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Editorial Results (free)

1. Commitment to Fitness Looks to Reverse Childhood Obesity -

If American children and teenagers are fat, then those in the Mid-South are fatter. And you don’t have to rely on some “Fattest Cities in America” list aimed at generating clicks and views to reach this conclusion.

2. Brockman: Memphis Airport in ‘Good Position’ -

Memphis International Airport is building its new identity at a steady pace one year to the month after Delta Air Lines enacted the cuts that came with its dehubbing of the airport.

And the president and CEO of the Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority says the state of the airport is sound and good.

3. Legal Issues Await Mob Attack Investigation -

Memphis police could make more arrests in the Poplar Plaza mob attack, but investigators believe they have the teenagers who started the riot on the parking lot of the Kroger supermarket Saturday, Sept. 6, that injured three people.

4. At the Counter -

THE COLLEGE INN, FULL CIRCLE. The future was in my hands. My parents had set me free and I sat there all by myself for the very first time, my own stool at the counter, my own menu in front of me and a cool new show on the TV above. It was 1957. I was eight. The show was Perry Mason. And I was in control.

5. Authors, Readers Converge for Book Festival -

Earlier this year, interest in the first Mid-South Book Festival, scheduled to take place later this month, began to reach what seemed like a fever pitch, according to Literacy Mid-South executive director Kevin Dean.

6. Bloodworth: Greenways Increasing Residential Values -

The Memphis region’s existing 50 miles of greenways, paths and trails are responsible for some increase in property values, particularly residential property, says Rusty Bloodworth, vice president of Boyle Investment Co. and past chairman of the Urban Land Institute’s Memphis chapter.

7. Push for Broader Minority Business Participation Grows -

A larger share of business for minority- and women-owned local businesses should begin with an inventory that matches existing businesses with existing opportunities.

And three leaders of the recently revived effort to build that share of business say from there the local Memphis economy overall can grow.

8. Silicone Arts Laboratories Recruited for Dallas Accelerator -

A Memphis company founded in 2011 that makes innovative cosmetic products has been recruited to participate in the Dallas-based health care accelerator Health Wildcatters.

The company is Silicone Arts Laboratories, which manufacturers a topical filler called Dermaflage that uses silicone to simulate skin and instantly conceal recessed imperfections. The product is waterproof and conceals skin imperfections for up to 36 hours. Designed for ease of use among consumers, Dermaflage’s other strength is that it provides a cosmetic option for concealing recessed scars and skin defects on the face and body without having to resort automatically to surgery or injections.

9. Baptist Doctor Named to Endocrinology Board -

Dr. Jay Cohen, endocrinologist and medical director at Baptist Medical Group-The Endocrine Clinic, recently was named to the advisory board of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists to help develop the 2014-2015 national diabetes treatment guidelines.

10. The Q Party -

CRISIS AVERTED. It’s all a matter of perspective.

At the height of the 1962 Cuban missile crisis, a friend’s father was in Corinth, Miss., on business. He was outside the courthouse having a cigarette and waiting for an appointment when he overheard a conversation between two old men on a bench.

11. Amazon Debuts Mobile Payment App and Card Reader -

NEW YORK (AP) – Amazon is taking direct aim at mobile payment systems such as Square by introducing the Amazon Local Register, a credit-card processing device and mobile app designed to help small business owners accept payments through their smartphones and tablets.

12. Baptist Doctor Named to Endocrinology Board -

Dr. Jay Cohen, endocrinologist and medical director at Baptist Medical Group-The Endocrine Clinic, recently was named to the advisory board of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists to help develop the 2014-2015 national diabetes treatment guidelines.

13. New York Firm Buys Retirement Community -

996 Cherry Road
Memphis, TN 38117
Sale Amount: $12.9 million

Sale Date: July 30, 2014
Buyer: GFTV Audubon Owner LLC
Seller: TV Memphis LP
Loan Amount: $23.5 million
Loan Date: July 30, 2014
Maturity Date: N/A
Lender: Grandbridge Real Estate Capital LLC
Details: An affiliate of New York-based Garrison Investment Group has paid $12.9 million for the 176-unit Town Village Audubon Park retirement community at 950 Cherry Road in East Memphis.

14. Gannett Splits Publishing, Broadcasting in Two -

NEW YORK (AP) – The game of survival is on for newspapers, as USA Today owner Gannett on Tuesday became the most recent major media entity to say it will divide its print and broadcast divisions into separate companies.

15. I Choose Memphis: Tim Young -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Tim Young

16. Tennessee Signs Out-of-State Firm for Ads -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Tennessee officials have signed a five-year, $60 million contract with a Kansas City, Missouri firm to produce the "Made in Tennessee" tourism campaign.

The marketing agency VML, which has opened a Nashville office, produced two 30-second TV commercials promoting getting outdoors in Tennessee. The ads feature with dramatic waterfalls, green rolling hills and horseback-riding amid a forest scene. The ads will play in about a dozen markets around the country.

17. Light and Dark -

WHEN STORIES ARE TOLD IN THE DARK, LEAVE A LIGHT ON. As I watch what leads the local TV news – basically a visual evening recap of whatever that day’s monitoring of police scanners and chasing sirens can produce – and what passes for TV reporting – basically an evening twist to whatever might be salacious or sensational in that morning’s paper – I wonder if all of our better angels have left town.

18. FanBank Shop Local Program Launches in Memphis -

A new shop local rewards program has launched in Memphis, one that brings a different approach to the efforts featuring loyalty cards and aggressive discounting that tend to be the norm.

FanBank, on the other hand, is designed to connect customers with local businesses using an approach similar to that of an airline or hotel rewards program. Participating consumers leave their information on file, and then they go about their shopping habits as normal, incrementally benefiting from the program along the way.

19. Fat Chance -

12-STOP. “My name is Dan, and I’ve lost control.”

“Hi, Dan,” answers America, desperately addicted to too much, too often, in need of a 12-stop consumption program. As in 12 ounces of any soft drink is plenty and 12 ounces of gin starts fights with strangers. As in 12 ounces of any animal in any form is too much and 12 things on your breakfast plate doesn’t jumpstart your day, just your LDL. As in 12 of anything larger than a carrot stick at a single sitting will narrow arteries and prospects, broaden what you’re sitting on, and make getting up from the table – or for anything – a challenge. For a forklift.

20. Antitrust Experts: 2 Big Deals Better Than 1 -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – Antitrust experts say AT&T's bid for DirecTV could reap immediate regulatory rewards. Coming so quickly on the heels of a rival cable company merger – the pairing of Comcast and Time Warner Cable – makes it easier for regulators to approve both transactions because they create two counterbalanced giants in pay TV.

21. Study: Political TV Ads on Health Law Total $445 Million -

CHICAGO (AP) – A new analysis finds the nation's health care overhaul deserves a place in advertising history as the focus of extraordinarily high spending on negative political TV ads that have gone largely unanswered by the law's supporters.

22. Jones, Reaves Look to Commission Terms -

For David Reaves and Eddie Jones, the 2014 election year is over.

23. Suburban Schools Seek Share of $50 Million -

The leaders of Shelby County’s seven school systems are expected to make their cases before the Shelby County Commission Wednesday, May 7, for $50 million in capital funds the county set aside for the current fiscal year.

24. Tackling the ‘Taboo’ -

Bill Courtney is adamant – which, if you know him, is a redundancy – that he has not written a political book.

25. You Ought to Be in Puzzles -

Dear Judge Vic, Do you believe in hiding messages in a crossword puzzle – like for birthdays, anniversaries, weddings, and such? Curious.”

“Dear Curious, Believe in it? Heckfire, I’ve seen it happen!” I’ve even done it myself. And will do it again. The question is when. And for whom.

26. Untapped Potential -

Since April 24, a crowd estimated at a few thousand people has flocked to the castle-like structure at 495 Tennessee St. for the chance to hang out at the Tennessee Brewery and enjoy a bar, food trucks, music and good company.

27. From the Gallery of Tradition -

AUGUSTA, Ga. – Overheard in the gallery:

“Where you staying tonight?”

“With you. Didn’t they tell you?”

“You got any cousins coming?”

28. In Internet TV Case, Justices Show Concern -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Grappling with fast-changing technology, Supreme Court justices debated Tuesday whether they can protect the copyrights of TV broadcasters to the shows they send out without strangling innovations in the use of the internet.

29. Brewery Project Looks for Answers -

When the Untapped event at the Tennessee Brewery ends June 1, the fortress-like landmark on the south bluffs will still be tentatively slated for demolition in August.

But organizers of the event, which mixes live entertainment, local beer and food, and the experience of gathering in a long-closed courtyard, hope some answers will have emerged about a possible life beyond August.

30. Bill Extends Tax Breaks for Wind Farms, Filmmakers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Wind farms, NASCAR tracks and filmmakers would keep their treasured tax breaks as part of an $85 billion package of temporary tax cuts passed by a key Senate committee Thursday.

31. Durham Dives Into Legislature During First Year -

When someone first mentioned to freshman state Rep. Jeremy Durham that there would be a new seat in Williamson County, he thought he was being asked to suggest someone, not run.

32. Shelby County Party Heads Look Ahead to Primaries -

As Shelby County Democrats try to improve on losing every countywide office to Republicans in the 2010 county elections, party leaders are also warning political figures who identify as Democrats not to cross party lines.

33. Pets Get the Hollywood Treatment at Growing Chain -

Shawn McGhee grew up on a farm in Southern California with sheep and cattle and “a dozen dogs, a dozen cats, running loose.”

34. Dish, Disney Deal Envisions Internet-Delivered TV -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – Dish Network and Disney have reached a landmark deal that envisions the day when Dish will offer a Netflix-like TV service to people who'd rather stream TV over the Internet than put a satellite receiver on their roof.

35. Wharton: City Must Target ‘Black Boy Crime’ -

As President Barack Obama talked from the East Room of the White House last week about violence and young African-American men and boys, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. was among a group of mayors meeting in New Orleans who say they are ready to back a new approach to the problem.

36. New Women’s Business Group Grows In Memphis -

A new business group for professional women and business owners has launched in Memphis and is meeting at Napa Cafe next week to hear a veteran sales strategy consultant talk about authenticity in the digital world.

37. Developers Amend Highland Row Plan -

Developers of the Highland Row mixed-use development by the University of Memphis are taking an amended plan for the project to the Land Use Control Board Thursday, Feb. 13.

The new plan calls for less retail and commercial uses and more residential development.

38. University of Memphis' Martin Challenges Dropout Premise -

University of Memphis interim President Brad Martin says the premise that students coming out of high school are academically unprepared for higher education may not be as prevalent as it’s believed to be. And he adds that the university’s experience indicates students leave without graduating because of other factors.

39. Haslam: Medicaid Expansion ‘A Clunker’ -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says he understands critics of his decision so far not to accept a federally funded expansion of Medicaid in Tennessee. But Haslam said the terms of the increased funding wouldn’t provide better outcomes for users or providers.

40. Luttrell Says Timing Key to Schools Funding -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell refers to the start two years ago of the reformation of local public education as “chaos and confusion.”

41. Council to Get Updates on City Expense Cuts -

Memphis City Council members get a closer look Tuesday, Jan. 21, at some ways the city can reallocate $80 million over the next five fiscal years to begin paying $100 million annually toward an unfunded pension liability the city estimates is at $709 million.

42. Council to Get Updates on City Expense Cuts -

Memphis City Council members get a closer look Tuesday, Jan. 21, at some ways the city can reallocate $80 million over the next five fiscal years to begin paying $100 million annually toward an unfunded pension liability the city estimates is at $709 million.

43. New Restaurant Opening Near Sears Crosstown -

A restaurant and bar with ties to a Memphis reality television show will open later this month near Sears Crosstown.

The restaurant and bar, called FoxCee’s Overton Park Bar & Grill, is being opened by the host and producer behind “Fox in tha City,” which airs on WLMT-TV CW30.

44. New Restaurant Opening Near Sears Crosstown -

A restaurant and bar with ties to a Memphis reality television show will open later this month near Sears Crosstown.

The restaurant and bar, called FoxCee’s Overton Park Bar & Grill, is being opened by the host and producer behind “Fox in tha City,” which airs on WLMT-TV CW30.

45. Tribune Co. Closes on Local TV Deal -

CHICAGO (AP) – The Tribune Co. said Friday that it has completed its $2.73 billion acquisition of Local TV Holdings LLC.

46. The Year That Was -

2013 brought plenty of unique and out-of-the-ordinary moments, as well as the launch of new events, businesses and civic ventures that collectively made the Memphis experience richer.

Much of it was covered in these pages, including in recent days a U.S. Supreme Court justice eliciting chuckles from and sharing his constitutional philosophy with an audience of Memphis lawyers.

47. Norris Expects Maintenance of Effort for Pensions -

Tennessee Senate Republican leader Mark Norris of Collierville says whatever fix Memphis leaders come up with for the city’s unfunded pension liability, the Tennessee General Assembly will probably still pass legislation dealing with the problem on a scale broader than Memphis.

48. Bad Blood -

December was already going to be a busy month at City Hall for the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

He would be bringing a plan to provide $15 million in city financing for the $180 million Crosstown revitalization project and rolling out its fix to address the Tennessee Comptroller’s vocal concerns about the city’s unfunded pension liability.

49. E.W. Scripps Buys Startup Newsy for $35 Million -

The E.W. Scripps Co., which owns newspapers and TV stations, said Monday that it bought video news startup Newsy for $35 million to help it enter the digital video business.

50. Crosstown Effort Shines as Development Example -

Construction documents for the $180 million revitalization of the Crosstown building were scheduled to be finished Friday, Dec. 6, with the project moving toward closing and construction in the next months.

51. Suburban Leaders Turn to Schools Details -

Shelby County Schools board members have schools agreements with suburban leaders in Bartlett, Collierville and Millington on their agenda Tuesday, Nov. 26, a week after approving the same type of agreements with different dollar amounts with Arlington and Lakeland.

52. Our Kind of Street -

A DIFFERENT KIND OF ADDRESS. The sticker on the door of Elwood’s Shack – sort of on Summer and sort of in Lowe’s parking lot – said “Summer Ave. is my Poplar.”

53. Haiku With Cartoon Twist -

HOT SPRINGS, ARK. – “Old Pond” cartoonist / big hit at haiku Hot Springs: / Jessica Tremblay.

November rolls in with hints of summer and winter. Autumn’s colors dot the hillsides surrounding historic Bathhouse Row. Amid falling leaves a dozen and a half haiku versifiers, from Boston to Memphis to Plano to Vancouver, descend upon the Arlington Hotel.

54. Kelley Shares Memphis Stories as Public Defender Assistant -

Lurene Kelley loves to tell a good story. These days she’s sharing some important stories that often go unheard in her role as special assistant for organizational communications in the law offices of the Shelby County Public Defender.

55. ‘Hoarders’ Star Partners With ServiceMaster -

“Hoarders” television personality and Clutter Cleaner owner Matt Paxton met this week with ServiceMaster Clean and Restore franchisees and staff at the ServiceMaster Training Academy to discuss their newly formed partnership and examine hoarding, which has been officially listed as a mental disorder by the American Psychiatric Association.

56. Hopson Offers Clues on Suburban Schools Transition -

Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson says it is looking less likely that the school system will provide support services to the new suburban school districts.

“There was some discussion early on,” Hopson said on the WKNO-TV program “Behind The Headlines.” “But I think as we move forward and some of the talks have happened between the County Commission and the municipal schools … I’m not so certain that there is going to be a wide menu of services that the municipal schools are going to even want. I don’t think we can build a budget around the possibility of sharing services.”

57. Local Health Care Changes Limited So Far, Doctors Say -

The Oct. 1 start of enrollment in health care exchanges may be the most visible part of the Affordable Care Act so far.

But changes to insurance and health care nationally already are about something other than lowering health care costs or widening access to health care and health insurance coverage.

58. Shelby Farms Road Reflects New Realities -

Eight years ago, environmental groups reached a consensus that a single north-south road through Shelby Farms Park was unavoidable and should be pushed as far west in the park as possible.

59. Levien: ‘Real Dialogue’ With Fans Crucial -

Last week in The Daily News, we brought you Part 1 of my interview with Grizzlies CEO Jason Levien. He talked about, among other things, ESPN The Magazine naming the franchise as the best in pro sports as just a starting point. He also said the Grizzlies will continue to keep an open mind about further player moves that could help the team.

60. This week in Memphis history: September 13-19 -

1973: Wayne W. Pyeatt assumed the duties of chief executive officer of National Bank of Commerce. He had been president and chief administrative officer. The decision by the bank’s board left Lewis R. McKee as board chairman.

61. Questions Raised About Criminal Justice System -

Shelby County’s public defender and the head of the Shelby County Corrections division say courts and prisons are changing and evolving as views about crime and punishment begin to change.

But Public Defender Stephen Bush and County Corrections Division director James Coleman said the intervention needs to start before citizens come into contact with the criminal justice system.

62. Director Says He Wants to Grow Mississippi Film Industry -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Director Tate Taylor says he wants to make his native Mississippi a place where people can build careers with steady work in the movie business.

He filmed "The Help" in the state in 2010 and announced Aug. 26 that he will make a feature film about the Godfather of Soul, James Brown, with the intention of shooting "every frame" in Mississippi.

63. More Than 300 Sites Ring Bells for MLK Speech -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Church bells were ringing out Wednesday at the National Cathedral and nationwide to answer a call from one of the most important civil rights speeches in history to "let freedom ring."

64. City Sanitation Changes Start With Fragile Pact -

Changes in city sanitation services would move toward a plan that could change decades of a system in which anything Memphians put by the curb gets picked up for a monthly solid waste fee, no matter how much is on the curb.

65. Talking Points -

Not long after appearing on two morning news shows to assert that U.S. military action in Syria is imminent, U.S. Sen. Bob Corker started his week with a list of Memphis appearances that included speaking to a lunchtime crowd on a range of subjects – everything from Middle East policy to the housing market’s incremental recovery.

66. Countdown Begins for Grizzlies Tip-Off -

Are you ready for some basketball?

What’s that you say, the word is FOOTBALL? Meaning it’s time to talk about walking through The Grove, running in space and snapping cell phone pictures of Johnny Manziel?

67. Business Leaders Say Tax Incentive Process is Tough -

It still takes too long to make a deal to move a business to Memphis with tax incentives, but without them, Memphis can’t compete with tax rates in other cities in the Southeast U.S., according to two local business leaders.

68. US Economy Grew at Sluggish 1.7 Percent Pace in Second Quarter -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy grew from April through June at an annual rate of 1.7 percent – a sluggish pace but stronger than in the previous quarter. Businesses spent more, and the federal government cut less, offsetting weaker spending by consumers.

69. Bunker, Ritz Differ on Tax Hike Afterlife -

Two Shelby County Commissioners with about a year left in office see an afterlife of issues with the county budget and $4.38 property tax rate the commission approved earlier this month.

But Wyatt Bunker and commission Chairman Mike Ritz differ on what the tax rate decision in particular says about the financial direction of county government and what taxpayers can bear.

70. Suburbs See Different Sales Tax Realities -

While Shelby County and city of Memphis government leaders have grappled with the loss of property value and its impact on the property tax rates for both governments, suburban leaders have a different reality.

71. Ardent Film Thriving Under Pekar’s Lead -

In a few short years, Jonathan Pekar has created a formidable film department at Memphis-based Ardent Studios.

The Memphis native has quickly racked up both local and national accolades, including a MidSouth Emmy award for Best Commercial Spot for the Memphis Music Foundation. Pekar returned to Memphis after more than two decades in Los Angeles, where he worked as a comedian, producer, film director and actor, including a stint as the producer of Shark Week at The Discovery Channel.

72. Strickland, Conrad Warn of Budget Pitfalls -

When most of the 13 people on the Memphis City Council began their service in 2008, the city’s property tax rate was $3.43 and rolling back that rate was a priority of a voting majority on the body.

73. City’s Car Inspection Debate Shifts Gears -

With the closing of the city’s four auto inspection stations Friday, June 28, a new phase begins in a political dispute that started its present path in the last year.

That is when the Memphis City Council voted to cut funding for the stations and the city employees who work in them.

74. Council Approves Tax Hike in $3.40 Property Tax Rate -

Memphis City Council members raised the city property tax rate Tuesday, June 26, by four cents above the recertified tax rate and put the rest of a turbulent budget season to rest.

The approval of the $3.40 property tax rate and city operating and capital budgets came in a council session that ended at 12:30 a.m. Wednesday morning.

75. State Pulls Riverfront Trail Funds -

The state of Tennessee has withdrawn $316,680 from the city for a riverfront bike and pedestrian system due to inactivity, according to state officials.

“Sorry for the bad news but this project is very old and there was no movement and I could not get any information out of any one on why there was such a delay in getting the project constructed that Federal Highway Administration said they were pulling the funding,” Lisa Dunn, transportation planner with the Tennessee Department of Transportation, wrote in an email to Jim Reeder, project development coordinator for the Riverfront Development Corp.

76. Luttrell: School Finances Will Continue to Change -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell won an important Shelby County Commission vote last week when the commission approved the $4.38 county property tax rate he recommended.

77. King Documentary Wins Prestigious Peabody Award -

A documentary about the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. has won the prestigious Peabody Award, with the help from the University of Memphis Libraries.

78. King Documentary Wins Prestigious Peabody Award -

A documentary about the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. has won the prestigious Peabody Award, with the help from the University of Memphis Libraries.

79. Memphis in the Meantime -

The city’s tourism and travel industry is thriving as a one-of-a-kind destination for leisure and business travelers, but industry insiders believe a larger, technologically updated convention center is needed in years to come if Memphis wants to remain competitive in bringing larger groups to town.

80. A Fond Farewell for Now -

Hard to believe, but almost three years has passed since I wrote the first “Giving Back” column in 2010. Credit goes to James Overstreet, associate publisher of The Daily News, who pulled me aside one day and asked if I had ever thought about sharing my ideas and some of our Lipscomb Pitts Breakfast Club philanthropic efforts with a broader audience. What started as an idea to share helpful tips, quickly evolved into a pipeline for positive stories, a spotlight for local nonprofits, and an avenue to provide easy ways to get more engaged in our community.

81. African-American TV Station Broadens Presence -

A new set of programming on Comcast Channel 31 geared toward Memphis’ African-American community is continuing to broaden its presence in the city.

The Carter Malone Group has developed a website for the venture, called MUTV1, which is short for Memphis Urban Television 1. In addition to serving as its agency of record, The Carter Malone Group CEO Deidre Malone also has a show on the channel called “Dialogue with Deidre.”

82. Senate Bill Lets States Tax Internet Purchases -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Attention online shoppers: The days of tax-free shopping on the Internet may soon end for many of you.

The Senate is scheduled to vote Monday on a bill that would empower states to collect sales taxes for purchases made over the Internet. The measure is expected to pass because it has already survived three procedural votes. But it faces opposition in the House, where some Republicans regard it as a tax increase. A broad coalition of retailers is lobbying in favor of it.

83. Hopson Says Merger Not Reason for Staff Cuts -

The interim superintendent of Shelby County’s two public school systems says staffing changes at some schools to start with the first school year of the merger aren’t as draconian as they could have been.

84. Beale Street Landing Eatery Search Resumes -

There were some signs early on that finding a restaurant operator for Beale Street Landing might be difficult.

The date for the restaurant to open kept getting pushed back and the contract remained unsigned long after it was announced that Beale & Second Inc. had tentatively agreed to operate the restaurant.

85. Kyle, Kelsey Debate Health Care, Government’s Role -

State Senate Democratic leader Jim Kyle of Memphis says Republicans in the Tennessee General Assembly are becoming like “Dixiecrats” – the Southern segregationist Democrats in the U.S. Congress in the late 1940s who formed their own party for a time.

86. Green Machine Brings Food to Neediest Areas -

On a recent Wednesday afternoon, dozens of volunteers worked to paint an 80-foot mural on the side of a former Memphis Area Transit Authority bus.

Students from Hollis Price Leadership Academy High School and other volunteers from the Memphis Grizzlies, St. Patrick’s Church and the University of Memphis graduate program in City and Regional Planning painted a colorful wellness-inspired mural that combines Memphis’ musical roots with fruits, vegetables and a message of healthy living.

87. I’m Lucky to Know Bea -

REMARKABLE CONNECTIONS. After last week’s column, Bea dropped me a thoughtful email note as she often does about whatever I’m writing about. My story about Linda Courtney and her son Bill struck a common chord, and Bea wanted to share.

88. Status of Auto Inspection Talks Varies -

The state of Tennessee is helping facilitate talks between city and county leaders about the coming deadline.

There are conflicting versions of what will happen at the end of the fiscal year. No one is certain or clear about what the federal response will be.

89. Magna Bank Adds Investment Services -

Magna Bank has added investment services to its mix of offerings available for customers.

The bank now is working with Cary Allen, a representative of independent investment securities firm LPL Financial Services. Allen will be based in Magna’s Quail Hollow branch at 6525 Quail Hollow Road, but he’ll be available to meet with customers at any of Magna’s other branches if they need.

90. Kelsey: State Confirms Six-Year Auto Inspection Timeframe -

Republican state Sen. Brian Kelsey of Germantown says he is confident Shelby County vehicle owners outside Memphis won’t have to go through auto inspections for another six years.

91. Lofty Company -

For creating the overnight package-delivery business four decades ago, and for everything his company has done since, FedEx Corp. founder Fred Smith has been placed among an elite group of chief executives by the business magazine Barron’s.

92. Bearden Photos on Display at Leadership Memphis -

Willy Bearden is a local filmmaker best known for works such as his 2010 feature “One Came Home” and the Memphis Memoirs series on WKNO-TV.

He produced the video exhibitions for the Cotton Museum and has produced the New Year’s Eve telecast from Beale Street as well as the Blues Music Awards for the Blues Foundation.

93. Memphis CBS Affiliate WREG Up for Sale -

WREG, the CBS affiliate in Memphis, is apparently up for sale.

Local TV LLC, the station’s owners, have announced internally they’re selling all their stations, according to a tweet from WREG-TV anchor Richard Ransom. “Anyone want to buy a TV station?” he added.

94. Sammons Seeks Final Cut Numbers From Delta -

Jack Sammons, the new chairman of the Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority board, is no stranger to the flight from Memphis to Atlanta. Sammons long has been the board’s frequent flyer when it comes to business travel.

95. Magna Bank Runs First Television Ad -

Starting this week, Magna Bank will begin airing a 30-second TV ad as part of its “We’re For You” print, online and broadcast advertising campaign.

96. Events -

The Cotton Museum will host Patrick O’Daniel, discussing his book “When the Levee Breaks: Memphis and the Mississippi Valley Flood of 1927,” Thursday, March 28, at 5 p.m. at the museum, 65 Union Ave. Cost is free and includes a complimentary museum tour and reception. Visit memphiscottonmuseum.org.

97. Musicians Get Plugged in to Cawein’s Signal Flow -

When Elizabeth Cawein left her job with the Memphis Music Foundation amid a restructuring of the organization, she had a choice.

The Memphis music fan could stay in the city and settle for a public relations job not connected to the music industry, or she could make a music-related PR job her focus and end up leaving town.

98. Magna Bank Runs First Television Ad -

Starting this week, Magna Bank will begin airing a 30-second TV ad as part of its “We’re For You” print, online and broadcast advertising campaign.

99. Funding From Suburbs Suggested -

Countywide school board members are not the only players in the schools merger feeling pressure, although they may be feeling more pressure than others.

Shelby County Commissioners whose districts include suburban towns and cities have also been hearing a lot from parents in the suburbs who not too long ago had made peace with the idea that they would be part of the consolidated school district for at least the first school year.

100. Barbic Says Coexistence at Humes Possible -

The superintendent of the state-run Achievement School District believes there is room at Humes Middle School for an optional school and the ASD charter school now at Gordon Elementary School.