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Editorial Results (free)

1. Counsel to the Council? -

In the statewide daily I read each morning, the Aug. 13, 2014, “Judge Parker” comic strip featured legal secretary Gloria saying to senior partner Sam, “Rocky Ledge is talking about having Steve come aboard as corporate council” (sic). I’m not a reader of this strip. Or any soap-operaesque strips, actually. Though I can remember a time in life when I read “Mary Worth” on a regular basis. I just can’t remember why.

2. Beneficiary Forms Trump Your Will -

Ray’s take: Few people like to think about death – particularly their own. But a sound estate plan includes dealing with that possibility to be certain your wishes are honored after you “make the switch.”

3. Ice Bucket Challenge Spotlights Viral Video Power -

Perhaps one of the greatest viral phenomena – the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge – has dominated social media channels for the past month, raising an impressive $70 million to date, compared to $2.5 million typically raised by the nonprofit during the same time period.

4. Finding Life Influencers -

Coaches such as Alabama’s Nick Saban get paid millions to lead and win championships, so it’s only natural that Saban would say something like this:

“We are not interested in the possibilities of defeat; they do not exist.”

5. Discover Labor Day Getaways Close to Home -

Labor Day, the traditional end to summer. Public swimming pools are closing and college football is getting underway.

It’s also time for one last getaway before fall settles in, especially if you have school-age children.

6. Millington Leaders Emphasize Unique School System -

For much of the move to the demerger of public education in Shelby County, the Millington Municipal Schools district has been overshadowed by the five other suburban school systems.

All six formed starting in January and three weeks ago opened for classes, but Millington school system leaders, principals, teachers and civic leaders didn’t have their opening celebration until this past weekend, the day after the Millington Central High School Trojans beat the Germantown Red Devils in the first weekend of high school football.

7. Tennessee Supreme Court Orders New Trial for Noura Jackson -

The Tennessee Supreme Court ordered a new trial for Noura Jackson Friday, Aug. 22, who was convicted in 2009 of second degree murder in the death of her mother, Jennifer Jackson.

8. TriMetis Acquires Biologistics Startup -

The pre-clinical research services company TriMetis Life Sciences has expanded by acquiring FoundationBio, a biospecimen procurement startup with offices in Memphis and Boston.

FoundationBio uses access to tissue donors via hospitals and community oncology clinics and their supporting pathology and laboratory services partners around the world to get specimens for research. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

9. Veteran’s HomeCare Franchise Aims for Place in Market -

There are always adjustments to be made, such as when a middle-school-aged boy moves from Philadelphia to Birmingham, Ala.

Brian Walker still recalls that day in gym class when the P.E. instructor was taking roll. When Walker heard his name called, he answered the way he always had in his young life: “Yo.”

10. Silicone Arts Laboratories Recruited for Dallas Accelerator -

A Memphis company founded in 2011 that makes innovative cosmetic products has been recruited to participate in the Dallas-based health care accelerator Health Wildcatters.

The company is Silicone Arts Laboratories, which manufacturers a topical filler called Dermaflage that uses silicone to simulate skin and instantly conceal recessed imperfections. The product is waterproof and conceals skin imperfections for up to 36 hours. Designed for ease of use among consumers, Dermaflage’s other strength is that it provides a cosmetic option for concealing recessed scars and skin defects on the face and body without having to resort automatically to surgery or injections.

11. Boomsday More Than Fireworks, Football -

It’s hard to imagine a college freshman passing up her first opportunity to spend a weekend at home. But when Boomsday is on the schedule, laundry can wait.

“I’ve stayed for Boomsday since freshman year, even though it’s the first weekend you can go home,” says Carrie Bowman of Hendersonville, who graduated from the University of Tennessee last spring with a degree in speech pathology.

12. Belmont Welcomes Largest-Ever Freshman Class -

If you graduated from Belmont 20 years ago, you might not recognize the campus today.

Near ceaseless on-campus construction and a huge spike in enrollment has changed the once-sleepy little school into a major player in Nashville and in national collegiate circles.

13. Vanderbilt Students Find Happiness in Music City -

As the Class of 2018 begins to poke around the Vanderbilt University campus, the newest Commodores will be met with the highest of expectations.

“This class is projected to have the highest academic quality in our history as measured by high school class rank and SAT scores,’’ says Doug Christiansen, vice provost for enrollment and dean of admissions.

14. NULYP President to Speak in Memphis This Weekend -

National Urban League Young Professionals president Brandi Richard will speak this weekend during the Memphis Urban League Young Professionals’ second annual Empowerment Conference.

15. Class is In -

For Collierville Schools superintendent John Aitken, the demerger of public schools in Shelby County didn’t become “real” until teachers reported the week before the Aug. 4 first day of classes.

16. SEC’s New Quarterbacks Ready to Prove Themselves -

They are the SEC quarterbacks left behind. The quarterbacking gods, with names like Manziel, McCarron, Mettenberger and Murray – what is it about M’s? – have ascended to a higher place: playing on Sundays in the NFL.

17. ‘Two Ears, One Heart’ -

The phone rings and rings at the Memphis Crisis Center – 19,000 times in 2013, or 2.2 times every hour, 52 times a day, 365 days a year.

Of the 19,000 calls logged last year, 1,301 – or 3.6 per day – were from people talking about killing themselves.

18. National Urban League Young Professionals President to Speak in Memphis -

National Urban League Young Professionals president Brandi Richard will speak this weekend during the Memphis Urban League Young Professionals’ second annual Empowerment Conference.

19. Leading by Example -

Have you heard about Raymond Burse, the newly appointed interim president of Kentucky State University who voluntarily reduced his salary by 25 percent to ensure that all university employees would make a minimum hourly wage of $10.25?

20. Turning Five -

When she was first handed the reins of the I Love Memphis blog almost a year ago, Holly Whitfield said she planned to keep the blog’s brand intact and to keep reminding Memphians why the city is worth their affection.

21. Graceland Manager Maps Global Outposts -

The recession and changes over the last nine years in the companies owning 85 percent of Elvis Presley Enterprises played a role in delaying plans for the expansion of Graceland into a 120-acre campus in Whitehaven.

22. I Choose Memphis: Andrés Flores -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Andrés Flores

23. Patient-Centered Focus -

The best ideas accomplish more than one thing. And so it is with Church Health Center’s commitment to earning accreditation as a Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH).

“We certainly didn’t have to do it,” said Jenny Bartlett-Prescott, CHC’s director of clinical services. “But it’s a way of providing patient care we believe in. It was a road map, if you will, for a path forward.”

24. Less-Frenzied House Hunting in Williamson County -

This past week, Realtor Stephanie Tipton Soper had two out-of-town families relocating to Nashville. Both were in search of homes in Williamson County.

Disclosure being the better part of valor, Stephanie is my real estate partner at Christianson, Patterson, Courtney and Associates. With my wife Beth and our twins vacationing in London, Stephanie was the only real estate agent from whom I can draw immediate, deadline-ready data and information, so here she is.

25. Reshaping a City, One Lot at a Time -

John G. Brittle Jr. doesn’t have an office. He has a war room. The space, crowded with maps, charts, books, piles of paper and marked-up spreadsheets, is ground zero for InfillNashville, the 10-person team of site selection specialists that Brittle leads at Village Real Estate Services.

26. LifeLinc Anesthesia Expands in Southeast -

LifeLinc Anesthesia, a growing anesthesia management company based in Memphis, has announced partnerships with four new medical facilities in the Southeastern United States:

Delta Gastroenterology in Southaven; Digestive Health Center in Ocean Springs, Miss.; St. Anthony Healthcare in Englewood, Fla.; and Tri-State Gastroenterology in Crestview Hills, Ky. All will utilize various aspects of LifeLinc’s management model for their anesthesia services.

27. Bigger, Better, Louder -

“When it comes to college football, the South has no equal, because the Southeastern Conference has no equal. Find me a conference with a better commissioner, better players, better head coaches, better staffs, better game-day atmospheres, better-looking coeds – better anything.”

28. The Q Party -

CRISIS AVERTED. It’s all a matter of perspective.

At the height of the 1962 Cuban missile crisis, a friend’s father was in Corinth, Miss., on business. He was outside the courthouse having a cigarette and waiting for an appointment when he overheard a conversation between two old men on a bench.

29. Wade: Never Too Early for Tiger Basketball Fans to Fret -

Oh, Josh Pastner, you Canada-bound court jester, you. Telling Tiger Nation that it makes no difference whether the University of Memphis wins exhibition games or loses them against college basketball giants Carleton University, McGill University and the University of Ottawa.

30. Former Tigers Head Man Finds Simpler Life at MTSU -

In nine years as the head coach, Tommy West provided the University of Memphis with much of its football lore: five bowls – there have only been seven – and 49 wins (third-most all time).

31. Sentencing Changes Sought for Business Crimes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The federal panel that sets sentencing policy eased penalties this year for potentially tens of thousands of drug dealers. Now, defense lawyers and prisoner advocates are pushing for similar treatment for an arguably less-sympathetic category of defendants: swindlers, embezzlers, insider traders and other white-collar criminals.

32. LifeLinc Anesthesia Expands in Southeast -

LifeLinc Anesthesia, a growing anesthesia management company based in Memphis, has announced partnerships with four new medical facilities in the Southeastern United States:

Delta Gastroenterology in Southaven; Digestive Health Center in Ocean Springs, Miss.; St. Anthony Healthcare in Englewood, Fla.; and Tri-State Gastroenterology in Crestview Hills, Ky. All will utilize various aspects of LifeLinc’s management model for their anesthesia services.

33. U of M’s Rudd Touts Freshmen Growth -

The student population at the University of Memphis is growing, but the city’s largest higher education institution is becoming more selective about those who apply for admission.

And University of Memphis President David Rudd said in the coming academic year, his first at the helm of the university, he plans to introduce the first needs-based scholarship program in the 102-year history of the institution as well as offer a flat tuition rate for students who continue on the school’s trajectory for graduation and attaining degrees.

34. Roast of the Town -

If you catch Jimmy Lewis these days and get him talking about coffee roasting, chances are he might never stop.

35. Fresh Market Debuts Midtown Store -

For a while now Central Gardens resident Tom Clifton has been driving to East Memphis to get his groceries.

36. Making Philanthropic Dollars Go Extra Mile -

Giving back to the community is a great way to fulfill your life while helping improve the lives of others. Acts of charity are both widely needed and often given, so if you are thinking about donating money, resources or time to a philanthropic cause, there are a few things you should take into consideration.

37. Cold Email Mastery, a Click Away From Anyone -

Cold calling is a tough business, though a necessity for many companies. The cost of sales is high, as is sales rep rejection and fatigue. Imagine if email could significantly improve your engagement rate with otherwise cold prospects. If executed well, it can, explains Scott Britton with life-longlearner.com, the forensic accountant of the email world whose company was acquired by Constant Contact for $100 million in 2012.

38. Tubbs Joins Humane Society as Development and Marketing Director -

Nikki Tubbs has joined the Humane Society of Memphis & Shelby County as director of development and marketing, responsible for developing and executing the humane society’s fundraising plan, overseeing special events and securing sponsorships, and supervising supplemental development programs and the development team.

39. Musical Tribute -

Jack T. Cooper was born a few years after American modernist composer Charles Ives died, but this did not the stop them from connecting – even before Cooper was born.

Cooper, 51, and an associate professor and the director of jazz and studio music at the University of Memphis, was born in Los Angeles to a mother who was a professional keyboardist and a father who was an amateur saxophone and clarinet player.

40. Discovering the World of Travel -

What does travel mean? On one hand, it’s a vacation from everyday life, an escape. It’s an opportunity to have your physical pains massaged away in a spa while an ocean breeze momentarily relieves your stress and worry.

41. Why Experts Live in Fear -

More trouble has fallen upon companies that tempt the universe with this ego-inflated statement: "We are the experts.” A sizable lack of innovation occurs in the practice of being perceived as experts instead of practicing humility in the workplace.

42. New Business Helps Clients Organize Homes, Lives -

When Amy Tuggle and her mother, Fran Cutshall, moved to Memphis from St. Louis recently they each decided to make a career change.

43. Cannon Wright Blount Names Wages as Partner -

It might be easy to think of Mike Wages’ line of work as involving stone-faced number-crunchers whose main task involves making sure figures line up correctly, as they focus mostly on gathering and presenting data.

44. Editorial: Economic Woes Pose Questions for Memphis -

It may be gone. But the recession sure took its time in departing after taking a heavy toll on economic development in Memphis. And some of us aren’t sure it has totally left the premises, especially in a city that is watching as other parts of the state are rebounding and recovering at a much quicker pace than Memphis.

45. Springing to Life -

When Ridgeland, Miss.-based development firm the Bryan Co. broke ground on The Horizon condominium tower in 2007, it was at the peak of the housing bubble and optimism from elected officials and Downtown boosters was equally high.

46. How Much Should I Save for Retirement? -

Ray’s take: Saving for retirement. It’s something we are all aware of and working on regularly. But how much do you need to save for retirement?

That is the quintessential question everyone asks. And the answer is not so clear. It depends. Truly.

47. Alexander Looks to Fend Off Tennessee GOP Challengers -

LAWRENCEBURG, Tenn. (AP) – After losing his first bid for Tennessee governor 40 years ago, Republican Sen. Lamar Alexander shed his blue suit and buttoned-up appearance for a plaid shirt, hiking boots and a 1,000-mile walk around the state.

48. Gannett Splits Publishing, Broadcasting in Two -

NEW YORK (AP) – The game of survival is on for newspapers, as USA Today owner Gannett on Tuesday became the most recent major media entity to say it will divide its print and broadcast divisions into separate companies.

49. I Choose Memphis: Tim Young -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Tim Young

50. The Power of Unplugging -

I am returning from a vacation on the Forgotten Coast, a cape wedged in between the sea and a bay. The best part of the location is that my smartphone connection did not work.

All of the incessant demands of running a business, having clients, making social media updates, keeping up with news for organizations for whom I serve on boards: poof, gone.

51. Local Movers Hit the Big Leagues -

Steven Reed, Jeff Coletta and Jonathan Greer met as children while playing youth football at the Germantown Youth Athletic Association, igniting a life-long bond that remains to this day.

52. UTHSC Professor Receives $2.5 Million Grant -

Donna K. Hathaway, University Distinguished Professor in the Department of Advanced Practice and Doctoral Studies in the College of Nursing at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, has received a $2.5 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, a subsidiary of the National Institutes of Health.

53. Events -

The Cooper-Young Business Association will hold a Red Hot Summer Music concert Wednesday, Aug. 6, from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in the Cooper-Young gazebo at Cooper Street and Young Avenue. Davy Ray Bennett will perform. The series continues Wednesdays through Aug. 27. Visit cooperyoung.biz.

54. Congress Races to Finish VA, Highway Bills -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress ran full-tilt into election-year gridlock over immigration Thursday and headed toward a five-week summer break with no agreement in sight on legislation to cope with the influx of young immigrants flocking illegally to the United States.

55. Ask a Lawyer -

JUDGED BY LAWYERS. Q: What do you when you have a lawyer buried up to the neck in sand?

A: Not enough sand.

Lawyers can’t catch a break.

Q: What the difference between a lawyer and a catfish?

56. Dohmen Life Science Adds Space in SE Memphis -

Dohmen Life Science Services is expanding its footprint in Southeast Memphis.

The operator of the pharmaceutical logistics company DDN recently inked lease renewals and an expansion that pushed its occupancy to 628,000 square feet.

57. More Vigorous US Economy Appears to Be Emerging -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy has rebounded with vigor from a grim start to 2014 and should show renewed strength into next year.

That was the general view of analysts Wednesday after the government estimated that the economy grew at a fast 4 percent annual rate in the April-June quarter. Consumers, businesses and governments joined to fuel the second-quarter expansion. The government also said growth was more robust last year than it had previously estimated.

58. UTHSC Professor Receives $2.5 Million Grant -

Donna K. Hathaway, University Distinguished Professor in the Department of Advanced Practice and Doctoral Studies in the College of Nursing at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, has received a $2.5 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, a subsidiary of the National Institutes of Health.

59. What’s Your Investment Risk Profile? -

Ray’s Take Risk. It’s something we are all involved in every day – sometimes consciously and sometimes not.

Just walking out the door of our homes and driving our cars involves a level of risk we don’t think about. We just assume we will arrive at our destination in good shape. There’s our daily subconscious risk.

60. Council Aims to Strengthen Local Medical Device Firms -

Shelby County medical device manufacturers are known for their innovation. But it took about three years of meetings before officially forming the Greater Memphis Medical Device Council this July.

“The industry was not used to coming together and sitting down,” said Bartlett Area Chamber of Commerce president John Threadgill. “They’re competitors. And to get competitors in the same room to talk about their issues, there’s some reluctance. But the fact is, they’re all having the same issues. The cat’s out of the bag.”

61. Groundbreaking Set for Graceland Hotel -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — Priscilla Presley is scheduled to attend a groundbreaking ceremony for a new hotel at Graceland, the Memphis tourist attraction at the longtime home of her late ex-husband, rock 'n' roll icon Elvis Presley.

62. Kirby Joins Literacy Mid-South to Lead Community Engagement -

Carley Cianciolo Kirby has joined Literacy Mid-South as community engagement coordinator. In her new role, Kirby will be responsible for the Mid-South Book Festival, which this year is scheduled for Sept. 25-28, as well as the citywide reading campaigns and Literacy Mid-South’s new school fundraising initiative.

63. Difference Maker -

When the Green Machine Mobile Food Market rolled up to University Place a year ago – the market being housed inside a lime green retired MATA bus – the first customer was a 103-year-old former school teacher in a wheelchair.

64. Grizzlies Plan ‘Pop-Up Park’ for Tom Lee Park -

The Memphis Grizzlies would like to activate Tom Lee Park while generating a community-wide discussion about the highest and best use of green spaces.

65. Frayser Town Center Would be Based on Manhattan Park -

The town center plan for Frayser that debuted this past weekend at the first annual “Frayser Day” celebration is built on the model of Bryant Park in Manhattan only on a smaller scale to fit the Frayser Plaza Shopping Center.

66. Globetrotting Stephens Eyes Eventual Return to NBA -

North Texas told D.J. Stephens no, said they no longer had a basketball scholarship for him. Remember that?

The only reason Stephens wound up at the University of Memphis was that a new young coach named Josh Pastner needed bodies to fill out the roster after John Calipari left for Kentucky and took everything but the nets off the rims at the Finch Center.

67. House Votes to Boost Child Tax Credit for Some -

WASHINGTON (AP) – More families with higher incomes could claim the popular child tax credit under a bill that won approval Friday in the House. But in a dispute that divides Republicans and Democrats, millions of the poorest low-income families would still lose the credit in 2018, when enhancements championed by President Barack Obama are set to expire.

68. Homebuilders Launch Insurance Program -

The West Tennessee Home Builders Association has joined forces with other homebuilder associations in Tennessee and contracted with national employee benefit consulting firm gbac inc. and Memphis-based Shoemaker Financial to launch the Tennessee Construction Industry Health Insurance Program.

69. New Life for Old Malls -

Since 1957, when the first modern, fully enclosed shopping mall was built in Edina, Minnesota, shopping became an American pastime. New shopping malls changed the landscape in communities across the country at the rate of 140 a year.

70. UTHSC Researcher Gets Neonatal Project Grant -

Dr. Adebowale Adebiyi, assistant professor in the physiology department at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, has received a $1.5 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, a subsidiary of the National Institutes of Health.

71. UTHSC Doctor Receives Mental Health Study Grant -

Kazuko Sakata, an assistant professor in the pharmacology department at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, has received a two-year grant totaling $147,500 from the National Institute of Mental Health, a division of the National Institutes of Health, to research whether an enriched environment early in life is more effective than later in improving or preventing depression.

72. Proposal Surfaces for Ashlar Hall -

Ashlar Hall could get new life as a help center for military veterans, according to a recent report.

A team that includes Jerome Hardaway, owner and operator of Frago, a nonprofit startup that takes an active approach to veteran transition, is exploring turning the vacant Midtown mansion into a facility offering veteran-based transition classes, according to a post at Choose 901.

73. Critical Decisions -

For the team behind the pending redevelopment of the massive Sears Crosstown property to reach its goal of maximizing the participation of women- and minority-owned businesses, it needed to make a crucial decision early in the planning process.

74. ‘Drive for Progress’ -

There’s a duality of meaning implied in the name of the civic organization where Nancy Coffee serves as president and CEO.

75. Proposal Surfaces for Ashlar Hall -

Ashlar Hall could get new life as a help center for military veterans, according to a recent report.

A team that includes Jerome Hardaway, owner and operator of Frago, a nonprofit startup that takes an active approach to veteran transition, is exploring turning the vacant Midtown mansion into a facility offering veteran-based transition classes, according to a post at Choose 901.

76. When Education Falls Short -

One of the chief complaints I hear from job seekers is that their lousy college education is to blame for their poor career success. Whether they went to the wrong school or got the wrong degree, the person wishes they could turn back time. They consider going back to school as a road to success.

77. Music Lounge to Open in Edge District -

The Edge District near Downtown lost a theater but is gaining a new live music lounge in August.

The Dizzy Bird, named after legendary Jazz greats John “Dizzy” Gillespie and Charlie “Bird” Parker, is slated to open Aug. 2 at 652 Marshall Ave.

78. Civic Celebration -

Shep Wilbun describes “Frayser Day” as “MEMfix on steroids,” referring to the efforts by the Mayor’s Innovation Delivery Team to reanimate business districts or blocks in several parts of the city.

79. Develop Interests Before Retirement -

Ray’s take: Retirement success is not automatic. It takes planning – and not just financial planning. According to a study by University of Missouri – Columbia, couples should plan for retirement, both financially and socially, and consider the changes that may occur in their relationships and day-to-day activities.

80. TheGRIND Evolves as First Anniversary Approaches -

The one-year anniversary is approaching for theGRIND, a digital publication that launched in January to bring its own take on covering the people, places and events of Memphis.

Leading up to that milestone, the publication has several things in the works that collectively showcase how it’s evolved quickly from an idea to the reality of an ambitious media startup. Editor in chief Kendra Lyons, for example, says plans in the works include a print version of the digital-only outlet, as well as a coffee table-style book that would feature the best photography and stories from theGRIND.

81. UTHSC Awarded $3.1 Million in Federal Grants -

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has awarded the University of Tennessee Health Science Center nine federal grants totaling more than $3.1 million for a variety of programs and research projects.

82. UTHSC Doctor Receives Mental Health Study Grant -

Kazuko Sakata, an assistant professor in the pharmacology department at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, has received a two-year grant totaling $147,500 from the National Institute of Mental Health, a division of the National Institutes of Health, to research whether an enriched environment early in life is more effective than later in improving or preventing depression.

83. Teach for America Leverages Start Co. Resources -

Education reform has been alive and well here in Memphis over the last few years. There have been many great initiatives established to secure dollars and establish programming to move our youth forward. As always, I am thinking of scale, sustainability and innovation to stay relevant.

84. Cohen-Wilkins Campaign Gets Personal -

In hard-fought political races, candidates try to disrupt the game plan of their rival, change the rules of the contest to their own liking and control the campaign’s narrative.

On the third day of the early voting period in advance of the Aug. 7 election day, that is what both contenders in the 9th District Democratic Congressional primary had come to.

85. Cohen Goes On Offense In Wilkins Challenge -

For weeks, U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen and Ricky Wilkins, his challenger in the Aug. 7 Democratic Congressional primary have been talking about each other without necessarily directly talking about each other or doing so at length

86. UTHSC Researcher Gets Neonatal Project Grant -

Dr. Adebowale Adebiyi, assistant professor in the physiology department at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, has received a $1.5 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, a subsidiary of the National Institutes of Health.

87. Baker Donelson Wins Beacon of Justice Award -

The National Legal Aid and Defender Association has named Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz PC a 2014 Beacon of Justice Award winner.

The awards recognize law firms that have devoted significant time and resources to creating and implementing innovative strategies to improve life outcomes for low-income people. Baker Donelson is being recognized for its development of the OnlineTNJustice platform, which provides free legal services via the Internet to low-income Tennessee residents.

88. I Choose Memphis: Hillary Quirk -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Hillary Quirk

Job title and company: Community Manager, Start Co.

89. Early Vote Expands as Campaigns Enter New Phase -

There is a unique and persistent part of the political process that gnaws at candidates, separating them from the voters they court and sometimes stalk. You might call it the day of the ballot.

In the weeks leading up to the start of early voting, they get hit up constantly by those putting out endorsement ballots to be distributed during early voting and on election day, most often by paid poll workers. Candidates must pay to be on a ballot, which those organizing the ballots say is necessary to cover printing and distribution costs.

90. Editorial: City Falters in Benefits Changes Approach -

There was a better way for the city of Memphis to make needed changes to health insurance benefits for city employees and retirees.

A lot more leadership from the mayor is at the top of the list of “should haves” we have in how this has been handled to date with pension changes still to come in October.

91. From Despair to Belief -

A July weekday afternoon, about 2:45. It’s the perfect time for just about anyone to be nodding off in class.

But in the basement of Midtown Church of Christ, where HopeWorks Inc. is housed, class is in session and a dozen men and their teacher are having a lively discussion.

92. Microsoft Cutting 18,000 Jobs, Signals New Path -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – Microsoft announced the biggest layoffs in its history Thursday, saying it will cut 18,000 jobs as it streamlines its Nokia mobile device business to focus on using the Windows Phone operating system.

93. Senate Candidate Gives Loan to Prominent Supporter -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The campaign of Republican U.S. Senate candidate Joe Carr has loaned $200,000 to the company of a prominent supporter in an unusual arrangement that has drawn the attention of the Federal Election Commission.

94. More Than Delta -

MESSAGE FROM HOME. A while back – right after I wrote a column blasting Delta, the Airport Authority and Garage Gargantua – I was invited to tour the airport and learn a thing or two or 50 about where so much of what and where we are takes off and lands every day.

95. Green Mountain Consulting Finds Home Along Poplar -

Logistics vendor Green Mountain Consulting wasn’t necessarily looking to buy an office building when it began its search for more office space for expansion.

“We’re not getting into the commercial real estate business because we wanted to be in it; we got into it because we have a company to operate and needed the space,” said Jim Jacobs, one of Green Mountain’s co-founders.

96. Thoughts for 30-Somethings -

Ray’s take: You spent your 20s setting up your life – developing some marketable skills, getting a career started, (hopefully) creating a budget, and learning to live with it.

97. Sherman Joins Campbell Clinic as Sports Medicine Physician -

Dr. Henry “Hank” Sherman has joined Campbell Clinic Orthopaedics as a sports medicine family practice physician in its Southaven office. Sherman treats patients who suffer from a variety of orthopedic injuries – from competitive athletes looking to get back in the game to weekend warriors who want to stay active later in life.

98. SEC Media Days Notebook: July 15 -

HOOVER, Ala. – South Carolina’s Steve Spurrier has been at this college coaching game a long time. He also had a stint in the NFL. And a college program’s big boosters, he said, are “similar to an owner in the NFL because they put the money up.”

99. Events -

Theatre Memphis will present “Front Porch Fairy Tales,” the culmination of its summer teen performance workshop, Monday, July 14, through July 20 at the theater, 630 Perkins Road Extended. Visit theatrememphis.org showtimes and tickets.

100. Transplant Games Show True Athletic Spirit -

At the NCAA Tournament every March, it is the cliché of clichés when coaches and players say in a press conference before their first game, “We’re just happy to be here.”

But when members of the Mid-South team competing in the Transplant Games of America July 11-15 in Houston say it, the phrase rings true.