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Editorial Results (free)

1. Square Sale -

Watty Brooks Hall said the event has become a highly anticipated competition, almost like Christmas morning is for children. During the semiannual Collierville Town-Wide Sidewalk Sale, one customer always shows up bright and early outside The Brooks Collection, Hall’s business on the town square.

2. Tennessee Teacher Survey Shows Concerns With Test Prep -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — With new tests on the way in math and English for students in grades three through 11, a survey released Wednesday shows Tennessee teachers worried that they're spending too much time on testing and test preparation.

3. Affordable Homes in an Unaffordable Market -

The gold rush of residential development throughout Middle Tennessee conceals what some in the region say is a growing crisis in affordable housing.

New homes and condos come on to the market every day, and even more are under construction or still in the planning stage, but those homes are often on the higher end of the price scale.

4. Solving the Culture Problem at Your Company -

There’s a reason “culture” was reported by Merriam-Webster to be the most popular word of the year in 2014, and we have Generation Y to thank.

Although millennials continue to be pegged as the “what can you do for me” generation, companies across the nation have realized it’s time to make a change to workplace culture. Meeting some of Gen Y’s unique needs is not only a must for the health of workplace culture, it’s also a huge benefit to businesses’ bottom lines.

5. Problem Properties -

Memphis has a crippling issue with blight, and one nonprofit is front and center with changing the culture that led to the city’s inundation of abandoned properties and lots.

Neighborhood Preservation Inc. was founded in 2012 as a court-appointed receiver of properties taken away from neglectful owners. Over the years, it has evolved to become a robust advocate for stronger legislation and development tools to deal with problem properties.

6. Memphis City Council to Revisit Benefits Changes -

Memphis City Council members continue Tuesday, Aug. 18, to revisit decisions they made on retiree and employee benefits in the last year.

At its Tuesday session, council members vote on the first of three readings of an ordinance that would allow some city employees to “freeze” their decision to enter the city’s Deferred Retirement Option Program.

7. Beale Board Looks at 3-Month Window to Set Up Shop -

The Beale Street Tourism Development Authority is looking at a narrow three-month window to get its lease agreement with City Hall signed and, in effect, begin its work for the city and hire some kind of day-to-day manager for the entertainment district.

8. Events -

Kirby Pines Retirement Community will host attorney J. Anthony Bradley for a free seminar titled “The 7 Things Every Senior Needs to Know About Estate Planning & Long-Term Care” Thursday, Aug. 13, at 10:30 a.m. at 3535 Kirby Road. A free lunch will follow. RSVP to erochelle@kirbypines.com or 901-369-7340.

9. Events -

Central Defense Staffing will host a job fair Wednesday, Aug. 12, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Marion Hale Community Center, 4791 Willow Road. CDS is hiring various positions for large accounts in Memphis and North Mississippi. Applicants should come prepared for an informational interview. For details on available positions, call 901-473-6385.

10. Nashville to Vote in Mayor's Race Featuring Heavy Spending -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The seven candidates vying to become Nashville's next mayor have spent a combined $12.5 million on their bids — the equivalent of $43 for every registered voter in Music City.

11. Urge to Merge -

First it was big insurer Aetna, announcing it’s reached a deal to buy rival Humana for $34.1 billion. Only a few weeks later, another pair of insurers decided to get hitched, with Anthem announcing it would buy Cigna for $48.4 billion.

12. Redbirds Manager Shildt Understands the Job -

The best part of being a Triple-A manager is obvious: You get to tell players they are going up to the major leagues.

First-year Redbirds skipper Mike Shildt has had the privilege of doing that many times this season. He says it’s never sweeter than telling a player, for the first time, that he’s going up to the St. Louis Cardinals.

13. 'En Fuego' -

When Southaven Mayor Darren Musselwhite took office in June 2013, one of the first tasks that landed on his desk was a long-planned regional outlet mall.

The outlet mall, planned for a roughly 33-acre site at Church Road and Interstate 55 in the DeSoto County city, had been on the drawing board for some time, but the recession and its aftermath caused developers and Mississippi officials to put it on hold.

14. Repair, Fence Ordered For Downtown Building -

The owner of a long-vacant Downtown building that suffered a partial roof collapse last week following heavy rain must erect “appropriate” fencing around the structure, according to Shelby County Environmental Court Judge Larry Potter.

15. Family Room -

Family homelessness may be an extraordinarily difficult problem to solve, but in Sister Maureen Griner’s experience many homeless families are just regular folks.

“Ordinary families with ordinary problems,” she said.

16. Owner of Blighted Downtown Building Will Appear in Court -

The owner of a blighted Downtown building that partially collapsed last week following heavy rain will be in Shelby County Environmental Court Wednesday, July 29.

During the Thursday afternoon rain that flooded streets and briefly knocked out electricity across Downtown Memphis, the roof of the four-story building at 107 S. Main St. partially collapsed and a water pipe burst, allowing water to creep into adjoining buildings.

17. Departing Thoughts from Asia -

This entry will be my last submission penned while living in Asia, so rather than discuss the market’s recent wiggles, I thought I would share some top of mind takeaways as I prepare to depart Hong Kong.

18. Partial Roof Collapse Revives Concern For Downtown Memphis Eyesore -

A hard rain Thursday, July 23, has put a problem property on the Main Street Mall’s “demonstration block” back in the public eye and potentially back in court.

During the Thursday afternoon rain that flooded streets and briefly knocked out electricity across Downtown Memphis, the roof of the four-story building at 107 S. Main partially collapsed and a water pipe burst.

19. Can US Housing Industry's Comeback Endure? The Outlook Dims -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. housing market has sizzled this summer, lifting expectations that home sales will finally help drive an economic expansion now in its seventh year.

Or will it?

20. New Daisy Renovation Signals New Era for Historic Building -

With a national partner found in Live Nation Entertainment, the New Daisy Theater is getting all dolled up to host nearly 200 musical acts annually.

The job doesn't just call for a new coat of paint to cover the decades of graffiti: the historic theater at 330 Beale is getting a complete overhaul.

21. Going Up: Labor, Materials Drive Construction Costs -

Shelby County homebuilders have steadily raised prices for months now, partly due to supply and demand but mostly due to soaring material and labor costs.

While the demand for new homes remains steady, the supply of new homes remains relatively low and homebuilders are able to raise prices. But construction costs have been on the upswing for several months and are impacting every corner of the construction industry.

22. Build Out -

Boyle Investment Co. is building a 52,000-square-foot office building at its Schilling Farms community in Collierville in which Helena Chemical Co.’s Southern Business Unit will lease half of the space.

23. Memphis Sole -

The football field measurements are perhaps inevitable in describing just how big Nike’s Northridge distribution center in Frayser is after its $301 million expansion.

The 2.8 million-square-foot facility – the equivalent of 49 football fields – is Nike Inc.’s largest distribution center in the world.

24. With No Real Rival, Tennessee Republicans Attack Their Own -

Republicans are sitting in Tennessee’s political catbird seat, but that doesn’t keep them from flying off in different directions.

Elected political leaders of the same stripe found themselves at odds this year over the Bible as a state book, Common Core education standards and Insure Tennessee, Republican Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to catch 280,000 people in a medical coverage gap.

25. Why Airlines Keep Pushing Biofuels: They Have No Choice -

NEW YORK (AP) — The number of global fliers is expected to more than double in the next two decades. In order to carry all those extra passengers, airlines are turning to a technology very few can make work on a large scale: converting trash into fuel.

26. Curiosity Closed the Sale -

Curiosity may have killed the cat – but in sales, curiosity can almost always close the deal.

Questions are a powerful tool in the sales process, but if you’re only using questions to identify your prospect’s needs at the beginning of the sales process, you may be missing key opportunities. If you’re not integrating questions from start to finish, you may not catch possibilities for cross-selling and up-selling – and you might as well be trying to overcome objections blindfolded.

27. Ikea Buys Cordova Acreage For Planned Memphis Store -

41 Acres for
Future Ikea Store

Sale Amount: $5.7 million

Sale Date: July 10, 2015

Buyer: IKEA Property Inc.

28. Clinton to Propose Increasing Capital Gains Taxes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hillary Rodham Clinton plans later this week to propose raising capital gains taxes for some investors, part of a larger campaign effort to encourage greater focus on longer-term economic growth rather than more immediate gains for investors.

29. Council to Vote on East Memphis Storage Facility -

The Memphis City Council is poised to take key votes Tuesday, July 21, on multiple real estate development projects, including an indoor storage facility planned in a prime East Memphis neighborhood.

30. Digital Diaspora -

The ubiquitous connectivity that permeates today's workplace is having a profound effect on company cultures, most notably in the digitally-fueled diaspora unfolding in which employees can work from just about anywhere.

31. Biomedical Company Expanding in Southeast Memphis -

Cognate Bioservices Inc. is launching a 32,500-square-foot expansion at its manufacturing facility at 4600 E. Shelby Drive in southeast Memphis near Lamar Avenue.

32. LRK Launches Expansion in Downtown Memphis -

Looney Ricks Kiss is embarking on an expansion of its Downtown Memphis headquarters.

The Memphis-based architecture, planning and design firm is expanding its office footprint by about 60 percent as part of a long-term lease extension at the Toyota Center building adjacent to AutoZone Park, 175 Toyota Plaza.

33. Tennessee’s ‘Fighting 26’ Democrats Work to Stay Relevant -

Sometimes Tennessee Democrats must feel like a tree that falls in the forest: Does anyone hear them?

When Democratic legislative leaders called for a special session this summer on Insure Tennessee, Gov. Bill Haslam’s market-based plan to use federal dollars to catch 280,000 working people in a health care coverage gap, they found themselves alone.

34. Beale Authority Prepares to Negotiate Lease With Memphis Leaders -

The Beale Street Tourism Development Authority is at what Downtown Memphis Commission president Paul Morris describes as an “awkward interim stage.”

35. Details Emerge on Planned Binghampton Retail Center -

The Binghampton neighborhood is inching closer to landing a grocery store as plans for a neighborhood retail center there come into clearer focus.

The Binghampton Development Corp. has signed a “letter of intent” with an unidentified national supermarket chain to build a store at the corner of Sam Cooper Boulevard and Tillman Street. It also is pursuing other retailers for the planned development that will bring more goods and jobs to the community.

36. Beale Group Plans for Lease Agreement Instead of District Ownership -

The Beale Street Tourism Development Authority is dropping the idea for now of a fee simple ownership of the entertainment district.

Members of the authority board, which met Thursday, July 9, will instead pursue the leasehold agreement with the city of Memphis, as contemplated in the city ordinance that created the authority as the new long-term planning group for the district.

37. Strickland Files for Mayor One Week From Deadline -

A week before the filing deadline for candidates on Memphis’ October ballot, city councilman Jim Strickland filed his qualifying petition for mayor and said he has a campaign war chest of approximately $400,000.

38. Council Approves Pinch Moratorium, Delays Vote On Civilian Police Review Board -

Memphis City Council members approved a 120-day moratorium Tuesday, July 7, on new building permits in the Pinch district as they also approved a planned development in the Downtown district.

The moratorium proposed by council member Berlin Boyd allows the council to grant waivers on a case-by-case basis during the four-month period. During the fourth months, the Memphis-Shelby County Office of Planning and Development will come up with some suggested guidelines for future development of the district that borders the reactivated Pyramid.

39. Council Approves Pinch Moratorium, Delays Vote On Civilian Police Review Board -

Memphis City Council members approved a 120-day moratorium Tuesday, July 7, on new building permits in the Pinch district as they also approved a planned development in the Downtown district.

The moratorium proposed by council member Berlin Boyd allows the council to grant waivers on a case-by-case basis during the four-month period. During the fourth months, the Memphis-Shelby County Office of Planning and Development will come up with some suggested guidelines for future development of the district that borders the reactivated Pyramid.

40. Council Approves Pinch Moratorium, Delays Vote On Civilian Police Review Board -

Memphis City Council members approved a 120-day moratorium Tuesday, July 7, on new building permits in the Pinch district as they also approved a planned development in the Downtown district.

The moratorium proposed by council member Berlin Boyd allows the council to grant waivers on a case-by-case basis during the four-month period. During the fourth months, the Memphis-Shelby County Office of Planning and Development will come up with some suggested guidelines for future development of the district that borders the reactivated Pyramid.

41. Carlisle Corp. Alters One Beale Plan -

Carlisle Corp. has revised plans for its ambitious, $160 million One Beale development at the foot of Beale Street in Downtown Memphis.

The south tower, which will include a four-star hotel, will now stand 18 stories tall, down from 22 stories as previously planned.

42. Gulch Approaching 50 Percent Buildout -

Nashville’s storied Gulch, originally the home of the downtown railway terminal, is approaching another milestone in its long history.

Revitalization of the area began in the early 2000s, and The Gulch Improvement District was formed in 2006. Since that time, developers have found great success in luring in upscale residential, commercial and mixed-use tenants.

43. Building Boom Strains Labor Pool, Supply Chain -

Middle Tennessee’s red-hot construction boom is becoming a victim of its own success. Architects, contractors and everyone in between, including Metro Codes, are up to their necks in work.

It’s a happy time of an industry that also can see long, slow periods of stagnation.

44. Shelby Farms Greenline Gardens Gets Makeover -

The Greenline Gardens at Shelby Farms Park – the centerpiece of a handful of park programs including the Farm-to-Fork Fellowship and the Greenline Garden Club Workshop series – has been given a long-overdue makeover.

45. Will Latest Inflammatory Comments Tarnish Trump's Brand? -

NEW YORK (AP) – Is Donald Trump's business empire as Teflon-coated as his hair appears to be?

Trump has found himself on the receiving end of the catchphrase he made famous on his reality show "The Apprentice" – "You're fired!" – after NBC dumped the real estate mogul Monday over comments he made about immigrants during his recent presidential campaign kickoff speech.

46. Graceland Hotel Developers File $84 Million Construction Loan -

3600 Elvis Presley Blvd.
Memphis, TN 38116
Loan Amount: $84 million

47. Developers Still Interested In Midtown Hotel -

Yes, the development team that had proposed replacing the French Quarter Inn at Overton Square is selling the property to Ballet Memphis, which plans on building a new performance center there.

But they say they still want to build a hotel in Midtown, according to a statement they provided to Brenda Solomito Basar, owner of Solomito Land Planning.

48. Business in Politics -

One of the first things Shea Flinn noticed when he left the Memphis City Council this year was that benches for audience members in the council chamber are less comfortable than council members’ seats.

49. Tigers Alumni Game a Chance for Fans to Relive Fond Memories -

It’s not the Final Four. In fact, it’s not even a November nonconference game against some directional school.

It’s an alumni game being played at the little campus gym at the University of Memphis. And it’s sold out.

50. Developers Still Interested in Midtown Hotel -

Yes, the development team that had proposed replacing the French Quarter Inn at Overton Square is selling the property to Ballet Memphis, which plans on building a new performance center there.

But they say they still want to build a hotel in Midtown, according to a statement they provided to Brenda Solomito Basar, owner of Solomito Land Planning.

51. Nike Formally Opens $301 Million Frayser Expansion -

Executives of Nike Inc. are in Memphis Friday, June 26, to formally open the $301 million expansion of the sports shoe and apparel giant’s Northridge distribution center at 3100 New Frayser Boulevard.

52. Patrick Accounting Owner Launches Payroll Vault Franchise -

Matthew Patrick, owner and managing member of Patrick Accounting and Tax Services, has launched a new payroll services firm.

53. Michigan Investor Pays $7.5 Million for Hickory Hill Apartments -

5995 Waterstone Oak Way
Memphis, TN
Sale Amount: $7.5 million

Sale Date: June 11, 2015
Buyer: RoCo-Lakes LLC
Seller: RRE Waterstone Holdings LLC
Loan Amount: $6.2 million
Loan Date: June 11, 2015
Maturity Date: June 11, 2017
Lender: Keybank NA
Details: RoCo-Lakes LLC, a Michigan limited liability company, purchased two parcels comprising The Lakes at Ridgeway Apartments on June 11.

54. Greening the Region -

A result of a $2.6 million grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and two years of planning, the pre-implementation phase of the Mid-South Regional Greenprint and Sustainability Plan is gaining momentum.

55. Climate Change as Faith Issue a Tough Sell -

It’s been a tough few years for Tennessee Interfaith Power and Light. The state affiliate of a national network of faith communities, the organization offers its members a spiritual way to respond to climate change issues and challenges from political and other sources.

56. Building Green in a Red-Hot Market -

Counting cranes has become a Nashville pastime, and the perks of all that development are clear – a robust economy, vibrant real estate market and more jobs.

Naturally, there is concern among some residents that all of the construction and increased population could harm the area’s environment, water and air quality and green space.

57. Tioga Environmental Consultants Stays Agile During Economic Change -

When someone is preparing a house for sale, they might look into painting the kitchen or refurbishing the basement. But many homeowners and management groups first turn to groups such as Tioga Environmental Consultants to investigate for coatings of lead-based paint or asbestos in the house.

58. Blight Fight -

Somer Smith and three colleagues were busy Thursday, June 11, cruising around the South End portion of Downtown on the lookout for neglected properties.

Smith, an associate at Brewer & Barlow PLC and a second-year student in the City and Regional Planning graduate program at the University of Memphis, was canvassing the area around Crump Boulevard and West Virginia Street as part of a volunteer force organized by the Downtown Memphis Commission to conduct a sweeping survey of property conditions.

59. Stones Rock Music City -

Pleased to meet you, hope you guessed our name. Well, hell, Mick, if it’s puzzling you, it’s Nashville. Music City USA.

We’re the national media’s flavor of the day – the “It city,” which has gone from being a secondary concert market – remember The Beatles played Memphis, not Nashville – to one of the country’s prime touring destinations.

60. Panel Alters Wharton’s Plan for Memphis Fairgrounds -

The Mid-South Coliseum becomes a pavilion with a grove next to a multi-purpose sports center. A 10-acre water park fronts on Central Avenue where a high school gym now stands.

A second north-south Tiger Lane intersects with the current east-west version.

61. Panel Alters Wharton’s Plan for Memphis Fairgrounds -

The Mid-South Coliseum becomes a pavilion with a grove next to a multi-purpose sports center. A 10-acre water park fronts on Central Avenue where a high school gym now stands.

A second north-south Tiger Lane intersects with the current east-west version.

62. Beale Authority Wants to Talk New Ownership Deal -

The newly appointed Beale Street Tourism Development Authority wants to talk to Memphis City Council members about a new arrangement for how it would govern the Beale Street Entertainment District for the city.

63. Editorial: One Beale and the Change We Think We Want -

For many years, urban planners have talked about the need for more density in Memphis – more of us living and working closer together. With that kind of density comes change.

It makes a working, credible public transportation system more likely to have a sustainable future, and it activates surroundings that previously were foreboding and assumed to be dangerous in their relative isolation.

64. Carlisle Corp. Gets Tentative OK on One Beale Plan -

Developers got a tentative green light to move forward with the ambitious One Beale project, convincing regulators that the twin skyscraper development would be a game-changer for the Memphis skyline.

65. MAA Outgrowing Its East Memphis Headquarters -

MAA has tapped Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors to explore its long-term corporate office needs.

The apartment-focused real estate investment trust says internal growth and the 2013 acquisition of Colonial Properties Trust means space at its East Memphis headquarters is getting tight.

66. Goodman to Accelerate Research in UTHSC Post -

When Dr. Steven Goodman starts his new job next month as vice chancellor for research at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, he will get under way on a mission to build a strong team of scientists that helps accelerate the university’s research efforts.

67. Beale Authority Wants to Talk New Ownership Arrangement -

The newly appointed Beale Street Tourism Development Authority wants to talk to Memphis City Council members about a new arrangement for how it would govern the Beale Street Entertainment District for the city.

68. Making the Connection -

Archie Willis III had just earned his master’s degree in business at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill when he returned to Memphis in 1981 to help his father, A.W. Willis Jr., redevelop the Adler Hotel Annex.

69. Beale Authority Wants to Talk Fee Simple Ownership Of District -

The newly appointed Beale Street Tourism Development Authority wants to talk to Memphis City Council members about a fee simple arrangement for how it would govern the entertainment district for the city.

70. New Carnival Cruise Brand Devotes Ship to Volunteer Trips -

NEW YORK (AP) – Carnival Corp. announced a new concept in cruising Thursday: service trips where passengers sail to a destination in order to volunteer there.

71. Love of Learning -

Porter-Leath’s recent donation of a few thousand books to its preschool students serves as one of the latest examples of how the nonprofit is exposing infants and toddlers to the written word in a larger push to prepare children for long-term learning success.

72. David Lusk Gallery Relocates to Flicker Street for Now -

Change, milestones, new beginnings – they’re all on the mind of David Lusk at the moment, now that he’s wound things down at his gallery’s longtime home in the Laurelwood Shopping Center to undertake a relocation.

73. First Tennessee Bank to Pay $212.5 Million for Bad Mortgage Loans -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – First Tennessee Bank has agreed to pay the U.S. government $212.5 million after admitting to making bad mortgage loans that left taxpayers footing the bill.

74. 'Art Saves Lives' Exhibit Installed at Masonic Lodge -

When the anonymous artist known by the letters “JR” won the TED prize in 2011 at the TED Conference in Long Beach, Calif., he called for the creation of an international art project that he said would use art “to turn the world inside out.”

75. Council Pursues Budget Loose Ends, Votes on Brewery Funding -

Memphis City Council members will vote Tuesday on $2.5 million in city funding for the Tennessee Brewery redevelopment.

The members also have budget changes to work out before final budget votes later this month. They will tackle those issues during a Tuesday morning committee session.

76. Orpheum Board Names New Center After CEO -

The board of the Memphis Development Foundation, which operates the Orpheum Theatre, has decided to name the organization’s new capital addition the Halloran Centre for Performing Arts & Education.

77. Hopson, Barbic Look Ahead to New School Year -

Dorsey Hopson and Chris Barbic are comparing notes on the new school year that begins in August, the first in three years in which the structure of public education in Shelby County essentially will remain the same.

78. Ramsey Uses ‘System’ to Reshape State’s Political Landscape -

Senate Speaker and Lieutenant Gov. Ron Ramsey laughs at the notion he’s changed since being elected to the Legislature 23 years ago, that he’s lost touch with the common man or become “arrogant” as lieutenant governor of Tennessee.

79. Orpheum Board Names New Center After CEO -

The board of the Memphis Development Foundation, which operates the Orpheum Theatre, has decided to name the organization’s new capital addition the Halloran Centre for Performing Arts & Education.

80. Oak Park Apartments Demolition Latest in Blight Campaign -

The group of Memphis leaders and Glenview-area homeowners standing in a parking lot last week surrounded by the shells of two two-story apartment buildings and the charred foundation of a third paused for a moment.

81. What Grads Must Do to Secure Employment -

Career counselors at many Tennessee colleges and universities say interest from corporate recruiters is higher than they’ve seen it in years.

There are more job postings, internship opportunities, pre-employment trainee classes and technology training programs for all skill levels, but if a recent graduate needs help in pursuing a career, schools want the new alums to come back to them.

82. Memphis Gets Greenlight to Relocate Police -

Now it’s all about closing the deal.

With no debate or discussion, the Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, May 19, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s proposal to buy the 13-story Donnelley J. Hill state office building at 170 N. Main St., just a stone’s throw from City Hall.

83. Eden Square Breaks Ground in Memphis' Hickory Hill -

Marina Cove apartments was known in its 1980s prime for its water features – a set of canals.

And when a crowd of 300 gathered Saturday, May 16, to break ground there for the first phase of the $40 million Eden Square development, a small pond that isn’t in the plans had formed by the tent.

84. Proveaux’s Fuel Cafe Brand Covers Multiple Platforms -

When Erik Proveaux opened Fuel Café, it was because he wanted to set up roots after traveling the country for years doing film production catering. Five years later those roots have spread, and now he operates a multimodal brand that covers the restaurant, catering, food truck and small-batch production industries.

85. Southbrook Tests Wharton Administration Shake-Up -

It didn’t take very long for the city of Memphis’ new chief administrative officer to make a tough call.

And when Jack Sammons came down on the side of pulling back city funding for Southbrook Mall, political allies and foes of Mayor A C Wharton Jr. watched to see if he would go along with the decision.

86. East Tennessee’s Endangered 8 -

The East Tennessee Preservation Alliance’s list of endangered heritage sites for the region:

1. The Stonecipher-Kelly House in Morgan County was built around 1814 by the first permanent white settlers in that area, as part of a Revolutionary War land-grant.

87. Preserving East Tennessee's Endangered Buildings -

When preservation comes up in conversation, it brings to mind crumbling Victorian mansions or maybe an old Woolworth’s sitting idle downtown.

That’s definitely been the case in and around Knoxville, and it’s a mindset that Knox Heritage and the East Tennessee Preservation Alliance (ETPA) are working hard to break.

88. Investors Pumping Hundreds of Millions Into Tennessee Startups -

The assignment sounded simple enough: Find out whether more money is coming into Nashville for startups.

If so, where is it coming from and what does it means to entrepreneurs, investors and the rest of us?

89. Foxx Hears Lamar Corridor as Priority in White House's Infrastructure Bill -

A group of 23 local leaders told U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx Tuesday, May 12, that improving the Lamar Avenue freight corridor is their first priority for federal infrastructure funding.

90. Developers: Tennessee Brewery Work is Tough Job -

The team behind the proposed redevelopment of the long-vacant Tennessee Brewery received a 20-year tax freeze and a long-term loan for a new parking garage to help usher the Downtown development along, but officials say much work remains before the $28.1 million project becomes a reality.

91. New Blood Tests May Transform Cancer Care -

A new type of blood test is starting to transform cancer treatment, sparing some patients the surgical and needle biopsies long needed to guide their care.

The tests, called liquid biopsies, capture cancer cells or DNA that tumors shed into the blood, instead of taking tissue from the tumor itself. A lot is still unknown about the value of these tests, but many doctors think they are a big advance that could make personalized medicine possible for far more people.

92. Incumbent’s Advantage Faces Test in Mayor’s Race -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. rolls out a new plan for emergency medical services Tuesday, May 10, that is expected to involve some private, nongovernment involvement.

No further details of the announcement were forthcoming from his administration, but it returns the still-forming 2015 race for mayor to an issue that is basic to virtually every mayoral election: public safety.

93. Boat Boom -

The Mississippi River has been a vital channel for boats and barges for more than 250 years. These days, Memphis doesn’t do much in the way of cotton exporting and Mark Twain touring, but the $43 million Beale Street Landing is bringing a new wave of river-based commerce: cruise ships.

94. Beale Street Board to Tackle District Plans, Future -

Jeff Sanford has spent much of the past five years consulting on redevelopment projects in other cities.

But Sanford – who stepped down from his post as president of the Center City Commission, now the Downtown Memphis Commission, in 2010 – hasn’t found another entertainment district comparable to Memphis’ most famous street.

95. Women in STEM is No Recent Phenomenon -

One of the challenges facing women in STEM disciplines is the lack of role models girls have when it comes to female mentors in science, engineering, technology and math.

Marie Curie is considered by many to be the trailblazer when it comes to the topic of women in science. And rightfully so. She discovered two elements, was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize (1903) and the first person to win a second one (1911), all before women had the right to vote.

96. TCAT’s 27 Campuses Offer ‘A Different Life’ -

Ready for a new career? If you’re looking for a fresh start, Tennessee may be one of the best places in the world to find it.

Through May 15, residents who want to retrain in a new career field can apply for a full scholarship to the Tennessee College of Applied Technology, a unique and highly effective system of technical colleges with 27 main campuses around the state.

97. Carlisle Corp. Files Plan For One Beale -

The Carlisle Corp.’s planned development for its One Beale project at Riverside Drive and Beale Street includes an “assembly/performance hall and convention center” as well as a lounge or nightclub with more than 125 seats.

98. Conduit Job Cuts Follow Bass Pro Gain -

The news that Conduit Global would lay off nearly 600 of its 700 Memphis call center employees happened so quickly that Mayor A C Wharton Jr. was caught by surprise when the word came Wednesday, May 6.

99. Brewery Redevelopers Seek 20-Year Tax Freeze -

The team behind the effort to redevelop the historic but long-vacant Tennessee Brewery could receive a 20-year tax freeze to help make the project a reality.

Developers Billy Orgel, Adam Slovis and Jay Lindy are proposing a $28.1 million adaptive reuse of the existing 90-foot-tall brewery building overlooking the Mississippi River, a new residential building and a new parking garage.

100. Universal Appeal -

Paige Marcantel, a licensed clinical social worker, served as a grief counselor for Baptist Memorial Hospital for several years before becoming a stay-at-home mom two years ago.

But when the opportunity to help local families dealing with child rearing issues and trauma arose – everything from disrespectful behavior to more serious issues like divorce, addiction and domestic violence – Marcantel couldn’t turn it down.