move at all.

18. United Housing Places 3,000th Homeowner -

Lisa Brice was living in a Memphis-area townhouse with her two teenage daughters when the water was turned off in the community back in January.

19. Martin’s Program Keeps Girls Engaged in STEM Fields -

Girls Inc. is a national nonprofit providing girls ages 6-18 with after-school and summer programs, field trips and college tours.

20. Upstart Memphis Begins Hatching Women-Led Startups -

The fourth floor of Playhouse on the Square’s facility at 66 S. Cooper St. is a bustling hub of entrepreneurial activity.

21. Electrical Workers Union Speaks Out Against Smart Meters -

The union representing Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division employees, including meter readers, plans to take its problems with Smart Meters to the road – the side of the road.

Leaders of International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 1288 said Monday, July 8, they intend to put up billboards warning the public of what they say are the dangers of the new meters the utility plans to seek city funding for later this year.

22. Bean’s Third Career Helps Researchers Around Globe -

More than a decade ago, Bob Bean and Tim Hodge met at a Wendy’s near Baptist Memorial Hospital to discuss what it would take to develop a lab for genetically testing mice for use in research.

23. Old Boundaries Fade as Schools Merger Nears -

There is still some power left in the line that separates Memphis City Schools from Shelby County Schools with about two weeks left until the two public school systems formally become one.

That was evident Tuesday, June 11, as the countywide school board approved a slate of 35 policy decisions for the merged school system whose fiscal year begins July 1.

24. Alco Files $4.7 Million Loan on Greenbriar Apartments -

Memphis-based Alco Properties Inc. has filed a $4.7 million loan on the Greenbriar Apartments at 3131 Madewell Street in Frayser.

25. Arts Award -

The New Ballet Ensemble and School is a first-time recipient of a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, money the Midtown-based school is using to create and perform an original dance work.

26. Cestaro: Lab Will be First of its Kind -

TriMetis president Phil Cestaro took a year off after he resigned from Nashville-based SCRI Global Services at the Sarah Cannon Research Institute in 2011, where he was president.

“I didn’t know how much time I was going to take off, I just knew I was going to enjoy life and my family,” he said. “It was the best decision I ever made.”

27. Lendermon Discusses Riverfront Access -

Riverside Drive could work well if it lost a lane of automobile traffic in each direction, says the president of the Riverfront Development Corp.

28. ‘Teacher Town’ -

There was a time not too long ago when teacher residency programs in Memphis were exercises in isolation. The new teaching recruits in and out of those programs often talked of being overwhelmed in their new school and career environments. But in the larger maelstrom of changes to the face of local public education, the residency programs are growing across all the different types of public schools emerging in advance of the August merger of city and county schools.

29. South Main’s New Life -

The history of the South Main Historic Arts District is as colorful as its present-day users, an alternating rhythm of sorts in Memphis’ songbook.

The area has oscillated from its ritzy suburban roots of the 1800s to the industrial era ghost town of the 20th century and now to its current status as Downtown’s flourishing arts and boutique district and the subject of some $100 million in investment. And it’s all due to stakeholders who braved the status quo in distinguishing the southern end of the Central Business District as that funky place with an indescribable vibe.

30. So Southern Makes Functional Items Beautiful -

Ideas behind small businesses tend to spring from familiar places and from entrepreneurs who see a need, have a passion, are good at what they do and want to turn it into a labor of love.

The best small-business concepts often combine all those aspects into one enterprise. Which makes sense, because with all the difficulties of running a business comes the realization that, for it to work, it has to be sustained over a long period of time. Thus, the necessity, of doing what you love.

31. Startup Ground Zero -

For three days over the past week, Memphis was effectively ground zero for technologists, startup founders, investors and entrepreneurs from near and far.

For that, the city can thank the organizers of the Everywhere Else startup conference who, with help from a collection of sponsors and supporters, took what was initially going to be called “Pitchmas,” happening last December, and refashioned it in a matter of months.

32. Lighting the Spark -

Somewhere, there’s an entrepreneur scribbling an idea on little more than the back of a napkin. Someone else has all the pieces of a new company in place, and now they’re ready to dial for dollars. Entrepreneurs are a talented bunch, but that talent doesn’t always include a knack for management or finance – skill sets that plenty of experts in Memphis stand ready to help explain.

33. Cash’s Turbulent Tenure Full of Surprises -

Kriner Cash came to the city as Memphis City Schools superintendent in July 2008. He began with an informal census that organized the school district’s student population by how many students were overage for their grade level, how many had no primary care physician and how many had access to no pre-kindergarten services.

34. Cash Exits At Critical Juncture In Merger -

Countywide school board members approved Thursday, Jan. 10, a severance package that ends Kriner Cash’s tenure as superintendent of Memphis City Schools.

Cash will remain through the end of July as an employee in an advisory capacity. At the end of July he gets six months of regular pay and $17,000 in moving and legal expenses as well as a letter of recommendation from the school system.

35. 2013: A Year of Books -

Last week we shared more ways you can celebrate the holidays while giving back at the same time. This week let us explore an easy way we can start planning ahead to make 2013 a Year of Books by working with Shelby County Books from Birth to plant the seeds of literacy and help build a stronger foundation for our future.

36. Aging With Grace -

Overton Park’s combination party and fundraiser this past weekend celebrated a milestone birthday for the park.

But in addition to serving as a way for supporters to tip the hat in honor of the park’s 111th anniversary and enjoy drinks, hors d’oeuvres, music and dancing in the park’s “formal gardens,” the “Magical Night at Overton Park” event Saturday, Nov. 10, was something more. Tina Sullivan, executive director of the Overton Park Conservancy, said the event was the group’s first major fundraiser.

37. Hotel Chisca Gets New Owners, Art Facelift -

The chain-link fence surrounding the dilapidated Hotel Chisca in Downtown Memphis is a little bit easier on the eyes as of Saturday, Oct. 27.

That’s because it now boasts 30 colorful banners created by students of St. Louis Catholic School, under the leadership of art teacher Robin Durden. The art exhibit, “Memphis Music Icons,” pays tribute to the Hotel Chisca’s legacy of being the location where Elvis Presley was first played on Dewey Phillips’ “Red, Hot and Blue” radio show from the WHBQ studios in 1954.

38. Hotel Chisca Gets New Owners, Art Facelift -

The chain link fence surrounding the dilapidated Hotel Chisca in Downtown Memphis is a little bit easier on the eyes as of Saturday, Oct. 27.

That’s because it now boasts 30 colorful banners created by students of St. Louis Catholic School, under the leadership of art teacher Robin Durden. The art exhibit, “Memphis Music Icons,” pays tribute to the Hotel Chisca’s legacy of being the location where Elvis Presley was first played on Dewey Phillips’ “Red, Hot and Blue” radio show from the WHBQ studios in 1954.

39. Volunteer Spirit -

We volunteer. Those two words comprise this particular radio station’s independent streak and listener-supported ethos, which traces its beginning to 1976 and to the days of vinyl and reel-to-reel tapes.

40. University of Memphis Law School Makes Hires -

New faces are becoming a familiar part of the University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law.

The school, which is closing in on its 50th anniversary celebration later this month, is in the midst of a health law initiative. It’s looking for a professor who will start up a health law program there.

41. Cohen Talks About Opponents, Schools, Race and His Political Past -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen is running for a fourth term in Congress starting with the Aug. 2 primary, in which he is being challenged by countywide school board member Tomeka Hart.

42. Hickory Hill Warehouse Sells for $1.3 Million -

5837 Distribution Drive
Memphis, TN 38141

Sale Amount: $1.3 million

Sale Date: July 11, 2012

43. Barboro Flats Financed for $9.6 Million -

Barboro Flats, a mixed-use building at 100 S. Main St., has been financed for $9.6 million.

100 South Main Partners filed a 35-year trust deed through Love Funding Corp. for the five-story building’s 92-unit apartment section and 7,000-square-foot ground-floor retail space. The building’s garage was not included in the financing, according to loan documents filed with the Shelby County Register of Deeds.

44. Shared Resources -

The ABA Place is a labor of love for founder Jenni Helms, the busy working mother of a 9-year-old boy with autism.

What started a little more than six years ago as a play date for children with autism spectrum disorders has grown into a comprehensive nonprofit program that actively serves more than 70 special-needs children.

45. Memphis Acts While Others Dream -

While headlines focus on a growing division of democrats versus republicans and business versus government, Memphis is proving that a shared vision for a positive future unites a city – and its nonprofits – across stereotypical divides.

46. Overton Park Conservancy Meets Milestone With Dog Park -

The Overton Park Conservancy counted 150 dogs of all sizes for the formal opening Saturday, June 2, of the Overton Bark dog park and more humans than that, also of all shapes and sizes.

It is those holding the leashes that the conservancy hopes to hold the attention of through the first summer the park has been under the control of the nonprofit group. Since December, the conservancy has operated the park under a contract with the city of Memphis.

47. ‘A Unifier’ -

The Levitt Shell recently kicked off its season of free public concerts with its most well-attended opening weekend to date, continuing a 75-year tradition of bringing together Memphians from all walks of life to enjoy music in Overton Park.

48. More Monkey Biz From Officials -

EVOLVING RESPONSE. The anachronistic Tennessee Legislature has awarded creationism equal scientific weight to evolution and declared that the prevailing religious belief of that body be offered as viable explanation to our school children for the order, formation and timing of the universe.

49. Cash Says Charlotte Job Offers More Reform Work -

Memphis City Schools superintendent Dr. Kriner Cash said he feels like his time in Memphis is growing short even if he doesn’t get the job as superintendent of Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools in North Carolina.

50. Haversack CEO Kept Going Until He Found What Works -

Editor’s note: This is the fourth in a six-part series on entrepreneurs in the current round of Seed Hatchery’s “cohort” boot camp.

Josh Bell, an avid hunter and fisherman, is so pumped about Haversack, his new outdoors-themed startup that’s taking shape, that he at times finds himself unable to break away from making plans, tweaking this and researching that.

51. Choice Of Entity: Choose Wisely -

The “choice of entity” discussion is unavoidable for start-up companies. In the spirit of the lifecycle of a business, it is one of the more prudent and pertinent discussions to have with your tax adviser. While sometimes an afterthought, this is a crucial matter and a misstep can prove costly.

52. More Ways to Help Black Colleges, Universities -

Part two of a two-part series “Supporting leadership for life is not just a motto for us – we invest in it. Many of the schools were founded in local churches and that historic bond is a tremendous source of pride.”

53. Geraci’s Goal: Nutrition For 106,000 Students -

Tony Geraci is a third-generation chef from New Orleans who came to Memphis in November to run a state-of-the-art kitchen built on 14 acres of land with menus featuring locally grown food from “the richest soil on the planet.”

54. Making Big Differences -

Last week we spotlighted Visible Music College, which is working to train and equip artists, technicians and business professionals in skill and character for effective service in the music industry and the church. Since January is known as National Mentoring Month, this week let us turn our attention toward an organization that is helping children reach their potential through professionally supported one-to-one relationships with mentors that have a measurable impact on youth: Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Memphis.

55. Suburban Leaders Await Schools Report -

The week after the schools consolidation transition planning commission began holding public hearings, the leaders of Shelby County’s six suburban municipalities are about to get a long-awaited report from consultants they hired last year to explore forming a separate school system to avoid schools consolidation.

56. Design 500 Finds Passion Preparing Museum Exhibits -

Scott Blake’s home office in a historic building at 671 Jefferson Ave. is clearly the abode of a man with a deep love of art, history and design.

57. Negative Hits Keep Coming in 2011 -

While some of the Mid-South’s more than 3,000 nonprofit organizations received major gifts and successfully engaged new donor bases, the anemic economic recovery required others to hold a magnifying glass to their bottom lines in 2011.

58. Allen Returns to Memphis, Devotes Time to Nonprofits -

After 14 years running a gallery, representing artists and writing for arts magazines in the Big Apple, Michel Allen last year returned home to the Bluff City to raise money, provide public relations services and develop marketing strategies for Memphis area nonprofits.

59. 4Memphis Mag Launches With New Ownership -

4Memphis magazine, formerly VIP Memphis Magazine, is under new ownership.

The new entity, 4Memphis Publishing LLC, is comprised of publisher Jim Walker, owner of Eden Spa & Laser and an officer with Merchants & Planters Bank; the Levy family of Oak Hall Inc.; Jay Mednikow of Mednikow Jewelers; Joel Hobson of Hobson Realtors; Judy McLellan of Crye-Leike Realtors Inc.; and Amy Howell of Howell Marketing Strategies LLC.

60. VIP Memphis Relaunches as 4Memphis Mag Under New Ownership -

4Memphis magazine, formerly VIP Memphis Magazine, is under new ownership.

The new entity, 4Memphis Publishing LLC, is comprised of publisher Jim Walker, owner of Eden Spa & Laser and an officer with Merchants & Planters Bank; the Levy family of Oak Hall Inc.; Jay Mednikow of Mednikow Jewelers; Joel Hobson of Hobson Realtors; Judy McLellan of Crye-Leike Realtors Inc.; and Amy Howell of Howell Marketing Strategies LLC.

61. Lowery Sends Letter to Grizzlies Owner -

Memphis City Council chairman Myron Lowery has sent a letter to Memphis Grizzlies owner Michael Heisley following the resolution the council passed Tuesday, Oct. 18, to “explore all options for recovery of lost revenues” because of NBA game cancellations.

62. CMOM Names Roberts Marketing, Fundraising Coord. -

Carrie Callaway Roberts has been named marketing and fundraising coordinator at The Children’s Museum of Memphis.

63. Four Memphis Orgs Receive Volunteer Tennessee Grants -

Volunteer Tennessee announced more than $2.4 million in formula grant funding for 2011-2012 AmeriCorps programs across Tennessee.

Four Memphis organizations received grants.

Memphis Teacher Residency received $182,000 to recruit outstanding leaders as co-teachers for Memphis’ most academically challenged public schools.

64. Obama Touts Jobs Bill Benefits for Small Business -

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) – President Barack Obama urged enthusiastic college students Wednesday to join him in his fight to get Congress to act on his new jobs bill. "Every single one of you can help make this bill a reality," the president called out at a hot and noisy rally at North Carolina State University.

65. Hernandez Joins Ballet Memphis as Director of Dev. -

Cathy Hernandez has joined Ballet Memphis as director of development. She also is an adjunct professor of arts administration and thesis adviser at Drexel University in Philadelphia.

66. Poteat Recognized With Active Living Award -

David Poteat, executive vice president of Meritan, has been awarded the Josephine W. Burson Active Living Award by Meritan’s board of directors, recognizing his contributions to the community.

67. Volunteer Opportunities Can Parlay Into Jobs -

Angela Richards and Tunya Alexander have two things in common. They both work at Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Memphis Inc., and they both got those jobs by volunteering with the organization first.

68. REP Helps Refugees Feel at Home In New City -

Rwandan native Jules Mucyoweva plays an integral role in the lives of roughly 400 refugees – about half of them children – from 18 countries, all served by the Refugee Empowerment Program.

69. Orthopedic Infection Growing Concern -

Dealing with infection is a complex problem facing orthopedic surgeons, and a growing concern as the first of the baby boomer generation turns 65 – increasing the number of artificial hips, knees and other orthopedic devices implanted in patients.

70. Raging River, Watchful City -

As the Mississippi River crested at a historic level last week, most Memphians went to their jobs as usual.

The Memphis Grizzlies continued their NBA playoff run at FedExForum with a sellout crowd the same night that the river approached its crest less than a mile away.

71. Eroica Wraps Season With Pair of Shows -

The Eroica Ensemble’s concert season is winding to a close, but its director hopes that audiences have seen that they are just getting started.

As with their last five concerts, Eroica will feature an internationally known soloist on May 21 at Germantown Performing Arts Centre and May 22 at First Congregational Church.

72. Cuts Point To City’s Shaky Budget Plan -

About this point three years ago, the current Memphis City Council – only four or five months in office – took the daring move of cutting the city’s property tax rate by 18 cents and cut funding to Memphis City Schools by $57 million.

73. Urban Child Institute Study Seeks Local Birth Data -

The Memphis-based Urban Child Institute is recruiting the final participants in what will ultimately be an intensive eight-year study focused on the cognitive development of young children in Shelby County.

74. Shelby Farms Unveils New Playground -

Wild songbirds provided the music for a springtime scene straight out of a fairy tale, as Snow White – illuminated in sunshine and surrounded by blossoming trees – read a story to a wide-eyed little girl seated at her side.

75. Open Dialogue -

Ask a group of teenagers whether they feel their ideas are taken seriously by adults and it’s pretty much guaranteed the response will be a unanimous, resounding “No.”

But if those teens participate in Imagine Memphis, a citywide initiative designed to connect youth and adults to imagine and create a better Memphis, the response to that question is likely to be an overwhelmingly positive one.

76. Changing Lives With Books -

Last week we discussed how Memphis Urban Young Life is stepping into local high schools to offer support to youth that need it most.

This week let us explore Shelby County Books from Birth, which is providing thousands of new books each month to local children up to age 5, in order to plant the seeds of literacy and help build a stronger foundation for our future. (See related story in March 4 edition of The Daily News.)

77. Capwell Shares Love of Reading Through Books From Birth -

After Nora Capwell’s children were born, she left her career in the financial industry to pursue volunteer work and eventually became involved with the Junior League of Memphis, a nonprofit organization of women committed to improving the Memphis community.

78. Airport Officials Keep Eye on FAA Reauthorization -

Memphis International Airport officials are keeping a wary eye on Washington as Congress considers renewing the authorization of the Federal Aviation Administration and possibly cutting or keeping flat Airport Improvement Project revenue.

79. Blues City Thrift to Bring New Retail Concept to Memphis -

It was the convergence of two very different needs that brought transplanted Memphians Amy Hoyt and Peter Baur together, but now the pair is working toward a single goal: the launch of Blues City Thrift.

80. Kings of the Court -

When the Harlem Globetrotters bring their acrobatic, ball-spinning, high-flying brand of showmanship to FedExForum Wednesday, fans will likewise bring with them certain expectations.

They’ll expect to leave the arena having seen the team dip into a deep bag of tricks that includes seemingly impossible ball-spins, wild dunks and comedic antics.

81. Charities Turn Super Sunday into Day of Giving -

Several Memphis-based nonprofits are using Super Bowl Sunday as an opportunity to encourage citizens to give back to their community.

For the seventh year in a row, Habitat for Humanity of Greater Memphis, a nonprofit housing ministry dedicated to providing decent housing for all members of the community, is asking football fans to party with a purpose this Sunday for its annual Home Team Huddle.

82. Spreading the Gospel -

Live From Memphis celebrates 10 years of promoting, supporting and showcasing Memphis music, film, art and culture with a Friday open house and free party at its studio at 1 S. Main St.

83. ATTN: Mayor Wharton -

Memphians sound off on city’s most pressing needs.

Aaron Shafer
Founder of Skatelife Memphis; scientist at St. Jude Children’s Research Hosp.

Develop and promote a citywide mentoring campaign. We must heavily invest in the positive development of our children. Many of our Memphis children suffer not from a material poverty, but a poverty of healthy relationships and ultimately a poverty of possibility – of reaching their full potential. Each of us has had supportive network of mentors (“the village”) in our lives, be they our parents, teachers or friends, that have come along side of us to build our self-esteem and to help us navigate a path that moves us closer to realizing our potential.

84. Civic Boost -

Duncan-Williams Inc. has earned its place as one of the premier broker-dealer firms in the Southeast U.S. over the course of its more than 40-year existence.

85. Local Groups Provide Feel-Good Gift, Card Options -

‘Tis the season for giving, and despite an uncertain economy – or perhaps because of it – many Mid-Southerners are making charitable donations to honor others this holiday.

“I think maybe the recession has caused everyone to realize how close to needing help we all are,” said Marvin Stockwell, public relations manager for the Church Health Center, which provides affordable health care for working people without insurance, and a wellness ministry for the entire community.

86. Commission: Read the Charter and Vote -

Both sides in the consolidation debate are urging citizens to read the proposed metro charter and vote.

And as the campaign nears the Nov. 2 Election Day vote on the charter, each side is accusing the other of reading things in the charter that aren’t there.

87. Taking Care of Business -

A diverse mix of Memphis businesses is defying the odds and finding success spanning multiple family generations. Grant & Co., Champion Awards, Jim’s Place East, Barden Stone and Broadway Pizza are among the Memphis institutions thriving under second- and third-generation ownership and management.

88. Garden Grit Teaches Memphians To ‘Grow-Cook-Share’ -

Two Midtown women are on a mission to encourage Memphians to eat local, even if that means assessing city-dwellers’ backyards to advise them on how to grow their own vegetables.

“It’s not rocket science. It’s taking care of your body. It’s growing food, it’s cooking food, it’s eating food. It’s essential,” said Wendi Gammill, who along with friend Jayne Ellen White founded Garden Grit, a local organization with a simple philosophy of “grow-cook-share.”

89. A Belated Wedding Gift -

Ray’s Take: June is the most popular month for weddings. Which means many newly hitched couples are now discovering the financial honeymoon is over as gift cards are exhausted and credit cards come due.

90. Zoo Poised for Millionth Visitor -

The Memphis Zoo this month is poised to welcome its millionth visitor for the year, a feat achieved by only a handful of American zoos.

Only once before has the zoo reached this milestone – in 2006, when more than a million visitors passed through its gates.

91. Luttrell, Ford Butt Heads Over Consolidation -

The two candidates for Shelby County mayor clashed again in Bartlett Tuesday evening over who is the most opposed to local government consolidation.

This time, Republican nominee Mark Luttrell took the offensive, criticizing interim Shelby County mayor and Democratic nominee Joe Ford for voting for the formation of a Metro Charter Commission.

92. Porter-Leath’s Mission Evolves Beyond Historic Orphanage -

Despite decreases in funding, Porter-Leath continues working to solve the problems that tear Memphis families apart and put the city’s children at risk.

Employees of the nonprofit organization took a 5 percent pay cut to help keep one of its programs running. This tradition of commitment at the Memphis charity, which started out as an orphanage, goes back 160 years.

93. Finish Line in Sight for Renovation Of Memphis Business Academy -

3306 Overton Crossing
Memphis, TN 38127
Loan Amount: $1.9 Million

Loan Date: Feb. 23, 2010
Maturity Date: Feb. 23, 2013
Borrower: Memphis Business Academy
Lender: Regions Bank

94. ALCO Refinances Loan On Frayser Apartments -

Memphis-based ALCO Properties Inc. has taken out a $4.7 million loan on the Greenbriar Apartments at 3131 Madewell Street in Frayser.

95. MED Woes Could Be Solved With New Hospital -

The annual funding crisis at The Regional Medical Center serves as a reminder of how little politics in Memphis has changed despite all of the claims of new leadership.

What has changed is the problem at the long-neglected MED is no longer once a year. It has now become a year-round problem that lacks the certainty of money running short just toward the end of the fiscal year.

96. Teacher Evaluations At Heart of Funds Talk -

The numbers are approximate. But they serve the point Tennessee Gov. Phil Bredesen wanted to make a week before the Tennessee Legislature began its special session on education.

Take a group of 100 Tennessee high school students and apply the percentages for what happens to Tennessee students.

97. Tennessee Alone In Capping Child Enrollees -

Tennessee is the only state in the union that has closed its federally sponsored insurance plan for children to new enrollees, according to the Center for Children and Families at Georgetown University’s Health Policy Institute.
The state on Nov. 30 stopped taking applications for CoverKids, which is Tennessee’s version of the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). The program provides comprehensive health and dental coverage to children in families who do not qualify for Medicaid, but cannot afford private health insurance.
That number has increased with Tennessee’s rising unemployment rate, which stands at 10.5 percent.
“Nearly all states are holding steady on their coverage of kids,” said Jocelyn Guyer, co-executive director of the Center for Children and Families. “Actually about half of states are moving forward to cover additional children. What that reflects is that as bad a time as it is for state budgets, it’s an even harder time for family budgets.
“States, even though they are really struggling financially, have been trying to find ways to help children and working families that are losing their jobs.”
Other states have also proposed cutbacks to SCHIP services, she said, but Tennessee is the only one not accepting any more enrollees.

98. Skate Park Advocate Shares Passion About Mud Island -

Aaron Shafer is among the backers of a skate park for Mud Island. He helped organize a strong and vocal skate park contingent at hearings this year on a renovation of the river park, along with www.skatelifememphis.org.

99. Vote Wisely, Remember Mayor’s Post Is Temporary -

Among the 25 people seeking to become Memphis’ next mayor, the ideal candidate does not exist. Even the more serious contenders, who are a minority in the record-setting group, lack the overall vision and ability to get things done.

100. Health Care Administrator Gives Back to Community -

Shantelle Leatherwood decided early in her career as a health care administrator to forgo the quest for a corner office in a hospital or executive suite and instead be closer to people.

She opted to work in community health centers. Leatherwood is the practice administrator at Christ Community Health Services.